Posts tagged with "museum"

Radisson’s New Hotel in Istanbul

Radisson Hotel Istanbul, Harbiye features 90 comfortable rooms and suites. Most of the hotel’s superior and premium rooms offer guests sea-view balconies overlooking the glistening Bosphorus and guest can enjoy a relaxing design and modern facilities in addition to the city vistas. Free Wi-Fi, work desks, rain showers and individual room climate control are just some of the features that make each room memorable. Nearby historic and cultural sites including the Atatürk Cultural Center, the Dolmabahçe Palace, and the recently opened Galataport Istanbul offer a breathing, amazing environment for culture and arts, shopping and dining.

A stone’s throw from the hotel, guests can discover the vibrant and modern entertainment complex, Taksim Square, which boasts a variety of restaurants and shops and where numerous parades and celebrations take place throughout the year. The renovated Atatürk Cultural Center is a key local point of Taksim Square and is home to Istanbul’s Opera House, the Theater Hall, the National Library, and AKM Gallery, a dream for art lovers and considered the beating heart of Istanbul’s art scene. Several of Istanbul’s most iconic and popular cultural destinations such as the Topkapı Palace Museum, the Hagia Sophia, and the bustling Grand Bazaar are all within easy access to the hotel. For those looking to do a spot of shopping, İstiklal Street, one of the most famous shopping avenues in Istanbul, is also a less than ten-minute walk away from the hotel.

After exploring the sights of Istanbul, guests can enjoy the Turkuaz restaurant for a delightful à la carte dining experience where guests can try local Turkish flavors and a selection of international cuisine. After a busy day, guests can also unwind with a hot drink in the privacy of their room or relax in the hotel’s spa, featuring a Turkish bath, sauna, and steam bath. Radisson Hotel Istanbul, Harbiye also has two meeting rooms with stylish and functional spaces for meetings up to 25 people which feature the latest audiovisual technology, including high speed Wi-Fi, a sound system and LCD projector.

Yilmaz Yildirimlar, Area Senior Vice President, Central & Eastern Europe, Russia and Turkey at Radisson Hotel Group, says; “We are excited to welcome another Radisson branded hotel in the heart of Istanbul. We remain strongly committed to cementing our leading position in Istanbul with both leisure and business destinations across the country. We have established clear objectives to reach over 50 hotels in operation and under development by 2023 and we are accelerating our growth accordingly.’’

Vefa Çelik General Manager of Radisson Hotel Istanbul, Harbiye says; ”We are very pleased with the cooperation with Radisson Hotel Group. Turkey is aiming for 42 million tourists and 35 billion U.S. dollars in tourism income for 2022, Radisson Hotel Group is in a prime position to offer guests a diverse guest experience to create memorable moments and we believe that our guests will enjoy exploring this unique and historical city with us.’’

Travel graphic via Samantha Miduri for use by 360 Magazine

2023 ZEITZ MOCAA × UNIVERSITY OF THE WESTERN CAPE MUSEUM

The 2023 Zeitz MOCAA & University of the Western Cape (UWC) Museum Fellowship Programme call for applications officially opens on 15 June 2022.

This call marks the second iteration of the year-long programme, developed to educate a new generation of art and museum professionals from Africa. With the aim to foster the growth of curatorial practice and advance scholarship on contemporary art discourse from the continent, the programme offers fellows exposure to museum practice facilitated by Zeitz MOCAA senior staff and is underpinned by rigorous academic scholarship at UWC’s Department of History and Centre for Humanities Research (CHR). 

“We are pleased to once again be collaborating with the University of the Western Cape on this incredible initiative to educate the next generation of exhibition makers and curatorial thinkers. We remain committed to merging scholarship on contemporary art production and circulation from Africa and its diaspora and hope to contribute to a new group of skilled professionals looking to work within museums, galleries, art centres, private and public collection management, biennials, art publishing, festivals, universities and more,” says Koyo Kouoh, Executive Director and Chief Curator at Zeitz MOCAA

During the 12-month Museum Fellowship Programme, fellows will engage in discourse around contemporary art, curatorial practice, art education, conservation, heritage and museology from Africa and the African diaspora. They will study and work with both institutions towards an accredited BA Honours qualification. This includes enrolling in courses on historiography, curatorship, museums, heritage and public history at UWC’s Department of History as well as obtaining work experience at Zeitz MOCAA in the Curatorial, Collections & Exhibition Management, Art Education and Institutional Advancement departments. Successful fellows will actively contribute to the research, planning, execution and management of museum projects, ranging from exhibitions, publishing and public programming to art education and fundraising.

“It is fitting that applications for the 2023 Zeitz MOCAA & University of the Western Cape (UWC) Museum Fellowship Programme opens one day before South Africa’s Youth Day on 16 June and during Youth Month. Our aim is to continue promoting narratives that are important to the building of artistic and curatorial communities and this feeds directly into the South African government’s goals of developing plans for a more effective arts and culture curriculum and supporting income and funding models for arts and culture initiatives,” says Rory Bester, Associate Professor in the Department of History at UWC.

The Fellowship begins in January 2023 and is open to individuals who are citizens of an African country. It covers the costs of tuition, accommodation, basic health insurance and a monthly stipend. Travel to South Africa and visa costs are not included. 

Applications for the 2023 programme close on 15 July 2022 and successful applicants will be contacted directly by 5 September 2022. Only the first 150 applications received will be considered for review.

For more information and to apply, visit zeitzmocaa.museum

Zeitz MOCAA and the University of the Western Cape (UWC) celebrate diversity in all its forms, including gender, ethnicity and sexual orientation. 

The Zeitz MOCAA & University of the Western Cape (UWC) Museum Fellowship Programme is supported by Zeitz MOCAA, the University of the Western Cape, AKO Foundation and Africa No Filter.

NYBG – ATT

The New York Botanical Garden‘s major, institution-wide exhibition Around the Table: Stories of the Foods We Love examines the art and science of foodways and food traditions, many dating back thousands of years. Visitors can explore the rich cultural history of what we eat and learn that – from global dietary staples such as rice, beans, squash, and corn to the regional spice and flavor provided by peppers, greens, and tomatoes – plants are at the base of all culinary customs. The presentation features expansive displays of living edible plants; art and science installations; weekend celebrations; wellness, culinary-themed, and children’s programming; and opportunities to gather at artist-designed tables set throughout NYBG’s 250 acres, bringing to life stories about the featured and other notable edible plants. Around the Table: Stories of the Foods We Love is on view June 4 through September 11, 2022.

“We are thrilled and gratified to be able to present Around the Table: Stories of the Foods We Love,” said Jennifer Bernstein, CEO and The William C. Steere Sr. President of The New York Botanical Garden, “The creation of this exhibition has truly been a collaborative and communal experience and a labor of love. We hope everyone will visit the Botanical Garden this summer and take a little time to uncover the botanical origins of the foods they think they already know, cultivate deeper understanding of the environmental and social impacts of our food choices, and discover the diversity and beauty of plants that are grown for cuisine around the world.”

Displays of Living Edible Plants at the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory

Showcasing hundreds of varieties of edible plants, including peppers, squash, cabbage, beans, grains, corn, banana, sugarcane, taro, and breadfruit, three installations in and around the Haupt Conservatory beckon visitors to explore the diversity and beauty of food plants grown around the world.

  • In the Conservatory’s Seasonal Exhibition Galleries, a wide assortment of edible herbaceous plants and fruit-bearing trees flourishing in containers, entwined in overhead trellises, and reaching skyward from green walls ideal for compact urban spaces inspire appreciation of the plants that nourish us.
  • The Conservatory Courtyards offer an array of familiar and surprising edible plants from across the globe – from dietary staples of the tropical regions of the world, including rice, taro, and banana, to crops suited to arid regions of the globe, including figs, citrus, and pearl millet. Peppers and tomatoes and other nightshades, grapes and olives, a gourd trellis, and a spirits garden featuring plants used in the creation of beer, wine, and liquors round out this diverse display.
  • A portion of the Botanical Garden’s Conservatory Lawn is transformed into an undulating field of dwarf sorghum and barley, traditional grains well-suited to NYBGߣs climate, allowing observation of the sowing, nurturing, harvesting, and replanting processes of these foundational food plants over the course of the exhibition.

African American Garden at the Edible Academy

Curated by Dr. Jessica B. Harris, America’s leading scholar on the foods of the African Diaspora, African American Garden: Remembrance & Resilience celebrates African American food and gardening histories and the contributions of essential plants to American foodways. Dr. Harris has worked with historians, heritage seed collectors, and NYBG’s Edible Academy staff to present a sequence of eight garden beds arranged in a semi-circle that celebrate African American food and gardening histories and their ongoing contributions to America’s plant and food culture. The experience also includes an orientation center, shaded seating areas, and a Hibiscus Drink Station designed by scenic designer Lawrence E. Moten III, whose include Broadway’s Chicken & Biscuits. The African American Garden also features a Poetry Walk curated by Cave Canem Foundation, the premier home for Black poetry, committed to cultivating the artistic and professional growth of African American poets.

Art and Science Installations Throughout the Garden

After a call for artists that resulted in many impressive submissions, The New York Botanical Garden selected 30 local artists, living or working in the Bronx, to design and create tables that explore central themes from Around the Table. On display across the Botanical Garden’s 250 acres, the artist-designed tables incorporate notable food plants, highlighting the plants’ history and cultural significance as well personal stories of food traditions and celebrations. The tables and accompanying interpretation encourage sitting, sharing, and storytelling. Visitors are prompted to learn more via the Bloomberg Connects mobile application, and at select tables, to create artworks or tell their own food stories.

In the LuEsther T. Mertz Library Building Art Gallery, visitors can examine the social and cultural impacts of the American food system through displayed works by contemporary Colombian-American artist Lina Puerta in Lina Puerta: Accumulated Wisdom. Puerta celebrates and acknowledges the essential, often invisible, role of farmworkers, the relationship between nature and the human-made, and ancestral knowledge in mixed-media sculptures, installations, collages, hand-made paper paintings, and wall hangings that incorporate materials ranging from textiles and handmade paper to found, personal, and recycled objects.

Launched in 2021, NYBG’s Bronx Foodways Oral Histories Project is a multiyear effort to collect, record, and archive personal food narratives from Bronx urban farmers and gardeners who focus on community gardens as centers for food, heritage, community, and social justice – making them accessible to the public. Each year, The New York Botanical Garden commissions two public murals celebrating the gardens and farmers from the Oral Histories Project. As part of the Around the Table exhibition, celebrated Bronx-based artist Andr Trenier is creating the initial murals. In NYBG’s Arthur and Janet Ross Gallery, . . .la tierra es nuestro alimento/the land is our nourishment presents oral history videos and photos of Bronx gardens taken by students from the Bronx Documentary Center as well as highlights Trenier’s murals.

Also in the Mertz Library Building, the creativity and ingenuity of plant scientists and plant-based chefs is exhibited, revealing the science and art of agriculture and cuisine. In Sowing Resilience: Origins and Change in Agriculture in the Elizabeth Britton Science Gallery, visitors learn how scientific knowledge from both ancient and recent pasts’ traditional and Indigenous methods of agriculture to new genetic technologies’ can provide insight into creating a more resilient food system to feed the growing planet in the face of the climate crisis and other environmental challenges. The work of NYBG scientists and others highlights how far domesticated plants have come from their origins and the importance of conserving crop biodiversity into the future. In the Rondina and LoFaro Gallery, Steam, Sear, Saut: 150 Years of American Vegetarian Cookbooks showcases 19th- and 20th-century plant-based cookbooks from the LuEsther T. Mertz Library‘s William R. Buck Cookbook Collection, as well as colorfully illustrated seed catalogs, to highlight the ways home chefs’ relationships to vegetables have changed through time. Recipe Roundtable in the Nathaniel Lord Britton Science Rotunda offers visitors an interactive opportunity to connect with Around the Table exhibition content by responding to various prompts calling for drawings of favorite veggies to reflections on culturally significant plants and ingredients to be recorded on recipe cards, which are then displayed throughout the Rotunda.

Bountiful Programming for All Ages

Visitors to Around the Table: Stories of the Foods We Love can enjoy diverse and engaging public programming for all ages. Highlights include artist-designed table tours, food demonstrations, children’s activities, themed weekend celebrations, and more.

On Saturday, June 18, 10 a.m.ߝ12p.m., a symposium, A Seat at the Table, includes two compelling sessions exploring how Black farming informs American history and culture in New York City and across the country:

  • In “Celebrating the African American Farmer,” Natalie Baszile, author of the 2021 anthology We Are Each Other’s Harvest, joins Dr. Jessica B. Harris, food historian and scholar, for a conversation in Ross Hall. Their wide-ranging dialogue covers topics from the historical perseverance and resilience of Black farmers and their connection to the American land, to the generations of farmers who continue to farm despite systemic discrimination and land loss.
  • “Stories from the Farm,” moderated by farmer, urban gardener, food advocate, activist, and NYBG Trustee Karen Washington, is a multigenerational panel discussion devoted to stories of Black farmers from many historical perspectives: North and South, Upstate New York and the Bronx, sharecroppers to family growers and urban farmers. Panelists including “chefarmer” Matthew Raiford and farmer/cultural anthropologist Dr. Gail Myers give historical and contemporary context for Black farmers’ contributions to communities and food justice movements in urban and rural America.

Each week during Around the Table, Wellness Wednesdays serves up the NYBG Farmers Market, food demonstrations, and health and wellness activities.

Offerings at the Edible Academy include food demonstrations and tastings, participatory gardening activities, , and food-themed celebration weekends such as Totally Tomatoes throughout the run of the exhibition.

In “Around the Kids’ Table,” guided by Everett Children’s Adventure Garden Explainers, children and their families tell stories about the foods that are most meaningful to them and enjoy exhibition-related writing, art, and nature-based activities. A Story Walk showcases author Tony Hillery’s children’s book Harlem Grown (Simon & Schuster/Paula Wiseman Books, 2020)about a community garden started by schoolchildren in an empty lot in Harlem, New York, in 2011 that has grown into a network of gardens throughout the city.

On select days, complementary exhibition programming includes “The Art of the Table,” during which individual table artists engage with visitors in special activities such as demonstrations, group painting, or storytelling.

About the Exhibition Advisory Committee

The New York Botanical Garden engaged advisors with expertise in documenting recipes and food histories, edible gardening past and present, food justice and food insecurity, global and local foodways, nutrition, the science of edible plants, and the visual arts to join a committee and participate in the development of Around the Table: Stories of the Foods We Love. Members include:

  • Toby Adams, Gregory Long Director of the Edible Academy, The New York Botanical Garden
  • Journei Manzayila Bimwala, leader and co-chair, Foodway at Concrete Plant Park
  • Garrett Broad, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Communications and Media Studies, Fordham University, and author of More Than Just Food: Food Justice and Community Change (University of California Press, 2016)
  • Kate Gardner Burt, Ph.D., R.D., assistant professor, DPD Director, and Undergraduate Program Director, the Dietetics, Foods, and Nutrition Program at Lehman College, City University of New York
  • Ursula Chanse, Director of Bronx Green-Up and Community Horticulture, The New York Botanical Garden
  • Winston Chiu, chef and co-founder, Rethink Food NYC, Inc.
  • Von Diaz, documentary producer, author of Coconuts & Collards: Recipes and Stories from Puerto Rico to the Deep South (University Press of Florida, 2018), and recipe and essay contributor to The New York TimesThe Washington PostBon AppetitFood & WineEater, and Epicurious
  • Sheryll Durrant, urban farmer, educator, and food justice advocate; Food and Agriculture Coordinator for New Roots Community Farm, and resident manager of Kelly Street Garden in the South Bronx
  • Jessica B. Harris, Ph.D., Americaߣs leading expert on the food and foodways of the African Diaspora, author of 12 critically acclaimed cookbooks, and 2020 James Beard Lifetime Achievement Award recipient
  • Mohammed Mardah, chairman, the African Advisory Council to the Bronx Borough President, and co-founder and executive director of Africans Help Desk
  • Alex McAlvay, Ph.D., Kate E. Tode Assistant Curator in the Institute of Economic Botany, The New York Botanical Garden
  • Lauren Mohn, Ph.D., Visiting Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies, Swarthmore College
  • Dario Mohr, New York-based educator and interdisciplinary artist who creates interactive sanctuary experiences, and founder and director, AnkhLave Arts Alliance, Inc.
  • Gary Paul Nabhan, internationally celebrated nature writer, agrarian activist, and ethnobiologist who works to conserve the links between biodiversity and cultural diversity
  • Henry Obispo, founder and CEO of Born Juice and ReBORN Farms
  • Lina Puerta, mixed-media contemporary artist whose work has been exhibited at the Ford Foundation Gallery, El Museo del Barrio, Wave Hill, and 21c Museum Hotels, and who recently completed an artist residency and exhibition at the Sugar Hill Children’s Museum of Art & Storytelling
  • Michael Purugganan, Ph.D., Silver Professor of Biology and former Dean of Science at New York University

About The New York Botanical Garden

Founded in 1891, The New York Botanical Garden is the most comprehensive botanical garden in the world and an integral part of the cultural fabric of New York City, anchored in the Bronx. Visitors come to the Garden to connect with nature for joy, beauty, and respite, and for renowned plant-based exhibitions, music and dance, and poetry and lectures. Innovative children’s education programs promote environmental sustainability and nutrition awareness, graduate programs educate the next generation of botanists, while engaging classes inspire adults to remain lifelong learners. The 250-acre verdant landscape, which includes a 50-acre, old-growth forest, and the landmark Enid A. Haupt Conservatory support living collections of more than one million plants. Unparalleled resources are also held in the LuEsther T. Mertz Library, the world’s most important botanical and horticultural library with 11 million archival items spanning ten centuries, and William and Lynda Steere Herbarium, the largest in the Western Hemisphere with 7.8 million plant and fungal specimens. Committed to protecting the planet’s biodiversity and natural resources, Garden scientists work on-site in cutting-edge molecular labs and in areas worldwide where biodiversity is most at risk.

For more information about and to purchase tickets for Around the Table: Stories of the Foods We Love, please go HERE.

Ukraine's Kalush Orchestra via 360 Magazine by 360 Magazine

How did the pandemic affect culture? These 3 new pieces of work will tell you 

We all know how much the world has been affected by the pandemic since March 2020. Social habits, travel, and sanitary measures are just three areas that have changed drastically in that time, and it will take a while for these to return to normal. 

In the art world, however, the changes haven’t been as well documented, even though the shock was just as severe for artists, writers, and museums.  

Three new pieces of work are about to change that, offering perspectives from a bookstore owner, a musician, and a museum curator during lockdown.  

All released in spring 2022, they’re part of an important seam of work emerging from the chaos of the COVID-19 pandemic.  

Hello, Bookstore 

When Matt Tannenbaum launched a GoFundMe campaign shortly after lockdown, it was the culmination of an ongoing trend.  

Even before the pandemic struck, his bookshop was affected by the dominance of online sellers. In the era where people shop online instead of walking to the shops, play on an online casino instead of visiting a real-life venue, and stream movies instead of going to the cinema, it’s hardly surprising that people choose to purchase books online, too. 

Yet, not even Tannenbaum could have predicted what would happen next. The fundraising campaign doubled its target amount as sympathetic book lovers flooded the store with cash. Within just two days, the total had hit $120,000, meaning that the owner was out of debt for the first time in his career. 

The reason was clear: the pandemic had brought home just how much independent bookstores meant to their local communities, or the ‘lifeblood’ as documentary creator Adam Zax put it. Far from doubling down on internet sellers, book buyers were showing support for those small book sellers that exist for the love of reading, not profit. 

The documentary attempts to show the day-to-day life of the business, rather than just a series of talking heads. In it, viewers can see Tannenbaum talking to customers and reading pieces of literature out loud at random points during the day. Zax wanted to ‘capture the soul’ of the shop, which he started filming before the pandemic as part of a multi-year timeframe. 

It means that the pandemic, and the subsequent cash windfall, comes along coincidentally, but ends up adding to a remarkably insightful piece of work.  

Charli XCX – Alone Together 

What effect did lockdown have on the mind of a musician? Charli XCX’s fourth album, Alone Together, attempts to provide an answer. Produced in just 40 days, the record is a fascinating glimpse into how the singer and her partner dealt with an enforced period of cohabitation. 

At the start of the lockdown, Charli revealed how she was going to ‘open up’ the process of making a record to an online audience: she promised to share demos, get real-time feedback, and even crowdsource lyrics with fans during production.  

The whole process was captured on video, which became the basis for an accompanying documentary for the album. Both pieces of work share the same name: a description of how, even though everyone involved was isolated, they collaborated to form a record. They were ‘alone together’.  

The record is an interesting experiment, and proof that musicians can create entire pieces of work online now, hooking up whole studios to the web and producing music in real-time.  

The Guardian called it ‘a very modern, fusional kind of digital fandom’ and compared it to anime hit show Belle, which depicts a lonely teenager becoming famous in a virtual world of online fans and digital concerts.  

If Charli XCX’s work tells us one thing about the pandemic, it’s that the old way of making music has given way to the digital era. 

The Museum: A Short History of Crisis and Resilience  

The idea of a book about how museums have dealt with crises in the past came to author Samuel Redman before COVID-19 struck. So it was a coincidence when the biggest health emergency of the last 100 years happened just as he was getting into his stride.  

The pandemic goes alongside past crises, such as the Great Depression and the Second World War, in Redman’s investigation into how these institutions adapted to sudden change but have remained committed to core values over the course of centuries.  

According to Redman, though, some events had different effects to others. The Depression, for example, changed the fiscal nature of museums, while the 1970s art strike failed to have a lasting impact.  

The book also has one eye on the future, asking what kinds of crises could affect the world, and whether museums will remain such a crucial part of human life.  

If the institutions continue to show the same resilience, then there’s a good chance they’ll be here for centuries to come, according to Redman.  

Through these three pieces of pandemic art, we can see a common paradox: that is, despite the unprecedented pace of change, many things continue to remain the same.  

On one hand, buying books, recording music, and viewing exhibitions have all taken on a digital veneer: we can now do all three things online, something that was impossible just a few years ago. 

Yet at the same time, the desire to create, consume and remember is as strong as ever, which suggests that the creative side of human nature can handle anything that’s thrown at it – including a once-in-a-lifetime pandemic. 

Bike Night via Tim McCormick for Harley Davidson Museum for use by 360 Magazine

May at HD Museum

Did you miss the Harley-Davidson Museum’s Bike Night Concert Series as much as we did? Have you spent countless hours shining the chrome on your bike as you counted down the days until the first Thursday of May? Your patience is rewarded this week when Bella Cain kicks off the season on May 5. All wheels are welcome to roll down to campus every Thursday to enjoy free live music from some of Milwaukee’s favorite bands, drool-worthy rolling sculptures, and tasty treats hot off the grill and ice-cold beverages.

And if you’re looking to throw a leg over the latest Harley-Davidson motorcycle to experience the fun and freedom that only H-D can deliver, mark your calendars for May 7 (and nearly every Saturday this summer) for the H-D Museum’s Saturday Demo Rides powered by Harley-Davidson Insurance. Choose from a dozen of the newest models and take a cruise through the neighboring Menomonee Valley. And yes, it’s offered for free at the H-D Museum.

Plus, make sure you show mom some love on Mother’s Day, Sunday, May 8. Roll two-up or bring down the whole family and take advantage of our Annual Pass perks for discounted admission, gifts at The Shop and meals at MOTOR Bar & Restaurant. On Mother’s Day, spend $150 or more at the shop and receive a free bracelet. And, make sure you fuel up at MOTOR’s Mother’s Day Brunch. Raise a glass to mom with bottomless mimosas for $14.95 or our Bloody Mary Bar for $12.95. Be sure to look out for complimentary carnations for moms and temporary tattoos for kids (while supplies last). 

And the annual Armed Forces Day Celebration lands at the Harley-Davidson Museum on Saturday, May 21. Join the Harley-Davidson Museum and active military and veterans as we honor the brave individuals serving in the United States Armed Forces. Together with the Milwaukee Armed Services Committee, the H-D Museum invites everyone to show your support for our troops on Armed Forces Day.

Programming/Events

H-D Museum Bike Night Concert Series powered by Budweiser and Bulleit Bourbon: All wheels unite every Thursday from 5 to 9 PM at the Harley-Davidson Museum. Join riders (and non-riders) for free live music from some of Milwaukee’s favorite bands, fun, drool-worthy rolling sculptures and outdoor food and beverage. The Bike Night Koozie Special is back. Enjoy $3 Busch Light all-season long.

Saturday Demos powered by H-D Insurance: Visit the Museum campus on Saturdays to experience the fun and freedom of a Harley-Davidson motorcycle. Visitors with their motorcycle endorsement/license will be able to choose from a dozen of the latest and greatest #FreedomMachines from Harley-Davidson, including Touring, Softail and Sportster models. A pre-determined scenic route through the Menomonee Valley will give riders the chance to explore the Museum’s surrounding neighborhoods. Sign-up is on a first-come, first-serve basis. Riders and passengers must be at least 18 years of age. All riders (and passengers) must wear a helmet, eye protection, shirt, long pants and closed-toe shoes with a heel strap. All riders and passengers must also bring their own riding gear. 

Mother’s Day at the Harley-Davidson Museum: Celebrate the most important woman in your life by giving her an unforgettable experience at the Harley-Davidson Museum. Spend the day touring the collection and campus, including The Shop, where you can find a special gift just for her. Spend $150 or more at The Shop and receive a free bracelet. Take a self-guided audio tour of the H-D Museum and if you bring the kids, make sure to check out the newly reopened Imagination Station! Don’t forget to score a complimentary carnation for mom and a temporary tattoo for the kids (while supplies last).  End your visit by taking in the sights of our beautiful 20-acre, park-like campus on our walking tour. It’s the mother of all Mother’s Day celebrations and it’s only found at the crossroads of 6th & Canal.

Armed Forces Day Celebration: Join the Harley-Davidson Museum and active military and veterans as we honor the brave individuals serving in the United States Armed Forces. Together with the Milwaukee Armed Services Committee, the H-D Museum invites everyone to show your support for our troops on Armed Forces Day. Military equipment and interactive displays are available for attendees to see and experience. This free event offers a unique experience to talk with all branches of the military to learn about their experiences and the challenges they face in maintaining our freedom. Please note that military discounts are found throughout campus. New this year is the Wisconsin Warrior Challenge. Open to kids and young adults ages 7-18, participants will join one of six teams and compete in a series of activities for the title of Wisconsin Warrior Champions. Activities will include obstacle courses, survival skills, drills, marching and more! Sign up to participate in advance on the Milwaukee Armed Forces Week website.

Upcoming Exhibit

1977 FLH “Blackula”: Milwaukee man Freddie Franklin purchased his Electra Glide from its original owner, 95-year-old Wallace Brzezinski, with only 4,500 miles on its odometer. And in short order, he completely re-envisioned the bike to reflect his timeless style. The motorcycle incorporates some hallmarks of Franklin’s disparate tastes. A dash of the Coney Island-style bikes—decked out with lights and reflectors—he mixed in elements of Willie G.’s seminal Knucklehead and topped off with details that harken to the 1970s blaxploitation films he watched back in the day. A clear statement of Black pride via the language of vintage motorcycles, this is a bike you must see in-person. On display May 13.

SEIS via Kamila Baron of House of Baron for use by 360 Magazine

SEIS

Fashion designer Peter Cohen and co-founder Francisco Cohen announce the opening of SEIS, an art gallery/exhibition hall, next door to his manufacturing & design plant on 6th Ave and Washington Blvd. The new space endeavors to be a showplace for a range of visual expressions from South Africa and California. 

For its opening, SEIS presents the work of renowned LA light and space artist Peter Lodato in collaboration with the enchanting bronzes of the late, great Cape Town sculptor Bruce Arnott.

Designer Peter Cohen was called “LA’s best secret” by the LA Times, dressing celebrities like Oprah and producing consciously and ethically out of his Los Angeles atelier.  For more information about SEIS, click HERE.

Apadana Relief via Sidney Kantono for J. Paul Getty Trust Communications for use by 360 Magazine

Persepolis Reimagined

Getty has launched Persepolis Reimagined, an immersive web experience that lets visitors explore the ceremonial capital of the ancient Persian Empire at its height. Visitors can walk in the footsteps of ancient dignitaries through the most accurate recreation of Persepolis to date, and learn about the art, architecture, and customs of this iconic monument to imperial power.

The experience is available across desktop and mobile and will soon be viewable in multiple languages, including Arabic, Farsi, French, Hindi, Spanish, Traditional and Simplified Chinese, and English.

Founded by Darius I around 518 BC, Persepolis was an embodiment of the Achaemenid imperial ideology, which is reflected in its art and architecture. It served as the ceremonial capital of the Achaemenid Persian kings and thrived for nearly 200 years. Though Alexander the Great looted and set fire to Persepolis in 330 BC, its ruins survive and are a source of national pride for modern-day Iranians as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Visitors begin their tour at the Gate of All Nations, the main entrance into Persepolis. After traversing a massive flight of 111 steps, they reach a gateway flanked by two massive and brightly painted bull statues that served as symbolic guardians of the city.

After the grand entrance, visitors encounter the Apadana (a great reception hall), the Palace of Xerxes (a place for ceremonies and rituals), the Southeastern Palace (royal residences), and the Royal Treasury, ending their journey with the impressive Hall of 100 Columns.

Along the way, visitors can also click to learn more about the many art objects and rituals that characterized the city, including modes of proper tribute and gift-giving, royal banquets, and Persian court dress. Additional present-day views of surviving architecture and artworks can also be viewed on the website.

The experience highlights that Achaemenid royal art incorporated craftsmanship and traditions from their vast and diverse empire, including Iranian architecture, Assyrian and Babylonian palace decorations, Egyptian design motifs, Greek and Indian craftsmanship and more.

Persepolis Reimagined is the result of a collaboration between historians, creatives, and technologists, including Getty’s own experts in the Museum and Digital departments, academic consultants from the University of California, Los Angeles and creative and technical production from MediaMonks. The immersive website is a part of the Getty Villa Museum exhibition, Persia: Ancient Iran and the Classical World, on view through August 8 at the Getty Villa in Los Angeles. The web experience presents select objects from the exhibition in the context of life at Persepolis, bridging surviving physical artifacts with this standalone digital recreation.

Truman NFT via Pace Public Relations for use by 360 Magazine

How the Metaverse Could Save Cultural Institutions

By: Chris Cummings, CEO & founder of Iconic Moments

Museums and cultural institutions are in trouble. At the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, these institutions learned that the typical business model of earning revenue through in-person ticket sales, event rentals and once-a-year galas was too fragile to be sustainable. In March 2020, it was estimated that 15 percent of the world’s museums would be forced to permanently close. By spring 2021, this number reached 37 percent, and today, 25 percent of U.S. museums have less than four months of funding to survive.

So how can the ‘Metaverse’ help? The ‘Metaverse’ provides cultural institutions a way to step outside the traditional four walls, providing them with the tools to explore and expand their reach in a digital environment. The result? Increased revenue and a chance to avoid permanent closure. 

What is the ‘Metaverse’?

The ‘Metaverse’ refers to a host of virtual worlds encased in a technology called blockchain. And while the ‘Metaverse’ is referred to as an ‘emerging’ space, it’s simply a rehash of a concept that has been around for a long time: a virtual world that includes the ability to create a virtual self and interact with others in this world.

The ‘Metaverse’ became increasingly important during the COVID-19 pandemic as audiences turned to digital worlds rather than the physical. And although much of the world is living in some sort of ‘post-pandemic’ society, the use of virtual worlds (and ‘Metaverses’) can continue to encourage engagement in new ways.

‘Metaverses’  function using blockchain technology, a distributed digital database that stores information about any transaction that’s taken place in its network. A Non-Fungible Token (NFT) is a type of token exchanged within this network that can store information about assets such as artwork or artifacts. We can use this distributed database as a resource to authenticate tokens and identify who owns a particular NFT—which is really just a receipt or certificate of ownership. A blockchain provides a decentralized means to store these receipts. 

‘Metaverses’ provide a playground in which to display and exchange NFTs. These NFTs could represent digital assets, such as pieces of virtual land or artworks that could be displayed in a virtual gallery. In other words, ‘Metaverses’ present NFTs in their natural (digital) environment.  

Solving A Problem

The ‘Metaverse’ allows us to create a new model to support the culture & heritage industry. Through it, heritage organizations, museums and cultural institutions can engage new stakeholders digitally, while showcasing the stories of archival assets, creating sustainability within the industry and preserving history permanently on the blockchain.

This combination of digital ownership and online interaction highlights an opportunity for museums. Iconic Moments guides cultural institutions into this space by asking them to rethink the museum experience and provide a new digital and creative environment for audiences to explore the collections.

We also support cultural institutions in creating an alternative dynamic revenue stream through NFTs. This will give institutions the much-needed income lost during the pandemic. NFTs will also provide audiences with a way to own and interact with different pieces of history and culture.

Two examples of cultural institutions and organizations looking to the ‘Metaverse’ to generate revenue through NFTs are the National Broadcast Museum in Chicago and the Universal Hip Hop Museum planned for Brooklyn. The National Broadcast Museum holds assets of the most meaningful moments in television and radio in our country’s history. Iconic Moments is working with this museum to create NFTs of significant broadcasts that can be sold to patrons and consumers, such as President Truman’s radio address announcing the end of World War 2. 

Meanwhile, Iconic Moments is working with the Universal Hip Hop Museum to explore alternative methods of fundraising, as this much talked about institution is employing an NFT campaign to raise the capital needed to build the museum. Because Hip Hop is itself a multifaceted experience involving both music and art, the NFT is an ideal format.

As the museum industry continues to explore the ‘Metaverse’ and benefit from NFT technology, consumers will find new ways to engage with the culture and history that is meaningful to them while providing much-needed financial support to the institutions they cherish.

IAM NYC Opening

IAM is the inverted experience of the self as reflected through the eyes of established and upcoming local and international artists. The museum’s mission is to showcase the various facades of New York City through an inverted perspective, forcing audiences to re-envision the city’s topologies and structures in a new and creative light.

The inverted museum welcomes its guests in the heart of Soho, one of New York City’s best-known neighborhoods for fine art and culture. The museum’s lobby acts as an orientation point, a place where individuals can gain more insight into various art installations and their historical relevance to the city. The IAM Inverted Art Museum encourages individuals to tap into the complex spectrum of human emotion while they traverse through an array of vibrant exhibition rooms. As they are guided through these thematic rooms, time halts, and guests become fully immersed in the singular moment of time as the visual storytelling of each exhibition unravels in front of them.

The uniqueness of IAM comes from the museum’s ability to capture a visual record of history, igniting feelings of nostalgia, happiness and curiosity in its audiences. Each room acts as a different urban landscape unfolding the various personalities of New York City. From the gritty to the luxurious, the uptown bound trains to the empty apartments in Billionaires Row, the unexpected nature of the inverted rooms can be described as physical surrealism, showing off the unanticipated and often illogical juxtapositions of the city’s identity. 

IAM recognizes that each unique piece of art acts as an entryway to the artist’s cultural, political, and socio-economic circumstances. Culture and art are created by ordinary people, and their collective experiences shape the perception of the world around them. Similarly, New York City’s art scene is multifaceted, a melting pot of artistic expression that transcends any physical bounds dictated by borders or bodies of water. The museum wishes to highlight each artist’s unique perception of the world through an inverted lens, encouraging its viewers to pause and digest each and every little detail that surrounds them. IAM hopes to be a place of inspiration for artists and visitors alike, allowing artists to create work as their full unique selves while promoting tolerance, respect, and equality.

Our exhibition rooms

  • IAM Statue of Liberty
  • Oversized Kids Bedroom
  • Authentic New York’s Antique Shop
  • Plasma Room inspired by Nikola Tesla
  • Diorama inspired by Stan Lee
  • LEGO® Bathroom

Exhibition rooms of New York Artists’ work

Staying true to its mission of visual storytelling, the IAM Inverted Art Museum is also prioritizing work installations by Ukrainian artists in the hopes of aiding those who are affected by the unjust war. A percentage of ticket purchases go towards rebuilding schools and helping kids in Ukraine. IAM works directly with a number of charities to ensure that all donations are going towards rebuilding Ukraine and aiding families in need. The museum will also hold an auction for a large-scale Ukrainian flag built out of lego blocks and 100% of the profits made from the auction will go towards war relief efforts in Ukraine.

The IAM Inverted Art Museum is also proud to be supporting Ukrainian artists seeking to come to the United States Under the O-1B visa, otherwise known as the Artists Visa. Selected artists will receive assistance with navigating through the O-1B petition process. Please note that we do not cover the cost of application fees or lawyers, rather we help applicants fill out their petitions as an alternative route to hiring a lawyer. Our team members have first-hand experience with applying for the O-1B visa and can help applicants with the completion of their own Visa application.

Although artists from all around the world are welcome to apply to this initiative on our website HERE, we are currently prioritizing Ukrainian artists.

0.83 RP via Guggenheim Museo Bilbao for use by 360 Magazine

Guggenheim Museum Collection

Guggenheim Museum Bilbao’s Motion, Autos, Art, Architecture, covers over a century’s worth of automotive creation, exploring its multiple connections with the visual arts and architecture. The impressive selection of vehicles, works of art and architectural documents that it comprises, covers the main technological achievements in the sector and melds them with their enormous social and cultural implications.

Practically since the invention of the automobile, both its fabulous appearance and its association with speed, a sense of adventure, autonomy, modernity and progress seduced artists and architects to the point of quickly becoming a constant in their creations. Likewise, ideas and forms originating in the artistic avant‐garde impregnated automobile design, giving rise to the important collaborations of figures from art and architecture that we all know today. In addition to proposing a complete review of the nearly two hundred years of creation, the exhibition addresses the unstoppable trend towards electrification that the automobile shares with so many other productive sectors and even ventures to sketch out future scenarios for this industry. Scenarios that, according to the experts, share three major axes: the use of new digital technologies, innovation in design, and maximization of care for the environment through renewable energies and the circular economy. 

The car was born mainly to solve the problems of pollution and traffic jams caused by horse‐drawn carriages in the emerging big cities. At the time, internal combustion vehicles were considered the more sustainable option. Nearly two centuries later, we find ourselves at a similar crossroads, which, thanks to technological progress, leads us to the adoption of the electric vehicle as the most efficient and environmentally responsible solution. In reality, electricity has always been present in the history of automotive invention.

Right from the beginning, propulsion by means of an electric motor competed with prototypes based on steam and gasoline, and, in the 1830s, Robert Anderson developed the first fully electric car, which Sibrandus Stratingh designed and manufactured on a small scale.

This major exhibition of the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, curated by Norman Foster, affords us a splendid opportunity to contemplate the past and present of this sector. It also acts to imagine a future in which the automobile goes even further in contributing to social progress and sustainable development—both of which are hallmarks of Iberdrola—while it continues to be the best example of the industry’s capacity to combine aesthetics, function and technology. 

Individual mobility is a major driver of our freedom. The most emotional and most-used mode of transportation is the car. And the car is here to stay. By 2030, the world of mobility will have undergone the greatest transformation since the transition from horse-drawn carriages to automobiles at the beginning of the twentieth century. The journey of individual mobility is exciting and greatly reflected in automobiles, art and architecture; and is being turned into an extraordinary experience in one of the most remarkable museums in the world. The exhibition brings together around forty automobiles—each the best of its kind in such terms as beauty, rarity, technical progress and a vision of the future. 

These are placed center stage in the galleries and surrounded by significant works of art and architecture. Many of these have never before left their homes in private collections and public institutions, and as such are being presented to a wide audience for the first time. The exhibition is spread over ten spaces in the museum. Seven galleries are themed in roughly chronological order. They start with Beginnings and continue as: Sculptures, Popularising, Sporting, Visionaries and Americana, closing with a gallery dedicated to what the future of mobility may hold. The remaining four spaces comprise a corridor containing a timeline and immersive sound experience, a live clay-modeling studio and an area devoted to models. Unlike any other single invention, the automobile has completely transformed the urban and rural landscape of our planet and in turn our lifestyle. We are on the edge of a new revolution of electric power, so this exhibition acts as a requiem for the last days of combustion.