Posts tagged with "Tennessee"

HGTV host & DIY expert Lauren Makk via 360 MAGAZINE.

Lauren Makk

DIY + Design + Lifestyle



Lauren Makk, HGTV host and DIY expert, is taking the design world by storm with her unique and accessible take on luxury design and DIY.

Listen to Lauren Makk and Vaughn Lowery on 360 MAG podcast RSS / SPOTIFY

You don’t often hear the words ‘DIY’ and ‘Luxury’ in the same sentence, but that’s because we didn’t know…until now. DIY expert, interior designer, and TV host in Nashville, Tennessee, she has caught the attention of fans with her budget-friendly approach to luxury DIY and design.

Lauren may be familiar to you from her appearances on various design shows such as Trading Spaces and ABC’s FABLife, but today she’s reintroducing herself and taking on the world of design with a unique perspective.

Across her digital and social media platforms, Lauren reveals her best thrifty design tips and tricks, as well as her luxury DIY and redesign projects. Click HERE to see some of her work.

Lauren Mark’s goal is to change the stereotype of DIY in the past, which is why she insists on being an “Interior RE-Designer,” focusing on re-using common everyday materials in new, impressive, and sophisticated ways. ”I love being in the design game with depth and texture,” she says.

Her sincerity and dedication to making design affordable have earned her the title of “Home Girl Next Door,” where you can find a lot of great finds for decorating your home or anywhere else. She shared: “I want my space to really reflect who I am or who my client is.” Click HERE to view some of her creations, such as ”Spring Inspired Floral Arrangement”.

”It all started with my great passion for graffiti,” Lauren confesses. Her plan from a young age has been to become an artist through a passion for design, which was fostered at a young age by her mother, who helped her gain those domestic skills that Lauren has mastered today through her deep African American roots from the South. She gathers her inspiration from being generations of housekeepers in her family. ”My mother really instilled in me a passion for creating that feeling of HOME,” she says.

Lauren Makk, a native of Oklahoma City, grew up in the home improvement industry. ”I have learned in the last two years, how important our home is. It’s our safe space,” she assures. ”I don’t care if you’ve been on vacation for two weeks or two years in jail. Everyone wants to go home because that’s where people feel safe,” she adds. Lauren and her mom enjoyed flipping houses as a hustle.

With her years of experience in construction, she has wanted to combine her three innate talents for DIY, design, and art to create her renowned firm Lauren Makk Interiors, which specializes in “Accessible luxury.”

Makk is now building on her brand and influence to take DIY and design to a whole new level. In fact, she currently judging the talent of young builders on Shop Class for Disney+ and Design Star: Next Gen on HGTV, among other shows.

Makk’s distinct perspective and experience have set it apart from others in the industry. ”I honestly feel like design is what my purpose here on Earth,” she says.

Congrats Lauren on your 1.5-year mark of sobriety. We’re always here for you.

For updates on future DIY projects, programs, tips, or tricks feel free to follow her on her digital platforms


Instagram | Twitter | TikTok | Website

Article: Andrea Esteban /Jess Chen

Attractions of Tennessee’s Native American heritage via 360 MAGAZINE

Attractions of Tennessee’s Native American heritage

Seven Attractions That Tell The Story Of Native Americans In Tennessee

You don’t have to look far to see the lasting legacy of Native Americans in Tennessee — in fact, the name “Tennessee” is derived from “Tanasi,” a Cherokee village in what is now Monroe County. Today, the state is home to more than 20,000 Native Americans and a rich culture and history waiting to be experienced by travelers. Below, check out seven attractions that tell the story of Tennessee’s Native American heritage. 

Travel Tip: The Trail of Tears National Historic Trail runs east to west across Tennessee, carving a tragic story of the removal of Cherokee Indians from their ancestral homelands.

Pinson Mounds State Archaeological Park

Listed on the National Register of Historic PlacesPinson Mounds State Archaeological Park covers more than 1,200 acres and contains at least 15 Native American mounds, which were both burial and ceremonial in purpose. The park’s archaeological features and wildlife can be viewed along six miles of interconnecting trails, including paved trails, which are wheelchair/bicycle accessible. The park’s Pinson Mounds museum offers further insight into these fascinating structures; it is designed to replicate a Native American mound, offering 4,500 square feet of exhibit space, an archaeological library, an 80-seat theater and a “Discovery Room”’ for historical exploration. 

Mound Bottom State Archaeological Area (only accessible to the public through hikes led by Harpeth River State Park rangers)

Head to the seven-acre Mound Bottom State Archaeological Area in Kingston Springs (just west of Nashville), where you’ll find the largest number of Native American ceremonial mounds in Tennessee — more than a dozen. Researchers believe the area was occupied between approximately 1000 and 1300 AD and was an important civic and ceremonial center connected to the Mississippian site of Cahokia, which was located across the river in what is now St. Louis. The Mound Bottom site is only accessible to the public through hikes led by Harpeth River State Park rangers — check the park’s events calendar for upcoming experiences.

Audubon Acres

Chattanooga’s oldest wildlife sanctuary, Audubon Acres, offers more than five miles of hiking trails over 130 acres on South Chickamauga Creek, along with abundant opportunities for picnicking, wildlife viewing, and photography. It’s also a spot steeped in Native American history. The visitor center houses an archeological museum showcasing one of the largest publicly viewable Native artifact collections in Chattanooga, while the Spring Frog Cabin, a Trail of Tears site, is a wonderfully preserved example of Cherokee architecture from the mid-1700s. Going back even further, Little Owl Village at Audubon Acres is believed to be the site of a 16th century Napochie village that the Spanish Tristan DeLuna expedition encountered during their travels north from Florida. 

Cumberland Gap National Historical Park

As the first great gateway to the American west, Cumberland National Historic Park is a must-visit for anyone with an interest in Tennessee’s Native American history. Located an hour north of Knoxville where the borders of Tennessee, Kentucky, and Virginia converge, the 24,000-acre park features miles of game trails that were originally used by Native Americans, allowing visitors to literally walk in the footsteps of the original stewards of the land. Later, those same trails became the footpaths for more than 300,000 settlers heading west over the Appalachian Mountains.

The Sequoyah Birthplace Museum

With the Eastern Band of the Cherokee Nation at the helm, the Sequoyah Birthplace Museum is Tennessee’s only tribally operated historical attraction. The East Tennessee museum telling the amazing story of Sequoyah, creator of the Cherokee writing system. Never before, or since, in the history of the world has one man, not literate in any language, perfected a system for reading and writing a language until Sequoyah. Located in the Great Smoky Mountains on the shores of beautiful Tellico Lake, the museum recently added the Max D. Ramsey Shoreline Trail, with 1.5 miles of walking trail, along the shoreline, bridges and boardwalks through the marshy areas.

Red Clay State Historic Park 

The tragic Trail of Tears begins at Red Clay State Historic Park. Encompassing 263-acres of narrow valleys formerly used as cotton and pastureland, the park site was the last seat of Cherokee national government before the Indian Removal Act, which resulted in most of the Cherokee people in the area being forced to emigrate west in the 1830s. It was here that the Cherokee learned that they had lost their mountains, streams and valleys forever. On the 263-acre property, you’ll find hiking trails, reconstructed sleeping huts, homesteads, council houses, the Blue Hole Spring, which served as a water supply during council meetings and the Eternal Flame, a memorial for the Cherokee people and those who were lost on the Trail of Tears.

Cherokee Removal Memorial Park and Museum

Cherokee Indian Removal Memorial, located on the banks of the Tennessee River in Birchwood, was one of the main staging areas for the Trail of Tears. Thousands of Cherokee Indians camped here before their infamous trip to the west. Lying near the center of the ancestral land of the Cherokee Nation, this area had nine encampments of thousands of Cherokees that waited weeks to be sent across the river here at Blythe Ferry. Today, a History Wall feature offers visitors a detailed visual re-telling of not only the Trail of Tears, but also the centuries-long saga of the literate and highly civilized Cherokee culture in Tennessee. A Memorial Wall, meanwhile, pays tribute to the people who died during the Trail of Tears — a necessary reminder of this tragic episode in our nation’s history. 

ABOUT TENNESSEE DEPARTMENT OF TOURIST DEVELOPMENT

Tennessee is the home of the blues, bluegrass, country, gospel, soul, rockabilly, and rock ‘n’ roll— delivering an unparalleled experience of beauty, history, and family adventure, infused with music that creates a vacation that is the “Soundtrack of America. Made in Tennessee.” Explore more at TNvacation.com and join other Tennessee travelers by following “TNVacation” on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram and YouTube, and “Tennessee” on Snapchat.

TNvacation.com | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | YouTube | Press Website

TENNESSEE MUSIC PATHWAYS via 360 MAGAZINE

Six new markers on “TENNESSEE MUSIC PATHWAYS”

FOLLOW THE MUSIC: TENNESSEE DEPARTMENT OF TOURIST DEVELOPMENT UNVEILS SIX NEW MARKERS ON “TENNESSEE MUSIC PATHWAYS” 

Howard Armstrong, G.B. Grayson, Jo Walker-Meador, Craig Morgan and Little David Wilkins Honored for Their Significant Contributions That Shaped Music History 

Tennessee Department of Tourist Development (TDTD) honored music icons Howard Armstrong, G.B. Grayson, Jo Walker-Meador, Craig Morgan and Little David Wilkins with the unveiling of six new markers on the “Tennessee Music Pathways” at locations across the state. Local and state leaders, family and friends and music industry executives gathered to celebrate their significant contributions to music history in Tennessee. 

A keeper of African American string tradition, Howard Armstrong was a multi-instrumentalist with an extensive repertoire. He was also a multilinguist, painter and a teller of folk tales and anecdotes drawn from his long life and career. Armstrong was honored on Oct. 18 with a marker in downtown LaFollette. His son, Ralphe Armstrong, and Mayor Jack Lunch were in attendance.

TDTD and Johnson County Center of the Arts honored G.B. Grayson with a marker on Oct. 18 in downtown Mountain City with special performances by Kody Norris and Kenny Price. The new marker is the latest addition to the “Musical Heritage Mural Mile” walking tour through downtown Mountain City. The self-guided mural tour connects Johnson County residents and visitors alike to a storied history of authentic Appalachian music, including Clarence “Tom” Ashley, Blind Fiddler, G.B. Grayson, who first recorded the Ballad of Tom Dooley, plus Fred Price and Clint Howard, who introduced the young Doc Watson to the world.

Alongside the City of Orlinda and Robertson County, Tennessee Tourism honored country music industry pioneer Jo Walker-Meador on Oct. 21 with a new marker on the Tennessee Music Pathways. As executive director of the Country Music Association (CMA) from 1962 until 1991, Jo Walker-Meador’s career mirrored the growth of the industry she led. She became a tireless proselytizer for country music. Under her leadership, the Country Music Hall of Fame, the CMA Awards, and Fan Fair (later CMA Music Festival, now known as CMA Fest) were established, in addition to many industry initiatives. 

On Oct. 18, TDTD and Dickson County honored country music star Craig Morgan with the unveiling of a “Tennessee Music Pathways” marker next door to the Clement Museum Hotel. Craig Morgan, a longtime resident of Dickson, attended the unveiling and held a book signing for his new memoir, “God, Family, Country.” A multi-faceted entertainer, Morgan has made a name for himself as a country music icon, TV personality, celebrated outdoorsman and patriotic Army veteran. With over 25 charted Billboard songs, Morgan is widely known for massive hits “This Ole Boy,” ”Almost Home,” “Redneck Yacht Club,” “That’s What I Love About Sunday,” “Little Bit of Life,” “Wake Up Lovin’ You,” “International Harvester” and “Bonfire.” A proud member of the Grand Ole Opry since 2008, he has made over 250 appearances on the hallowed stage.

On Tuesday, Oct. 25, Little David Wilkins was honored in Parsons with a new marker. As a country singer, songwriter and entertainer, Wilkins scored 17 country hits. His composition, “Coming On Strong,” was a No. 11 pop hit for Brenda Lee in 1966, and he wrote songs for artists as diverse as soul singer Percy Sledge; country star Conway Twitty; and folk-pop group, the Serendipity Singers. Wilkins was also a nightclub performer and worked as a supporting artist to several major country stars. 

Nearly every town in Tennessee has a story when it comes to music. Tennessee Music Pathways is a guide that connects visitors to the rich musical heritage of our state. From the largest cities to the smallest communities, the Pathways stretches across all 95 counties and features hundreds of landmarks and attractions from the seven genres of music that call Tennessee home: blues, bluegrass, country, gospel, soul, rockabilly and rock ‘n’ roll. Everyone knows about Elvis Presley in Memphis, the historic Ryman Auditorium in Nashville and Dolly Parton’s East-Tennessee roots; but there is a deeper story to be told. From rockabilly to sacred music – our musical history is statewide, diverse and deserves to be heard. This is what makes Tennessee the “Soundtrack of America.” 

Tennessee Music Pathways: 

Launched by the Tennessee Department of Tourist Development in 2018, Tennessee Music Pathways is an online planning guide that connects visitors to the state’s rich musical heritage at tnmusicpathways.com. From the largest cities to the smallest communities, Tennessee Music Pathways stretches across all 95 counties and features hundreds of landmarks from the seven genres of music that call Tennessee home.

Grammy Award-winning producer Dave Audé via 360 MAGAZINE.

Dave Audé – Motions

Listen to Grammy Award-winning Producer, DJ and Remixer Dave Audé discuss his debut album and illustrious career with Vaughn Lowery on 360 MAG podcast HERE.

Los Angeles native Dave Audé is a Grammy Award-winning producer. Currently, he resides in Nashville with his loving wife and three kids. In the early 90’s, he was best known as the co-founder of Moonshine Music.

Audé has produced a plethora of highly acclaimed artists such as Beyoncé, Rihanna, Jennifer Lopez, Céline Dion, Lady Gaga, and Madonna. With 13 number-one singles on the Billboard Dance Music Charts, he has remixed hundreds of songs.

In 2010, Audé was nominated for a Grammy for his remix of Dean Coleman’s, “I Want You.” In 2016, he won for his Bruno Mars makeover of “Uptown Funk.” Dave admits the best part of the Grammy’s, “Knowing I’m nominated.” The DJ adds, ”Obviously winning as well and taking home the trophy, but really getting there first, being nominated by someone and everyone vote for you, and making it to the final five is really amazing.”

Dave Audé’s professionalism and and rhythms reflect his characteristic ease within the realm of mathematical electronic music. With twenty years plus experience, this vet maintains his methodology, “The real focus is on the artist and the song,” Dave confesses.

Audacious Records has produced a 120 as a remixer and 14 #1s as an artist. In 2015, the imprint was listed No.1-Independent Record Label. Of late, they continue dropping hits like, “This Is Our Time” and “Break Out.”

In 2008, he was named musical director for the Pussycat Dolls Tour. Today, he serves as the Grammy co-chairman of the Nashville chapter.

As the ultimate remixer, Dave provides the sonic solution. With a strong background rooted in artist development and musicality, he co-wrote and co-produced Selena Gomez’s Kill’em with Kindness as well as remixed Shaggy and Sting’s Just One Lifetime.

Throughout the decades, he built a reputation as a master remixer and producer, delivering chart-topping results. Audé constantly experiments with various genres, conjuring melodic magic for his fans across the globe. In 2021, Audé received his third GRAMMY nod for “Best Remixed Recording, featuring Ariana Grande and Demi Lovato on “Met Him Last Night.”

Subsequently, Dave Audé made a decision to manufacture his very own menu of music. According to Dave, ‘‘I just decided that I wanted to do my thing and have an album. I really wanted to sit down and write a bunch of music with my friends and put out an album of my own.’’ Audé’s chameleon-like abilities allow him to succeed in any genre, from pop to country and electronic to rock. Upon being asked about his best-loved tracks, “They are all my favorites for different reasons.” Further, for Dave, the dance genre isn’t strictly for the clubs, it’s life’s soundtrack. ”Nowadays dance music is heard in everything, it’s to brush your teeth, to wake you up in the morning, to prepare breakfast, etc.,” shares the megastar.

Some advice to aspiring music producers:

  • “Sometimes the long road is the road to take.”
  • ”You need to gain some experience and meet people.”
  • For all those people who want to work in music: “It’s really about knowing that you want to do something with music, you know, stick with it, keep in mind what your goal is, what your end goal is.”

Article: Andrea Esteban, Vaughn Lowery

Haunted Opera House

It is “spooky season” and nobody can resist a good ghost story this time of year, especially one that recently caught the attention of a group of fashionistas. STAAR Theatre at Antoinette Hall is situated in a town square on the margins of Nashville in Pulaski, Tennessee, USA. Antoinette Hall is the oldest surviving opera house in Tennessee and one of the oldest in the United States…and also one of the most haunted. The theatre has hosted many fine traveling entertainers, local productions and other events over the years. After a massive fire destroyed most of the town of Pulaski in the 1800s, a local man named Mr. Angenol Cox announced that he would be constructing a grand hall on the east side of the square replacing a large portion of the burned area. Named after Mr. Cox’s wife, Antoinette Hall opened on Christmas of 1868. 

Reports from the current opera house executive director, Tammy Pierchoski, show that groups and individuals have experienced cold spots, disembodied voices, shadow figures, equipment interaction, EVP’s, footsteps, batteries being drained, people have been made physically sick to the point of vomiting, people have been scratched, black mist seen, a piano playing on its own, smells of flowers, the feeling of your energy being drained, feelings of being watched and being touched by unseen hands.

When fashion designer, Tess Mann, with Tess Mann Haute Couture and Couture by Tess caught wind of these ghostly stories, she immediately wanted to plan a hauntingly romantic photo shoot to bring awareness to Antoinette Hall’s current restoration project. The two-story Second Empire building is owned by Southern Tennessee Area Arts Repertory (STAAR), a 501c3 nonprofit. The Antoinette Hall Preservation Society, a STAAR companion organization, has launched a major fundraising effort, which supports an extensive stabilization and restoration project. The ultimate goal is to have the STAAR Theatre serve as a regional multicultural arts center. 

During the planning process of this photo shoot production, Ukraine was devastated by the invasion of their beloved country. The styling team felt the right thing to do was show support for their country and use several beautiful Ukrainian wedding dress designs in the photoshoot.  

The architectural project to restore Antoinette Hall  is estimated at $12-15 million dollars in order to preserve its historic beauty and regain its function as a performing arts center. Fashion designer and bridal gown store owner, Tess Mann, has committed to donate $100 from every purchase of her Couture By Tess trademark label, and 5% of her boutique’s sales from selected bridal gowns sold such as Randy Fenoli Bridal and Robert Bullock Bride. This donation period begins January 1, 2023 and will run through December 31, 2024. 

One thing’s for certain, the spirits that haunt Antoinette Hall like their home. Would be a pity to have a bunch of homeless ghosts running around Pulaski, Tennessee, haunting the community. The philanthropic efforts of this creative team never ends. 

Barrett Dennison of El Osito Films in Pulaski shoots Halloween bridal story via 360 MAGAZINE.
Barrett Dennison of El Osito Films in Pulaski shoots Halloween bridal story via 360 MAGAZINE.

Photo Shoot Team Credits

Venue: Staar Theatre at Antoinette Hall 

Creative Direction and Gown Retailer: Tess Mann/Couture by Tess Bridal

Gown Designers:  Armonia and Ida Torez of Pollardi Fashion Group 

Photography: Barrett Dennison/ El Osito Films

Special Effects: Corey Austin Allen

Invitations/Graphic Designer: Porchlight Design Co.

Menswear Producer: Jim’s Formal Wear

Menswear Retailer:  Outlook Menswear

Models/Actors: Jenn Schiavonne-Whorton, Dan Whorton, Grace Coleman, Laura Cox, Krista Grover, Kerusso Coleman, Andy Sisk

PR Agency: Meredith Corning PR

Canadian singer kane brown has new music via 360 MAGAZINE

Kane Brown + JIMMY KIMMEL LIVE!

TAKING OVER TWO NIGHTS ON JIMMY KIMMEL LIVE! NEXT WEEK!

Multi-Platinum entertainer Kane Brown, releases his third studio album, Different Man, today (listen here).  The 17-track album features previously released songs “Grand,” #1 song “Like I Love Country Music,” “Whiskey Sour,” #1 hit “One Mississippi,” “Leave You Alone” and features from Blake Shelton and his wife Katelyn Brown.  The album showcases production work from Brown himself along with Dann Huff, Andrew Goldstein, Lindsay Rimes and Ilya Toshinskiy. In celebration of the release, Brown releases the music video for “Thank God,” a loving duet with his wife Katelyn Brown (watch here).

Brown has already been in full swing with promotion for the album. At the end of last month, he made history with his debut performance of his smash hit single “Grand” on the MTV VMA stage marking him as the first male country artist to hit the iconic stage (watch here).  Brown will continue his release week with a two nights on Jimmy Kimmel Live! (9/13 & 9/14). Kane’s previously announced performance on Good Morning America will be rescheduled for a later date.  Brown spoke with The New York Times for a profile and was featured in the Los Angeles Times Fall Music Preview.

Brown’s latest single, “Like I Love Country Music” reached #1 on the Country Radio charts last month. The accolade earned Brown his eighth chart-topping record on the Country Radio charts. Brown, who has garnered nearly 12 billion career streams to date, also earns his fastest rising single with “Like I Love Country Music.” Additionally, “Like I Love Country Music” topped the Australian and Canadian radio charts, marking Brown’s first 7-week run at the top of the Canadian charts.

Brown will be kicking off his global Drunk or Dreaming Tour on September 17, which will include his first touring dates to Australia and New Zealand as well as his long-awaited return to Canada, Europe and the US. Just announced earlier this week, the US leg of the tour will kick off in Grand Rapids, MI on March 16, 2023 and hit 23 US cities along the way before wrapping in Greenwood Village, CO at Fiddler’s Green Amphitheatre on Saturday, June 10. During the tour, Brown will perform his first solo headlining arena show at the Bridgestone Arena in Nashville on March 31.  Tickets for Drunk or Dreaming are on sale now. Visit his official site for a full list of tour dates, additional pre-sale and ticket on-sale information. Special guests Dustin Lynch, Gabby Barrett and LOCASH will join on select dates. 

About Kane Brown

Named as one of Time’s 100 most influential people in the world, Brown has ascended from social media notability to become one of country music’s most accomplished mainstays with eight chart-topping singles to his name. Noted as “the future of country music” (Billboard), Brown first broke onto the scene with the arrival of his self-titled, 2X Platinum debut album (2016), where he became the first artist ever to lead all five of Billboard ’s main country charts simultaneously. His debut effort, Kane Brown, topped the Billboard Top Country Albums chart for 13 weeks and garnered 7X Platinum-certified hits “Heaven” and “What Ifs”-the fourth and seventh most-streamed country songs of all time (U.S. Nielsen Country On-Demand Streams chart). With the release of his follow-up album Experiment (2018), Brown became the only male country artist in more than 24 years to have his sophomore album debut at the top of the Billboard 200.

Following Experiment, Brown released his multi-song project Mixtape Vol. 1 – which earned Brown an ACM Award nomination for Album of the Year (2021) and an ACM win for “Video of the Year.” A CMA, ACM, Billboard, AMA and People’s Choice Award nominee, Brown has collaborated with numerous artists including Grammy and Academy Award winning singer-songwriter H.E.R. (“Blessed & Free,”) DJ Marshmello (2X Platinum “One Thing Right”), Khalid and Swae Lee (3X Platinum “Be Like That”), “blackbear (Platinum “Memory”), John Legend (“Last Time I Say Sorry”), Camila Cabello (“Never Be The Same” remix), Brooks & Dunn (“Believe”) and Becky G. (“Lost In The Middle Of Nowhere” remix), Lauren Alaina (7X Platinum “What If’s” and Chris Young (2X Platinum “Famous Friends”), which became Billboard’s 2021 year-end No. 1 Country Airplay Song and earned a CMT Award for “Collaborative Video of the Year.” 

Gatlinburg Sevier Company Great Smoke Mountains via MaryKatelyn Price via Tennessee Tourism for use by 360 Magazine

Tennessee Tourism × Earth Day

Known for its natural beauty, unique culture and southern hospitality, Tennessee strives to be at the forefront of sustainability efforts to preserve its wonder and charm for future generations to come. In honor of Earth Day, Tennessee Tourism created a roundup of clean, green and sustainable ways to eat, explore, lodge and travel across the state. Find Tennessee Tourism on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube

A More Sustainable Tennessee

The Solar Farm Welcome Center: The Solar Farm Welcome Center is surrounded by a 25-acre, five-megawatt solar farm, overseen by the University of Tennessee. The center features a circular interactive spectrum exhibit bringing solar power to life for visitors. Here you can learn how solar energy really works, how the sun is keeping the lights on, and the innovations and opportunities solar power brings to Tennesseans.

Tennessee Sustainable Spirits: Tennessee is home to world-class whiskey, wine, beer and fine spirits. Tennessee Sustainable Spirits is a voluntary recognition and technical assistance program by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation which seeks to reduce operational costs and environmental impacts for wineries and wine-growers, breweries and distilleries as well as serve as a gateway to sustainability through popular brands.

Tennessee Sustainable Hospitality: Along with generating economic activity, Tennessee’s hospitality industry has an environmental impact on the state through resource usage and waste generation. Tennessee Sustainable Hospitality and TDEC provide a sustainability roadmap for businesses to follow which includes tips for energy and water conservation, recycling and waste reduction, food waste reduction, communication, education and greening the supply chain.

Keep Tennessee Beautiful: Keep Tennessee Beautiful is the state-level affiliate of Keep America Beautiful, and serves as a state resource for litter prevention, community greening, and recycling and water education. They are also partners with TDOT’s Nobody Trashes Tennessee, the state of Tennessee’s official litter prevention campaign.

Chattanooga Airport: The Chattanooga Airport became the first and only U.S. airport powered by sustainable solar energy with a 2.74-megawatt solar farm consisting of over 9,000 solar panels and battery storage technology that allows the system to run off the grid. Additionally, it has LEED-certified facilities, and the world’s first LEED Platinum Certified aviation terminal.

Celebrate Earth Day with These Statewide Events

EarthDayz at Rock City: Join Rock City Gardens in Chattanooga this April for EarthDayz, a naturally fun outdoor Earth Day celebration. Be mesmerized when vines and trees come to life with methodical movement, hear live percussionists and go on a virtual scavenger hunt while enjoying the great outdoors.

Museum of Science & History’s Annual Plant Sale: This Earth Day weekend the Museum of Science & History (MoSH) in Memphis will host its annual Volunteer Plant Sale on April 22 and 23, 2022 at the Lichterman Nature Center. During the celebration guests can explore the 65-acre nature center and arboretum that is home to lush gardens, wildlife exhibits, and trails through lake, meadow and forest habitats.

Ijams Nature Center’s Sustainable Fashion Event: On Sunday, April 24, the Ijams Nature Center and Natural Alternatives Salon and Spa in Knoxville will present Fleurish: A Sustainable Fashion Event. It will include 12 local designers, along with hair stylists and makeup artists, who will create looks using both recycled and natural materials.

Seed Lending Library at Stokes Brown Library: Dig in the Dirt! Check out free seeds to plant a garden through the Seed Lending Library at Stokes Brown Public Library in Springfield and while you’re there, check out some fun Earth Day reading for all ages, whether children-friendly Earth Day crafts, juvenile and family gardening, or adult sustainable living skills. Try your hand at a window-seal herb garden, porch container garden, raised beds or inground garden and discover your green thumb.

Earth Day at Wolf Gap: Celebrate Earth Day at Wolf Gap in Pulaski by getting on in nature with a Native Plant Walk, observe and assist with freshwater testing, get crafty and make native wildflower seed bombs. There will also be a special Earth Day scavenger hunt, Tenn Pin Alley’s food truck and more.

Where to Stay

David Crockett State Park Cabins: The David Crockett State Park Cabins in Lawrenceburg are the perfect, family weekend getaway. Equipped with geothermal-powered HVAC units and gas fireplaces, these LEED-certified vacation homes are ahead of the curve on energy conservation. The state park also has the Tennessee Naturalist Program which serves as an educational training program to provide service and outreach efforts to help preserve Tennessee’s natural beauty and resources.

The Greenbrier Beechhouse: Enjoy unique, earth-friendly lodging at the luxury treehouse rental in Greenbrier which features tongue-and-groove pine ceilings, a spacious deck, swing bridge, fresh eggs and much more. Visit the magic and check availability HERE.

The Crash Pad: Located in Chattanooga, this eco-friendly, LEED-certified glamping spot is unlike any other. Offering 24 bunk beds or five private rooms, complimentary DIY breakfast and walking distance to some of the area’s best restaurants and bars, this classic yet charming hostel provides visitors with a blend of reclaimed and renewable resources to ensure the best of energy efficiency while supporting local sustainable businesses.

Where to Eat & Drink

The Polk County Tramp Festival: The 64th annual Ramp Tramp Festival in Reliance will take place April 22-23 with two days of live music, crafts and traditional Ramp Meals which includes ramps in eggs, white beans, cornbread, fried potatoes and streaked meat bacon.

Lupi’s Pizza Pies: Lupi’s Pizza Pies in Chattanooga makes their pizzas and salads from local ingredients purchases from local farms and vendors in the community, or from their own Flying Turtle Farm. In addition to producing most of their own meats, vegetables and flowers. Lupi’s recycles everything possible from glass and plastic to trimmings and food waste from the kitchen to feed the pigs at the farm.

The Farm House: The Farm House in Nashville is an innovative farm-to-table restaurant located in downtown Nashville. Prepare your taste buds for Chef/Owner Trey Cioccia‘s ever-changing seasonal menu. This spring enjoy delicious dishes ranging from trout to southern carbonara, bone-in porkchop and much more. 

Get Outside

Memphis Riverfront Park’s Arbor Day Tree Planting and Pollinator Party: On April 29, head to Mud Island to volunteer in planting replacement trees along the river at its Arbor Day Tree Planting. Stick around the next day to participate in the Pollinator Workshop Garden party at Beale Street Landing to learn more about local pollinators.

Springfield Greenway: Springfield Greenway is a scenic 4-mile paved trail that meanders along the historic and business districts, we well as tree-lined Sulfur Creek and public playgrounds. The flat and wide terrain accommodates walkers, runners and bike riders. This greenway has been honored with a 4-star Award, the highest award granted from the Tennessee Recreation and Parks Association

Gatlinburg Skylift Park: Take in Tennessee’s stunning beauty at Gatlinburg Skylift Park’s launch of its special VIP Sunrise Access event. Here, ticket holders will be granted early access to the park to see the sunrise over the stunning Smoky Mountains.

Mirimichi Lakes Golf: Bring your “A-game” this Earth Day at Mirimichi Lakes Golf in Millington. This award-winning course of more than 7,400 yards provides its visitors with an eco-friendly experience. From integrated pest management and water conservation, Mirimichi offers championship-worthy views and environmentally friendly practices for both amateur and professional level players.

Immerse Yourself

Cheekwood Estate and Garden: Cheekwood Estate and Gardens in Nashville serves the public as a botanical garden, arboretum and art museum with an extraordinary historic 1930s estate, 55 acres of cultivated grounds and expansive vistas, 12 distinct gardens and a 1.5-mile-long woodland trail. Visitors are invited to come and celebrate Earth Day by enjoying this year’s Martin Shallenberger Artist-in-Residence, a free 30-minute audio tour of the 1.5-mile-long Ann & Monroe Carell Jr. Family Sculpture Trail, pick up an arboretum map to learn about the 120+ distinct species that live on the property, experience the Bracken Foundation Children’s Garden and partake in Cheekwood’s Wellness 360 which is an initiative in partnership with Vanderbilt Health that encourages visitors to take advantage of Cheekwood’s 55-acres of breathing room to rejuvenate the mind, body and spirit.

Hatchie BirdFest: Head to Brownville to partake in 3-days of bird watching and escape to the great outdoors at the ninth annual Hatchie Birdfest (April 22-24). The event will offer a variety of activities for all ages and skill levels, including nature hikes, educational seminars, a canoe trip down Oneal Lake and much more.

Spring Garden Fair: The Spring Garden Fair in Kingsport is a true celebration of heritage farming and heirloom gardening. From April 30-May 1, come and experience the oldest garden fair in the region where attendees can hear from master gardeners, buy from a wide selection of heritage and native perennials, annuals, trees and shrubs.

The Art Project: Keep the sustainable, family-friendly fun going in Memphis at The Art Project, a studio where kids dive into their craft skills and get creative with a wide array of supplies and recycled materials for their very own DIY piece of art.

The Homestead Festival: The Homestead Festival takes place June 3-4 at a 100-acre historic farm in Columbia and will feature a variety of entry-level homesteading activities, talks and demonstrations during the day and then musical performances on the main stage at sunset. The festival was created for those interested in getting started in homesteading or living more sustainably by teaching them the skills of food preservation, raising chickens, making soap, homeschooling and more. 

Memphis Shelby Company via Tennessee Tourism for use by 360 Magazine

Tennessee Music Pathways

From Nashville to Memphis to Bristol, Tennessee is known for its music significance and contributions across the world. From the music legends of Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, and Dolly Parton to the young music stars of today such as Taylor Swift, Kelsea Ballerini, and Justin Timberlake, seven genres of music call Tennessee home–Country, Rock ‘N’ Roll, Blues, Bluegrass, Rockabilly, Soul, and Gospel. The state’s rich musical heritage offers a musical oasis for all generations through a broad array of events, locations and stories that are all made uniquely in Tennessee.

Tennessee Music Pathways: The Tennessee Music Pathways connects visitors to the people, places and events that made Tennessee the international music mecca it has become. Throughout the 95 counties of the state, you can see legendary artists’ hometowns, famous music venues, museums dedicated to sharing this rich music history in interactive ways and much more. You can also travel the Ken Burns Country Music Pathways featuring the locations spotlighted in Ken Burns’ documentary Country Music.  

Tennessee Songwriters Week: Tennessee Songwriters Week (Feb. 20-26, 2022) supports music venues, generates awareness of songwriters’ contributions to Tennessee, paves the way for future artists and inspires travelers to experience the state’s music stories, history, attractions and venues.

Explore the Historical Sites

The Birthplace of Country Music Museum: It was in 1927 in Northeast Tennessee where Ralph Peer conducted recording in which country music foundation artists, the Carter Family and Jimmy Rodgers, were discovered. Johnny Cash would go on to say these sessions were “the single most important event in the history of country music,” and now guests can learn about these sessions and the story at The Birthplace of Country Music Museum in Bristol. Visit Bristol in September to attend the award-winning Bristol Rhythm & Roots Reunion where the roots of traditional Appalachian music are brought to life through talented musicians.

Ryman Auditorium: Head to Nashville to walk on the hallowed ground of the Ryman Auditorium as you tour this historical icon. The Mother Church was the original site of the Grand Ole Opry, “the show that made country music famous.” It is a culture engine for Nashville and continues to bring music and fans together for over 128 years through concerts and behind-the-scenes tours. 

Graceland: Second only to the White House, Graceland is the most-visited residence in the country. Purchased by Elvis Presley in 1957, it was his home until his death 20 years later. In 1982, it opened to the public and more than 20 million people have visited since. In 2017, it expanded to include Elvis Presley’s Memphis, a 200,000-square-foot-square exhibition space, museum and automobile collection, all in Memphis, Tennessee.

Find more of Tennessee’s Music History Destinations HERE.

Feel the Sounds

The Caverns: They say bluegrass is mountain music, but sometimes you need to go down below. Descend more than 300 feet underground to a stone amphitheater in The Caverns, situated at the base of Monteagle Mountain near Pelham, where Bluegrass Underground has hosted countless music greats. Visitors to the Volunteer state will not want to miss the chance to get down in such an unforgettable place.

Bluebird Café: If you’re looking for the next Garth Brooks, take in a show at The Bluebird Café, a singer-songwriter haven in Nashville. The tiny venue always sells out, regardless who’s playing, so get tickets in advance or come early to wait in line to make sure you get a seat to one of the hottest writers’ rounds in Nashville. Afterwards, head to the Broadway Historic District: Honky Tonk Highway where visitors can hop around to the numerous famous bars where many music legends first got their start such as Tootsie’s Orchid Lounge where Kris Kristofferson, Patsy Cline and Waylon Jennings were all regular customers. Every year in June mark your calendars for CMA Music Festival where country music biggest, brightest and upcoming stars takeover downtown Nashville.

Beale Street Historic District: Declared by an act of Congress as “Home of Blues,” Beale Street in Memphis is a historic center for jazz, blues and rock enthusiasts. Here, relive some of the musical greats such as B.B. King and Louis Armstrong while exploring more than 25 bars, cubs and restaurants that line the district. Plan a trip this April 29- May 1 for the popular Beale Street Music Festival where the 2022 lineup is filled with some of the hottest stars including Foo Fighters, Van Morrison, Weezer, and many more.

Feel the Music Now Playing in Tennessee HERE.

Connect to the Music

Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum: Learn about all the country music greats at the world’s largest music museum, the Country Music Hall of Fame in downtown Nashville. Walk through 350,000 square feet of galleries, educational centers, ever-changing exhibits and much more.

West Tennessee Delta Heritage Center: While in West Tennessee, make a trip to the West Tennessee Delta Heritage Center where you can find the home of Sleepy John Estes, and the one-room schoolhouse Tine Turner attended which now houses memorabilia including costumers, posters, videos and much more at the only Tina Turner museum in the world.

National Museum of African American Music: The first of its kind in the world, the National Museum of African American Music in Nashville celebrates and honors the vast music contributions of African Americans. Step inside to see interactive exhibits, videos, photos and more of famous artists from B.B. King to Beyonce, Fisk Jubilee Singers and Aretha Franklin. Learn about the history and music greats who birthed genres like R&B, jazz, blues and hip hop.

Stax Museum of American Soul: In Soulsville U.S.A, Memphis, the Stax Museum of American Soul Music presents the story of Stax, from early hits from music icons such as Booker T. & the MG’s and Isaac Hayes. Next door is Stax Music Academy, where students can learn about soul and tour the world playing it. Just around the corner from the museum is Royal Studios where current soul artists such as Bruno Mars cut their recent hits such as “Uptown Funk.”

Museum Center of 5ive Points: Cleveland is in the heart of the Ocoee Region, an area rich in traditional crafts and music. The Museum Center at 5ive Points in Cleveland’s Five Points neighborhood includes regional crafts on exhibit and for sale together with live music events and maintains a permanent exhibit called “The Red Back: America’s Best-Loved Hymnal.” These famous hymnal books and their signature red covers lived in the pew-back pockets of churches around the U.S. and were printed in Cleveland using a Linotype, which is also on display.

About Tennessee Department of Tourist Development

Tennessee is the home of the blues, bluegrass, country, gospel, soul, rockabilly and rock ‘n’ roll— delivering an unparalleled experience of beauty, history and family adventure, infused with music that creates a vacation that is the “Soundtrack of America. Made in Tennessee.” Join other Tennessee travelers by following them on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube.

Protest via BIG30 for use by 360 Magazine

BIG30 – Protest

Fresh off the release of his explosive debut project, BIG30 released his first new music this year with hard-hitting: “Protest”. The track is a dynamic blend of technical skill and steely intensity, mixing percussive flows and 30’s vivid recollections of life. The track, which pays tribute to Pooh Shiesty, 30’s friend and frequent collaborator, comes alongside an official music video that has also been released.

King of Killbranch, released last Fall, marked BIG30‘s most ambitious effort to date. The project solidified him as one of the strongest newcomers of the past year and began his journey to rap dominance. Prior to the project release, he kicked off 2021 with a celebrated feature on Pooh Shiesty‘s RIAA Gold-certified “Neighbors,” which peaked at #51 on the Billboard Hot 100. From there, he completed a trap artist rite of passage by appearing on Gucci Mane‘s “Shit Crazy,” garnering the attention of Complex, Vulture, and other tastemaking outlets in the process. With several standout singles and his debut project at his back, BIG30 is set to make the most of his moment, which is starting to look like it will last a very long time. 

About BIG30

Armed with a blistering delivery, menacing lyrics, and bullet-riddled memories from the Memphis streets, BIG30–the 21-year-old rapper to watch–unloads casual threats and bleak aphorisms with a concussive force that’s beginning to reverberate through the industry. His verse on Pooh Shiesty’s 2021 single “Neighbors” was the shot heard ’round the world, giving 30 his first RIAA Gold certification without even releasing his own project. By the time the duo recorded “Neighbors,” more than two years after they started writing tracks together, BIG30 had refined his flow and arrived more confident than ever. That song peaked at No. 51 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart and contributed to the now 116M+ global streams that 30 can claim. Until then, 30 had been watching YouTube views and Facebook shares, not RIAA-certifications, especially since he wasn’t sure if the public was ready for the raw content of his bars. Now, he takes advice from people like 50 Cent and records with the idols he grew up listening to. 30, the father of two children (with another on the way) plans to one day have his own record label and millions to his name. After signing to N-Less/Bread Gang Entertainment, he has the chance to reach the potential his label boss saw in him right away. Now, as he shares his debut project with the world, he’s ready to prove his spot among the many heavyweights who’ve given him their co-sign.

Mina Tocalini, 360 Magazine, Ray LaMontagne

TrueSouth Season Four Episode Five

On Sunday, Jan. 16 at 7 p.m. ET, TrueSouth Presented by YellaWood concludes its fourth season with a special fifth episode that takes viewers on a Mississippi River road trip. This SEC Network series revolves around two food stories told from one place, which TrueSouth sets in conversation to make larger points about Southern beliefs and identities.

Episode Summary

This episode is a behind-the-scenes romp up and out of Henderson, La., through New Orleans, following the Mississippi River to Greenville, Miss., and, finally, Memphis, Tenn.

The story begins at Turtles Bar on the Atchafalaya levee. In New Orleans at Dooky Chase‘s, the 80-year-old Creole restaurant, gumbo is eaten and old fashioneds are sipped. Next comes beer at Snake and Jake’s Christmas Club Lounge, the diviest dive bar in the city. Before the crew leaves for the drive north, they buy wine and snacks at Keife and Company. Following the river, they cross into Mississippi. At Doe’s Eat Place in Greenville, they indulge in porterhouses and a well-earned night off. The epic road trip ends on Summer Avenue in Memphis, Tenn., with a quick stop at La Guadalupana for chilaquiles. And, just down the street, biscuits at Bryant’s Breakfast with hip hop legends 8Ball and MJG.

Music is forever important. For episode 17, the crew sampled, among others, the City Champs out of Memphis, a soulful jazz trio that reimagines Stax-era sounds. The TrueSouth playlist on Spotify shares the full soundtrack and score of every season of TrueSouth.

Season Summary

Season four of TrueSouth began in Scott, La., the buckle on the Boudin Belt that stretches across Cajun Country. Episode two of the show floated to Lake Village, Ark., just across the Mississippi River, where Santa “Cowboy” Lee cooks fat T-bones at a pizza restaurant, and Rhoda’s Famous Hot Tamales bakes half-pecan and half-sweet potato pies that are worth a three-hour drive. For episode three, the crew floated into Mobile Bay, Ala., for breakfast cocktails at a beach bar and fish and grits and second chances at a steamtable restaurant. We drove north to St. Louis, Mo. for episode four, where the crew developed a unified sandwich theory of the city, dependent on wave after wave of immigrants.

About TrueSouth

TrueSouth is a limited series on Southern food and culture, airing monthly on SEC Network. Four-time James Beard Award winner John T. Edge writes and hosts the show, which is executive produced by two-time New York Times best-selling author, ESPN senior writer Wright Thompson, and produced by Bluefoot Entertainment. The series, now in its fourth season, revolves around two food stories told from one place, which TrueSouth sets in conversation to make larger points about Southern beliefs and identities. 

About SEC Network

The Southeastern Conference and ESPN launched SEC Network on August 14, 2014. The network televises hundreds of games across the SEC’s 21 sports annually. Programming includes in-depth analysis and storytelling in studio shows such as SEC Nation, Thinking Out Loud, Out Of Pocket and Rally Cap, daily news and information with The Paul Finebaum Show and SEC Now, original content such as TrueSouth, SEC Storied, and SEC Inside, and more. Hundreds of additional live events are available for streaming exclusively on SEC Network’s digital companion, SEC Network+, via the ESPN App and their website. The network is also available in more than 135 countries throughout Europe, the Middle East, Africa, and Asia via ESPN Player, ESPN’s sports streaming service in the region.