Posts tagged with "black lives matter"

Vaughn Lowery, 360 Magazine

VAUGHN

Vaughn Lowery’s heart pumps passion and produces positive change. His career has taken him from humble beginnings in Detroit to a graduate of Cornell University. From there, he became active in modeling, acting and producing screenplays. Now, Vaughn is the founder and president of one of the leading pop culture and design publications of today, 360 MAGAZINE.

Vaughn won over television audiences when he appeared in Kmart’s smash hit Joe Boxer commercial, dancing his self-titled “Boxer Boogie” wearing nothing but his Joe Boxer underwear. With this “brief” appearance, Vaughn Lowery, a.k.a “Joe Boxer,” soon became a household name. He appeared with Leeza Gibbons on Extra, Katie Couric on Today Show and Jay Leno on Tonight Show boogieing down with them and performing his signature dance. According to the Detroit Free Press, Vaughn’s “Boxer Boogie” has paid off, helping Kmart sell roughly $20 million in Joe Boxer apparel a week.” In just the first year he was responsible for Kmart selling over $1.5 billion of duds, besting Martha Stewart’s launch year with over $500 million in sales.

The Detroit native embarked on an acting and modeling career during a trip to New York City when renowned make-up artist Sam Fine set him up with a fashion photographer, Fadil Berisha. Before his appearance as Joe Boxer, Vaughn worked as a successful print model for such companies as Gap, Target, Skechers, Old Navy, Bath & Body Works Fragrance, Nordstrom, and Marc Ecko. He also worked as a runway model for Tommy Hilfiger, Phat Farm, and Karl Kani. He has graced the pages of FHM (SA), URB Magazine, and Glamour.

Vaughn continues to be busy in the media. A few years back, ABC News Primetime aired a segment chronicling his life, along with the tragic John Ritter story. Vaughn has also filmed a Super Bowl commercial, completed a high-profile Dasani Water billboard ad campaign, appeared on America’s Next Top Model, where he stirred up some controversy, guest-starred on the comedy, “Scrubs,” and screened his controversial 35mm festival film, The Young & Evil, at Sundance 2009, which was nominated for Cardiff’s Iris Prize within the same year. He was also named Seventeen Magazine’s “17 Hot Guys.” The last film Vaughn acted in is called The Company We Keep (directed by Roy Campanella), where he plays a fast-talking manager within the record industry, Barry. Currently, Vaughn is in the midst of producing a short film Chasen Life, which won a writing competition. He is also adapting audiobook Say Uncle into a feature-length film and pitching his third reality series. Moreover, he’s in the process of establishing 360 Fest, a film festival that will introduce and screen some of the most provocative short and features in the world.

Outside of Vaughn Lowery’s entertainment endeavors, Vaughn has always determined to give back and continues to keep his personal promise to be a contributing citizen to those in need. He has lent his name and support to: Women At RiskHuman Rights CommissionMarch of DimesHeart of Los Angeles Youth, and schools across the nation where he encourages kids to be their best. Furthermore, Vaughn serves as the Brand Ambassador for both Falling Whistles, which supports war-affected kids in the Congo, and Pink United for breast cancer awareness. He sits on the board of Awakening Young Minds, a nonprofit organization that conducts emotional education workshops for troubled youth.

Vaughn Lowery’s talents are only overshadowed by his winning personality, infectious smile, and his ability to capture hearts as one of the most engaging and approachable individuals in the entertainment industry.

Signed copies of Vaughn’s memoir,  Move Like Water × Be Fluid, are available on 360’s e-Commerce shop and Audible.

As of late, Lowery has developed their inaugural 360 MAG podcast series on Apple and Spotify as well as a new NFT Animal Series on OpenSea.

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OTG

In his spare time, designs e-bike bras and reconfigures their silhouettes.

Mixed Media Fabrications

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BLK app via 360 MAGAZINE official site and podcast

Spotlight: BLK App

Founded in 2017, the B-L-K app encompasses more than a community for singles seeking a prospective date or companionship. The niche platform has the largest subscription of Black Men & Women and is known as affiliates of the Match.com portfolio. 360 Magazine’s Armon Hayes met with the B-L-K app Head of Marketing Jonathan Kirkland via zoom to discuss what the ‘new wave’ app is all about, its impact and what’s to come.

About six years ago Kirkland began in the digital space with apps like Grindr and Bumble. He shares the experience applying to a Brand-partnership job at Grindr as a joke, which lead to a self-discovery journey that allowed him to discover how he thrives through niche communities while identifying their needs. Subsequently evolving the online dating functionality and perspective, Kirkland goes on to say, “It’s all about making connections, where those connections are is up to you and who you match with.

When embarking on the new B-L-K app, founders knew that they wanted to keep the Black community at the forefront of the platform. “The Black experience is a unique one, especially in America and [this] transcends into the dating app space,” said Kirkland. Exploding during lockdown at the height of the pandemic, he is committed to growing the platform with the aid of the audience he serves. The app allows for an understanding that connections aren’t merely one-to-one, but a one to many. Diligent in shifting the narrative that Black women are less desirable, the B-L-K app provides the forum to communicate byway fostering understanding.

With 3 million downloads and counting, the cultural app is creating a space for a wide scale of individuals to connect and, most importantly, build friendships. B-L-K remains true to their core demographic by creating dialogue, while also educating through user connections on matters surrounding racial injustices.

Brought to the forefront on the app as well as our lives, B-L-K particularly highlights the global misfortunes of 2020 at the hands of law enforcement to Breonna Taylor & George Floyd, just to name a few. Such criteria are typically not discussed or even introduced on dating platforms, let alone the first encounter with someone new. Furthermore, getting to know someone online can be awkward as it is. Kirkland emphasizes the initiative of the app, stating, “It’s a space where blackness can be celebrated; find more qualified matches and start dating faster.”

By: Armon Hayes, Vaughn Lowery, McKinley Franklin

Listen to Kirkland/Hayes podcast interview HERE.

BLM graphic via Mina Tocalini for us by 360 MAGAZINE

HBCU Cultural Heritage Stewardship

Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) have been an integral part of our educational system in the United States. Originally being founded in the 1830s, HBCUs cultivate an environment that was long sought after to ensure educational equality. This nations HBCUs are full of the rich history of African American activism, and their campuses also stand as pioneering pieces of landscaping and architecture.

This is precisely why on February 28, the National Trust’s African American Cultural Heritage Action Fund declared they would be awarding over $650,000 in grant awards to five HBCUs across the country in part with their HBCU Cultural Heritage Stewardship Initiative.

While each HBCU embodies symbolisms of African American brilliance and triumph, the programming guarantees that each campus will collect resources to protect and sustain the historical campuses. These grants aim to preserve and revitalize landmark pieces that grace each HBCU, and to promote leadership on each respective campus.

Two differing forms of grants entail the initiative; the first being a $150,000 grant aiming to expand campus-wide cultural stewardship plans, and the second as a $60,000 developmental grant that will conserve a specific milestone building on or associated with an HBCU campus.

Each grant has the intention to enhance plans to improve and sustain varying architectural campus facilities. Launched through the National Trust’s Action Fund in 2020, the program allies with The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, National Endowment for Humanities, Ford Foundation, The JPB Foundation, J.M. Kaplan Fund and The Executive Leadership Council.

The initiative set in place today entails $3.2 million set forth to the HBCUs grants, seeking influence from the Trust’s extensive years of practice to generate proposals of refurbishment and maintenance at each college or university. The National Trust’s Action Fund links with 13 HBCUs and has financed 6 campus and 7 singular-developing projects modern day.

Brent Leggs, Senior Vice President and Executive Director of the African American Cultural Heritage Action Fund at the National Trust spoke on the impact that these grants would permit, stating, “These grants are significant in light of the recent threat to HBCU campuses. Preservation is the strategic counterpoint to centuries of erasure, and it underscores the critical nature of the African American contribution to our nation.

“Without the doctors, lawyers, engineers and other professionals HCBUs have produced, the American story would not be the same.  The Action Fund’s work to preserve the legacies of intellect, activism, and enlightenment on these campuses will inspire future generations of all Americans to believe that, despite the challenge, they too can overcome.”

The following HBCU recipients include:

  • Florida A&M University (Tallahassee, Florida) aiming to produce stewardship projects across their 422-acre campus (1887)
  • Johnson C. Smith University (Charlotte, North Carolina) to create a conservation strategy for its Historic Quad (1867)
  • Rust College (Holly Springs, Mississippi) aiming to produce stewardship projects across their campus (1866)
  • Shaw University (Raleigh, North Carolina) aiming to produce stewardship projects across their 65-acre campus (1865); and
  • Voorhees College (Denmark, South Carolina) aiming to produce stewardship projects across their 380-acre campus (1897).

Shaw University President Dr. Paulette Dillard spoke on their excitement to be apart of the Trust’s recipients this year, stating, “The Shaw University community expresses its sincerest appreciation to the National Trust for Historic Preservation for awarding the campus a $150,000 planning grant to assist our efforts in preserving African American history.

“From educating the former enslaved to graduating some of the first African American doctors to helping ignite the civil rights movement, the legacy of Shaw University is woven into the fabric of American history. Preserving the treasures of our historic buildings extends the powerful narrative that describes the indelible contributions of this university.”

The planning grant, too, entails that all HBCU beneficiaries gain access to a paid student professional growing opportunity; one student from each individual campus will work with a team of architects, engineers and consultants to grow their campus. This funding comes from the Initiative and grows the field of African American preservationists.

Florida A&M President Dr. Larry Robinson spoke on the behalf of their campus, stating, “Florida A&M University is the third oldest campus in the State University System of Florida. We appreciate the support of the National Trust for Historic Preservation to assist the University in furthering preservation of landmark buildings on our campus.

The planning grant will allow the faculty, staff, and students across the disciplines of architecture, engineering and the humanities to collaborate in ways that highlight the national impact of Johnathan C. Gibbs, Lucy Moten and Andrew Carnegie and the buildings named in their honor. They also will help preserve the history of the Civil Rights Movement on our campus where iconic figures like Booker T. Washington, Mary McLeod Bethune, Marian Anderson and others changed American history.”

Black Directory in Fashion

Leading Racial Justice and Fashion Leaders Launch First-Of-Its-Kind Directory of Black Professionals in the Fashion Industry

Color Of Change’s #ChangeFashion Initiative and Black In Fashion Council Will Provide Brands An Easy Way To Hire Black Talent 

Color Of Change and IMG’s #ChangeFashion and Black In Fashion Council announced the launch of the BIFC x #ChangeFashion Directory, the first directory focusing on increasing opportunities for Black professionals in the fashion industry. This project is the first resource to be released from #ChangeFashion to help organizations execute the goals laid out in the #ChangeFashion Roadmap. The Roadmap seeks to empower fashion industry allies to embark on the journey of systematically addressing inequity and the exclusion of Black talent.

The directory currently houses the profiles and resumes of over 300 Black professionals, featuring Black-identifying photographers, makeup artists, set designers, and more with a geographic reach that expands across the world. Brands want to make a commitment to racial justice, equity, and inclusion and our Roadmap provides a guide to do so. The directory allows brands to move beyond statements of solidarity to create an industry that fully embraces diversity and inclusion. Currently, the directory will only be available to brands that sign on to the #ChangeFashion Roadmap and have committed to working with Color Of Change to achieve racial equity within the fashion industry. 

“Performative activism for racial equity needs to go out of style,” said Amity Paye, Senior Director of Communications at Color Of Change. “Black people and people of color continue to push the fashion industry forward both in the spotlight and behind-the-scenes —  yet the legacy of the industry is one of racial exclusion. This directory is an invitation for the industry to easily hire Black talent and professionals after taking a pledge to commit to racial justice. Black people are not a trend to flaunt whenever it’s socially impressive. With this directory, we are calling on the industry to #ChangeFashion by moving from rhetoric to action, and by investing in Black talent and careers.”  

“Too often, we hear from brands that they can’t find Black talent or that their rolodex of talent needs to be more inclusive, but they don’t know where to begin,” said Lindsay Peoples Wagner and Sandrine Charles, Co-founders at Black In Fashion Council. “We are incredibly passionate about eradicating this problem and being a resource for companies to use a more diverse roster of talent and know that resources like this will make a significant impact in the industry.”

“We cannot create meaningful change without analyzing and overhauling the systems that brought us here in the first place,” said Romola Ratnam, SVP of Social Impact at Endeavor. “With this directory, we are further democratizing industry access by providing brands a comprehensive resource to change their hiring practices and ensure there is diversity both in front of and behind the camera.”

Along with being a resource for any brand committed to addressing historical racism and systemic inequality, it also aims to help fashion organizations and companies truly change the status quo, break patterns and set new norms that empower, finance, and reward Black people in the industry. There are no excuses as to why there is not an increased presence of Black artists and talent in the fashion industry. This directory will help the industry include more Black people, putting them at the center of the work. 

Learn more about the directory HERE

Color Of Change is the nation’s largest online racial justice organization. We help people respond effectively to injustice in the world around us. As a national online force driven by over 7 million members, we move decision-makers in corporations and governments to create a more human and less hostile world for Black people in America.

#ChangeFashion is a vertical within the Color Of Change #ChangeIndustries initiative dedicated to eradicating racism in the fashion industry. In partnership with the Black In Fashion Council, IMG, and Joan Smalls, its goal is to rally companies and talent across the fashion industry to restore equity and advance racial justice by moving from rhetoric to action.

Black In Fashion Council is a group of editors, models, stylists, media executives, assistants, freelance creatives, and industry stakeholders aiming to build a new foundation for inclusivity in the fashion industry.

Endeavor is a global sports and entertainment company, home to the world’s most dynamic and engaging storytellers, brands, live events, and experiences. The company is composed of industry leaders including entertainment agency WME; sports, fashion, events, and media company IMG; and premier mixed martial arts organization UFC. The Endeavor network specializes in talent representation, sports operations & advisory, event & experiences management, media production & distribution, experiential marketing, and brand licensing. 

IMG is a global leader in sports, fashion, events, and media. The company manages some of the world’s greatest athletes and fashion icons, owns and operates hundreds of live events annually, and is a leading independent producer and distributor of sports and entertainment media. IMG also specializes in licensing, sports training, and league development. IMG is a subsidiary of Endeavor, a global entertainment, sports, and content company.

BLM illustration for use by 360 MAGAZINE

ReserveBar’s Black Brands

ReserveBar’s Spirited Change Initiative

Black-Owned Brands

LS Cream Liqueur ($36): LS Cream Liqueur is an award-winning cordial inspired by cremas, an ancestral recipe native to Haiti with notes of coconut, vanilla, nutmeg, and cinnamon mixed with a blend of fresh cream and neutral grain spirits. Since it was impossible to find cremas in stores, husband and wife Myriam Jean-Baptiste and Stevens Charles decided to launch their own cream liqueur, inspired by Stevens’ late grandmother’s handwritten cremas recipe which she left behind and that the family had cherished for decades. 

Sorel Liqueur ($40): Born of the spice trade, versions of sorrel date back to the 1600s, when hibiscus flowers were first imported to the new world from West Africa. Valued for its medicinal properties, Jackie Summer’s grandparents carried this culinary tradition with them when they emigrated from Barbados to Harlem, NY in the 1920s. In 2012, Jack left a 25-year career as a corporate executive to launch his micro-distillery, Jack from Brooklyn. When Jack received his distilled spirits permit (DSP), he was the only Black person with a license to make liquor in America, and the first to hold this license post-prohibition. 

Brough Brothers Bourbon Whiskey ($29): Brough Brothers Distillery is Kentucky’s first African American owned distillery. Kentucky-born co-founders and brothers Victor, Bryson, and Christian Yarbrough started from humble beginnings in Louisville, where they learned early about hard work and dedication. They took those lessons, traveled the globe, and brought their newfound knowledge of the spirits industry back to Kentucky, where the vision for Brough Brothers was born. Through Brough Brothers, the Yarbrough’s plan to make a positive and lasting impact through job creation and economic development within their local and global communities. 

Uncle Nearest 1856 Premium Aged Whiskey ($59): In 2017, Uncle Nearest 1856 Premium Aged Whiskey launched in the United States. Honoring the first African American master distiller, this premium whiskey swiftly rolled out throughout the U.S. and abroad, and can now be found in 50 States, 10 Countries, and shipped to over 148 countries in the world. Uncle Nearest is now the Fastest-Growing Independent American Whiskey Brand in U.S. History.

Loft & Bear Artisanal Vodka ($30): Loft & Bear is the brainchild of Paul Ryan Elliott, an east coast native. Paul founded Loft & Bear in 2014 and continues to work toward fulfilling long-term sustainable success, encouraged by the opportunity to bring inclusivity and diversity to the beverage alcohol industry. Loft & Bear’s commitment to social awareness is seen in its Distill.Drink.Donate program in which 5% of Loft & Bear profits are donated to PATH, a charity aimed at ending homelessness and providing support for distressed families, veterans affairs, and human services throughout Southern California. 

BLM illustration for use by 360 MAGAZINE

Black History Month Gift Guide

As Black History Month (BHM) commences, we aim to honor the history and celebrate the successes of Black/African American people. This February, 360 has assembled a list of impeccable products that strive to honor the rich past, present and future of BHM.

Fabletics t-shirt collection

In partnership with Melissa Koby and Rob Lewis, Fabletics announced the launch of their limited edition ‘BHM Tees’ series. Both artists, Koby and Lewis, are devoted to cultivating discussion surrounding Black representation, which is the exact goal for the BHM collaboration.

Including a series of four tees, Fabletics releases the ‘Kindred,’ ‘Harmony,’ ‘Africobra’ and ‘Festac 77,’ that have individual, unique artworks that continue conversation of harmony amongst insufficiently represented groups. Fabletics has promised to donate $50k in support of Community Spring and Imagine Black Futures, organizations that are committed to uplifting and providing power to the Black community.

This unrepeated ‘BHM’ tee collection showcases the timeless Fabletics ‘Go-To’ design showcasing a comfortable, gender-neutral fit available in sizing XS-XXL. The tees can be purchased for $39.95 (VIP price) on fabletics.com and in retail stores, beginning February 1.

BHM Fabletics tees via Carli Bendetti for use by 360 MAGAZINE

Lids historically Black institution partnership collection

In collaboration with The Negro Leagues Museum, Black Fives and Harlem Globetrotters, Lids has produced a new apparel and accessories series that will pay tribute to the three historic Black sports establishments, They Gave Us Game.

The compilation will be sold year-round, showcasing goods that reference vintage pieces worn by iconic African American players throughout the years. Constructed with an innovative, modern touch, the collection still has reminiscent underlines from each property. A piece of all earnings from the collection will be donated to Lids Foundation. The foundation is dedicated to giving back to these groups to further influence youth sports. Pricing ranges from $80 – $100, with headwear varying between $31.99 – $39.99, and They Gave Us Game will be available on Monday February 28

Lids globetrotters collection piece via Lids for use by 360 MAGAZINE

The Crunch

The Crunch allows for the convenience of 7 kitchen electrics in one unit. It replaces a traditional air fryer, grill, rotisserie, dehydrator, toaster oven, roaster, and convection oven to bring you one multifunctional powerhouse. It’s 12.7 Qt. capacity provides more room for more food and better results. It has eight main cooking functions, including fries, meat, seafood, pizza, chicken, vegetables, bake, and dehydrate. You can use it to make both French fries and beef jerky! There’s also a rotisserie function and an e-recipe book with over 20 recipes. 

TIDAL

This Black History Month, TIDAL will be releasing content weekly to celebrate the history and contributions of the Black community across key themes. Week one focused on Health and Wellness (the official theme of Black History Month 2022), and for this second week TIDAL has unveiled 11 playlists honoring the legacy and campus life of HBCUs. Subscribers can enjoy a variety of playlists such as: 

The remainder of February will see Social Justice and Behind The Mic content (spotlighting Black writers, engineers and producers behind the music we love) as well as the popular What’s Going On: Artists Speak Their Truth playlist, where artists discuss the message behind their songs that have become social justice anthems. 

As an added bonus, activist and renowned jazz trumpeter, Keyon Harrold, will be tapping into TIDAL to create an exclusive playlist that will feature a brand-new track. All playlists and exclusive content can be found on TIDAL’s Black History Month hub HERE.

Women is Losers x Latino International Film Festival for use by 360 Magazine
Gabrielle Archuleta illustrates Black History Month for 360 MAGAZINE

Black History Month

By Hannah DiPilato

February is Black History Month and 360 Magazine would like to recognize some historic people of color who have become a positive influence on society. In 2020, the Black Lives Matter movement skyrocketed and brought attention to the diversity that still exists within our community. Although society has come a long way from the early 1900s when segregation ran rampant, the movement for equality has a long way to go. From inventors to musicians, there are a number of successful people we would like to acknowledge in honor of Black History Month.

Martin Luther King Jr.
Arguably one of the most important leaders in the Civil Rights Movement, Dr. King spent his time preaching for equality in a peaceful way. He will always be remembered for his famous “I Have a Dream” speech and his ability to lead others in this historical movement. Dr. King is one of the most influential

Joseph E. Lowery
Joseph E. Lowery is the grandfather of 360 Magazine’s President Vaughn Lowery and founded the Southern Christian Leadership Conference alongside Dr. King. Throughout his life, Lowery served as vice president, chairman of the board and president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference as well as a leader in the Civil Rights Movement.

George Washington Carver
Many people are familiar with George Washington Carver for his inventive skills. He made over 300 products from peanuts and as an agricultural scientist promoted methods to prevent soil depletion.

Garrett Morgan
Garrett Augustus Morgan, Sr. is to thank for the invention of traffic lights as well as gas masks. Every time you stop at a red light, take a moment to think of Morgan for this essential technology.

Barack Obama
As the first black president of the United States, Barack Obama made an impact as the 44th president and showed young people of color they have representation in politics. He continues to use his voice to connect with the American people.

Kamala Harris
Keeping in the theme of politics, Vice President Kamala Harris is the first woman vice president, the first African American vice president and the first Asian American vice president. She’s giving young women of color everywhere a sense of representation.

Madam C.J. Walker
As the first recorded female self-made millionaire in America, Madam C.J. Walker was an influential entrepreneur, philanthropist and activist of her time.

Frederick McKinley Jones
Frederick McKinley Jones was the co-founder of Thermo King and he brought incredible improvement to long-haul transportation of perishable goods. Jones also won the National Medal of Technology.

Stevie Wonder
Stevland Hardaway Morris, better known as Stevie Wonder, is a musical prodigy that became blind after birth and learned to play the harmonica, piano and drums by age nine. He is now a notable singer, songwriter, musician and record producer.

Lonnie Johnson
Lonnie Johnson is known for his success as an aerospace engineer. He has worked on the U.S. Air Force term of service and has also worked at NASA for twelve years including in the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

Patricia Bath
As an ophthalmologist, Patricia Bath was an early innovator of laser cataract surgery. She was also the first woman, African American physician to receive a patent for a medical invention.

Oprah Winfrey
One TV personality almost everyone is familiar with is Oprah. Known for her television show The Oprah Winfrey Show, she has made waves in the world of entertainment. She is also known for co-producing a Broadway musical version of The Color Purple, establishing O, The Oprah Magazine, the Oprah Winfrey Network (OWN) as well as creating Oprah.com.

Harriet Tubman
After being born into slavery, Harriet Tubman was a conductor of the Underground Railroad and helped many enslaved men and women escape. She led many people to freedom with her bravery and connection with antislavery activists.

Rosa Parks
Rosa Parks gained her notoriety as an activist in the Civil Rights Movement and is known for starting the Montgomery bus boycott after refusing to give up her seat to a white passenger. She has been called “the first lady of civil rights” and “the mother of the freedom movement” by the United States Congress.

John Lewis
John Lewis was chairman Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) as well as one of the “Big Six” leaders who organized the 1963 March on Washington. He was an essential part of the Civil Rights Movement and ending legalized racial segregation.

Alexander Miles
If you’ve ever ridden in an elevator, you can thank Alexander Miles for the automatic opening doors; he was awarded the patent for this invention in 1887. Mills was riding in an elevator with his daughter and he deemed an elevator shaft door left open could be dangerous.

Mary Kenner
Mary Kenner was an inventor famous for her development of the sanitary belt, the precursor to the self-adhesive maxi pad. However, due to racial discrimination, the idea wasn’t adopted for thirty years. She has five patents for various household items.

Maya Angelou
Known for her many famous pieces of writing, Maya Angelou was a poet, memoirist and civil rights activist. Over fifty years, she wrote a number of autobiographies, essays, poems, plays, movies and television shows. She also received over 50 honorary degrees as well as awards for her writing.

LeBron James
Along with being considered one of the greatest NBA players of all time, LeBron James also started the LeBron James Family Foundation to help create generational change for the children and families of LeBron’s hometown in Akron, Ohio.

Malcolm X
As a popular spokesperson at the time of the Civil Rights Movement, Malcolm X encouraged Black Americans to protect themselves against racism. He preached a much different lesson than Martin Luther King Jr. who preached nonviolence.

Thurgood Marshall
Thurgood Marshall was the Supreme Court’s first African American justice as well as a prominent civil rights activist. He served on the court for 24 years and helped with influential rulings at the time of the Civil Rights Movement such as the case of Brown v. Board of Education.

Jackie Robinson
Jackie Robinson was the first African American to play in Major League Baseball in the United States during the 20th century. He broke the color barrier of the MLB when he played for the National League Brooklyn Dodgers as second baseman with the jersey number 42.

halle berry illustration by Mel Quagrainie for use by 360 magazine

HALLE BERRY – THE PEOPLE’S ICON

Academy Award-Winning Actress, Director, and Producer Halle Berry to Receive The People’s Icon Award at The 2021 People’s Choice Awards

Cardi B to Present Berry with the Award at the Ceremony Live on NBC and E! on Tuesday, December 7 at 9PM ET/PT

Today, NBC and E! announced that Academy Award-winning actress, director, and producer Halle Berry will receive “The People’s Icon” award at the 2021 “People’s Choice Awards.” Grammy Award-winning artist Cardi B will present the award to Berry at the ceremony. The PCA Award-winner and seven-time nominee will be honored for her contributions in TV and film, including her directorial debut in the highly anticipated film “Bruised,” which will be in select theatres on November 17 and arrives on Netflix on November 24. Cardi B and Berry teamed up to executive produce the film’s soundtrack, which features six original songs by award-winning and multi-platinum female artists, including a song by Cardi B. The 2021 “People’s Choice Awards” will air simultaneously on both NBC and E! on Tuesday, December 7 at 9pm ET/PT from the Barker Hangar in Santa Monica, CA.

“Throughout her career, Halle Berry has broken down barriers, directed and starred in diverse roles that have paved the way for others in the industry,” said Jen Neal, Executive Vice President, Entertainment Live Events, Specials & E! News, NBCUniversal Entertainment Television and Streaming. “In addition to her filmography accolades and trendsetting ethos, Berry is known for her philanthropic work with women, children and underserved communities. She is an icon of our time and for all these reasons and more, we are honored to present her with ‘The People’s Icon’ award.” 

As an actor, producer, director, activist, philanthropist, and fashion icon, Berry has made history on multiple accounts. Highlights include her performance in “Monster’s Ball,” which earned her the Academy Award for “Best Actress,” making her the first Black woman to receive that honor, as well as being nominated for a Golden Globe for “Best Actress” for her role in “Frankie and Alice.” Berry also earned an Emmy, Golden Globe, SAG and NAACP Image Award for her extraordinary performance in HBO’s telefilm, “Introducing Dorothy Dandridge,” which she also produced. 

Most recently, Berry filmed Netflix’s “The Mothership,” which she stars in and executive produced, and will be seen in Roland Emmerich-helmed sci-fi epic “Moonfall” for Lionsgate, which is due in theaters February 2022. In 2020, Berry made her highly anticipated directorial debut in new film “Bruised,” in which she also stars.

Outside of her filmography success, Berry is an active supporter of the Jenesse Center in Los Angeles, which supports victims of domestic violence and aims to change the pattern of abuse in the lives of women and children. Further, Berry joined forces with Novo Nordisk and the Entertainment Industry Foundation to launch the Diabetes Aware Campaign and has supported a vast number of charities and organizations such as Afghanistan Relief Organization, Black Lives Matter, Clothes Off Our Back, Love Our Children USA, Make-A-Wish Foundation, Stand Up to Cancer, Revlon Run/Walk, and United Nations World Food Programme. 

Berry also founded rē•spin, a platform created to provide broader access to health and wellness content and products through inclusivity and conversation. Rooted in discovery and learning, the heart of rē•spin is its global community connected around the core belief of a holistic mind, body, and soul approach to wellness.   

The 2021 “People’s Choice Awards” will air simultaneously on both NBC and E! for the first time on Tuesday, December 7 at 9:00pm ET/PT from the Barker Hangar in Santa Monica, CA.  “Live from E!: The 2021 People’s Choice Awards” will kick off the night with a red carpet special at 7:00pm ET/PT on E!. The “People’s Choice Awards” and “Live from E!: The 2021 People’s Choice Awards” are both produced by Den of Thieves with Executive Producers Jesse Ignjatovic, Evan Prager and Barb Bialkowski.

 

See the full list of all 40 categories and nominees online.

MLWXBF chapter 4 illustration via Alison Christenson for use by 360 Magazine

Ivy League BLM Courses

By: Emily Bunn

Ivy League Schools to Begin Teaching “Black Lives Matter” Courses

Proving their commitment to diversity and understanding, several Ivy League colleges will begin offering courses on the Black Lives Matter Movement. Whereas other Ivy League schools, such as Cornell, have created Africana Departments that focus on the centrality of Africa and the African Diaspora to the modern world, BlackLivesMatter classes are situated in a specific cultural moment. Though, of course, the Black Lives Matter falls under the umbrella of contemporary African history, it is positioned in a more concentrated, modern application. Princeton and Dartmouth are the two first schools to begin accrediting this intersectional coursework. While Princeton most recently enacted their BLM coursework, Dartmouth has been pioneering this change since 2015.

Dartmouth’s Black Lives Matter course discusses topics such as The Ivory Tower, understanding St. Louis and its racial history, race and class, racial violence, and systemic and unconscious racism, among other topics. Part of Dartmouth’s course description reads, “though the academy can never lay claim to social movements, this course seeks in part to answer the call of students and young activists around the country to take the opportunity to raise questions about, offer studied reflection upon, and allocate dedicated institutional space to the failures of democracy, capitalism, and leadership and to make #BlackLivesMatter. Developed through a group effort, this course brings to bear collective thinking, teaching, research, and focus on questions around race, structural inequality, and violence.” The course is taught by a wide variety of professors from different academic disciplines and social backgrounds. Taught for ten weeks by close to 20 different professors, Dartmouth’s Black Lives Matter coursework stands as a comprehensive example of a cross-disciplinary concentration that recognizes and situates history in a contemporary, American context.

Princeton’s #BlackLivesMatter class looks to examine the “historical roots and growth of the Black Lives Matter social movement,” and is “committed to resisting, unveiling, and undoing histories of state sanctioned violence against Black and Brown bodies.” Princeton’s #BlackLivesMatter’s course description reads as such: “This seminar traces the historical roots and growth of the Black Lives Matter social movement in the United States and comparative global contexts. The movement and course are committed to resisting, unveiling, and undoing histories of state sanctioned violence against Black and Brown bodies. The course seeks to document the forms of dispossession that Black Americans face and offers a critical examination of the prison industrial complex, police brutality, urban poverty, and white supremacy in the US.” The course’ sample reading list includes selections from Angela Davis, Claudia Rankin, and Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor.

Princeton’s course will be taught by Professor Hanna Garth, who has previously taught “Race and Racisms,” “Postcolonial and Decolonial Theory,” and “Theories of Social Justice.” Garth’s self-defined interest in “the ways in which people struggle to overcome structural violence” and past experience has well-prepared her for teaching this class. Garth remarks, “All of my research, teaching, and mentoring is designed around my commitment to feminist methodologies and critical race theory.”

While some have aggressively asserted that Princeton’s course readings are from a former communist party leader who once made it on the FBI’s Most Wanted List, their negativity further highlights the necessity of this course. While these assertions may be true, it is telling that certain critics commonly overlook the individual’s many (more recent) accomplishments. The author in question is Angela Davis – a revered, respected, and well-educated civil rights activist, philosopher, academic, and author. By painting Davis as an unpatriotic, dangerous criminal, it distracts from the important lessons that are to be learned from this influential leader. Similarly, Fox News’ article on Princeton’s new course links their mention of the “Black Lives Matter” movement not to an explanation of what the movement is, but instead to a page on US protests. As opposed to creating an educational resource for what the BLM Movement is, conservative critics are quick to jump to claims of Black violence and riots.

Especially in 2021, as the United States grapples with the fight for racial and civil justice, discussions surround race, policing, prison reform, and politics are more pertinent than ever. It is absolutely essential that our nation’s college students are exposed to critical race theory and critical thinking. By shielding America’s youth from the necessary history of this country – which is still being experienced today – we are only putting them in a position of increased vulnerability and ignorance. Knowledge is power and educating oneself on society’s issues is the only way to efficient work towards progressive social change. Hopefully, as the most prestigious academic institutions begin to model examples of intersectional and anti-racist coursework, other colleges and universities will soon follow suit.

Mel Quagrainie for use by 360 Magazine

Justice For Ahmaud Arbery

On November 24, 2021, three white men were found guilty of murdering 25-year-old unarmed Black man Ahmaud Arbery. The murder was committed by the three white men after unfounded suspicions that Mr. Arbery had been committing break-ins in their neighborhood in South Georgia.

The three defendants were Travis McMichael, 35, his father, Gregory McMicheal, 65, and William Bryan, 52, their neighbor.

Mr. Arbery lived outside of the small town of Brunswick, Georgia with his mother. He enjoyed staying in good shape and was a jogger who was often seen running in and around his neighborhood. Mr. Arbery was shot dead in a suburban neighborhood known as Satilla Shores through which he was jogging.

On Sunday, February 23, 2020, Arbery was murdered after being provoked by a white man and his son. Gregory McMichael saw Mr. Arbery running in Satilla Shores from his front porch and believed Mr. Arbery looked like a suspected man involved in numerous break-ins in the area. He then called to his son, Travis McMichael.

The police reports state that “the men grabbed a .357 Magnum handgun and shotgun, got into a pickup truck and chased Mr. Arbery, trying unsuccessfully to cut him off. A third man was also [William Bryan] involved in the pursuit.” In a recording of a 911 call that was made before the chase began, a neighbor reported a Black man was inside a house still under construction.

A video shot by William Bryan shows a struggle that preceded three shotgun blasts. The video is about a half-minute long and shows Mr. Arbery running along the two-laned suburban road when he comes upon a white truck. Travis opens the driver’s side door with a shotgun, and Greg, his father, is in the bed of the pickup truck with a handgun.

Mr. Arbery then runs out of frame, and muffled shouting is heard before Mr. Arbery appears back in the video’s view. Mr. Arbery and Travis enter view of the camera recording, fighting outside of the truck as three shotgun shots echo.

Mr. Arbery then tries to run but stumbles and falls after a few steps.

There was another video published that depicted a man walking into a house that was under construction in the same neighborhood, with him eventually running out. S. Lee Merritt, one of Mr. Arbery’s family’s lawyers, released a statement that the video does not reveal anything that was not already understood evidence. Merritt continues by explaining that Mr. Arbery was not engaging in illegal activity and did not take anything from the site.

Gregory McMichael is a former Glynn County police officer and past investigator with the local district attorney’s office.

Two months passed after the shooting, and still, no one had been arrested for the murder of Ahmaud Arbery. The prosecutor for the Brunswick Judicial Circuit, Jackie Johnson, recused herself from the case because of a potential conflict of interest. Gregory, one of the men involved in the shooting, had previously worked in her office.

The case was sent to George E. Barnhill, the district attorney in Waycross, Georgia, who also later recused himself from the case. This came following Mr. Arbery’s mother arguing the point that Barnhill had a point of conflict as well because his son also worked for the Brunswick district attorney. Before he was released from the case, Mr. Barnhill did write a letter to the Glynn County Police Department arguing there was not adequate probable cause to arrest the pursuers of Ahmaud Arbery.

In December, the Atlanta news station WSB attained police body camera footage from when officers arrived on February 23, including the conversations that took place immediately following the shooting. These recorded conversations show that the officers on the scene knew of Gregory’s background.

Ms. Johnson, who was voted out of her job as chief prosecutor for the area, was indicted with a charge of violating her oath. This came about from her demonstration of “favor and affection” to Gregory. There was also a charge of obstruction due to her instructions to two police officers on February 23 to not arrest Travis.

During the eventual lead prosecutor in the case, Linda Dunikoski’s, closing statement, she argued that the defendants began a pursuit after and an attack on Mr. Arbery, “because he was a Black man running down the street.” This raised her question of whether race was a leading issue in the attack. The prosecution continued to argue to the jury that Mr. Arbery posed no imminent threat to the men and that they had no reason to believe he had caused such suspected crimes, a tactic that proved effectual due to the guilty verdict by the jury.

The case and trial have been carefully followed in the United States since the earlier April conviction of white officer Derek Chauvin for the second-degree murder of George Floyd. Video from the scene depicted Chauvin kneeling on the neck of unarmed Black man George Floyd for nearly nine minutes. This video generated an international uproar, placing an emphasis on questions about the unfair treatment that minorities endure at the hands of the police in America.

The three defendants face sentences of up to life in prison for the state crimes that were committed. They had each separately been indicted on federal charges that include hate crimes and attempted kidnapping. They are expected to stand trial for those charges in February.