Posts tagged with "black lives matter"

Muralist Criola Via Criola socials

JUNGLE PLAZA – CRIOLA

In this monumental mural, the artist depicts four Black women in profile, facing each other in a mirrored disposition through a central altarpiece. The scene is completed with snake plants, hummingbirds, and serpents, all popular elements in Afro-Brazilian syncretic religions. This suggestive iconography serves as an expression of spiritual healing: snake plants, for instance, are popular plants in Brazil (commonly referred to as “St. George’s Spade”), believed to be instilled with protective powers against evil, and used in ceremonial blessings.

Acclaimed muralist, Criola, has significant mural paintings in São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, Belo Horizonte, Paris, and now right here in the Miami Design District. The artist’s display in Jungle Plaza will be her most giant mural outside of Brazil, and her second public work in the US, following “Black Girl Magic” in Las Vegas last year. Her mural, Interdimensional Portal, portrays Afro-Brazilian ancestors in ritualistic performance, accessing ancient forest wisdom for medicinal purposes, and transcending thresholds of knowledge. 

3801 NE 1st Ave, Miami, FL 33137
Photo Credit: Luis Gomez
The Frontline names Bukky Ojeifo apart of their "Frontline 40" via Frontline for use by 360 Magazine

Frontline 40

The Frontline is a group of individuals dedicated to finding solutions to solve mass societal and political problems that inflict the United States.

After the tumultuous past few years we’ve all endured, a number of causes have been raised to the attention of people all around the world. From the effects of the pandemic to the ever-present racism, The Frontline makes it their goal to achieve change that lawmakers haven’t thus far. 

Standing stronger together, the group urns to see a reshaping of the world we live in today. The Frontline believes in the power of unity; that together, they can achieve whatsoever they set their minds to.

Members of The Frontline volunteer their time in hopes of implementing lasting changes. From connecting with others to spread the word, or even working local polls, The Frontline members work on all different levels to accomplish advancements.

Driven by the Movement for Black Lives, United We Dream and the Working Families Party, The Frontline has awarded a select group of people who continue to ensure just and equal opportunity for all. 

The awardees, also known as “Frontline 40,” caught the eyes of The Frontline as they continue to fight against the crises that conflict the US. Of the recipients, some of the main causes being fought for include securing access to clean water in Flint, Michigan, discovering what an anti-racist society would look like and finding an end to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Of the New York winners, the “Frontline 40” consists of Bukky OjefioChanelle ElaineDiana BerrentDrew DixonGabe TobiasJanvieve Williams ComrieJune MosesQiana Mestrich and Sil Lai Abrams.

“These aren’t the talking heads you see every night on cable news,” stated Tiffany Flowers, campaign director of The Frontline. “These are the real people on the frontlines of our communities making a real change. It’s time we honor them and say, ‘thank you,’ for all the work they do and do what we can to uplift and support their critical work to end white nationalism and advance liberation for our communities.” 

Stay tuned for an array of events hosted by The Frontline, including the recent panel that saw Lavender Rights Project executive director, Jaelyn Scott, director of Flint Rising, Nayyirah Shariff, Omisade Burney-Scotts from The Black Girl’s Guide to Surviving Menopause, and Dr. Sarah L. Webb from Colorism is Healing speak about their initiatives and plans to ensure just change. 

June Moses apart of the "Frontline 40" via Frontline for use by 360 Magazine
June Moses
Chanelle Elaine apart of the "Frontline 40" via Frontline for use by 360 Magazine
Chanelle Elaine
Janvieve Williams Comrie apart of the "Frontline 40" via Frontline for use by 360 Magazine
Janvieve Williams Comrie
Qiana Mestrich apart of the "Frontline 40" via Frontline for use by 360 Magazine
Qiana Mestrich

Images courtesy of Frontline

Trans woman, actress, entertainer, TV personality Monroe Alise shot Corey Fletcher speaks to Vaughn Lowery via 360 Magazine podcast

Monroe Alise

Listen to Monroe Alise’s full conversation with Vaughn Lowery on the 360 MAG Podcast HERE

Monroe Alise is an actress, LGBTQIA+ advocate, model and comedienne. As a transgender woman, she has fulfilled her childhood dream of working in the entertainment industry. Her philosophy on life is described in her mantra, “If you can’t laugh at life, you will never find a reason to live it.”

Born and raised in Washington DC, Monroe grew up passionate and inspired by media and entertainment. Her admiration for her father’s successful career as a DJ ignited her insatiable desire to entertain. Thus, she began singing in church, propelling her into the world of artistic expression. 

For Monroe, a great singer consists of emulating your favorite idols while taking advantage of the potential of one’s own voice. As a child, she recalls being compared to artists like John Legend and Luther Vandross because of her tonality and courage. Another favorite is Nina Simone, whom she references while belting evangelical hymns. 

As a youth, Monroe was a very active and social child. She studied sports public relations but fancied theatre. These disciplines were conducive to her discovery of sexuality. Further, she began to notice a direct correlation with her mother’s maternal responsibilites, rather than her father and two brother’s machismo profile. 

According to Monroe, “While they were playing games and sports, I was in the kitchen doing my mom’s hair.” In addition, her openly gay aunt was influential in her gender transformation due to her immense pride and confidence.

Monroe’s gender bender was painstakingly challenging but became easier over time. For instance, while preparing for an acting role as a Trans woman, she became comfortable in this new skin. After the audition, she gave herself permission to continue to live within this newfound reality.

A year later, Monroe made the decision to come out, “I was like, well this is who I am, so I socially reinvented myself and this is the girl you see.” Eventhough the transition embraced authenticity, it was extremely taxing on her family as well as father’s religious convictions.

Lacking legit representation and management, Monroe began to utilize social media to seek opportunities within the realms of fashion and Hollywood. As a thespian, Monroe became enthralled by the portrayal of becoming another homosepian while subsequently having an impact on the world. This year’s main objective is New York City’s Broadway. Her short-term is to star in a sci-fi like Star Trek or Star Wars as well as a fantasy film similar in type to Harry Potter and Twilight. Longterm, Monroe aspires to host a namesake talk show directed and produced by herself.

As an emerging Trans Community activist, Monroe is deeply concerned about the increasing rate of violence against her people. She hopes to alleviate the suffering of her collective, especially at the hands and ignorance of the narrow-minded. 

Monroe’s Five Principles:

1.) Adequate preparation;

2.) prevention of underachievement;

3.) working while you wait without worry;

4.) preparing for your mission;

5.) and continuing to work because you know you’ve been doing the best you could.

Credits:

Article: Andrea Esteban, McKinley Franklin, Armon Hayes, Vaughn Lowery

Photo: Corey Fletcher

Resources:

Trans Lifeline

Human Rights Campaign

Follow Monroe Alise:

Instagram | Facebook | Twitter YouTube | Spotify

Check out Monroe on the latest season of P-Valley on Starz.

Mireya Ramos – Debut Album

Latin GRAMMY Award-winning Latinx vocalist Mireya Ramos releases her debut solo album, Mireya, on ONErpm with a star-studding affair featuring some of the biggest names in Latin music today, May 31, 2022. Mireya spotlights the acclaimed singer and founder of all-female mariachi band Flor de Toloache alongside special guests Adrian Quesada (Black Pumas), Mike Garson (Davis Bowie), Camilo Lara (Mexican Institute of Sound), Gaby Moreno, Jorge Glem, Claudia Brant, Haydée Milanés, Leo Genovese, Velcro, and Roman Rojas. An autobiographical depiction of a day in the life of Ramos, Mireya unveils stories of Afro-Latino pride, police brutality, Black Lives Matter, unbridled love, break-ups, and self-love.

Mireya dives into the story of a brown girl from Puerto Rico born to a Dominican mom and Mexican mariachi dad; of her nights dancing to New York City hip-hop and at Giant Step events; of jamming on her violin with DJs and bands from all over the world while hustling in Queens and Brooklyn performing mariachi music to make rent. It’s a reflection of her musical globe-trotting adventures from India and New Zealand (with her partner Andy Averbuch) to life-changing mariachi performances at The White House, the Latin GRAMMYs (live set celebrating Ruben Blades, “Person of the Year 2021”), and NPR’s Tiny Desk Concert.

Mireya represents my path and growth and the experiences that inspired that progress,” says Mireya Ramos. “It’s taken 10 years to bring this album out the way I’ve intended to. The process all started with laying down tracks in 2012 with producer Sinhue Padilha, who now tours with Lila Downs. It’s taken on a whole new life since then with so many of my favorite musicians playing on the recording. Mireya is a carefully crafted, honest portrayal from my soul to the ears and minds of those keen to know what makes me who I am.

Ramos sings down the cultural barriers between modern Anglo and Latin music on Mireya, blending genres with textures of Mexican classics while revealing the emotional heritage of America’s future. Mireya opens with Nunca te voy a Olvidar with Flor de Toloache, Jorge Glem and Roman Rojas. On the track, Ramos never forgets where she came from and shares the riches of Latin culture with the world.

La Llama highlights her collaboration with Adrian Quesada of Black Pumas; Ramos also appears on Quesada’s new album, Boleros Psicodélicos (ATO Records; June 3, 2022), on the track Tus Tormentas. A catchy hip-hop beat, thick low-end bass guitar, and Ramos’ violin set the perfect vibe for the duo’s vocals to glide above. With lyrics by Ramos’ brother Velcro, La Llama features her rapping debut. Inspired by Stevie Wonder’s Master Blaster, Canto takes listeners on a dub-adventure with chill island reggae putting smiles on listeners’ faces. Produced by Andy Averbuch, Canto includes a crew of Kiwi musicians from Ramos and Averbuch’s year-long stay in Aotearoa, New Zealand during the pandemic.

Lady Grinning Soul by David Bowie gets a Latinx make-over featuring pianist Mike Garson (who plays on the original track on the Bowie album, Aladdin Sane) with Ramos singing in Spanish and English with vocalist Gaby Moreno. The stripped-down version follows Ramos’ full-band single of the track produced by Camilo Lara (Mexican Institute of Sound). The remixed version on Mireya takes the vocals, piano, and strings centerstage.

Angelitos Negros, also featuring Camilo Lara, has been with Ramos her entire life with her mother singing it since she was a young child. Angelitos Negros speaks to the importance of the representation of black and brown communities, and the lack thereof. In the case of the storyline of Angelitos Negros, the whitewashing of BIPOC communities in historical paintings. Ramos took to the streets to perform Angelitos Negros at Black Lives Matter protests across the globe. Composed by her cousin Sonia Montez, Climbing Fences was inspired by the Michael Brown police shooting case in Ferguson, MS and represents all police brutality cases in black and brown communities.

Mireya rounds out with songs of love and loss. Mi Mayor Fortuna is a power-ballad writing collaboration between Ramos and two-time GRAMMY Award-winner Claudia Brant. Ramos channels the great Latin pop singers Laura Pausini and Cristian Castro with her soaring vocals on this heart-wrenching rancheras. Produced by Sonia Montez, La Golondrina is a beautiful Mexican classic traditionally performed at funerals and tributes her grandmother, Manisa. Ever since Ramos heard Imogen Heap’s Hide and Seek, she’s envisioned recording herself doing a version of La Golondrina with the vocoder effect. The melody itself is sweet, yet melancholic. The rancheras Canción Mixteca features singer Haydee Milanés and Gaby Moreno, who contributes deft electric guitar work underneath the emotive vocal harmonies.

Quédate Aquí is equally fit for driving with the windows down and the volume up or on a sweaty dance floor. A cover of New Zealand’s stadium-packing pop behemoth Six60, Quédate Aquí is the Latinx summer jam of 2022. Para Mí carries an electro-synth soundscape with tasty drums by Stevie Wonder’s touring percussionist, Euro Zambrano. Ramos sings of a difficult ending to a romantic relationship, where her former lover keeps appearing in her dreams while she wishes he was only a faint memory.

Beauty Free is a self-assurance hymn, a mantra. Ramos composed the piece when she was not feeling herself, but knew she could rely on the healing powers of music. She wrote Beauty Free to remind herself that she is strong, beautiful, and always her own favorite girl.

“…her tender new single ‘Mi Mayor Fortuna’ further cements her as a powerhouse of a vocalist…

the romance she oozes is so beautiful it’s contagious.” –Remezcla

To purchase/stream Mireya, click HERE.

For more information on Mireya Ramos, please visit:

mireyaramos.com ,Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Spotify

Vaughn Lowery President of 360 MAGAZINE

VAUGHN LOWERY

Vaughn Lowery, the founder and president of the NGLCC certified, 360 MAGAZINE, has always strived for positive social change. He graduated from Cornell University. From there, he became active in modeling, acting and publishing.

A decade or more, Vaughn Lowery became notable when he appeared in Kmart’s smash commercial – Joe Boxer. It helped the retailer roughly sell US$20 million per week. By becoming an exclusive spokesperson, he appeared with Leeza Gibbons on Extra, Katie Couric on Today Show, and Jay Leno on The Tonight Show.

At the culmination of college, he relocated to New York City; and thus, Vaughn began a career as an actor and model. It was there where celebrity makeup artist Sam Fine set him up with a fashion photographer, Fadil Berisha. Above Joe Boxer, he worked as a successful print model for many companies such as GAP, Old Navy, as well as a runway model for Tommy Hilfiger, Phat Farm, and Karl Kani. He has graced the pages of Elle, Cosmopolitan and Glamour. Additionally, he flipped the Houston Chronicle.

Years back, ABC News Primetime aired a segment chronicling his life, along with the tragic John Ritter story. Vaughn has also filmed a Super Bowl commercial, completed a high-profile Dasani Water billboard ad campaign, appeared on America’s Next Top Model, guest-starred on the comedy, Scrubs, and screened his controversial 35mm festival film, The Young & Evil, at Sundance 2009. Having been represented by major industry players such as NEXT, he was also named Seventeen Magazine’s 17 Hot Guys. His hindmost project The Company We Keep boasts director Roy Campanella II along with comedic co-star Leslie Jones. At present, Vaughn wrote a short, Chasen Life, which won a writing competition. He adapted audiobook Say Uncle into a feature-length film, pitched a reality series and is in the process of architecting an immersive design experience.

Due to his turbulent upbringing in Detroit, Vaughn has kept his personal promise to be a contributing citizen to those in need. He has lent his name and support to: Women At Risk, Human Rights Commission, March of Dimes, Heart of Los Angeles Youth, Awakening Young Minds and schools across the nation where he encourages adolescents to step into their power.

As of late, Lowery has developed their inaugural 360 MAG Podcast on Audible, Apple and Spotify as well as a new NFT Animal Series on OpenSea.

Futher, 360 MAGAZINE was named Business of the Month by the National Gay & Lesbian Chamber of Commerce [NGLCC]. The NGLCC is the business voice of the LGBT community, the largest advocacy organization dedicated to expanding economic opportunities and advancements for LGBT people, and the exclusive certifying body for LGBT-owned businesses. It possesses deep affiliations with FORTUNE 100 Fastest Growing Companies.

Lastly, hard cover and auditory interpretations of Vaughn’s memoir, Move Like Water × Be Fluid, are available on Amazon, Barnes & Noble and Walmart.

Follow:

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OTG

Vaughn Lowery in classic fedora for 360 MAGAZINE
Vaughn Lowery tests and reviews NÜR San Francisco for 360 MAGAZINE, wearing eyewear by Valentino and shirt by Allsaints.
Vaughn speaks on the NFT-VIP ‘press panel’ on Sun., June 19 at 2:30pm EST Margaritaville Times Square Resort NYC.

In his spare time, he designs e-bike bras and reconfigures their silhouettes.

Mixed Media Fabrications

PORT:

BLK app via 360 MAGAZINE official site and podcast

Spotlight: BLK App

Founded in 2017, the B-L-K app encompasses more than a community for singles seeking a prospective date or companionship. The niche platform has the largest subscription of Black Men & Women and is known as affiliates of the Match.com portfolio. 360 Magazine’s Armon Hayes met with the B-L-K app Head of Marketing Jonathan Kirkland via zoom to discuss what the ‘new wave’ app is all about, its impact and what’s to come.

About six years ago Kirkland began in the digital space with apps like Grindr and Bumble. He shares the experience applying to a Brand-partnership job at Grindr as a joke, which lead to a self-discovery journey that allowed him to discover how he thrives through niche communities while identifying their needs. Subsequently evolving the online dating functionality and perspective, Kirkland goes on to say, “It’s all about making connections, where those connections are is up to you and who you match with.

When embarking on the new B-L-K app, founders knew that they wanted to keep the Black community at the forefront of the platform. “The Black experience is a unique one, especially in America and [this] transcends into the dating app space,” said Kirkland. Exploding during lockdown at the height of the pandemic, he is committed to growing the platform with the aid of the audience he serves. The app allows for an understanding that connections aren’t merely one-to-one, but a one to many. Diligent in shifting the narrative that Black women are less desirable, the B-L-K app provides the forum to communicate byway fostering understanding.

With 3 million downloads and counting, the cultural app is creating a space for a wide scale of individuals to connect and, most importantly, build friendships. B-L-K remains true to their core demographic by creating dialogue, while also educating through user connections on matters surrounding racial injustices.

Brought to the forefront on the app as well as our lives, B-L-K particularly highlights the global misfortunes of 2020 at the hands of law enforcement to Breonna Taylor & George Floyd, just to name a few. Such criteria are typically not discussed or even introduced on dating platforms, let alone the first encounter with someone new. Furthermore, getting to know someone online can be awkward as it is. Kirkland emphasizes the initiative of the app, stating, “It’s a space where blackness can be celebrated; find more qualified matches and start dating faster.”

By: Armon Hayes, Vaughn Lowery, McKinley Franklin

Listen to Kirkland/Hayes podcast interview HERE.

BLM graphic via Mina Tocalini for us by 360 MAGAZINE

HBCU Cultural Heritage Stewardship

Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) have been an integral part of our educational system in the United States. Originally being founded in the 1830s, HBCUs cultivate an environment that was long sought after to ensure educational equality. This nations HBCUs are full of the rich history of African American activism, and their campuses also stand as pioneering pieces of landscaping and architecture.

This is precisely why on February 28, the National Trust’s African American Cultural Heritage Action Fund declared they would be awarding over $650,000 in grant awards to five HBCUs across the country in part with their HBCU Cultural Heritage Stewardship Initiative.

While each HBCU embodies symbolisms of African American brilliance and triumph, the programming guarantees that each campus will collect resources to protect and sustain the historical campuses. These grants aim to preserve and revitalize landmark pieces that grace each HBCU, and to promote leadership on each respective campus.

Two differing forms of grants entail the initiative; the first being a $150,000 grant aiming to expand campus-wide cultural stewardship plans, and the second as a $60,000 developmental grant that will conserve a specific milestone building on or associated with an HBCU campus.

Each grant has the intention to enhance plans to improve and sustain varying architectural campus facilities. Launched through the National Trust’s Action Fund in 2020, the program allies with The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, National Endowment for Humanities, Ford Foundation, The JPB Foundation, J.M. Kaplan Fund and The Executive Leadership Council.

The initiative set in place today entails $3.2 million set forth to the HBCUs grants, seeking influence from the Trust’s extensive years of practice to generate proposals of refurbishment and maintenance at each college or university. The National Trust’s Action Fund links with 13 HBCUs and has financed 6 campus and 7 singular-developing projects modern day.

Brent Leggs, Senior Vice President and Executive Director of the African American Cultural Heritage Action Fund at the National Trust spoke on the impact that these grants would permit, stating, “These grants are significant in light of the recent threat to HBCU campuses. Preservation is the strategic counterpoint to centuries of erasure, and it underscores the critical nature of the African American contribution to our nation.

“Without the doctors, lawyers, engineers and other professionals HCBUs have produced, the American story would not be the same.  The Action Fund’s work to preserve the legacies of intellect, activism, and enlightenment on these campuses will inspire future generations of all Americans to believe that, despite the challenge, they too can overcome.”

The following HBCU recipients include:

  • Florida A&M University (Tallahassee, Florida) aiming to produce stewardship projects across their 422-acre campus (1887)
  • Johnson C. Smith University (Charlotte, North Carolina) to create a conservation strategy for its Historic Quad (1867)
  • Rust College (Holly Springs, Mississippi) aiming to produce stewardship projects across their campus (1866)
  • Shaw University (Raleigh, North Carolina) aiming to produce stewardship projects across their 65-acre campus (1865); and
  • Voorhees College (Denmark, South Carolina) aiming to produce stewardship projects across their 380-acre campus (1897).

Shaw University President Dr. Paulette Dillard spoke on their excitement to be apart of the Trust’s recipients this year, stating, “The Shaw University community expresses its sincerest appreciation to the National Trust for Historic Preservation for awarding the campus a $150,000 planning grant to assist our efforts in preserving African American history.

“From educating the former enslaved to graduating some of the first African American doctors to helping ignite the civil rights movement, the legacy of Shaw University is woven into the fabric of American history. Preserving the treasures of our historic buildings extends the powerful narrative that describes the indelible contributions of this university.”

The planning grant, too, entails that all HBCU beneficiaries gain access to a paid student professional growing opportunity; one student from each individual campus will work with a team of architects, engineers and consultants to grow their campus. This funding comes from the Initiative and grows the field of African American preservationists.

Florida A&M President Dr. Larry Robinson spoke on the behalf of their campus, stating, “Florida A&M University is the third oldest campus in the State University System of Florida. We appreciate the support of the National Trust for Historic Preservation to assist the University in furthering preservation of landmark buildings on our campus.

The planning grant will allow the faculty, staff, and students across the disciplines of architecture, engineering and the humanities to collaborate in ways that highlight the national impact of Johnathan C. Gibbs, Lucy Moten and Andrew Carnegie and the buildings named in their honor. They also will help preserve the history of the Civil Rights Movement on our campus where iconic figures like Booker T. Washington, Mary McLeod Bethune, Marian Anderson and others changed American history.”

Black Directory in Fashion

Leading Racial Justice and Fashion Leaders Launch First-Of-Its-Kind Directory of Black Professionals in the Fashion Industry

Color Of Change’s #ChangeFashion Initiative and Black In Fashion Council Will Provide Brands An Easy Way To Hire Black Talent 

Color Of Change and IMG’s #ChangeFashion and Black In Fashion Council announced the launch of the BIFC x #ChangeFashion Directory, the first directory focusing on increasing opportunities for Black professionals in the fashion industry. This project is the first resource to be released from #ChangeFashion to help organizations execute the goals laid out in the #ChangeFashion Roadmap. The Roadmap seeks to empower fashion industry allies to embark on the journey of systematically addressing inequity and the exclusion of Black talent.

The directory currently houses the profiles and resumes of over 300 Black professionals, featuring Black-identifying photographers, makeup artists, set designers, and more with a geographic reach that expands across the world. Brands want to make a commitment to racial justice, equity, and inclusion and our Roadmap provides a guide to do so. The directory allows brands to move beyond statements of solidarity to create an industry that fully embraces diversity and inclusion. Currently, the directory will only be available to brands that sign on to the #ChangeFashion Roadmap and have committed to working with Color Of Change to achieve racial equity within the fashion industry. 

“Performative activism for racial equity needs to go out of style,” said Amity Paye, Senior Director of Communications at Color Of Change. “Black people and people of color continue to push the fashion industry forward both in the spotlight and behind-the-scenes —  yet the legacy of the industry is one of racial exclusion. This directory is an invitation for the industry to easily hire Black talent and professionals after taking a pledge to commit to racial justice. Black people are not a trend to flaunt whenever it’s socially impressive. With this directory, we are calling on the industry to #ChangeFashion by moving from rhetoric to action, and by investing in Black talent and careers.”  

“Too often, we hear from brands that they can’t find Black talent or that their rolodex of talent needs to be more inclusive, but they don’t know where to begin,” said Lindsay Peoples Wagner and Sandrine Charles, Co-founders at Black In Fashion Council. “We are incredibly passionate about eradicating this problem and being a resource for companies to use a more diverse roster of talent and know that resources like this will make a significant impact in the industry.”

“We cannot create meaningful change without analyzing and overhauling the systems that brought us here in the first place,” said Romola Ratnam, SVP of Social Impact at Endeavor. “With this directory, we are further democratizing industry access by providing brands a comprehensive resource to change their hiring practices and ensure there is diversity both in front of and behind the camera.”

Along with being a resource for any brand committed to addressing historical racism and systemic inequality, it also aims to help fashion organizations and companies truly change the status quo, break patterns and set new norms that empower, finance, and reward Black people in the industry. There are no excuses as to why there is not an increased presence of Black artists and talent in the fashion industry. This directory will help the industry include more Black people, putting them at the center of the work. 

Learn more about the directory HERE

Color Of Change is the nation’s largest online racial justice organization. We help people respond effectively to injustice in the world around us. As a national online force driven by over 7 million members, we move decision-makers in corporations and governments to create a more human and less hostile world for Black people in America.

#ChangeFashion is a vertical within the Color Of Change #ChangeIndustries initiative dedicated to eradicating racism in the fashion industry. In partnership with the Black In Fashion Council, IMG, and Joan Smalls, its goal is to rally companies and talent across the fashion industry to restore equity and advance racial justice by moving from rhetoric to action.

Black In Fashion Council is a group of editors, models, stylists, media executives, assistants, freelance creatives, and industry stakeholders aiming to build a new foundation for inclusivity in the fashion industry.

Endeavor is a global sports and entertainment company, home to the world’s most dynamic and engaging storytellers, brands, live events, and experiences. The company is composed of industry leaders including entertainment agency WME; sports, fashion, events, and media company IMG; and premier mixed martial arts organization UFC. The Endeavor network specializes in talent representation, sports operations & advisory, event & experiences management, media production & distribution, experiential marketing, and brand licensing. 

IMG is a global leader in sports, fashion, events, and media. The company manages some of the world’s greatest athletes and fashion icons, owns and operates hundreds of live events annually, and is a leading independent producer and distributor of sports and entertainment media. IMG also specializes in licensing, sports training, and league development. IMG is a subsidiary of Endeavor, a global entertainment, sports, and content company.

BLM illustration for use by 360 MAGAZINE

ReserveBar’s Black Brands

ReserveBar’s Spirited Change Initiative

Black-Owned Brands

LS Cream Liqueur ($36): LS Cream Liqueur is an award-winning cordial inspired by cremas, an ancestral recipe native to Haiti with notes of coconut, vanilla, nutmeg, and cinnamon mixed with a blend of fresh cream and neutral grain spirits. Since it was impossible to find cremas in stores, husband and wife Myriam Jean-Baptiste and Stevens Charles decided to launch their own cream liqueur, inspired by Stevens’ late grandmother’s handwritten cremas recipe which she left behind and that the family had cherished for decades. 

Sorel Liqueur ($40): Born of the spice trade, versions of sorrel date back to the 1600s, when hibiscus flowers were first imported to the new world from West Africa. Valued for its medicinal properties, Jackie Summer’s grandparents carried this culinary tradition with them when they emigrated from Barbados to Harlem, NY in the 1920s. In 2012, Jack left a 25-year career as a corporate executive to launch his micro-distillery, Jack from Brooklyn. When Jack received his distilled spirits permit (DSP), he was the only Black person with a license to make liquor in America, and the first to hold this license post-prohibition. 

Brough Brothers Bourbon Whiskey ($29): Brough Brothers Distillery is Kentucky’s first African American owned distillery. Kentucky-born co-founders and brothers Victor, Bryson, and Christian Yarbrough started from humble beginnings in Louisville, where they learned early about hard work and dedication. They took those lessons, traveled the globe, and brought their newfound knowledge of the spirits industry back to Kentucky, where the vision for Brough Brothers was born. Through Brough Brothers, the Yarbrough’s plan to make a positive and lasting impact through job creation and economic development within their local and global communities. 

Uncle Nearest 1856 Premium Aged Whiskey ($59): In 2017, Uncle Nearest 1856 Premium Aged Whiskey launched in the United States. Honoring the first African American master distiller, this premium whiskey swiftly rolled out throughout the U.S. and abroad, and can now be found in 50 States, 10 Countries, and shipped to over 148 countries in the world. Uncle Nearest is now the Fastest-Growing Independent American Whiskey Brand in U.S. History.

Loft & Bear Artisanal Vodka ($30): Loft & Bear is the brainchild of Paul Ryan Elliott, an east coast native. Paul founded Loft & Bear in 2014 and continues to work toward fulfilling long-term sustainable success, encouraged by the opportunity to bring inclusivity and diversity to the beverage alcohol industry. Loft & Bear’s commitment to social awareness is seen in its Distill.Drink.Donate program in which 5% of Loft & Bear profits are donated to PATH, a charity aimed at ending homelessness and providing support for distressed families, veterans affairs, and human services throughout Southern California. 

BLM illustration for use by 360 MAGAZINE

Black History Month Gift Guide

As Black History Month (BHM) commences, we aim to honor the history and celebrate the successes of Black/African American people. This February, 360 has assembled a list of impeccable products that strive to honor the rich past, present and future of BHM.

Fabletics t-shirt collection

In partnership with Melissa Koby and Rob Lewis, Fabletics announced the launch of their limited edition ‘BHM Tees’ series. Both artists, Koby and Lewis, are devoted to cultivating discussion surrounding Black representation, which is the exact goal for the BHM collaboration.

Including a series of four tees, Fabletics releases the ‘Kindred,’ ‘Harmony,’ ‘Africobra’ and ‘Festac 77,’ that have individual, unique artworks that continue conversation of harmony amongst insufficiently represented groups. Fabletics has promised to donate $50k in support of Community Spring and Imagine Black Futures, organizations that are committed to uplifting and providing power to the Black community.

This unrepeated ‘BHM’ tee collection showcases the timeless Fabletics ‘Go-To’ design showcasing a comfortable, gender-neutral fit available in sizing XS-XXL. The tees can be purchased for $39.95 (VIP price) on fabletics.com and in retail stores, beginning February 1.

BHM Fabletics tees via Carli Bendetti for use by 360 MAGAZINE

Lids historically Black institution partnership collection

In collaboration with The Negro Leagues Museum, Black Fives and Harlem Globetrotters, Lids has produced a new apparel and accessories series that will pay tribute to the three historic Black sports establishments, They Gave Us Game.

The compilation will be sold year-round, showcasing goods that reference vintage pieces worn by iconic African American players throughout the years. Constructed with an innovative, modern touch, the collection still has reminiscent underlines from each property. A piece of all earnings from the collection will be donated to Lids Foundation. The foundation is dedicated to giving back to these groups to further influence youth sports. Pricing ranges from $80 – $100, with headwear varying between $31.99 – $39.99, and They Gave Us Game will be available on Monday February 28

Lids globetrotters collection piece via Lids for use by 360 MAGAZINE

The Crunch

The Crunch allows for the convenience of 7 kitchen electrics in one unit. It replaces a traditional air fryer, grill, rotisserie, dehydrator, toaster oven, roaster, and convection oven to bring you one multifunctional powerhouse. It’s 12.7 Qt. capacity provides more room for more food and better results. It has eight main cooking functions, including fries, meat, seafood, pizza, chicken, vegetables, bake, and dehydrate. You can use it to make both French fries and beef jerky! There’s also a rotisserie function and an e-recipe book with over 20 recipes. 

TIDAL

This Black History Month, TIDAL will be releasing content weekly to celebrate the history and contributions of the Black community across key themes. Week one focused on Health and Wellness (the official theme of Black History Month 2022), and for this second week TIDAL has unveiled 11 playlists honoring the legacy and campus life of HBCUs. Subscribers can enjoy a variety of playlists such as: 

The remainder of February will see Social Justice and Behind The Mic content (spotlighting Black writers, engineers and producers behind the music we love) as well as the popular What’s Going On: Artists Speak Their Truth playlist, where artists discuss the message behind their songs that have become social justice anthems. 

As an added bonus, activist and renowned jazz trumpeter, Keyon Harrold, will be tapping into TIDAL to create an exclusive playlist that will feature a brand-new track. All playlists and exclusive content can be found on TIDAL’s Black History Month hub HERE.

Women is Losers x Latino International Film Festival for use by 360 Magazine