Posts tagged with "Black History Month"

BLM graphic via Mina Tocalini for us by 360 MAGAZINE

HBCU Cultural Heritage Stewardship

Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) have been an integral part of our educational system in the United States. Originally being founded in the 1830s, HBCUs cultivate an environment that was long sought after to ensure educational equality. This nations HBCUs are full of the rich history of African American activism, and their campuses also stand as pioneering pieces of landscaping and architecture.

This is precisely why on February 28, the National Trust’s African American Cultural Heritage Action Fund declared they would be awarding over $650,000 in grant awards to five HBCUs across the country in part with their HBCU Cultural Heritage Stewardship Initiative.

While each HBCU embodies symbolisms of African American brilliance and triumph, the programming guarantees that each campus will collect resources to protect and sustain the historical campuses. These grants aim to preserve and revitalize landmark pieces that grace each HBCU, and to promote leadership on each respective campus.

Two differing forms of grants entail the initiative; the first being a $150,000 grant aiming to expand campus-wide cultural stewardship plans, and the second as a $60,000 developmental grant that will conserve a specific milestone building on or associated with an HBCU campus.

Each grant has the intention to enhance plans to improve and sustain varying architectural campus facilities. Launched through the National Trust’s Action Fund in 2020, the program allies with The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, National Endowment for Humanities, Ford Foundation, The JPB Foundation, J.M. Kaplan Fund and The Executive Leadership Council.

The initiative set in place today entails $3.2 million set forth to the HBCUs grants, seeking influence from the Trust’s extensive years of practice to generate proposals of refurbishment and maintenance at each college or university. The National Trust’s Action Fund links with 13 HBCUs and has financed 6 campus and 7 singular-developing projects modern day.

Brent Leggs, Senior Vice President and Executive Director of the African American Cultural Heritage Action Fund at the National Trust spoke on the impact that these grants would permit, stating, “These grants are significant in light of the recent threat to HBCU campuses. Preservation is the strategic counterpoint to centuries of erasure, and it underscores the critical nature of the African American contribution to our nation.

“Without the doctors, lawyers, engineers and other professionals HCBUs have produced, the American story would not be the same.  The Action Fund’s work to preserve the legacies of intellect, activism, and enlightenment on these campuses will inspire future generations of all Americans to believe that, despite the challenge, they too can overcome.”

The following HBCU recipients include:

  • Florida A&M University (Tallahassee, Florida) aiming to produce stewardship projects across their 422-acre campus (1887)
  • Johnson C. Smith University (Charlotte, North Carolina) to create a conservation strategy for its Historic Quad (1867)
  • Rust College (Holly Springs, Mississippi) aiming to produce stewardship projects across their campus (1866)
  • Shaw University (Raleigh, North Carolina) aiming to produce stewardship projects across their 65-acre campus (1865); and
  • Voorhees College (Denmark, South Carolina) aiming to produce stewardship projects across their 380-acre campus (1897).

Shaw University President Dr. Paulette Dillard spoke on their excitement to be apart of the Trust’s recipients this year, stating, “The Shaw University community expresses its sincerest appreciation to the National Trust for Historic Preservation for awarding the campus a $150,000 planning grant to assist our efforts in preserving African American history.

“From educating the former enslaved to graduating some of the first African American doctors to helping ignite the civil rights movement, the legacy of Shaw University is woven into the fabric of American history. Preserving the treasures of our historic buildings extends the powerful narrative that describes the indelible contributions of this university.”

The planning grant, too, entails that all HBCU beneficiaries gain access to a paid student professional growing opportunity; one student from each individual campus will work with a team of architects, engineers and consultants to grow their campus. This funding comes from the Initiative and grows the field of African American preservationists.

Florida A&M President Dr. Larry Robinson spoke on the behalf of their campus, stating, “Florida A&M University is the third oldest campus in the State University System of Florida. We appreciate the support of the National Trust for Historic Preservation to assist the University in furthering preservation of landmark buildings on our campus.

The planning grant will allow the faculty, staff, and students across the disciplines of architecture, engineering and the humanities to collaborate in ways that highlight the national impact of Johnathan C. Gibbs, Lucy Moten and Andrew Carnegie and the buildings named in their honor. They also will help preserve the history of the Civil Rights Movement on our campus where iconic figures like Booker T. Washington, Mary McLeod Bethune, Marian Anderson and others changed American history.”

Slave Play

Slave Play

By Krish Narsinghani

As of late, 360 Magazine joined Center Theatre Group’s grand post-pandemic reopening of LA’s Mark Taper Forum. What better way to kickoff the return of the arts than with the highly acclaimed drama, Slave Play. Featuring moments of explicit content, the play has sparked controversy amongst the theater community. The diverse seven hundred or so person crowd watched as the playwright, Jeremy O. Harris, primed the show sharing how he started his journey in LA as an actor, and how his first finished work at Yale is currently being watched across the nation. This Broadway hit has planted itself in Downtown Los Angeles and is here to stay, stirring heads in the entertainment space as the city continues to expand in theatricals.

Guests experiencing the play for the first time were quickly drawn in with the opening scene set on a plantation field. To have a thickening plot is an understatement. Slave Play is a must-watch for everyone of all colors and backgrounds. A perfect release during Black History Month, this art can be used for pleasure or as an educational tool to celebrate and learn about ones Blackness in a relationship. Overall, the acting and curves in the storyline had the crowd at the edge of their seat and left us in awe. The minimal stage production and use of lighting surprisingly didn’t hinder the story and allowed the acting to shine through. The intimate theater actually improved the atmosphere where attendees could better hear and witness the grit and raw emotions of the leads, Antoinette Crowe-Legacy and Paul Alexander Nolan, without the need for traditional smoke and mirrors. The two played an interracial couple that expressed a wife’s frustration with viewpoints I’d never heard. The profanity did make me feel uncomfortable at times, but it’s needed to fully encapsulate one within the character conflict plus it pushes the script to feel more alive. It’s interesting how subtle some of the dialogue is between characters and still have fans pondering days later. The play is already a hot topic of pop culture conversations amongst Angelenos and it’s only the beginning.

A handful of celebrities attended the opening night including Tracee Ellis Ross, Mara Brock Akil, Wendy Raquel Robinson, Logan Browning, Ashley Blaine Featherson, Samira Wiley, Ashley Park, Sofia Boutella, Patrick Fabian, Wade Allain-Marcus and Malia Obama. The evening finished with a standing ovation and a toast with the Taper team. Slave Play is refreshing in taste and is highly recommended to anyone who enjoys progressive media in general.

More About Slave Play

It’s the most Tony Award®-nominated play in history. It stunned off-Broadway. Then it shocked Broadway. Now, Jeremy O. Harris, “a major new voice in the American theater” (Chicago Tribune), brings his “raw, revelatory, and revolutionary play” (The Daily Beast) to the Taper, in the same production that roiled New York. Directed by two-time NAACP and Obie Award® winner Robert O’Hara, Slave Play is “one of the best and most provocative new works to show up in years” (The New York Times).

At the MacGregor Plantation, nothing is as it seems, and yet everything is as it seems. It’s an antebellum fever-dream as three interracial couples converge to rip open history at the intersection of race, love, and sexuality in 21st-century America. It’s a world where the sex is as raw as the emotions, and the twists as salacious as the truth. Don’t dare shy away from this production that “reimagines the possibilities of what theatre can give us” (The New York Times).

About Jeremy O. Harris

Full-length plays include: Slave Play (Broadway, New York Theatre Workshop, NYT Critics Pick, Winner of the 2018 Kennedy Center Rosa Parks Playwriting Award, the Lorraine Hansberry Playwriting Award, and The Lotos Foundation Prize in the Arts and Sciences), DADDY (Vineyard Theatre/The New Group, Almeida Theatre). In 2018, Jeremy co-wrote A24’s film Zola with director Janicza Bravo. He is the 11th recipient of the Vineyard Theatre’s Paula Vogel Playwrighting Award, a 2016 MacDowell Colony Fellow, an Orchard Project Greenhouse artist, a resident playwright with Colt Coeur, and is under commission from Lincoln Center Theater and Playwrights Horizons. Jeremy is a graduate of the Yale MFA Playwrighting Program. Jeremy is currently developing a pilot with A24 for HBO.

For info on tickets to the Slave Play, head to the Center Theatre Group’s website.

Slave Play Actors
Photo credit: Ryan Miller/Capture Imaging
Slave Play Actors Opening Night
Photo credit: Craig Schwartz Photography
BLM illustration for use by 360 MAGAZINE

ReserveBar’s Black Brands

ReserveBar’s Spirited Change Initiative

Black-Owned Brands

LS Cream Liqueur ($36): LS Cream Liqueur is an award-winning cordial inspired by cremas, an ancestral recipe native to Haiti with notes of coconut, vanilla, nutmeg, and cinnamon mixed with a blend of fresh cream and neutral grain spirits. Since it was impossible to find cremas in stores, husband and wife Myriam Jean-Baptiste and Stevens Charles decided to launch their own cream liqueur, inspired by Stevens’ late grandmother’s handwritten cremas recipe which she left behind and that the family had cherished for decades. 

Sorel Liqueur ($40): Born of the spice trade, versions of sorrel date back to the 1600s, when hibiscus flowers were first imported to the new world from West Africa. Valued for its medicinal properties, Jackie Summer’s grandparents carried this culinary tradition with them when they emigrated from Barbados to Harlem, NY in the 1920s. In 2012, Jack left a 25-year career as a corporate executive to launch his micro-distillery, Jack from Brooklyn. When Jack received his distilled spirits permit (DSP), he was the only Black person with a license to make liquor in America, and the first to hold this license post-prohibition. 

Brough Brothers Bourbon Whiskey ($29): Brough Brothers Distillery is Kentucky’s first African American owned distillery. Kentucky-born co-founders and brothers Victor, Bryson, and Christian Yarbrough started from humble beginnings in Louisville, where they learned early about hard work and dedication. They took those lessons, traveled the globe, and brought their newfound knowledge of the spirits industry back to Kentucky, where the vision for Brough Brothers was born. Through Brough Brothers, the Yarbrough’s plan to make a positive and lasting impact through job creation and economic development within their local and global communities. 

Uncle Nearest 1856 Premium Aged Whiskey ($59): In 2017, Uncle Nearest 1856 Premium Aged Whiskey launched in the United States. Honoring the first African American master distiller, this premium whiskey swiftly rolled out throughout the U.S. and abroad, and can now be found in 50 States, 10 Countries, and shipped to over 148 countries in the world. Uncle Nearest is now the Fastest-Growing Independent American Whiskey Brand in U.S. History.

Loft & Bear Artisanal Vodka ($30): Loft & Bear is the brainchild of Paul Ryan Elliott, an east coast native. Paul founded Loft & Bear in 2014 and continues to work toward fulfilling long-term sustainable success, encouraged by the opportunity to bring inclusivity and diversity to the beverage alcohol industry. Loft & Bear’s commitment to social awareness is seen in its Distill.Drink.Donate program in which 5% of Loft & Bear profits are donated to PATH, a charity aimed at ending homelessness and providing support for distressed families, veterans affairs, and human services throughout Southern California. 

Charles Young via Antonio Tobias Mendez for use by 360 Magazine

Col. Charles Young

By: Charles Blatcher III

One hundred years, one month, and nine days to the date of Colonel Charles Young‘s death in Nigeria on January 8, 1922, February 17, 2022 will mark the day that the United States Army will bestow the rank of Brigadier General of the United States Army on Colonel Charles Young. Also, this promotion serves as an affirmation that perseverance and dedication to a goal have been rewarded. This honor to Brigadier General Charles Young is the result of a 41-year advocacy by the Coalition of Black Veterans headquarters in Oakland, California, and a promise I made to retired Sergeant Samuel Waller.

The advocacy began in 1977 when I met and became friends with retired Sergeant Samuel Waller, the last surviving veteran of the Spanish American War in California. Sergeant Waller had served with then Captain Charles Young in the Philippine Islands (1901) as a member of the 24th Infantry Regiment. Young was the Commanding Officer of the Ninth Calvalry Regiment in the country. According to Waller, Young was the best Officer in the United States Army. He said that Black troops loved and respected Young and would follow him to hell and back. Waller was adamant when he added that the only reason Charles Young was not a General was based upon his color. Sergeant Waller planted a seed that day. As I began learning about Colonel Young, I had to concur with Sergeant Waller that there was only one reason as W.E.B. DuBois said, “There was no place for a Black General in the United States Army.”

In 1978 while consulting with Sergeant Waller regarding the “March for Recognition” Sam made a request: to not let them [Black soldiers] be written out of history. As a young Black man and a veteran, I promised to do my best to honor his request. My promise has been kept with Colonel Charles Young’s promotion to Brigadier General. My sincere thanks to the organizations, associations, and many individuals who have contributed to this milestone.

Young’s promotion is a great day for many people including his descendants as well as to the State of Kentucky. Any day that a nation can face its past mistakes and put forth the efforts to correct those mistakes is a Great Day. It is a sign of growth and hope. Growth in that we have taken steps to mature beyond the foolishness of not understanding that the strength of our Nation resides in our unity of purpose and Hope that we continue to do the necessary work to preserve our Democratic Republic. However, this is not the end of the advocacy for Brigadier General Charles Young.

We have submitted a request for the Department of Interior to consider annexing the General’s birth cabin which is in May’s Lick, Kentucky, into the National Park Service. We are looking at the tourism possibilities of getting the highway between May’s Lick and Wilberforce, Ohio designated the “Brigadier General Charles Young Corridor.” The designation covers the route from his birthplace to his residence at the time of his death. 

In addition to making Young’s birthplace part of the National Park Service, we are leading an effort to erect a bronze statue of Brigadier General Charles Young on horseback in Washington, D.C. This statue will memorialize the General’s 497-mile walk/horseback ride from Wilberforce, Ohio to Washington D.C. in 1917. The trip was to prove his fitness to return to active duty after forced into medical retirement. The statue could welcome visitors to the National African American Museum of History and Culture. Our military involvements are the cornerstone of our claim for Civil Rights. Currently, there are bronze maquettes on public display in the Kentucky Center for African American Heritage, in Louisville, and the Buffalo Soldiers National Museum in Houston. We have called upon Lonnie Bunch, the Secretary of the Smithsonian Institute, for guidance.

The United States Army is in the process of renaming Army bases that currently honor Confederate generals. Army tradition dictates that the rank of General is the qualification for being considered for a base name. Naming a base after a Colonel would represent a break in that tradition. We submitted Colonel Young’s name anyway on the merits of his history. In February 2020, Governor Andy Beshear granted Young a state promotion of honorary Brigadier General in the Kentucky National Guard. However, this honorary promotion was limited to the State. Governor Beshear joined us in writing to President Joe Biden to federalize the State promotion that would qualify Young to be considered a candidate for a base to bear his name. Now, this recent Federal promotion may have a significant impact on our request. 

The Coalition is optimistic that along with Young, we have sent recommendations for four other Generals to be considered: Brigadier General Benjamin O. Davis, Sr., the first Black General in the Regular Armed Forces; General Roscoe Robinson, Jr., the first Black 4 Star General in American History; Brigadier General Hazel W. Johnson, the first Black Woman General in American History; and Major General Charles C. Rogers, the only Black General recipient of the Medal of Honor. The Commission’s decision will be released in October.

Coalition members are in talks regarding an event to mark Young’s promotion. More than likely, the event will be planned for the Spring or Summer in Kentucky or Washington, D.C. It would be appropriate to host a ceremony in Section C of Arlington National Cemetery. The Arlington visit would allow us to have a site visit of the grounds at the National African American Museum of History and Culture. The public will be welcome to join the “Salute”. I end with a personal “Salute” to all of you who contributed toward the promotion. I “Salute” the late Sergeant Samuel Waller, United States Army for giving purpose to my life. Ready & Forward!

Little Rock High school via National Park Service for use by 360 Magazine

BHM on the Road

For Black History Month, the Holiday Rambler brand has assembled a collection of sites, monuments, and museums throughout the United States that recognize and commemorate significant Black leaders, historical sites, and poignant places.

The roots of Black History Month date back to 1915 when an organization dedicated to promoting achievements by Black Americans declared the second week in February, “Negro History Week”. More than 60 years later, the original week expanded into Black History Month when President Gerald Ford officially recognized it in 1976.

For those planning a Black History Month road trip, traveling in a “home on wheels” makes things easier and more convenient. Holiday Rambler RVs are known for their superior functionality and luxury design amenities that allow travelers to explore far and wide with confidence and in comfort.

One of the brand’s signature motorhomes is the 2022 Vacationer®, a Class A Gas motorhome with three models that range from 34′ to 39′ and are built on a Ford Chassis. While the Vacationer is shorter in length, it’s designed to impress. The 36F model sleeps up to eight with a sleeper sofa, king bed, bunk beds that convert into a seating area, and an optional Hide-A-Loft drop down queen bed. Other sought-after amenities include two full baths, electric fireplace, stainless steel appliances, three-burner cooktop, master bedroom suite, and three LED TVs, including an exterior entertainment center.

Holiday Rambler is a Class A RV brand within REV Recreation Group, Inc., which is a subsidiary of REV Group®, Inc.

The U.S. Civil Rights Trail

For those who can dedicate a week or longer to Black History Month exploration, the U.S. Civil Rights Trail is the place to start.

Established in 2018, the Civil Rights Trail preserves the history of the Civil Rights Movement in the 1950s and 1960s. The trail crosses 14 states and Washington, D.C., and connects more than 100 landmarks and historical sites, including the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum in Jackson; the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama; the locations of sit-ins across the South; and the Supreme Court in Washington D.C. The trail website contains a wealth of information and features an interactive map, along with detailed itineraries by state.

RVers can spend the night at Rivertown Rose Campground near Jackson, Mississippi, Kounty Air RV Park near Selma, Alabama, or Cherry Hill Park near Washington, D.C.

Washington D.C.

The nation’s Capitol is home to several significant sites, including the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial. The centerpiece of the memorial is a commanding 30′ granite statue, known as the Stone of Hope, that pays tribute to the Civil Rights leader. King is the first African American honored with a memorial on or near the National Mall and only the fourth non-President to be memorialized this way. The outdoor site is free and open 24 hours a day. Nearby on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial, find the spot where King gave his iconic “I Have a Dream” speech.

Occupying a prominent location next to the Washington Monument on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., the nearly 400,000-square-foot National Museum of African-American History and Culture is the nation’s largest and most comprehensive cultural destination devoted exclusively to exploring, documenting, and showcasing the African American story and its impact on American and world history. The museum features more than 36,000 artifacts with collections on African American music, literature, photography, and more.

The National Portrait Gallery houses iconic images of Black Americans, from a painting of Lena Horne to an antique photograph of Frederick Douglass. Be sure to check out the official portrait of President Obama in America’s Presidents gallery and the official portrait of former First Lady Michelle Obama in the 20th Century Americans gallery. Both paintings were done by African American contemporary artists.

Arlington National Cemetery is a moving tribute to some of our country’s bravest and brightest men and women, including Medgar Wiley Evers. Evers, an American Civil Rights activist and World War II veteran, was assassinated in 1963 and is buried in Section 36, Grave 1431. The cemetery is home to many other important and prominent Black Americans, including the “Buffalo Soldiers,” U.S. Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall, and Hazel W. Johnson-Brown, the first African American woman to attain a general officer rank in American military history.

RVers can spend the night at Cherry Hill Park.

Atlanta, Georgia

Atlanta was the birthplace of Dr. King and it is also the final resting place of the iconic leader and his wife, Coretta Scott King. Visitors can spend two full days in the city touring King’s birth home, visiting Ebenezer Baptist Church where King was a minister, paying their respects at his tomb, and exploring two significant museums.

The National Center for Civil and Human Rights is a museum and human rights organization that aims to inspire people to tap into their own power to change the world around them. The Center’s exhibitions feature the papers and artifacts of King, the history of the U.S. Civil Rights Movement, and stories from the struggle for human rights around the world.

Each year, nearly a million people make the pilgrimage to The King Center to learn of and be inspired by Dr. King. The King Center is dedicated to educating the world about his life, legacy, and teachings. The center’s archives house the largest collection of primary source materials on King and the American Civil Rights Movement in the world. The archives also include more than 200 oral history interviews with King’s teachers, friends, family, and peers.

RVers can spend the night at Atlanta South RV Resort.

Memphis and Nashville, Tennessee

Sadly, Memphis is infamous as the city where Dr. King was killed. The Lorraine Motel balcony, the place where King was assassinated in 1968, serves as the backdrop for The National Civil Rights Museum. Through interactive exhibits, historic collections, dynamic speakers, and special events, the museum offers visitors a chance to walk through history and learn more about a tumultuous and inspiring period of change. The Mason Temple Church of God in Christ is part of the museum and is the place where King delivered “Mountaintop,” his last speech.

Based in Nashville, the National Museum of African American Music celebrates the role Black Americans played in helping create the American soundtrack. The museum houses a collection of music created and inspired by African American artists. On any given day, guests can join an intimate chat with an artist or industry leader while taking in dozens of interactive exhibits.

RVers can spend the night at Graceland RV Park & Campground near Memphis or Elm Hill RV Resort near Nashville.

Detroit, Michigan

From Motown to the Underground Railroad, Detroit’s Black roots run deep. The city is home to various cultural and historic sites, including the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History. The museum has more than 35,000 artifacts, including permanent collections about Harriet Tubman and the Underground Railroad.

For many, Detroit was the last stop on the Underground Railroad. The Second Baptist Church of Detroit provided a safe place for approximately 5,000 people who were enslaved, offering food and rest before they crossed the Detroit River into Canada and freedom. Tours of the church and its exhibits are provided by members of the Detroit Underground Railroad Historical Society.

The Henry Ford Museum of American Innovation is home to the bus where in Montgomery, Alabama, Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat and changed the course of history. Nearby is Greenfield Village, a living history outdoor museum that includes a recreation of the Missouri slave cabin where famous botanist and inventor George Washington Carver was born as well as the actual dwellings of two slave families from the Hermitage Plantation near Savannah, Georgia.

RVers who visit Detroit after April 15 can spend the night at Hass Lake Park when the resort reopens for the season.For more travel tips and ideas and to see the latest Holiday Rambler models, follow Holiday Rambler on Facebook and Instagram.

BLM illustration for use by 360 MAGAZINE

Black History Month Gift Guide

As Black History Month (BHM) commences, we aim to honor the history and celebrate the successes of Black/African American people. This February, 360 has assembled a list of impeccable products that strive to honor the rich past, present and future of BHM.

Fabletics t-shirt collection

In partnership with Melissa Koby and Rob Lewis, Fabletics announced the launch of their limited edition ‘BHM Tees’ series. Both artists, Koby and Lewis, are devoted to cultivating discussion surrounding Black representation, which is the exact goal for the BHM collaboration.

Including a series of four tees, Fabletics releases the ‘Kindred,’ ‘Harmony,’ ‘Africobra’ and ‘Festac 77,’ that have individual, unique artworks that continue conversation of harmony amongst insufficiently represented groups. Fabletics has promised to donate $50k in support of Community Spring and Imagine Black Futures, organizations that are committed to uplifting and providing power to the Black community.

This unrepeated ‘BHM’ tee collection showcases the timeless Fabletics ‘Go-To’ design showcasing a comfortable, gender-neutral fit available in sizing XS-XXL. The tees can be purchased for $39.95 (VIP price) on fabletics.com and in retail stores, beginning February 1.

BHM Fabletics tees via Carli Bendetti for use by 360 MAGAZINE

Lids historically Black institution partnership collection

In collaboration with The Negro Leagues Museum, Black Fives and Harlem Globetrotters, Lids has produced a new apparel and accessories series that will pay tribute to the three historic Black sports establishments, They Gave Us Game.

The compilation will be sold year-round, showcasing goods that reference vintage pieces worn by iconic African American players throughout the years. Constructed with an innovative, modern touch, the collection still has reminiscent underlines from each property. A piece of all earnings from the collection will be donated to Lids Foundation. The foundation is dedicated to giving back to these groups to further influence youth sports. Pricing ranges from $80 – $100, with headwear varying between $31.99 – $39.99, and They Gave Us Game will be available on Monday February 28

Lids globetrotters collection piece via Lids for use by 360 MAGAZINE

The Crunch

The Crunch allows for the convenience of 7 kitchen electrics in one unit. It replaces a traditional air fryer, grill, rotisserie, dehydrator, toaster oven, roaster, and convection oven to bring you one multifunctional powerhouse. It’s 12.7 Qt. capacity provides more room for more food and better results. It has eight main cooking functions, including fries, meat, seafood, pizza, chicken, vegetables, bake, and dehydrate. You can use it to make both French fries and beef jerky! There’s also a rotisserie function and an e-recipe book with over 20 recipes. 

TIDAL

This Black History Month, TIDAL will be releasing content weekly to celebrate the history and contributions of the Black community across key themes. Week one focused on Health and Wellness (the official theme of Black History Month 2022), and for this second week TIDAL has unveiled 11 playlists honoring the legacy and campus life of HBCUs. Subscribers can enjoy a variety of playlists such as: 

The remainder of February will see Social Justice and Behind The Mic content (spotlighting Black writers, engineers and producers behind the music we love) as well as the popular What’s Going On: Artists Speak Their Truth playlist, where artists discuss the message behind their songs that have become social justice anthems. 

As an added bonus, activist and renowned jazz trumpeter, Keyon Harrold, will be tapping into TIDAL to create an exclusive playlist that will feature a brand-new track. All playlists and exclusive content can be found on TIDAL’s Black History Month hub HERE.

Women is Losers x Latino International Film Festival for use by 360 Magazine
Gabrielle Archuleta illustrates Black History Month for 360 MAGAZINE

Black History Month

By Hannah DiPilato

February is Black History Month and 360 Magazine would like to recognize some historic people of color who have become a positive influence on society. In 2020, the Black Lives Matter movement skyrocketed and brought attention to the diversity that still exists within our community. Although society has come a long way from the early 1900s when segregation ran rampant, the movement for equality has a long way to go. From inventors to musicians, there are a number of successful people we would like to acknowledge in honor of Black History Month.

Martin Luther King Jr.
Arguably one of the most important leaders in the Civil Rights Movement, Dr. King spent his time preaching for equality in a peaceful way. He will always be remembered for his famous “I Have a Dream” speech and his ability to lead others in this historical movement. Dr. King is one of the most influential

Joseph E. Lowery
Joseph E. Lowery is the grandfather of 360 Magazine’s President Vaughn Lowery and founded the Southern Christian Leadership Conference alongside Dr. King. Throughout his life, Lowery served as vice president, chairman of the board and president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference as well as a leader in the Civil Rights Movement.

George Washington Carver
Many people are familiar with George Washington Carver for his inventive skills. He made over 300 products from peanuts and as an agricultural scientist promoted methods to prevent soil depletion.

Garrett Morgan
Garrett Augustus Morgan, Sr. is to thank for the invention of traffic lights as well as gas masks. Every time you stop at a red light, take a moment to think of Morgan for this essential technology.

Barack Obama
As the first black president of the United States, Barack Obama made an impact as the 44th president and showed young people of color they have representation in politics. He continues to use his voice to connect with the American people.

Kamala Harris
Keeping in the theme of politics, Vice President Kamala Harris is the first woman vice president, the first African American vice president and the first Asian American vice president. She’s giving young women of color everywhere a sense of representation.

Madam C.J. Walker
As the first recorded female self-made millionaire in America, Madam C.J. Walker was an influential entrepreneur, philanthropist and activist of her time.

Frederick McKinley Jones
Frederick McKinley Jones was the co-founder of Thermo King and he brought incredible improvement to long-haul transportation of perishable goods. Jones also won the National Medal of Technology.

Stevie Wonder
Stevland Hardaway Morris, better known as Stevie Wonder, is a musical prodigy that became blind after birth and learned to play the harmonica, piano and drums by age nine. He is now a notable singer, songwriter, musician and record producer.

Lonnie Johnson
Lonnie Johnson is known for his success as an aerospace engineer. He has worked on the U.S. Air Force term of service and has also worked at NASA for twelve years including in the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

Patricia Bath
As an ophthalmologist, Patricia Bath was an early innovator of laser cataract surgery. She was also the first woman, African American physician to receive a patent for a medical invention.

Oprah Winfrey
One TV personality almost everyone is familiar with is Oprah. Known for her television show The Oprah Winfrey Show, she has made waves in the world of entertainment. She is also known for co-producing a Broadway musical version of The Color Purple, establishing O, The Oprah Magazine, the Oprah Winfrey Network (OWN) as well as creating Oprah.com.

Harriet Tubman
After being born into slavery, Harriet Tubman was a conductor of the Underground Railroad and helped many enslaved men and women escape. She led many people to freedom with her bravery and connection with antislavery activists.

Rosa Parks
Rosa Parks gained her notoriety as an activist in the Civil Rights Movement and is known for starting the Montgomery bus boycott after refusing to give up her seat to a white passenger. She has been called “the first lady of civil rights” and “the mother of the freedom movement” by the United States Congress.

John Lewis
John Lewis was chairman Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) as well as one of the “Big Six” leaders who organized the 1963 March on Washington. He was an essential part of the Civil Rights Movement and ending legalized racial segregation.

Alexander Miles
If you’ve ever ridden in an elevator, you can thank Alexander Miles for the automatic opening doors; he was awarded the patent for this invention in 1887. Mills was riding in an elevator with his daughter and he deemed an elevator shaft door left open could be dangerous.

Mary Kenner
Mary Kenner was an inventor famous for her development of the sanitary belt, the precursor to the self-adhesive maxi pad. However, due to racial discrimination, the idea wasn’t adopted for thirty years. She has five patents for various household items.

Maya Angelou
Known for her many famous pieces of writing, Maya Angelou was a poet, memoirist and civil rights activist. Over fifty years, she wrote a number of autobiographies, essays, poems, plays, movies and television shows. She also received over 50 honorary degrees as well as awards for her writing.

LeBron James
Along with being considered one of the greatest NBA players of all time, LeBron James also started the LeBron James Family Foundation to help create generational change for the children and families of LeBron’s hometown in Akron, Ohio.

Malcolm X
As a popular spokesperson at the time of the Civil Rights Movement, Malcolm X encouraged Black Americans to protect themselves against racism. He preached a much different lesson than Martin Luther King Jr. who preached nonviolence.

Thurgood Marshall
Thurgood Marshall was the Supreme Court’s first African American justice as well as a prominent civil rights activist. He served on the court for 24 years and helped with influential rulings at the time of the Civil Rights Movement such as the case of Brown v. Board of Education.

Jackie Robinson
Jackie Robinson was the first African American to play in Major League Baseball in the United States during the 20th century. He broke the color barrier of the MLB when he played for the National League Brooklyn Dodgers as second baseman with the jersey number 42.

HOMCPB via Marvel Comics for use by 360 Magazine

History of Black Panther

As Black History Month approaches, Marvel is taking fans on the ultimate historical journey, uncovering the evolution of Marvel’s first Black superhero: T’Challa, the Black Panther.  Marvel Entertainment and SiriusXM announced that their latest original unscripted podcast series, The History of Marvel Comics: Black Panther, premieres Monday, February 14.

The six-episode documentary podcast, hosted by New York Times best-selling author Nic Stone (Shuri, Dear Martin), explores the comic book origins of the Black Panther through conversations with the creators who shaped T’Challa’s journey, celebrates the innately Afro-Futuristic world of Wakanda, and analyzes the larger social impact of the character.

The History of Marvel Comics: Black Panther brings writers, artists, and historians together to share a story that only Marvel can tell. The show features exclusive interviews with notable talent including Brian Stelfreeze, Christopher Priest, Don McGregor, Joe Quesada, John Ridley, John Romita Jr., Reginald Hudlin, Ta-Nehisi Coates, and more.

Throughout The History of Marvel Comics: Black Panther, Stone will take both new and lifelong fans behind-the-scenes in a definitive tell-all of the incredible journey of T’Challa, how he came to be Black Panther, and how he and the world of Wakanda have evolved since. The show explores some of Black Panther’s most pivotal moments including Stan Lee and Jack Kirby’s 1966 debut of the character at the height of the Civil Rights Movement, his continued evolution through the birth of the Black Power Movement, his time with the Avengers, and of course, the launching of Black Panther’s adventures.

“As thrilling as it’s been to watch Marvel’s First Black superhero leap his way to the top of fan-favorite lists over the past few years, getting to dig into his origin story with the people who made him (and the characters around him) is truly the coolest thing I’ve ever gotten to do,” said host Nic Stone. “I can’t wait for fans to hear from the individuals who have spent almost 60 years shaping, expanding, and humanizing our beloved King of Wakanda and Black Panther, especially as his world continues to grow.”

The series will initially be available exclusively on the SXM App and Marvel Podcasts Unlimited on Apple Podcasts. Episodes will be widely available one week later on Pandora, Stitcher, and all major podcast platforms in the U.S. Learn more HERE.

About Marvel Entertainment

Marvel Entertainment, LLC, a wholly-owned subsidiary of The Walt Disney Company, is one of the world’s most prominent character-based entertainment companies, built on a proven library of more than 8,000 characters featured in a variety of media for over eighty years. Marvel utilizes its character franchises in entertainment, licensing, publishing, games, and digital media.

Reb Czukoski for use by 360 Magazine

Go “BTS” w/ Dallas Black Dance Theatre

Dallas Black Dance Theatre welcomes the public to enjoy a free Behind the Scenes viewing of its two professional companies, as well as three performing academy ensembles through the Thanksgiving holiday. The performance allows viewers to get insight on the rehearsal process, get a first look at more upcoming works and a chance to meet the dancers. MUFG Union Bank is the presenting sponsor for the Behind the Scenes performances. Live performances begin on Monday and Tuesday, November 22-23, 2021 at Noon CST in the Dallas Black Dance Theatre at 2700 Ann Williams Way, Dallas, TX. 75201.

The experience has quickly become a holiday tradition for families during Thanksgiving break, and seating has swiftly reached volume. The Monday performance can still be viewed on-demand for free from Monday, November 22, 2021 at 3:00 pm until Sunday, November 28, 2021, at 11:59 CST.

DBDT and DBDT: Encore!
Monday, November 22, 2021

Dallas Black Dance Theatre and DBDT: Encore! will be presented in this free program. DBDT will showcase excerpts from its 45th season, along with rehearsal run-throughs and previews for what is in store for Cultural Awareness February 18-19, 2022. DBDT: Encore! will share a piece of works prepared for Black History Month and Rising Excellence April 22-23, 2022.

Dallas Black Dance Academy
Tuesday, November 23, 2021

Dallas Black Dance Academy will showcase the talents of students in three performing ensembles. The Allegro Performing Ensemble, DBDT’s premier academy ensemble, will provide a class demonstration. The Senior Performing Ensemble displays the choreographic process, and the Junior Performing Ensemble will perform an excerpt from one of their works.

If you would like to get on the waitlist for the free in-person performances, RSVP to ticketsales@dbdt.com with your name, the date you would like to attend, the number of tickets needed, and your cell phone number.

For more performance details visit www.DBDT.com.

Beyond 28 Podcast via 42West for use by 360 Magazine

Audio Chateau × 24kGoldn – Warriors Freestyle

Bay Area native 24kGoldn is having a breakout year with his smash hit “Mood,” which spent eight weeks atop the Billboard 100. After releasing his debut album El Dorado, 24kGoldn is putting his voice and talent to a new theme song created for his beloved six-time NBA Champion Golden State Warriors to anchor their new Beyond28 podcast.  The track, titled “Warriors’ Freestyle,” will open the new, monthly podcast, which extends the conversation around Black History Month outside the confines of February to celebrate Black History year-round. “Warriors’ Freestyle” was written by 24kGoldn and production collective Audio Chateau, and was produced by Audio Chateau (Jared Gutstadt x Kinder). Listen to the track HERE. 

Created by the Golden State Warriors and Goodby Silverstein & Partners (GS&P), in partnership with Chase and podcast studio and audio entertainment producers, Audio Up, the Beyond28 podcast made its official debut on April 21 with series host and narrator, ESPN’s Marc J. Spears.  Featuring an array of notable figures, artists, activists and community members, new episodes will premiere once a month over the course of the next year, with each episode taking on a new theme. In the latest May episode, the show discusses topics surrounding mental health for Mental Health Awareness Month.  

The podcast is a continuation of the Beyond28 platform, which was established by the Golden State Warriors and GS&P in February of 2020. The initial launch included a short film featuring Stephen Curry flipping through a calendar and exclaiming with each turn of the page, stating: “This is Black History Month. And so is this.” Since then, Beyond28’s goal has been to extend Black History Month into a yearlong celebration beyond the 28 days of February. While continuing to honor trailblazers who have helped shape Black history, Beyond28 also strives to acknowledge today’s important Black History makers as well as those who have made a significant impact within their community. The Beyond28 podcast will continue all year long, providing a thoughtful conversation and embodying the Warriors’ desire to celebrate the contributions of the Black community every day.

The Beyond28 podcast is available now wherever podcasts are available. “Warriors’ Freestyle” from 24kGoldn and Audio Chateau is available on all streaming platforms now.