Posts tagged with "Black History Month"

Beyond 28 Podcast via 42West for use by 360 Magazine

Audio Chateau × 24kGoldn – Warriors Freestyle

Bay Area native 24kGoldn is having a breakout year with his smash hit “Mood,” which spent eight weeks atop the Billboard 100. After releasing his debut album El Dorado, 24kGoldn is putting his voice and talent to a new theme song created for his beloved six-time NBA Champion Golden State Warriors to anchor their new Beyond28 podcast.  The track, titled “Warriors’ Freestyle,” will open the new, monthly podcast, which extends the conversation around Black History Month outside the confines of February to celebrate Black History year-round. “Warriors’ Freestyle” was written by 24kGoldn and production collective Audio Chateau, and was produced by Audio Chateau (Jared Gutstadt x Kinder). Listen to the track HERE. 

Created by the Golden State Warriors and Goodby Silverstein & Partners (GS&P), in partnership with Chase and podcast studio and audio entertainment producers, Audio Up, the Beyond28 podcast made its official debut on April 21 with series host and narrator, ESPN’s Marc J. Spears.  Featuring an array of notable figures, artists, activists and community members, new episodes will premiere once a month over the course of the next year, with each episode taking on a new theme. In the latest May episode, the show discusses topics surrounding mental health for Mental Health Awareness Month.  

The podcast is a continuation of the Beyond28 platform, which was established by the Golden State Warriors and GS&P in February of 2020. The initial launch included a short film featuring Stephen Curry flipping through a calendar and exclaiming with each turn of the page, stating: “This is Black History Month. And so is this.” Since then, Beyond28’s goal has been to extend Black History Month into a yearlong celebration beyond the 28 days of February. While continuing to honor trailblazers who have helped shape Black history, Beyond28 also strives to acknowledge today’s important Black History makers as well as those who have made a significant impact within their community. The Beyond28 podcast will continue all year long, providing a thoughtful conversation and embodying the Warriors’ desire to celebrate the contributions of the Black community every day.

The Beyond28 podcast is available now wherever podcasts are available. “Warriors’ Freestyle” from 24kGoldn and Audio Chateau is available on all streaming platforms now.

Cardi B Illustration for 360 Mag

21 in 21

21 Afro-Latinxs to celebrate in 2021 and beyond! 

By: Javier Pedroza

It’s Black History Month, which gives the planet time to reflect on how African American achievements have contributed to US history and how African achievements have contributed to the world. Although, don’t forget it is important to highlight and celebrate Black accomplishments year around. Due to the current global climate, it’s important to become more knowledgeable and celebrate the Afro-Latinx population for its contributions to US history and the world.

After 2020, it is an especially important time to embolden the community to take part in the celebration of Black culture. This year, the Black History Month theme is “Black Family: Representation, Identity and Diversity” which explores the African diaspora and their contributions.

To really understand the African diaspora it is essential to acknowledge that there were more African slaves to Latin America than to the United States. “There were 11.2 million Africans who came to the New World in the slave trade and of that 11.2 million, only 450,000 came to the United States,” Harvard professor Henry Louis Gates Jr. said in a discussion about his PBS documentary series Black In Latin America. He added, “The real black experience, in terms of numbers, is all throughout the Caribbean and Latin America.”

Today, Latinx should understand their roots, which have an undoubtedly long history of African heritage. Hispanics & Latinx identities are beautifully complex, multifaceted and multidimensional. A Pew Research Center survey of Latinx, adults shows that one-quarter of all U.S. Latinx self-identify as Afro-Latinx, Afro-Caribbean, or of African descent with roots in Latin America. This is the first time a nationally representative survey in the U.S. has asked the Latinx population directly whether they considered themselves Afro-Latinx.

Many Latinos identify with their ancestral countries of origin – Puerto Rico, Colombia, Mexico, Nicaragua, Cuba, Peru, the Dominican Republic, etc. Others may also identify with their Indigenous roots and all of these experiences made contributions to Black History. A goal to have moving forward is to celebrate global Black History and continue to recognize the contributions African-Americans have made to the world, including achievements made by Afro-Latinxs & Afro-Indigenous people. It’s imperative for Latinxs to acknowledge their African & Indigenous heritage given that history and cultures are inextricably linked to slave trade in the Americas, genocide and the African Diaspora. 

Here’s a growing list of amazing Afro-Latino (a,x) heroes and their contributions. 

1. Arturo Alfonso Schomburg

(January 24, 1874 – June 10, 1938)

Place of birth: Santurce, Puerto Rico 

Contributions: Arturo Alfonso Schomburg, born to a Black mother and father of German descent, was a historian. Mr. Schomburg is considered to be one of the Fathers of Black History & a key figure in the Harlem Renaissance. Schomburg’s lifework consisted of research and preservation—work that would lead him to become one of the world’s premier collectors of Black literature, slave narratives, artwork, and diasporic materials. 

2. Dr. Marta Moreno-Vega 

(January 3, 1942)

Place of birth: East Harlem, New York

Contributions: Dr. Marta Moreno-Vega is an Afro-Boricua who established the Caribbean Cultural Center African Diaspora Institute (CCCADI). Dr. Moreno Vega has been an advocate for cultural equity, cultural studies and education. As the second director of El Museo del Barrio, one of the founders of the Association of Hispanic Arts, Network of Centers of Color and the Roundtable of Institutions of Color, Dr. Moreno Vega has contributed to assuring that the contributions of African and African descendants are integral to the lives of civil society in the Americas. 

3. Celia Cruz 

(October 21, 1925 – July 16, 2003)

Place of birth: Havana, Cuba

Contributions: Celia Cruz was a singer & recording artist born and raised in Havana, Cuba. She was one of the most iconic artists of the 20th century. Her many honors included three Grammy Awards and four Latin Grammys for recordings such as Ritmo en el corazón (1988; with Ray Barretto) and Siempre viviré (2000).

4. Dr. José Celso Barbosa 

(July 27, 1857 – September 21, 1921)

Place of birth: Bayamón, Puerto Rico 

Contributions: Dr. José Celso Barbosa was a Physician, Sociologist and Politician.  Known as the father of the Statehood for Puerto Rico movement, Barbosa was the first Puerto Rican, and one of the first persons of African descent to earn a medical degree in the United States.

5. Ruth Fernández (Ruth Noemi Fernández Cortada) 

(May 23, 1919 – January 9, 2012)

Place of birth: Ponce, Puerto Rico

Contributions: Ruth Fernández, “El Alma de Puerto Rico Hecha Canción” (“The Soul of Puerto Rico Turned Song”) was a Puerto Rican contralto, actress, and a member of the Puerto Rican Senate. She was the first and only singer ever elected to the Senate of Puerto Rico. She was considered by many to be the Rosa Parks of Puerto Rico when she refused to enter the Vanderbilt Hotel in San Juan through its back entrance because she was a woman of color. The owners of the hotel stated that blacks had to enter through the rear of the building, but during one evening where she was set to perform at the hotel’s ballroom, she marched into the hotel via its front entrance. After this event, the hotel changed its policy.

6. Cardi B (Belcalis Marlenis Almánzar)

(October 11, 1992)

Place of birth: Manhattan, New York

Contributions: Afro-Latina Cardi B is a Dominican & Trinidadian rapper, songwriter, and actress raised in the Bronx, New York. Recognized by Forbes as one of the most influential female rappers of all time, Cardi B is known for her aggressive flow and candid lyrics, which have received widespread media coverage. She is the highest certified female rapper of all time on the RIAA’s Top Artists (Digital Singles) ranking, also appearing among the ten highest-certified female artists and having the two top-certified songs by a female rap artist.

She is the only female rapper with multiple billion-streams on Spotify and became the first artist to top the inaugural Billboard Global 200. Her accolades include a Grammy Award, eight Billboard Music Awards, five Guinness World Records, five American Music Awards, eleven BET Hip Hop Awards and two ASCAP Songwriter of the Year awards. In 2018 Time magazine included her on their annual list of the 100 most influential people in the world, and in 2020, Billboard honored her as Woman of the Year. 

7. Rosa Alicia Clemente 

(April 18, 1972)

Place of birth: Bronx, New York

Contributions: Afro-Boricua Rosa Alicia Clemente is the 2008 United States Vice-Presidential Candidate, Producer, Journalist, Political Commentator & Scholar-Activist. Rosa is a graduate of the University of Albany and Cornell University. She is currently a doctoral student in the W.E.B. Du Bois Department of Afro-American Studies of University of Massachusetts Amherst. 

8. Congressman Ritchie John Torres 

(March 12, 1988)

Place of birth: Bronx, New York

Contributions: Ritchie Torres is an Afro-Boricua politician who is a member of the Democratic party. He is the US representative for New York’s 15th congressional district. Torres was the first openly gay candidate to be elected to legislative office in the Bronx, and the youngest member of the city council. Torres won the November 2020 general election and assumed office on January 3, 2021. This makes him one of the first openly gay Black men elected to Congress (along with Mondaire Jones). This also made Torres the first openly gay Afro Latino elected to Congress. As such, he is one of the nine co-chairs of the Congressional LGBTQ+ Equality Caucus in the 117th United States Congress. 

9. Zoe Saldana (Zoë Yadira Saldaña Nazario) *Trending Now

(June 19, 1978)

Place of birth: Passaic, New Jersey

Contributions: Zoe Saldaña is of mixed ethnic heritage, with her mother being of Puerto Rican descent and her father hailing from the Dominican Republic. Zoe is the only performer to get star billing in more than one movie that grossed over $2 billion worldwide with Avatar and Avengers: Infinity War. 

10. Dr. Pedro Albizu Campos 

(September 12, 1891 – April 21, 1965)

Place of birth: Ponce, Puerto Rico 

Contributions: Dr. Pedro Albizu Campos was a Puerto Rican attorney, social activist, nationalist and the son of a mixed-race mother who was the daughter of slaves and a Basque father from a farming and landowning family. The latter not only provided no financial support but also did not legally recognize his son until he was 19, and Albizu Campos grew up in poverty. In 1912 he was awarded a scholarship to study chemistry and engineering at the University of Vermont. He transferred a year later to Harvard University, majoring in chemistry and literature and becoming the first Puerto Rican Harvard graduate. Many people in Puerto Rico consider Dr. Pedro Albizu Campos the father of the Puerto Rican Independence Movement. 

11. Carmelo Kyam Anthony

(May 29, 1984)

Place of birth: Brooklyn, New York

Contributions: Carmelo Anthony is an Afro-Latino professional basketball player. He has been named an NBA All-Star ten times and an All-NBA Team member six-time Anthony also played in the 2016 Olympic Games, his fourth straight stint in the Olympics, which was a record for a US male basketball player, breaking the old record of having played in three Olympiads he shared with James and Robinson. He has celebrated his roots by giving back to Puerto Rico, remodeling basketball courts in a poor neighborhood 3 years in a row now. 

12. La La Anthony (Alani Nicole Vázquez) 

(June 25, 1981)

Place of birth: Brooklyn, New York

Contributions: La La Anthony is an Afro-Puerto Rican actress, host, producer and New York Times best-selling author. La La Anthony has supported charities such as the Elton John AIDS Foundation, Gabrielle’s, Angel Foundation, GLAAD and Voto Latino. 

13. Rosie Perez (Rosa María Perez) 

(September 6, 1964)

Place of birth: Brooklyn, New York

Contributions: Rosie Perez is an Afro-Latina actress, choreographer and community activist. Rosie was appointed to the Presidential Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS by President Barack Obama in 2010. Among many honors, Rosie was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for her performance in Fearless as well as three Emmy Awards for her work as a choreographer on In Living Color (1990–1994).

Perez has also performed in stage plays on Broadway, such as The Ritz, Frankie and Johnny in the Clair de Lune, and Fish in the Dark. In addition, she was a co-host on the ABC talk show The View during the series’ 18th season. 

14. MJ Rodriguez (Michaela Antonia Jaé Rodriguez) 

(January 7, 1991)

Place of birth: Newark, New Jersey

Contributions: MJ Rodriguez is an African American and Puerto Rican actress who is among the largest cast of transgender actresses on the show Pose. MJ made history by becoming the first Trans woman to ever sign a beauty deal with Olay Body. MJ was awarded the Hispanic Heritage Special Trailblazer Award at the 31st Hispanic Heritage Awards in Washington D.C. 

15. Ramon E. Contreras 

(22-years-old)

Place of birth: Brooklyn, New York

Contributions: Ramon Contreras is a young political activist, advisor and filmmaker who is changing the nature of civic engagement by championing and encouraging minorities to participate in politics. Ramon is a fierce gun control enthusiast and founded YouthOverGuns, a platform advocating for change in underserved communities of color. He led a protest of thousands across the Brooklyn Bridge and is the National Strategist for the nation-wide organization, March for Our Lives. 

16. Laith Ashley De La Cruz 

(July 6, 1989)

Place of birth: Harlem, New York

Contributions:  Laith Ashley is a model, actor, singer-songwriter and entertainer of Dominican descent. He was the first transgender man to be featured in a Diesel campaign. Laith has been on the cover of countless magazines and has had featured stories published on countless others all around the world; ie, British GQ.

Laith was on the cast of the reality TV series, “Strut,” executive produced by Whoopi Goldberg, and raised the heart rates of viewers in his appearance on hit series, “Pose,” on FX. Ashley is also an activist, particularly in transgender issues. He worked with FLUX, a division of the AIDS Healthcare Foundation, which is dedicated to raising awareness and providing support to trans and gender-nonconforming people. 

17. Dianne Morales 

(June 21, 1967)

Place of birth: Brooklyn, New York 

Contributions: Double Ivy League graduate Dianne Morales is an Afro-Boricua with degrees from Harvard University and Columbia University. Dianne is the former CEO of several multi-million dollar social service nonprofits and is also the first Latina / Afro-Latina candidate for New York City Mayor. 

18. Johnny Pacheco 

(March 25, 1935 – February 15, 2021)

Place of birth: Santiago De Los Caballeros, Dominican Republic

Contributions: Johnny Pacheco was one of the most influential artists of Latin music. He was one of the creators of The Fania All-Stars and Fania Record (#latinmotown), the most successful record label in the history of Latin music. 

19. Aida Rodriguez (Aida Margarita Parada Rodriguez) 

(August 29, 1977)

Place of birth: Boston, Massachusetts

Contributions: Aida Rodriguez is a comedian, host, producer, actress and the first Latina / Afro-Latina (Puerto Rican & Dominican) to appear in two comedy specials airing in one month on both HBO and Showtime. Aida’s latest comedy special premiered on Netflix as part of the “They Ready” series hosted by Tiffany Haddish. Rodriguez has also appeared on Comedy Central’s This Week at the Comedy Cellar, The Nightly Show, five-time host of the PBS Imagen Awards, NBC Last Comic Standing’s finals, TRUtv’s Laff Tracks and is also a regular contributor for The Young Turks. 

20. Indya Moore 

(January 17, 1995)

Place of birth: Bronx, New York

Contributions: Indya Moore is of Haitian, Puerto Rican, and Dominican ancestry. They are an actor among the largest cast of transgender on the show Pose. Moore does not identify as a Latinx, and instead identifies as Afro-Taíno. In June 2020, in honor of the 50th anniversary of the first LGBTQ Pride parade, Queerty named them among the fifty heroes “leading the nation toward equality, acceptance, and dignity for all people.” 

21. Gina Torres 

(April 25th, 1969)

Place of birth: Manhattan, New York 

Contributions: Gina Torres is an actress and the first Afro-Latina to create, produce and star in her own show, ‘Pearson’. Torres won the ALMA Award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Syndicated Drama Series for her role in Cleopatra 2525. Gina also received the Best Supporting Actress award by The Imagen Foundation (Spanish for “image”) Awards, the only premier Latino entertainment awards program dedicated to honoring the positive portrayal and creative excellence of Latinos and Latino cultures on screen. 

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Gabrielle Archuleta illustrates Black History Month for 360 MAGAZINE

Black Content Creators To Follow

By: Emily Bunn

Here at 360 Magazine, we are always looking to shine a spotlight on the voices of up and coming change makers, movers, and shakers. We are shining a light on Black content creators who are standing up and making a change in the communities and world around them. Though many of these discussions are taking place in the virtual sphere currently, these conversations have the power to translate into change via education met with action. While this list is far from complete, here are some talented, ambitious Black content creators, authors, educators and activists on Instagram that deserve more recognition:

Jerris Madison

Self-described as a “digital nomad”, best dressed amputee, social media strategist and photographer, followers are sure to be asking themselves: “What can’t Jerris do?” To further his life of accomplishments, Jerris is also the Editor-In-Chief and Founder of OBVIOUS Magazine. OBVIOUS describes their magazine as “visionaries dedicated to bringing a different philosophy to Fashion, Beauty, Culture, Activism, Travel, Global Politics, and Design”, “We are the voice for those that do not yet realize they have a voice.” OBVIOUS looks to recognize talent and allow them the space to grow, consistently bringing light to queer and BIPOC models and public figures. Jerris’ Instagram displays his recent endeavors with OBVIOUS, travel adventures, outfit pics, and other uplifting lifestyle content.

Aja Barber

Aja is a content creator who discusses fast fashion, sustainability, and environmentalism topics in conjunction with racial capitalism. She highlights the importance of accountability in social justice, emphasizing the importance of taking these online discussions into the social spaces around you, both on and off-screen. She encourages her followers to normalize the discomfort these conversations may ensure, and ways to dismantle the prioritization of white comfort that often dominates these discourses. Her infographics on sustainability and fast fashion are educational while maintaining a conversational tone.

Michael Letterlough, Jr.

Instagrammers are sure to be awed by Michael’s stunning, surreal, immersive photography feed. While many online users venture to Instagram to post selfies, Michael uses his platform as a creative, photographer, and director to share the stories of others. His recent photo exhibition project, “Legacy: Through the Eyes of a Child”, looks to pay tribute to African American icons throughout history.

Additionally, Michael is the CEO of Suavv Magazine– a Black Men’s lifestyle publication. The magazine focuses on creating lifestyle content geared towards the active, urban, sophisticated young male, and creates an open space for discussions among Black men to open up about topics that aren’t often discussed otherwise. By prodding these conversations thorough thoughtful articles surrounding relationships, politics, sex, sports, and religion in the magazine’s “The Barbershop” category, Letterlough creates the potential for real social change. These topics are furthered in the Suavv TV video discussions, each of which features a visionary who aids in humanizing and deepening these conversations.

Ibram X. Kendi 

Dr. Kendi is National Book Award winning author, NYT Bestselling author, and Boston University Professor and Director of the Center for Antiracist Research. Luckily, you don’t have to be a student of Dr. Kendi to learn from him– his Instagram page is full of insight. He frequently shares his opinions on U.S. politics and Black American history, and his involvement with literary projects. Recently, Dr. Kendi has been promoting his newest book, “Four Hundred Souls,” and his work with BU.

Dominique Drakeford 

Dominique is self-described as “A Black Indigenous Vanguard of Sustainability.” She is also an environmental educator, community advocate, writer, creative director, and the founder of the magazine MelaninASS, which covers topics such as sustainable and decolonized fashion, wellness, and the environment. Her discussion of these topics is furthered in her involvement with Sustainable Brooklyn, of which she is a co-creator. Heralding holistic wellness and health, Domonique inspired her followers to live more natural, intentional, liberated lives. Dominique describes her mission on her website: “As a pillar of visibility – I help create an accessible framework for how Black & Brown Indigenous communities absorb information, gain clarity & become more sustainably liberated while simultaneously working to dismantle toxic systems of white “supremacy” across environmentalism, climate change, eco fashion and zero waste movements.”

Munroe Bergdorf 

Munroe Bergdorf is an English activist and model who has amassed an impressive 551k on Instagram. She had been Loreal’s first transgender model, until a racial row ensued, but continued to pioneer LGBT+ representation and rights when she was appointed as an LGBT advisor to the UK’s labour party. While her involvement wasn’t long-lasting, her continued efforts have been, as she continues to fight for systemic change. In 2018, Munroe won the award for “Changemaker of the Year” at the Cosmopolitan Awards. More recently, Munroe has been supporting the #DrawALine campaign in the fight against female genital mutilation, transgender rights, and other social justice causes.

Vaughn Lowery

Vaughn Lowery is the President of 360 Magazine. Lowery constantly looks to uplift the voices racially and sexually diverse public figures in his magazine–recently featuring LaJune, Jonte’ Moaning and Don Benjamin, to name only a few. Some of the most notable stars to grace the cover of the magazine include Demi Lovato, Bella Thorne, David Guetta, Steve Aoki, and Sabrina Carpenter, among many others. While he has previous experience in modeling, acting, and producing screenplays, Lowery is finally telling his own story in his upcoming, debut  memoir: “Move like Water × Be Fluid.” This novel will be released as an exclusive multi-volume installation within 360 MAGAZINE, and stands as the inception of the brand’s foray into publishing. Lowery is also is in the process of establishing 360 Fest–a film festival created to showcase the most provocative, enthralling new films from across the globe. Lowery continues to give back to others, not only by uplifting their voices, but also through giving back to charities and foundations to support marginalized, underserved communities.

On his Instagram, Lowery is often seen fashionably sporting and utilizing products from the brands 360 Magazine provides innovative coverage of. His page feels personal and intimate, often sharing videos of himself with his son, which lends a personal lens into Lowery’s life and proves his authentic passion for the companies with which he chooses to collaborate. His Instagram boasts the glitz and glam of his endeavors and stylish wardrobe in an authentic, inviting way that inspires followers to want to get to know Vaughn on a deeper level.

Ts Madison

Ts Madison is an author, television host, producer, artist, motivational speaker, and media personality. Madison is a transwoman, and uses her online platform to bring advocacy and awareness to the LGBTQIA+ community. In 2016, Madison won the Lifetime Achievement Award at the 2016 Transgender Erotica Awards. In 2019, Madison was honored as one of the top 100 LGBT people in Out Magazine. She continues to champion LGBT rights as she is the first Black trans woman to star in and exclusively produce her own reality series, The TS Madison Experience, premiering March 4 on WeTV. For more of Madison, fans can also check out her weekly gossip show, “The Queens Supreme Court.”

Wendy Williams

Wendy Williams, most notably known as the host of The Wendy Williams Show, is an American broadcaster, businesswoman, author, and media personality. Wendy’s talk show has been on air for over a decade, since 2008, and her fanbase remains dedicated to hearing her opinionated views, entertainment coverage, and the personal advice she gives to audience members. Wendy looks to help those in need further through her involvement with the Lymphatic Education & Research Network, of which she is a celebrity ambassador. On her Instagram, Wendy often posts “Hot Questions” to have her audience weigh-in on hot button issues, as well as sharing personal snapshots of her life, clips of The Wendy Williams Show, and short form celebrity interviews.

Brittany Packnett Cunningham

Brittany is an activist, educator, writer, and contributor to MSNBC, among other titles. Her content highlights issues such BIPOC hate crimes and violence, prison reform, systemic racism and white supremacy in America, and the death penalty, among other political topics. She also has a podcast called UNDISTRACTED, which discussions surrounding intersectional feminism, black and trans power, and timely conversations on the current U.S. political climate. Her page is highly opinionated in the best way, Brittany’s content is sure to make viewers reflect on their operations within the systems that govern the societies around themselves.

Ayana Gabrielle Lage 

Ayana is a blogger from Tampa, Florida who posts about U.S. politics, Black grief, interracial relationships and raising biracial children, online virtue signaling via social media, facing micro-aggressions, and other lifestyle, motherhood and self-care topics. While Ayana recognizes that it is not her job to educate her audience on these topics, her page is very informative, and not to mention, aesthetically pleasing.

Rachel Elizabeth Cargle

Rachel is a self-described public academic, philanthropic innovator, and social entrepreneur. Her Instagram page sparks conversation surrounding topics such as under-recognized Black history, the Indigenous Land Back movement, decolonization, Black feminist thought and womanhood, and anti-racism–all of which are topics that she hosts workshops on, as well. Her page is flooded with her own words of wisdom and personal experiences, which are further outlined her monthly syllabi, The Great Unlearn. Additionally, Rachel is the founder of The Loveland Foundation, which looks to grant better access to mental health care for Black women.

Austin Channing Brown

Austin is a writer, speaker, and producer who has amassed an impressive 406k followers on Instagram. She often posts about her writings on justice, fighting white supremacy and saviorism, and speaking up about the current political climate, which are also spoken about in her new book she is promoting, “I’m Still Here: Black Dignity In A World Made For Whiteness.” She also hosts a video web series titled The Next Question, in which she further broaches all of these topics.

Jason Lee

Jason is the founder, CEO, and editor-in-chief of Hollywood Unlocked (HU), the online entertainment magazine and multimedia platform. Hollywood Unlocked has expanded into other media genres, including a YouTube podcast and a book detailing Lee’s rise to fame as a respected entertainment journalist. Lee is also known for his appearance on Love & Hip Hop: Hollywood. While Lee has been open about his struggles as an openly gay, biracial man, Lee now uses his position as face of the publication to create conversations with his dedicated audience of about the stories that Hollywood Unlocked covers.

Bevy Smith

Bodacious, brilliant and beloved, Bevy Smith is an entertainment personality, motivational speaker, author, brand ambassador, and businesswoman. Known for being the host of Sirius XM’s “Bevelations” on Radio Andy and former co-host of Bravo’s Fashion Queens, Smith possesses her audience with charm, wit, and humor. Smith also has recently released a memoir under the same title of her radio program, “Bevelations”, which details her rise to fame, and how others can also manifest their dreams. Bevy is uplifting, inspiring, and ebullient.

Layla F. Saad

The New York Times bestselling author of “Me and White Supremacy,” Layla F. Saad uses her Instagram to speak about the monthly book club she hosts, @goodancestorbookclub, which features BIPOC authors. Layla also runs the Good Ancestor podcast, in which she tackles discussions surrounding anti-racism, intergenerational trauma, environmental justice, class, storytelling, and more.

Liv Little

Founder of gal-dem magazine, Liv Little is a storyteller at heart, but happens to also be an Instagram aficionado. gal-dem is an independent magazine produced by women of color and nonbinary people of color. In 2019, the magazine released the book “’I Will Not Be Erased’: Our Stories About Growing Up As People of Colour,” bringing to light some of the experiences of the magazine’s own staff. In 2021, Little was named as one of Forbes’ 30 under 30. Recently, Little has been utilizing her Instagram to advertise her bi-weekly newsletter, post stylish shoots and candid selfies, share her favorite Black women authors, and share her writing projects.

DéVon Christopher Johnson

DéVon is the founder and CEO of BleuLife Media Group. He has built his own personal brand from his publication, Bleu Magazine, though the media company has expanded to an online digital sister magazine, Bleu TV,  a podcast network, a geo-targeting mobile ad platform, and an agency that represents digital influencers. Bleu Magazine is an aspirational lifestyle publication for multicultural men which looks to serve diverse audiences globally. The magazine is even in the process of developing a wellness subscription box for Black men. DéVon is an advocate for breathing life back into print media, especially within communities of color. On his Instagram, DéVon often posts travel flicks, snaps selfies, and advocates for Black-owned media.

Questlove Supreme with Reverend Al Sharpton illustration for use by 360 Magazine

Questlove Supreme Black History Month Programming

Last Week Featured Acclaimed Episode With Iconic Singer-Songwriter Stephanie Mills

Acclaimed music & pop culture-based iHeart Podcast Series, Questlove Supreme, today releases its newest episode featuring an exclusive interview with the legendary, Reverend Al Sharpton. This episode of Questlove Supreme is the perfect way close out the podcast’s Black History Month programming while continuing the conversation.

At 4 years old Reverend Al Sharpton knew what his mission would be in life and so his journey began as a great orator, warrior and leader in the plight of justice and equality for Black people. Listen as Reverend Al shares his story with Quest and Team Supreme and find out how music was pivotal in framing his story.

Listen to this week’s episode featuring Reverend Al Sharpton, out today HERE.

Listen to last week’s episode with Stephanie Mills HERE.

Prior guests on Questlove Supreme have included Mariah Carey, Zoe Kravitz, James Taylor, Seth Rogan,  Estelle, Jimmy Fallon, Kurtis Blow and several others. It was announced earlier this year that Questlove Supreme is rolling out Classic Episodes from years past on Mondays. These episodes will include conversations with Michelle Obama, Cree Summer, Lenny Kravitz, Chris Rock, Maya Rudolph, Weird Al and many more. Check them out HERE.

Questlove Supreme is a fun, irreverent and educational weekly podcast that digs deep into the stories of musical legends and cultural icons in a way that only Questlove and Team Supreme can deliver. Each episode is driven by conversation ranging from the guest’s origins (along with a few never-before-revealed secrets to their success) to their life passions and current projects. Additional hosts on the series include renowned and award-winning on-air personality and music commentator Laiya St.Clair, GRAMMY Award-nominated rapper/singer Phonte Coleman, GRAMMY, Tony and Emmy award winning music director “Unpaid” Bill Sherman, and engineer for Questlove, The Roots, The Tonight Show and Elvis Costello, “Suga” Steve Mandel.

Heather Skovlund illustration for beer article for 360 MAGAZINE

Tennessee Brew Works × Turner Haus Brewery

Celebrate Community Through Craft Beer” with Release of Gazelle Hazy IPA and ‘Jazz + Brews’ Virtual Event to Celebrate Black History Month.

Nashville-based craft brewery Tennessee Brew Works and Chicago-based Turner Häus Brewery have partnered to celebrate Black History Month and the craft brewing community with the release of their collaboration beer, Gazelle Hazy IPA. The Double India Pale Ale, now available at Tennessee Brew Works, honors Olympic legend, Tennessee native and Tennessee State University graduate, Wilma “The Gazelle” Rudolph.

Gazelle Hazy IPA is an 8-percent, ABV Double India Pale Ale that utilizes preeminent hops, including Waimea, Strata, Idaho 7 and Cashmere. The IPA is dominated by citrus and tropical fruit notes. Like all Tennessee Brew Works beers, this label was created by a local artist, Tennessee State University Professor, Sam Dunson. The label depicts Erika Motley, also a track star, and symbolizes the impact Rudolph has made with generations of athletes.

Tennessee Brew Works and Turner Häus Brewery will present a virtual event on Feb. 27Jazz + Brews. The two breweries will “Celebrate Community Through Craft Beer” with a Virtual Tasting Experience and Panel Discussion examining “Diversity in the Adult Beverage Manufacturing Industry,” moderated by Eric Holt, Professor of Belmont College and co-founder and president of Nashville’s Lovenoise. The event will feature live jazz sets from Marcus Finnie + Friends, in conjunction with the Nashville Jazz Workshop.

Jazz + Brews includes a curated, take home box, complete with a Tennessee Brew Works X Turner Haus Gazelle Hazy IPA 4-pack, a new home baked Slim + Husky’s artisan pizza, a commemorative pint glass, and Urbaanite Nashville City Guide Vol. 1.

The virtual event includes live jazz sets and a fireside chat with Chicago’s Steve Turner and some of Nashville’s spirits business leaders, including Tennessee Brew Works’ President and Founder, Christian Spears, Stacey Thomas of Stacey Wines and Jason Ridgel from Guidance Whiskey.

Jazz + Brews Event Details

Jazz + Brews is a live virtual event on Feb. 27, 2021 from 6pm–9pm. Guests can pick up their curated boxes at Tennessee Brew Works on Friday, Feb. 26, from 12pm­–7pm, or on Saturday, Feb. 27, from 12 pm–5pm. Tennessee Brew Works is located at 809 Ewing Ave. in Nashville.

Tickets for Jazz + Brews are $40 per person. Visit their website to purchase tickets. The online stream (private link) will be sent day of event.

“Brewing beer is a form of creative art,” says Steve Turner, CEO and co-founder of Turner Häus Brewery. “Collaboration with other artists is a very important part of the creative process, but, moreover, this particular collaboration showcases how diversity in this country can and should be celebrated collectively to create something epic.”

“We are honored to work with Steve and his team on this historic hazy double IPA. This beer was particularly special to us, so we are using some distinguished hops, pulling out all the stops!” said Christian Spears, founder and president of Tennessee Brew Works. “It has been an absolute pleasure working on this project with Turner Häus Brewery. The tagline, “Celebrating Community Through Craft Beer,” truly encapsulates this collaboration, which will be the first of many. Our Jazz + Brews event will be an important conversation for our industry, as well as our customers.”

“I am always proud to see Nashville entrepreneur’s come together to support one of our own. Turner has all the right ingredients for success in his newest venture Turner Haus Brewery…great product, passion to innovate and a plan to grow. The successful launch of the Gazelle Hazy IPA is just a start. I feel it is important, as a fellow black business owner, to pay it forward in all that you do as well as honor those that came before you. Turner does just that with this series,” said Eric Holt, event moderator and managing partner at Lovenoise.

ABOUT TURNER HAUS BREWERY

The Turner Häus Brewery concept was founded with the mission to celebrate community through craft beer by providing a fun, welcoming environment for craft beer enthusiasts and homebrewers alike. We cater to beer drinkers, homebrewers and our community, which includes the revitalization of our neighborhood in the historic Bronzeville district of South Side Chicago, Illinois. To learn more, visit Turner Häus Brewery at turnerhausbrew.com.

ABOUT TENNESSEE BREW WORKS

Tennessee Brew Works was founded in 2013 with a mission to create high quality craft beer that pays homage to the land, traditions and culture of Tennessee. They brew beers using only natural ingredients and source them from local farms whenever possible. Tennessee Brew Works is owned and operated by folks in Tennessee. They are guided by their motto: “We work hard to create high quality craft beer that makes Tennessee proud. Our culture places importance on family, friends, and community, and we hope you’ll be a part of it.” To learn more, visit Tennessee Brew Works at tnbrew.com.

PUMA x Black Fives Apparel

PUMA x BLACK FIVES FOUNDATION

PUMA ANNOUNCES MULTI-YEAR PARTNERSHIP WITH THE BLACK FIVES FOUNDATION IN SUPPORT OF BLACK HISTORY EDUCATION REFORM

Global sports company PUMA is celebrating Black History Month by highlighting the work of Black leaders, partners and community organizations that continue to inspire and shape the future for generations to come. 

Throughout the month, PUMA will stand alongside athletes, ambassadors and partners by amplifying their voices and actions across various platforms in support of universal equality, justice and acceptance for all.  

To kick off the month, PUMA announced a multi-year partnership with the Black Fives Foundation, a 501 (c)(3) nonprofit, whose mission since 2002 is to research, preserve, showcase, teach and honor the pre-NBA history of African Americans in basketball. The partnership will raise awareness about this vital history and its pioneering players, teams and contributors through initiatives that make a difference, as well as feature special apparel and footwear collections with popular PUMA styles including vintage graphics and logos maintained by the Foundation’s trademarked slogan, “Make History Now.”

“I’m proud and honored to partner with PUMA toward making a meaningful, long-lasting difference in expanding Black history education to include the pioneering African American teams, players, and contributors who helped pave the way for today’s game,” said  Founder and Executive Director of the Black Fives Foundation Claude Johnson. 

PUMA, together with the Black Fives Foundation, will help support the Foundation’s preservation and education efforts through creative activations that include an engaging, multi-use online museum to display its archive of historical artifacts and content from the Black Fives Era. The Black Fives Foundation’s Virtual Vault, presented by PUMA, will be an online portal for visitors to see, learn, and be inspired by the pre-NBA history of African Americans in basketball through nearly 1,000 artifacts in the Foundation’s historical archive. Items include vintage equipment, ticket stubs, game gear, images, scorecards and more. The Virtual Vault is set to launch later this year. 

Also this month, PUMA will be giving back to the Harlem community with partner AfroBrutality, hosting conversations with current and former athletes around activism in sport through their #REFORM platform and more.

The first PUMA x Black Fives collection will include popular PUMA styles including vintage graphics and logos maintained by the Foundation’s trademarked slogan “Make History Now.” Five unique silhouettes will be featured in the collection including a hoodie, short sleeve and long sleeve tee, pants and shorts all in a black and cream color palette.

Retailing for $45 – $90 the PUMA x Black Fives Foundation clothing collection will be available on PUMA.com and at the PUMA NYC Flagship Store on Friday, February 12th. PUMA and Black Fives will also be releasing a forthcoming footwear collection this spring.

The partnership, which supports Black History education reform and the Foundation’s preservation and education efforts through creative activations, including an engaging, multi-use online museum to display its archives of historical artifacts and content from the Black Fives Era, will also include the release of footwear later this year.

For more information, please visit PUMA’s website and the partner page

About PUMA

PUMA is one of the world’s leading Sports Brands, designing, developing, selling and marketing footwear, apparel and accessories. Formorethan70 years, PUMA has relentlessly pushed sport and culture forward by creating fast products for the world’s fastest athletes. PUMA offers performance and sport-inspired lifestyle products in categories such as Football, Running and Training, Basketball, Golf, and Motorsports. It collaborates with renowned designers and brands to bring sport influences into street culture and fashion. The PUMA Group owns the brands PUMA, Cobra Golf and stichd. The company distributes its products in more than 120 countries, employsmore than16,000people worldwide, and is headquartered in Herzogenaurach/Germany. To learn more visit their website.  

About The Black Fives Foundation 

The Greenwich, CT-based Black Fives Foundation is a 501(c)3 public charity whose mission is to research, preserve, showcase, teach, and honor the pre-NBA history of African Americans in basketball, a period known as the Black Fives Era that lasted from the early 1900s to 1950 when the NBA signed its first Black players. The organization advocates expanding Black history education to amplify and include this important history, utilizing nearly 1,000 related artifacts in its historical archive as well as a portfolio of related intellectual property and other difference-making initiatives. For more information, please visit their website

The Ford Foundation’s Darren Walker in Conversation with Andre Leon Talley

The Ford Foundation’s Darren Walker will be interviewed by André Leon Talley on a zoom call Thursday, February 11th at 7:00 pm EST hosted by the Museum of Arts and Design (MAD).

The Ford Foundation’s president Darren Walker and fashion icon André Leon Talley join MAD Interim Director Terry Skoda for a Black History Month special edition of MAD Moments, exploring Walker’s path to the Ford Foundation, his vision for the future of philanthropy, and the role of museums in reimaging who has a seat at the table and a voice in the room.

Closed captioning provided.

ABOUT THE PANELISTS

André Leon Talley was the indomitable creative director at Vogue during the magazine’s rising dominance as the world’s fashion bible. Over the past five decades his byline has appeared in Vanity Fair, HG, and The New York Times. He began his career as an assistant to Diana Vreeland at The Metropolitan Costume Institute, later working at Interview magazine, and as Paris Bureau Chief for Women’s Wear Daily. He is the author of books including two autobiographies, The Chiffon Trenches and ALT, as well as Little Black Dress, A.L.T.:365+, MegaStar, and Oscar de la Renta: His Legendary World of Style. He is also the subject of the documentary The Gospel According to André. Mr. Talley received his MA in French Studies from Brown University and served on the board of trustees for the Savannah College of Art and Design for twenty years.

Darren Walker is president of the Ford Foundation, a $13 billion international social justice philanthropy. He is co-founder and chair of the Presidents’ Council on Disability Inclusion in Philanthropy. Before joining Ford, Darren was vice president at Rockefeller Foundation, overseeing global and domestic programs. In the 1990s, he was COO of the Abyssinian Development Corporation, Harlem’s largest community development organization. Darren co-chairs New York City’s Mayoral Advisory Commission on City Art, Monuments, and Markers, the New York City Census Task Force, and the Governor’s Commission and serves on The Independent Commission on New York City Criminal Justice and Incarceration Reform and UN International Labour Organization Global Commission on the Future of Work. He serves on many boards, including Carnegie Hall, the High Line, VOW to End Child Marriage, the Committee to Protect Journalists, the National Gallery of Art, and the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History & Culture. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and is the recipient of 16 honorary degrees and university awards, including Harvard University’s W.E.B. Du Bois Medal. Educated exclusively in public schools, Darren was a member of the first Head Start class in 1965 and graduated from The University of Texas at Austin. He has been included on Time’s annual 100 Most Influential People in the World, Rolling Stone’s 25 People Shaping the Future, Fast Company’s Most Creative People in Business, and OUT Magazine’s Power 50.

Design and cleanliness story illustration by Gabrielle Archuleta for 360 magazine

COVID GUIDANCE: The importance of TOP-DOWN CLEANING

Robin Wilson launched Robin Wilson Home in 2000 and created a conglomerate that covers eco-design, licensed products, interior design, and real estate development. Her brand has generated over $82 million in wholesale revenue from sales of cabinetry and textiles. She became the first Black woman with a line of hypoallergenic textiles sold nationwide at Bed Bath & Beyond (now in Wal-Mart), among other retailers. Her book, CLEAN DESIGN: Wellness for your Lifestyle was #1 on Amazon and focused on eco-friendly designs and hypoallergenic products for consumers.

Recently, the lifestyle expert introduced the practical aspect of Top-Down Cleaning. In this era of quarantines and lock downs, the last thing anyone wants to do is add to our work load – and a few simple tips will help you maintain a clean and healthier living space!

The Statistics

Sixty million Americans – that is one in five of us – have asthma and allergies. We sneeze, sniffle, and itch. Expose us to a whiff of dust, a gust of pollen, a sniff of perfume, or an encounter with an inquisitive dog or cat, and before we know it, our airways start to close up, and we begin to cough, wheeze or struggle to breathe.

With COVID in the air, the last thing we need is an inflammatory response. So cleaning your space has never been more important. Remember that asthma and allergies cannot be cured, but they can be managed. We can reduce symptoms by avoiding the allergens that trigger them. Unfortunately, the average home is full of allergy and asthma triggers, which means the place that should be your sanctuary can be a major source of allergenic triggers.

What is Top-Down Cleaning?

Most people create twice the cleaning work by first cleaning the floor, softa, tabletop or countertop and then cleaning the lights, ceiling fan or cabinets – only to see dust drift downward.

Solution: Clean from the top-to-bottom. In fact, if you have a second level, start upstairs and then work your way downstairs. Start at the highest point and make sure you have the following tools: paper towels, microstatic dust mitt/cloth, microstatic duster/floor sweeper, HEPA vacuum and a non-toxic cleaning solution. Cleaning solutions should include: baking soda, vinegar, toothpaste and Coca Cola.

Starting at the Top

We forget that walls are one of the largest surfaces in our spaces. Use a microstatic duster cloth/mitt to rub gently along the walls starting at the ceiling line and let the dust fall. As well, make sure to swipe over light receptables, ceiling fans or chandeliers.

Surfaces

Then clean the surfaces, starting with the highest-level lamp, bookcase, window treatments, cabinet or closet shelf. Allow dust/dirt to fall. As you work you way down, you will find that you need to vacuum or wipe down surfaces.

As mentioned earlier, there are a few tricks that involve cleaning solutions that are non-toxic.

1.       Toilet Ring Solution: Pour Coca Cola into your toilet overnight, and use toilet brush in the morning and the stubborn ring will disappear (may have to be repeated dependent on the level of stain) by morning.

2.       Crayon Marks: Use toothpaste. Smear on the mark and let sit for about 20 minutes. Using light brush strokes, and the crayon should be removed, or at least diminished.

3.       Stained Baking Sheets: to make them look new, use vinegar and baking soda. Coat pan with baking soda. Pour a layer of white vinegar on top. You may see slight bubbling. Let sit for 4 hours. Use gloves and a brush in circular motion. Watch the surface start to look new.

Finish at the Floor

The last thing that you need to do in your space is clean the floor.

1.       Make sure to invest in a HEPA filter vacuum as the dust and dirt is stored in a chamber (unlike older vacuum units that sometimes-added dust back into the space), and the canister can be emptied outside.

2.       Before you clean, you might want to make sure that you remove rugs and shake them outside.

3.       Run a microstatic dust cloth over the floor before you vacuum so that you can ensure that minimal dust flies around.

One tech solution that many working from home families are investing is an electronic robot vacuum that can be programmed to work during the day in various rooms. Some floor robot vacuums have HEPA filters, and can be a great option if you have a pet and want to make sure to limit buildup of dander and hair on your floor.

[SIDE BAR] For a space that follows CLEAN DESIGN protocols, it is important to replace a few items:

1.       Change your older model vacuum to a HEPA vacuum to effectively limit dust in the space. Especially important if your home is near any location that had recent fires.

2.       Change your vinyl shower liner to a nylon shower liner to minimize mold.

3.       Review the window treatments and find options that can be laundered and are not ‘dust catchers’ or which can be easily vacuumed.

4.       Replace your pillow after 3 years if it has not been washed frequently or covered with a zippered liner.

5.       Think about using your window screens so that you can open your windows for 5 minutes daily.

SIDEBAR

Leading triggers include:

  • Dust mites in beds and pillows
  • Dander from pets
  • Mold growth in walls, bathrooms and basements
  • Pollen from outdoor trees and grasses in your hair that infiltrates your sleep space or living room sofa
  • Fumes from cooking and chemical cleaners
  • Toxic or environmentally unfriendly building materials that permeate indoor air

Remember, you can change that by using the strategies in the book, Clean Design: Wellness for your Lifestyle (Greenleaf, 2015). Create a healthy home environment that manages indoor air quality and protect your family from dust, mold, pollen, fumes, odors, airborne toxins, chemicals and other substances. Create a home environment that nurtures good health.

According to the American Lung Association, “poor indoor air quality can cause or contribute to the development of infections, lung cancer…headaches, dry eyes, nasal congestion, nausea, and fatigue” in anyone, not just those who suffer from asthma and allergies. We can all benefit from living in a more pure home environment.

More physicians are convinced that there is a link between environmental toxins, indoor air quality and allergies. Chemicals we are exposed to in our homes and offices have the power to make us sick, and we can improve our health and wellness using Clean Design principles.

Shopping for Hypoallergenic Options

The pandemic made both me and my clients realize that the CLEAN DESIGN HOME which sells our retail products is more important than ever – and that we should find non-toxic cleaning options and information for day-to-day living, especially since so many of us are working from home. I have pivoted to focus on building out the product line, and have just licensed our brand. So much information involves simple non-toxic options– the ideas are rooted in my bestselling book, Clean Design: Wellness for your Lifestyle.

About Robin Wilson

Her design projects including the White House Fellows office, a part of President Clinton’s Harlem office, and the rustic beach cottage of Robert DeNiro – each project had a very quick turnaround and exacting standards. She was named to the Top 100 Female Founders List in 2020 by INC magazine. Her eponymous licensed brands of textiles is sold at retail and hospitality. She is also in the process of creating Design+Build projects. She is author of two award-winning books: Clean Design She is the first woman with a branded line of custom cabinetry that was sold by over 400 independent kitchen dealers nationwide (2009-2018). First featured in Oprah’s magazines and extensive media coverage since 2005. In May 2013, her furniture line, Nest Home by Robin Wilson, premiered at the International Contemporary Furniture Fair (ICFF) in New York. In 2014, she partnered with consumer products giant Panasonic to promote their latest line of cutting edge products for the home.She is an ambassador to the Asthma & Allergy Foundation of America, and previously served on the board of the Sustainable Furnishings Council.

Gabrielle Archuleta illustrates Black History Month for 360 MAGAZINE

Black History Month

By Hannah DiPilato

February is Black History Month and 360 Magazine would like to recognize some historic people of color who have become a positive influence on society. In 2020, the Black Lives Matter movement skyrocketed and brought attention to the diversity that still exists within our community. Although society has come a long way from the early 1900s when segregation ran rampant, the movement for equality has a long way to go. From inventors to musicians, there are a number of successful people we would like to acknowledge in honor of Black History Month.

Martin Luther King Jr.
Arguably one of the most important leaders in the Civil Rights Movement, Dr. King spent his time preaching for equality in a peaceful way. He will always be remembered for his famous “I Have a Dream” speech and his ability to lead others in this historical movement. Dr. King is one of the most influential

Joseph E. Lowery
Joseph E. Lowery is the grandfather of 360 Magazine’s President Vaughn Lowery and founded the Southern Christian Leadership Conference alongside Dr. King. Throughout his life, Lowery served as vice president, chairman of the board and president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference as well as a leader in the Civil Rights Movement.

George Washington Carver
Many people are familiar with George Washington Carver for his inventive skills. He made over 300 products from peanuts and as an agricultural scientist promoted methods to prevent soil depletion.

Garrett Morgan
Garrett Augustus Morgan, Sr. is to thank for the invention of traffic lights as well as gas masks. Every time you stop at a red light, take a moment to think of Morgan for this essential technology.

Barack Obama
As the first black president of the United States, Barack Obama made an impact as the 44th president and showed young people of color they have representation in politics. He continues to use his voice to connect with the American people.

Kamala Harris
Keeping in the theme of politics, Vice President Kamala Harris is the first woman vice president, the first African American vice president and the first Asian American vice president. She’s giving young women of color everywhere a sense of representation.

Madam C.J. Walker
As the first recorded female self-made millionaire in America, Madam C.J. Walker was an influential entrepreneur, philanthropist and activist of her time.

Frederick McKinley Jones
Frederick McKinley Jones was the co-founder of Thermo King and he brought incredible improvement to long-haul transportation of perishable goods. Jones also won the National Medal of Technology.

Stevie Wonder
Stevland Hardaway Morris, better known as Stevie Wonder, is a musical prodigy that became blind after birth and learned to play the harmonica, piano and drums by age nine. He is now a notable singer, songwriter, musician and record producer.

Lonnie Johnson
Lonnie Johnson is known for his success as an aerospace engineer. He has worked on the U.S. Air Force term of service and has also worked at NASA for twelve years including in the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

Patricia Bath
As an ophthalmologist, Patricia Bath was an early innovator of laser cataract surgery. She was also the first woman, African American physician to receive a patent for a medical invention.

Oprah Winfrey
One TV personality almost everyone is familiar with is Oprah. Known for her television show The Oprah Winfrey Show, she has made waves in the world of entertainment. She is also known for co-producing a Broadway musical version of The Color Purple, establishing O, The Oprah Magazine, the Oprah Winfrey Network (OWN) as well as creating Oprah.com.

Harriet Tubman
After being born into slavery, Harriet Tubman was a conductor of the Underground Railroad and helped many enslaved men and women escape. She led many people to freedom with her bravery and connection with antislavery activists.

Rosa Parks
Rosa Parks gained her notoriety as an activist in the Civil Rights Movement and is known for starting the Montgomery bus boycott after refusing to give up her seat to a white passenger. She has been called “the first lady of civil rights” and “the mother of the freedom movement” by the United States Congress.

John Lewis
John Lewis was chairman Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) as well as one of the “Big Six” leaders who organized the 1963 March on Washington. He was an essential part of the Civil Rights Movement and ending legalized racial segregation.

Alexander Miles
If you’ve ever ridden in an elevator, you can thank Alexander Miles for the automatic opening doors; he was awarded the patent for this invention in 1887. Mills was riding in an elevator with his daughter and he deemed an elevator shaft door left open could be dangerous.

Mary Kenner
Mary Kenner was an inventor famous for her development of the sanitary belt, the precursor to the self-adhesive maxi pad. However, due to racial discrimination, the idea wasn’t adopted for thirty years. She has five patents for various household items.

Maya Angelou
Known for her many famous pieces of writing, Maya Angelou was a poet, memoirist and civil rights activist. Over fifty years, she wrote a number of autobiographies, essays, poems, plays, movies and television shows. She also received over 50 honorary degrees as well as awards for her writing.

LeBron James
Along with being considered one of the greatest NBA players of all time, LeBron James also started the LeBron James Family Foundation to help create generational change for the children and families of LeBron’s hometown in Akron, Ohio.

Malcolm X
As a popular spokesperson at the time of the Civil Rights Movement, Malcolm X encouraged Black Americans to protect themselves against racism. He preached a much different lesson than Martin Luther King Jr. who preached nonviolence.

Thurgood Marshall
Thurgood Marshall was the Supreme Court’s first African American justice as well as a prominent civil rights activist. He served on the court for 24 years and helped with influential rulings at the time of the Civil Rights Movement such as the case of Brown v. Board of Education.

Jackie Robinson
Jackie Robinson was the first African American to play in Major League Baseball in the United States during the 20th century. He broke the color barrier of the MLB when he played for the National League Brooklyn Dodgers as second baseman with the jersey number 42.

New Sites on Historic Civil Rights Trail

Memphis’ Beale Street Historic District and WDIA Radio Station Added to U.S. Civil Rights Trail

Beale Street Historic District joins together the Historic Daisy Theater/Randle Catron Interpretive Center, the Withers Collection Museum and Gallery, Historic First Baptist Beale Street Church and Robert R. Church Park.

WDIA Radio and the Beale Street Historic District are now stops on the U.S. Civil Rights Trail as announced today by Gov. Bill Lee; Commissioner Mark Ezell, Tennessee Dept. of Tourist Development and Secretary/Treasurer of the U.S. Civil Rights Trail Marketing Alliance; Memphis Mayor Strickland; Shelby County Mayor Lee Harris; and President and CEO of Memphis Tourism Kevin Kane. The announcement was made during a press event hosted by Memphis Tourism at the original B.B. Kings on Beale Street.

“Today is a special day as Tennessee shines a brighter light on the brave men and women who stood up for equal rights,” said Gov. Bill Lee. “I am proud that with the addition of these two sites, travelers from around the world will have the opportunity to learn more about Memphis’ deep civil rights history.”

This acceptance is in large part due to Memphis Tourism’s efforts alongside Tennessee Department of Tourist Development’s continued leadership and their sustaining membership of the U.S. Civil Rights Trail Marketing Alliance.

WDIA Radio was the first radio station in the country programmed entirely for African Americans. Efforts to break down racial boundaries pushed WDIA Radio to the top of the charts, both on the air and in the Memphis community.

The Beale Street Historic District is a National Historic Landmark. The 15-block area was a hotbed for several African American businesses, a Freedman’s Bank, the headquarters of Ida B. Wells’ anti-segregationist newspaper, “Free Speech,” and churches after the Civil War. African Americans came to work, entertain and be entertained, shop and strategize during the Civil Rights Movement.

“The addition of Beale Street and WDIA to the U.S. Civil Rights Trail will help spread the word of the historical significance of this community to our country’s long journey to equality and human rights,” said Mayor Lee Harris, Shelby County Mayor. “Both these sites will be invaluable additions to the trail and these additions will lead to countless conversations and learning opportunities for visitors and our residents.”

WDIA Radio and the Beale Street Historic District join original stops in Memphis which include Clayborn Temple, Mason Temple Church of God in Christ and the National Civil Rights Museum at the Lorraine Motel.

The U.S. Civil Rights Trail is a collection of churches, courthouses, schools, museums and other landmarks in the Southern states and beyond that played a pivotal role in advancing social justice in the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s, shifting the course of history.

With the newly-added stops, Tennessee now has 12 stops on the U.S. Civil Rights Trail including Fisk University and Woolworth’s on 5th in Nashville and Green McAdoo Cultural Center in Clinton. Visitors from around the world travel to Tennessee to explore where history was made.

For more information on Tennessee’s trail sites, visit www.tncivilrightstrail.com.

To learn about other states’ sites on the U.S. Civil Rights Trail, visit civilrightstrail.com.

About the U.S. Civil Rights Trail
The U.S. Civil Rights Trail is a collection of churches, courthouses, schools, museums and other landmarks primarily in the Southern states where activists challenged segregation in the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s to advance social justice. Famous sites such as the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama; Little Rock Central High School in Arkansas; the Greensboro, North Carolina, Woolworth’s where sit-ins began; the National Civil Rights Museum at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tennessee; and Dr. King’s birthplace in Atlanta, to name a few. The people, locations and destinations included in the Civil Rights Trail provide a way for families, travelers, and educators to experience history firsthand and tell the story of how “what happened here changed the world.” For details about dozens of significant sites and to see interviews with civil rights foot soldiers, visit civilrightstrail.com.

About Memphis
Memphis is a world-class sports destination that is complemented by the legendary food and music the city is known for around the world. The city is headlined by live music and full of one-of-a-kind experiences that include Beale Street, National Civil Rights Museum, Stax Museum of American Soul Music, Sun Studio, Elvis Presley’s Graceland and Memphis Zoo, home to two giant pandas. Stunning Mississippi River views, mouthwatering barbecue, lively festivals, and intriguing galleries and museums round out the many attractions and activities for visitors to experience in Memphis. These only begin the list of what’s so great about the Home of the Blues, Soul and Rock ‘n’ Roll. For more information, visit www.memphistravel.com

About the Tennessee Department of Tourist Development
Tennessee is the home of the blues, bluegrass, country, gospel, soul, rockabilly and rock ‘n’ roll-delivering an unparalleled experience of beauty, history and family adventure, infused with music that creates a vacation that is “The Soundtrack of America. Made in Tennessee.” In 2018, Tennessee’s tourism industry generated $22.02 billion in economic impact, more than $1.81 billion in state and local tax revenue and more than 187,757 tourism-related jobs. Explore more at tnvacation.com and join other Tennessee travelers by following “tnvacation” on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram and YouTube or “Tennessee” on Snapchat.