Posts tagged with "exhibition"

Fernanda Laverna at The Manolis Gallery via Timur Tugberk at TaraInk for use by 360 Magazine

Fernanda Lavera – Mr. Freak & Lucy

Clive Davis, Greg Schriefer, and Steven & Myrthia Manolis welcomed noteworthy Miami artists, socialites, collectors, and celebrities to the Manolis Projects Gallery to attend the launch “Mr. Freak & Lucy” unveiling the works of Fernanda Lavera. Greg manages the artist, and he and Clive have been big supporters of hers. They now are showcasing Fernada’s incredible talent, event, gallery, and private tours of her show through July 31 at The Manolis Projects Gallery. Her vibrant, larger than life, abstracted works that grace the gallery serve as a contemporary approach to neo-expressionism. Fernanda’s works are captivating, expressive, and enthralling to the eye.

“In this new series of works, including huge, captivating canvases that seem to explode with invention and fearlessness, she presents a novel vernacular that is overpowering and unforgettable” –Bruce Helander (Florida Artists Hall of Fame)

The Manolis Projects Gallery is the exclusive representative of Fernanda Lavera’s works in the United States. Mr. Freak & Lucy” is now available for public viewing seven days a week. Many of Fernanda’s collectible works have sold within the show’s first week. We encourage all art collectors, seekers, and investors to visit now through the end of July. Fernanda’s works are becoming highly collected by the likes of the superstar, legendary music producer, and esteemed art collector, Clive Davis and billionaire political commentator, David Rubin.

When I saw Lavera’s work, I immediately sensed she was the one….a second-generation neo-expressionist, with a feminine Latin twist, who could pick up where Basquiat left off and take it higher, maybe much higher. I love the stories behind her work!” –Clive Davis, Collector

We would like to extend a special invitation to all press for a private showing of her works, tour of the gallery with founders Steven and Myrthia Manolis, and exclusive in-person and virtual interviews with Greg Schriefer, Steven Manolis, and Fernanda Lavera herself.

This group show features the works of 38 collected, established, and burgeoning global artists, including 92 works (17 giant works from FL), of Steven Manolis, Connie Lloveras, Jojo Anavim, and many more.

“Mr. Freak & Lucy – Thursday, April 22 from 5:30 to 9:30 pm at Manolis Projects: 335 NE 59th Street Miami, Florida 33137

ABOUT FERNANDA LAVERA

María Fernanda Lavera (b.1975-), from Buenos Aires, Argentina, discovered her fascination for art and painting through an aunt who imparted to her a love of sketching and textures.

At first glance, her paintings appear to be wall images, graffiti that draws attention to itself through its bluntness, its hypnotic colors, and a unique style, a good street artist needs to stand apart from so many others. By covering every centimeter of the surface with color and with the images of contemporary objects turned into reductions of themselves, becoming more symbols than objects.

The images appear to explode from the depths, releasing outlandish forms of intense colors that, in turn, generate contrasts of surprising expressiveness that seem to have been created by the artist’s unconscious sketches. This is when we glimpse the surreal world manifested by Lavera with an extreme passion and that informs the viewer – the spectator – of a certain state of inner turmoil. Among the recognizable forms are symbols, objects, and everyday contours that approach the realm of Pop Art. Her diverse range of themes ranges from psychedelic cartoons juxtaposed with figures of rabid cats and race cars, to the expression of visibly disturbing events. Watchful eyes and disproportionate and stooping witnesses seem to look on helplessly.

Lavera explains that she likes to let things happen intuitively, without a clear intent: she is fascinated by the effects of color, the play of light and shade that allow her to explore her moods freely. Painting is a visual conversation for her – a moment, a feeling, and, especially, an outlet that allows the possibility to express the mystery of life through a symbolic space of complete expressive freedom.

“I looked at my canvas and asked, can I be free like him? So I let my feelings inspire me, my emotions, and the colours and the shapes that dance in my own being. It gave me the courage to let me be me, who I was, and who I am. Here and now” – Fernanda

About Monolis Projects

Manolis Projects is Florida’s largest working studio and fine art gallery, located in Miami’s Lemon City neighborhood. We proudly feature unique paintings, sculptures and collectible limited edition works from over 40 artists from around the world. We focus on modern master’s and contemporary art, bridging the gap between established and emerging artists and collectors. J. Steven Manolis, a leading and critically acclaimed abstract expressionist artist, also paints and displays his own work.

Manolis Projects also hosts the East Coast’s only Artists’ Salon where artists come to exchange ideas and inspire each other and show their work. We curate three new shows every year. If you want to see a working studio gallery and what happens behind the scenes, this is the place to visit. The Gallery is open by appointment only, seven days a week.

J. Steven Manolis is a well-known philanthropist in the Arts, having served as Chairman of the Advisory Board for the National Academy of Design in New York City and on the Board of Trustees of the Vermont Studio Center. Manolis also offers private curation services for collectors, architects, and designers.

“The gallery offers visitors a unique behind-the-scenes view of a working studio + gallery.”

ABOUT THE OWNERS

Manolis Projects is a family business owned by artist J. Steven Manolis and his wife Myrthia Moore.  Additionally, Myrthia’s sons, Jason and Brian are helping to bring Manolis Projects to the next level of service and expertise. We all have different roles.

Steven brings his business expertise and profound knowledge of art history and curation, both as an artist and as the former (1997-2006) Chairman of the Advisory Board of the National Academy of Design in New York City.  Prior to his Chairmanship, he spent 1987-1997 serving as a Member of the Advisory Board of the National Academy of Design. He also served as a Trustee and Development Director of the Vermont Studio Center, from 2007 until 2016. This is the largest international artist residency program in the United States. He was also a Trustee of the Emily Mason Wolf Kahn Foundation from 2007-2016.

Many of our gallery artists are members of the National Academy of Design (National Academicians.) Additionally, we strive to bring new artists who have the potential of becoming collectible artists. We want to help our clients invest in art they love and that has the potential to appreciate over time.

Myrthia has a background in finance and economics, as well as, having a degree in Marriage and Family Therapy. She is also an artist who designs jewelry.

Manolis Projects is located at 335 NE 59th Street Miami, Florida 33137, is open 7 days a week, by appointment only.

Fernanda Laverna at The Manolis Gallery via Timur Tugberk at TaraInk for use by 360 Magazine

Fernanda Laverna at The Manolis Gallery via Timur Tugberk at TaraInk for use by 360 Magazine

Painter Palette illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Gruin × Clean Slate Exhibition

GRUIN: CLEAN SLATE EXHIBITION

Exhibition opening Thursday, May 6th, 2021 from 5-9pm PST and Saturday, May 8th from noon-5pm PST

Location:  Domicile (n)
4859 Fountain Avenue Los Angeles, CA, 90029

By appointment here 

LINK TO THE EXHIBITION

As we emerge from the pandemic, Clean Slate, curated by Margot Ross and Emerald Gruin, is an exhibition full of hope and celebration of new beginnings, wiping the slate clean for a rebirth. 

Laura Jones’ work, Gaia, is the centerpiece of the exhibition. “Gaia”, the mother of all life, is the goddess of healing and cleansing removing all past darkness. The Australian Sturt desert pea flower featured in the painting, represents rebirth. After the rain, these flowers blossom and are symbolic of the rebirth of nature. 

Belynda Henry’s works represent her fascination with the Australian landscape. Living and working in a lush valley in New South Wales, Henry experiences its ever-changing sights, sounds, light and textures. She is absorbed by nature’s compositions and colors, meditating on the medium and incorporating those impressions in her imaginative works, which are vibrantly modern and uniquely visceral.

Jonathan Rosen debuts a digital mirror piece from his Dream Machines series. After a year of confinement and sacrifice on the surface of the mirror the word BORN glows radiantly as a thousand phrases flash randomly underneath. When a viewer stands before the mirror and takes a photo a single message is frozen over the viewer’s reflection reminding us what we were all born to be. 

Using the motif of a silhouette, Keelin Montzingo’s figures are taken directly from influencers’, models’ and brands’ Instagram accounts, observing how the female pose exists in an echo chamber where the real mirrors the constructed and the constructed seeks the real. While Montzingo does not criticize self-promotion, she questions whether the female is collectively perpetuating the male gaze or rather reclaiming the body, defining an empowering narrative where the female speaks directly to the female in celebration of the divine.

Dana James’ The Hero evokes a sense of nostalgia and history, where she works the textured wax achieving a distressed, “wear and tear” aspect, referencing antiquated, sentimental belongings.

Camie Lyons is an Australian-based artist working across a variety of mediums – including sculpture, painting and drawing. Her practice is largely inspired by her intuition and experiences as a contemporary dancer, as she explores the free-flowing possibility of lines, form and movement created by the human body. 

Elliott Nimmo’s new series of work began on the cusp of Spring. Each painting explores the crisp light filtering through the trees, early morning mist and the possibilities that each new wave brings to the shore.

Jay Miriam paints magical moments of lingering time demonstrating that, when we are so caught up in a routine, we pass time without thought. In The Sunbathers, three women forget themselves in a forest as rain drizzles and one hides behind a bush.

Laura Kimmel (née Laura Weyl) is a New York-based filmmaker, photographer, and multimedia artist. Her NFT work Non Fungible Woman, uses analog image manipulations to create visceral, poetic visual worlds. Laura’s work explores the labyrinth of femininity through ritualistic, performative art making. She journeys with her muses, often trespassing, in pursuit of magical realms to conjure authentic expressions of self-outside the constraints of social constructs. Her photograph As Above evokes an alternate reality of light and color, a portal to the subliminal.

Leila Jeffreys’ work Revival evokes the feeling after the bushfires, where there is regrowth and new signs of life. The image appears like a tree of leaves, the birds appear to look like the tree is blooming with new leaves.

Although at first glance, Tom Smith’s work appears digital, it is carefully hand-made. Melt is constructed from 2 paintings on paper in opposing hot and cold colors, Smith slices the paintings into tiny strips using a razor. One slice at a time, he alternates the strips and adheres them into one picture. The painting then experiences 400 tons of pressure in a hydraulic press, permanently affixing the slices with vibrating effect revealing and distorting the image. 

While attending a decidedly anti-queer Catholic school in Colombia, for Juan Arango Palacios the jungle became a place of refuge—a safe haven—it was the first place and time in Juan’s life where they felt completely content with who they are. This space, which over time has been transformed into an archetype, acts as a timeless setting for the people that Juan meets and experiences that they would have navigating the path ahead of them. Juan is committed to creating dynamic compositions that represent the blurred memories of an immigrant, the suppressed fantasy of a queer person, and an imagined heaven informed by an icon laden religion.

Rico Ayeni is a self-taught artist from Brooklyn, New York, who makes storytelling imagery that combines color and passion while documenting everyday life around the world. A Head In The Clouds Is A Clear Mind was captured when Ayeni was touring around Africa, looking for moments which highlighted certain characteristics and challenges he observed from his people. 

Paris-based Cyrielle Gulacsy has created CS005 / (Spectral Component) for Clean Slate, the first of a series developed during lockdown. Struck by the beauty of the light during her first trip to California in 2017, Cyrielle studied the solar spectrum and the color temperature variations depending on the sunlight’s interaction with the atmosphere. The paintings are composed like windows opened to the sky that capture the magical and ephemeral instants of daylight. Breaking down the solar spectrum, each piece offers a moment of contemplation and invites the viewer to deeply meditate on the essence of light: its origin, its nature, its beauty. The artist uses pointillism and layers of dots to give form to the principle of “wave-particle duality” in quantum mechanics, a property of the photon, the particle of light.

VISITOR INFORMATION:

domicile (n.) is located in the Merrick Building in East Hollywood at 4859 Fountain Avenue. The gallery can be visited by appointment only.

Website

Instagram

Miles Hyman, Crash #23 - Crestline, 2021, Oil on linen, 45 x 63.75 inches for use by 360 Magazine

Miles Hyman – Narrative Images

On view: May 13 – June 26, 2021 | Opening: May 13, 11 AM to 9 PM

Philippe Labaune Gallery is pleased to present Narrative Images, an exhibition of paintings and original comic strips by French American artist Miles Hyman. This will be the debut of Miles Hyman’s paintings in New York. Informed by mid-century American realism, European symbolism, and film noir, Hyman’s recent work is a study in light, imaginative juxtapositions, and a record of personal geography. Accompanying his paintings will be a selection of original comic strip drawings from graphic novel adaptations of Hyman’s grandmother Shirley Jackson’s The Lottery, James Ellroy’s The Black Dahlia, among others. Narrative Images will be on view from May 13 – June 26, 2021 with an opening reception on May 13 from 11 am to 9 pm.

The exhibition presents two painting series, Crash and East Coast Light. In the ongoing painting series, Crash, Hyman creates imaginative dichotomies of figure and landscape. An elusive, potentially quixotic relationship forms between female characters seemingly unfixed in time, with similarly enigmatic vehicle wreckage behind them. The characters at times appear to be plucked from other worlds, while others seemingly have a more direct tie to the dramatic scene appearing over their shoulder.

Within East Coast Light, a suite of paintings depicts fictional characters at various locations throughout New York City. The subject matter highlights the importance the city has to Miles Hyman, a locus steeped with childhood and adolescent memories, and a source of development for him as an artist. To this day, the historical resonance and constantly evolving landscape, coupled with a quality of light unique to metropolises, continues to provide a wellspring of inspiration for the artist.

Accompanying Hyman’s paintings will be original charcoal drawings from several of his graphic novels, most notably The Lottery. In 2016, Hyman released the graphic novel adaption to his grandmother Shirley Jackson’s critically acclaimed 1948 short story. In what Hyman aptly termed “a feat of inter-disciplinary acrobatics,” he had the overwhelming task to create a visual expression from words on a page and to keep the novel’s nuances and the secrets intact for the reader. Hyman viewed the undertaking as a way to rediscover one of Jackson’s greatest works and allowed him “to affirm a tangible link to her life and work in a way that was both professional and deeply personal.” The ability to pair his grandmother’s word with his drawing is a familial pairing like no other.

About Miles Hyman

Miles Hyman was born in Vermont in 1962, and currently lives and works in Paris. Hyman studied drawing and printmaking with David Schorr at Wesleyan University in Connecticut before attending Paris’ Ecole des Beaux-Arts. His works have been exhibited in museums including the Palais de Tokyo, the Glénat Foundation, Rome’s Institute of Graphic Arts and the French Musée de l’Illustration. In 2017, he was awarded the prestigious Chevalier des Arts et des Lettres from the French Ministry of Culture. Hyman’s drawings are featured by international publishers such as Simon & Schuster, Viking, Farrar Straus & Giroux, Gallimard, and Chronicle Books. His work has also appeared in The New Yorker, The New York Times, Futuropolis, and a specially commissioned project with Louis Vuitton.

About Philippe Labaune Gallery
Founded in 2021, Philippe Labaune Gallery is devoted to championing and presenting original 20th and 21st-century comic art and illustrations by emerging and established artists from around the world. Prior to opening the eponymous gallery, Labaune curated an extensive survey of European comic art Line and Frame: A Survey of European Comic Art, at the former Danese/Corey Gallery in 2020.

Location
534 W 24th St Ground Floor,
New York, NY 10011

*The featured image above is: Miles Hyman, Crash #23 – Crestline, 2021, Oil on linen, 45 x 63.75 inches

Victoria Selbach for UNRAVELED Confronting The Fabric of Fiber Art. For use by 360 Magazine

UNRAVELED: Confronting The Fabric of Fiber Art

A Group Show Curated by Indira Cesarine

OPENING RECEPTION: April 17, 2021

VIP Preview 1pm – 3pm // Opening Reception 3pm – 8pm

EXHIBITION ON VIEW: April 17 – May 28, 2021

45 Lispenard Street, NYC 10013

The Untitled Space is pleased to present “UNRAVELED: Confronting The Fabric of Fiber Art” group show opening on April 17 and on view through May 28, 2021. Curated by Indira Cesarine, the exhibition will feature textile and fiber-based artworks by 40 contemporary women artists. “UNRAVELED: Confronting The Fabric of Fiber Art” explores in depth the themes and techniques of the medium through the works of female-identifying artists working with natural and synthetic fiber, fabric, and yarn. The exhibition presents figurative and abstract works that address our lived experience and history through the lens of women weaving, knotting, twining, plaiting, coiling, pleating, lashing, and interlacing. Narratives of self-identification, race, religion, gen­­der, sexuality, our shared experience, as well as protest and the patriarchy are literally “unraveled” through embroidery, felt, woven and hooked rugs, braided and sewn hair, sewn fabrics, discarded clothing, cross-stitching, repurposed materials and more.

Exhibiting Artists: Amber Doe, Carol Scavotto, Caroline Wayne, Christy O’Connor, Daniela Puliti, Delaney Conner, Dominique Vitali, Elise Drake, Elizabeth Miller, Hera Haesoo Kim, Indira Cesarine, Jamia Weir, Jody MacDonald, Julia Brandão, Kathy Sirico, Katie Cercone, Katie Commodore, Katrina Majkut, Katy Itter, Kelly Boehmer, Linda Friedman Schmidt, Lisa Federici, Marianne Fairbanks, Mary Tooley Parker, Melanie Fischer, Melissa Zexter, Mychaelyn Michalec, Mz Icar, Orly Cogan, Robin Kang, Rosemary Meza-DesPlas, Ruta Naujalyte, Sally Hewett, Sarah Blanchette, Sooo-z Mastopietro, Sophie Boggis-Rolfe, Stacy Isenbarger, Stephanie Eche, Victoria Selbach, and Winnie van der Rijn.

Curatorial Statement:

unravel [ uhn-rav-uhl ] to separate or disentangle the threads of (a woven or knitted fabric, a rope, etc.). to free from complication or difficulty; make plain or clear; solve: to unravel a situation; to unravel a mystery.

“UNRAVELED: Confronting the Fabric of Fiber Art” investigates the narratives of contemporary fiber artists. The exhibition brings together a diverse group of artists who each address through their own personal vision, materials, and methods, works that are deeply rooted in the history of feminism, in the intersection of art and craft, addressing our living experiences and personal languages. We live in a world of extremes – on one hand, the pandemic has brought forth an intensity on digital and online programming peaking with the emergence of NFT art, and on the opposite end of the spectrum we are seeing a return to the comforts of the home and along with it a renaissance of organic and handmade artworks that embody that spirit. The laborious and repetitive methods required to create one work of fiber art can take hundreds of hours, yet equally the creation process is often referred to as a mediative act of healing, allowing for an expressive personal and cultural interrogation.

Fibers have been an integral part of human civilization for thousands of years. Textile art is one of the oldest art forms, dating back to prehistoric times. Despite early works of textiles such as embroideries and tapestries having been made by both men and women, the tradition of textiles and needlework evolved into that of “women’s work” and was not only dismissed as not “important” but was literally banned from the high art world by the Royal Academy in the 18th century (circa 1769). With the rise of the women’s movement as well as technological advances, women reclaimed the medium, subverted its history as a lesser art form, and transformed it into a tool of expression, of protest, of personality. From early suffrage movement embroidered banners to the groundbreaking exhibitions and works of female pioneers such as Bauhaus weaver Anni Alber’s momentous solo show at the Museum of Modern Art in 1949, Lenore Tawney’s exhibition at the Staten Island Museum in 1961 to Judy Chicago’s groundbreaking 1979 work “The Dinner Party”, we have seen the medium evolve and inspire new generations of fiber artists.

“UNRAVELED: Confronting the Fabric of Fiber Art” explores this new wave of female-identifying artists who are using materials ranging from thread and yarn to human hair, fabrics, and discarded clothing, among a range of other components to unravel the “language of thread” with works that provoke and interrogate. Whether drawn from a deeply personal narrative, or rooted in political motivation, each artist weaves, spins, sews, and hooks the viewer with their detailed and intricate textures that communicate and empower. The exhibition presents two and three-dimensional pieces that explore with gravity and humor our contemporary culture, its beauty, flaws, and idiosyncrasies through murals, assemblages, fragile and gestural threads, meditative, and metaphorical fibers. “UNRAVELED: Confronting the Fabric of Fiber Art” pushes the boundaries, investigates ancient as well as new materials and techniques, and presents a contemporary universe of the language of women and their interwoven, progressive vocabulary.”– Curator Indira Cesarine

“To know the history of embroidery is to know the history of women.” – Rozsika Parker author of “The Subversive Stitch” (1984)

“I am a multimedia artist who uses sculpture and performance to bear witness to the experiences of black women even as American society aims to render us and our lives as invisible and meaningless. Despite the prevalent “urban black” narrative, my experience is tied to the natural world, and I use materials that reference my desert environment and my lived experience as a black woman with Indigenous roots.” – Artist Amber Doe

“I mix subversion with flirtation, humor with power, and intimacy with frivolity. My subject matter is frank and provocative, dealing with issues of fertility, sexuality, self-image, isolation, vulnerability, indulgence, and beauty in the mundane, which are designed to challenge social stereotypes embedded within childhood fairytales. My work explores the many flavors of feminism.” – Artist Orly Cogan

“I pull from my autobiography to illustrate stories of trauma, sexuality, intimacy, and growth. Detailed beading and cyclical patterning emphasize the consistent labor in the repetitive motion of handsewing, that which mirrors the emotional and psychic labor expended in order to manage the suffering a body can accumulate over time. My sculptures translate the life experience of a survivor of complex trauma through the lens of glittering beadwork in order to recount deeply traumatic stories for the same cultural collective that due to repression, denial, censorship and deliberate silencing…” –Artist Caroline Wayne

“This body of work scrutinizes the amalgamation of victim shaming tropes that men and women are taught throughout their lives, both passively and actively, through social norms, pop culture, our educational and legal systems, religious establishments, and familial influences and upbringing.” – Artist Christy O’Connor

“My work focuses on my personal experience living within the confines of a female body, exploring sexuality, religion, and body image. The shared narratives of childbirth, menstruation, dysmorphia, sexual violation, and societal scrutiny all come into play and find connections with the viewers in their shared commonality.” – Artist Dominique Vitali

“My textile works are hand-sewn, fabric based sculptural pieces made from recycled materials that have multiple uses as ritual talismans, wearables, ecstatic birth blankets, dreamcatchers and traveling altars”. – Artist Katie Cercone

“Discarded clothing is my paint. I give second chances to the worn, the damaged, the mistreated, the abandoned, the unwanted, and to myself. My emotional narrative portraits and figurative artworks examine the human condition through my own lived experience. The violence of cutting and deconstruction make way for the reconstruction and refashioning of a broken past.” – Artist Linda Friedman Schmidt

“We are drawn to the grand gesture, the loud assured voice, the bold move, the aggressive brush stroke. I celebrate the opposite: the small moments in our lives – the unremarkable… as Covid-19 took over, some of the things I was celebrating became even more pertinent; toilet paper, soap, hand sanitizer. These objects became signs of hope, of safety, of comfort.” – Artist Melanie Fischer

ABOUT THE UNTITLED SPACE

The Untitled Space is an art gallery located in Tribeca, New York in a landmark building on Lispenard Street. Founded in 2015 by artist Indira Cesarine, the gallery features an ongoing curation of exhibits of emerging and established contemporary artists exploring conceptual framework and boundary-pushing ideology through mediums of painting, sculpture, printmaking, photography, video and performance art. The gallery is committing to exploring new ideas vis-à-vis traditional and new mediums and highlights a program of women in art. Since launching The Untitled Space gallery, Cesarine has curated over 40 exhibitions and has exhibited artwork by more than 450 artists. Her curatorial for The Untitled Space includes solo shows for artists Sarah Maple, Rebecca Leveille, Alison Jackson, Fahren Feingold, Jessica Lichtenstein, Tom Smith, Loren Erdrich, Kat Toronto aka Miss Meatface, Katie Commodore, and Jeanette Hayes among many others. Notable group shows include “Art4Equality x Life, Liberty & The Pursuit of Happiness” public art exhibition and group show presented in collaboration with Save Art Space, “IRL: Investigating Reality,” “BODY BEAUTIFUL,” “SHE INSPIRES,” Special Projects “EDEN” and “(HOTEL) XX” at SPRING/BREAK Art Show, and internationally celebrated group shows “UPRISE/ANGRY WOMEN,” and “ONE YEAR OF RESISTANCE” responding to the political climate in America, as well as numerous other critically-acclaimed exhibitions. Recent press on Indira Cesarine & The Untitled Space includes Vogue (US), Vogue Italia, CNN, Forbes, Newsweek, W Magazine, Harper’s Bazaar, Teen Vogue, New York Magazine, i-D Magazine, Dazed and Confused, and The New York Times among many others.

*Featured image artwork by Victoria Selbach for UNRAVELED: Confronting The Fabric of Fiber Art. 

artwork by  Elise Drake, UNRAVELED Confronting The Fabric of Fiber Art. For use by 360 Magazine

Artwork by Elise Drake, UNRAVELED Confronting The Fabric of Fiber Art.

artwork by Indira Cesarine, for UNRAVELED Confronting The Fabric of Fiber Art. For use by 360 Magazine

Artwork by Mary Tooley Parker, UNRAVELED Confronting The Fabric of Fiber Art.

Immersive Van Gogh Chicago 9 - Photo Credit Michael Brosilow.

Lighthouse ArtSpace Chicago Extends Immersive Van Gogh Exhibit 

DUE TO POPULAR DEMAND, LIGHTHOUSE ARTSPACE CHICAGO ANNOUNCES EXTENSION FOR IMMERSIVE VAN GOGH EXHIBIT THROUGH NOV. 28

Initial Block of Tickets Sold Out; New Block of Tickets on Sale Wednesday, April 7 at 10 a.m.

Lighthouse ArtSpace Chicago, a new venue within Chicago’s recently renovated landmark Germania Club Building, today announced that due to popular demand the U.S. premiere of the blockbuster art experience Immersive Van Gogh Exhibit will extend its dates to November 28, 2021 after having sold out the current block of tickets. Tickets go on sale Wednesday, April 7 online and by phone at 844-307-4644.

Lighthouse ArtSpace Chicago, a three-story facility located at 108 W. Germania Place, is dedicated to immersive art presentations, merging the boundaries between entertainment and culture to give visitors the sense that they are encountering art as never before. Utilizing the building’s Victorian Era architectural details, 35-foot-tall walls and multiple levels (including balconies), the venue will present vibrant immersive art exhibitions that surround the viewer on all sides.

The venue’s first presentation,Immersive Van Gogh, is a visually spectacular digital art exhibition that has received widespread critical acclaim. Immersive Van Gogh invites audiences to “step inside” the iconic works of post-Impressionist artist Vincent van Gogh, evoking his highly emotional and chaotic inner consciousness through art, light, music, movement and imagination. The Italian creative team who pioneered digital experiences in Paris has created a custom design to fit the gracious Neo-Classical architecture of the exhibition’s Chicago home.

The hour-long, walk-through experience has been designed with health and safety as a priority. Capacity will be limited in accordance with the City of Chicago’s safety protocols. Additional safety precautions include touchless ticket-taking, temperature checks upon arrival, hand sanitizer stations, social distancing markers throughout the venue, and digitally projected social distancing circles on the gallery floors to ensure appropriate spacing. All guests must wear a face covering at all times during their visit to Lighthouse ArtSpace Chicago.

Immersive Van Gogh was designed by creative director and Italian film producer Massimiliano Siccardi, with original, mood-setting music by Italian multimedia composer Luca Longobardi,who provided a score that combines experimental electronic music with pure, ethereal and simple-seeming piano.Vittorio Guidottiis the Art Director. Siccardi and Longobardi are both pioneers of immersive digital art experiences in Paris, where they were part of the team that created the world-renowned Van Gogh, Starry Night exhibition, among others. With more than 70 projectors illuminating over 15,000 square-feet, visitors to Immersive Van Gogh are encircled from head-to-toe in Van Gogh’s brushstrokes and colors, including animated details from works such as Self Portrait with Felt Hat (1888), The Bedroom in Arles (1889), Irises (1889) and The Starry Night (1889).

Immersive Van Gogh is a new way of encountering art, as it quite literally surrounds viewers on all sides with the brilliant work of one of the greatest painters of all time,” said Immersive Art Space Co-Producer Corey Ross. “Both connoisseurs and new admirers of Van Gogh’s work are guaranteed a breathtaking perspective on the influential artist’s oeuvre. Merging state-of-the-art technology, theatrical storytelling, animation and some of the finest works of art ever created, Immersive Van Gogh is a uniquely mesmerizing experience that seemingly transports the viewer into the artist’s mind to see these timeless works as never before.”

“Despite being unknown throughout his life, Van Gogh’s artwork has created a lasting impact through its emotional richness and simple beauty,” said Massimiliano Siccardi, Immersive Van Gogh designer. “Both myself and Luca Longobardi are very excited to once again bring Van Gogh’s legacy to life in a way that is unique to the beautiful architecture of the Germania Club Building.”

The premiere of Immersive Van Gogh in Chicago was described as “a feast for your eyes” by WTTW Chicago and “impressive…(with) clever touches (and) emotional resonance” by the Chicago Tribune.  The Daily Herald said the exhibit “reimagines masterpieces for a digital age” and TimeOut Chicago called it “a visual spectacle… the future of experiential art.”

Lighthouse ArtSpace Chicago is operated by Immersive Art Space LP, a partnership between co-producers Corey Ross, Svetlana Dvoretsky, Maria Shclover and Irina Shabshis. The venue also features a merchandise/gift shop. Future plans include additional immersive art shows as well as live performances.

Ticket prices start at $39.99 for adults ($24.99 for children 16 or younger) with untimed and flexible ticket options available. The venue is easily accessible by public transportation and has ample parking in the nearby James House parking garage. For more information about Immersive Van Gogh, visit this website or call 844-307-4644.  Follow the exhibition on social media on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.

About Vincent van Gogh

Legendary Dutch painter Vincent van Gogh (1853 – 1890) is recognized as one of the world’s greatest and best loved artists. He was born in the Netherlands to his father, Theodorus van Gogh, and his mother, Anna Cornelia Carbentus, a moody artist whose love of nature, drawing and watercolors was passed on to her son. He worked at his uncle Cornelis’ art dealership when he had already been fluent in French, German and English, as well as his native Dutch. He fell in love with English culture when he was transferred to the Groupil Gallery in London in 1873.

During his short life he painted more than 2,000 artworks ranging from ordinary household items and self-portraits to surreal landscapes that inspire awe. Van Gogh was a post-Impressionist painter whose work — notable for its beauty, emotion and color — highly influenced expressionism in 20th-century art. He struggled with mental illness and remained poor and virtually unknown throughout his life.

He was tragically admitted to a psychiatric hospital after offering his severed ear to a woman at a local brothel. For hope, he turned to painting and nature, until one day when he went out to paint in the morning with a loaded pistol in his hand and reportedly shot himself in the chest. In his 37 years alive, Van Gogh only sold one painting, The Red Vineyards, to his brother Theo.

Rendition of John D. Gerdes's painting illustrated by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Florida Outsider Art

An Irresistible Urge to Create

The Monroe Family Collection of Florida Outsider Art On view through September 5 at the Boca Raton Museum of Art

The passion for Outsider Art runs deep in Florida, where self-taught artists have forged an indelible mark of special attention on the creative landscape of the state. An Irresistible Urge to Create: The Monroe Family Collection of Florida Outsider Art is the most comprehensive exhibition of its kind, on view at the Boca Raton Museum of Art until September 5th. This is the first time a museum has presented this definitive group of artists with an exhibition of this size and scope. Against the odds, many of these artists created obsessively to escape from their worlds that were often full of deep conflict and personal struggles.

Starting in the early 1990s, the photographer Gary Monroe drove throughout the state of Florida for more than ten years― from Key West to Jacksonville to Pensacola― on a mission to find what he calls “Florida’s renegade artists.” Thirty years later, after collecting, protecting and archiving more than 1,000 works by outsider artists, the result is an exhibition that leaves viewers spellbound.

“When I made these journeys across Florida to seek out and connect with these outlier artists, it was before the internet and it was quite laborious,” says Monroe. During his decade-long quest across the state, Monroe personally met nearly all of these artists one by one and became part of their lives. At the time this required a major personal commitment: he had to earn their trust to be allowed into their reclusive worlds. “It was an adventure,” adds Monroe. “Especially since there were no cell phones or GPS. Just good old road maps and phone booths. “Monroe’s odyssey culminated in 2003 when his book Extraordinary Interpretations: Florida’s Self-Taught Artists was published by the University Press of Florida.

The Museum has selected 86 of these works by 44 Florida artists for this landmark exhibition, which has already been tapped to travel to two other museums. “This new project opens a welcome window into another world. The world of wonders that lies outside the artistic establishment” says Irvin Lippman, the Executive Director of the Boca Raton Museum of Art. “This confounds our understanding of contemporary art, in a good way.”

“Outliers, boundary-crossers, pilgrims, exiles”

An Irresistible Urge to Create presents 86 works, many never seen before, by 44 Florida artists including: Purvis Young, George Voronovsky, Aurelia “Mama” Johnson, Frank Ritchie, Ruby “Miss Ruby” Williams, Gene Beecher, Kathy d’Adesky, Brian Dowdall, Floryan (Florian) Ludwig, Reva Freedman, Ozzie Lee “OL” Samuels, Sybil Gibson, Joey Smollon, Polly Bernard, Milton Ellis, Janice Kennedy, John Gerdes, Susanne Blankemeier, Morgan Steele, Alyne Harris, and Ed Ott. “For these artists, making art was as essential as breathing,” says Irvin Lippman. “Their artistic freedom was a pure, sincere and intimate means of communication.”

The artists in this exhibition were not interested in monetary gain or acclaim, they just wanted to create. “People who admire the independent spirit that unites these artists are awed by their sense of urgency. Their art is genuine. They let it flow from deep within their interior selves, they did not promote their work,” says Monroe. Most of George Voronovsky’s works, for example, have never been seen before. “I’ve been a custodian of his life’s work for the past 38 years,” adds Monroe.

The show is accompanied by an exhibition catalog with a specially commissioned poem by Campbell McGrath about artists’ urge to create. Titled Florida Primitives, the poem starts: “All Florida artists are primitives, so feral in their soil, so lush, endemic and elemental . . . All Florida artists are outsiders, outliers, highwaymen, boundary-crossers, pilgrims, exiles . . .,” and ends with: “art is an urge as irresistible as Florida.” The state, after all, continues to be known for its high strangeness. Home to 21 million people and growing more every day – especially after the pandemic– Florida also attracts more than 100 million tourists each year, adding to its population. The warm weather has also historically attracted homeless citizens from the colder regions, and people who live on the margins. Since its beginnings, Florida has always been known as a curious destination for artists of all types. Often what happens in Florida can serve as a lens to view upcoming cultural trends for the rest of the country too. The exhibition catalog explores how, over time, the vocabulary that is used to describe these “outsider “artists has evolved as the art world shifts its perception about what art is, and what art can be. “None of these artists were trained technicians, yet they each found their own way to technically transcribe their intuitions,” adds Monroe.

The History of Outsider Art

The interest in what is frequently called Outsider Art began in the early 20th-century with psychiatrists who studied artists who were institutionalized. In 1922, the book Artistry of the Mentally Ill became influential to the Surrealists. Later, in 1948, Jean Dubuffet and others founded the Compagnie de l’Art Brut, a collection of what they called “raw art” – art made outside the traditions of fine art. According to Kathleen Goncharov, the Senior Curator of the Boca Raton Museum of Art: “This interest has recently increased exponentially, as more mainstream institutions celebrate these kinds of artists. ‘Outsider’ artists are now most definitely ‘In.’ Many controversial terms have been bandied about to describe them, such as self-taught (in addition to ‘outsider’), but no truly definitive name yet. I suggest we call all creative works that are arresting, intriguing, and interesting conceptually, as simply ‘art’ and leave it at that. Jean Dubuffet said it best when he declared that art’s best moments are when it forgets what its own name is,” says Goncharov. “Artists create – that’s what they do.”

Up until 20 years ago, this work was not widely accepted as fine art. It wasn’t shown in museums and professionals from the art world looked down upon it. “This challenges the primary beliefs of traditional artmaking and has added a lot to the plurality of art,” says Monroe. “Being surrounded by such a large collection of artworks made by self-taught artists are invigorating. Especially because of their visual resolve to express themselves without convention.”

No Distance

These artists were not learning from their predecessors, their works are all coming from deep within themselves. Many of them dealt with deep emotional loss in their lives and debilitating conflict. Yet at the same time, they each experienced an overwhelming surge of creativity in their lives. “A lot of times, when going to see a museum or gallery show the viewer experiences a sense of distance, exhibitions can feel standoffish,” says Monroe. “Here, there is no distance between you and these self-taught artists. I think it’s because the work is so visceral. There’s no pretense whatsoever, no artifice, there are no rules.”

Most of the artists in this exhibition worked in total isolation. There were no political points to be made. These are people who created solely by delving into their own psyche and expressing themselves purely. Their art is not part of anything else except their own reality, they were not following canon. “There’s nothing between you and their art because it is so heartfelt,” adds Monroe. “This project gives you a glimpse into their psyche, which is so different from ours. Their whole being comes across. As the title suggests, they were driven to create.”

Virtual Art Experiences from the Museum’s Digital Galleries

The Boca Raton Museum of Art has created virtual tours and activities for art lovers from around the world to enjoy online, including this exclusive video presentation by Gary Monroe discussing the lives and work of under-recognized Florida artists, and Only in Florida! Your Story, Your Art with Dr. Caren Neile, a dynamic performance/lecture that weaves together the creative impulses and talents of storytellers and outsider visual artists – both groups who were long considered unworthy of serious recognition and study (funded through a grant from the Florida Humanities with funds from the National Endowment for the Humanities). Support is provided by Art Bridges Foundation for the Museum’s virtual programming #BocaMuseumatHome and #KeepKidsSmartwithArt.

More About the Exhibition and the Catalogue

After originating at the Boca Raton Museum of Art through September 5, the exhibition will travel to the Tampa Museum of Art (November 4, 2021 – May 22, 2022), and then to the Mennello Museum of American Art (June 10, 2022 – October 16, 2022). The exhibition catalog, published by the Boca Raton Museum of Art, is available for purchase at the museum store.

About the Museum

Kicking off its eighth decade in 2021, the Boca Raton Museum of Art encompasses a creative campus that includes the Museum in Mizner Park and the Art School. As one of South Florida’s cultural landmarks, the Museum has provided cultural and artistic service to the community, and to many visitors from around the world, since it was founded by artists in 1950. Visit the museum website to enjoy the Museum’s current online content, including video tours and digital gallery guides. Support for #BocaMuseumatHome and #KeepKidsSmartwithArt virtual programming is provided by Art Bridges Foundation. Museum hours, admission prices and more visitor information available here.

About Gary Monroe

Gary Monroe is a Florida photographer and author. He received a master’s degree in fine arts from the University of Colorado at Boulder. Monroe has photographed people and culture in numerous countries and throughout Florida, including the endings of the old-world Jewry that once characterized Miami’s South Beach, with extensive travels throughout Haiti, tourists on their “rite of passage” at Disney World, and corporate effects on the landscape. In addition, Mr. Monroe has written ten books about Florida art, including the seminal book, The Highwaymen: Florida’s African-American Landscape Painters, which explores uncharted cultural territories and constitutes a meaningful part of our social history.

Award illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

NYC Scholastic Art × Writing Awards

New York City Scholastic Art & Writing Awards Exhibition

Now on View at The Met

Art and Writing by 2021 Gold Key Winners on Display in The Met’s Ruth and Harold D. Uris Center for Education

The nonprofit Alliance for Young Artists & Writers and The Metropolitan Museum of Art have announced the opening of the seventh annual Scholastic Art & Writing Awards: New York City Regional Exhibition at The Met’s Ruth and Harold D. Uris Center for Education. This special exhibition is now on view and is free to the public through May 21, 2021.

The exhibition features more than 200 works of art and writing by New York City based Gold Key recipients participating in the 2021 Scholastic Art & Writing Awards, the country’s longest-running and most prestigious award and recognition program for creative teens. This year, students from all five boroughs in grades 7-12 submitted more than 10,000 works in 28 categories to the New York City regional program of the Awards, representing more than 300 schools.

Education has been at the heart of The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s mission since our founding in 1870, said Heidi Holder, the Frederick P. and Sandra P. Rose Chair of Education at The Met. Now, more than ever, we are committed to investing in education and supporting the creativity of New York City’s young people. It is an honor to present the 2021 Scholastic Art & Writing Awards: New York City Regional Exhibition in partnership with the Alliance for Young Artists & Writers. This annual exhibition demonstrates the power of art to transform, uplift, and challenge us.

All works were blindly adjudicated by accomplished creative and literary professionals based on originality, technical skill, and the emergence of a personal vision or voice. This year, the exhibition will present framed prints of students’ work, due to ongoing restrictions related to the COVID-19 pandemic and to ensure equitable access for all the student artists.

The artworks on display at The Met received top regional awards and were eligible to receive national honors through a second round of judging, which can open further opportunities for exhibition and publication, as well as access to scholarships. The Awards have honored distinguished artists since 1923, including Andy Warhol, Cy Twombly, Kay WalkingStick, John Baldessari, Luis Jimenez, and Catherine Murphy, whose works are in The Met collection.

Chris Wisniewski, Executive Director, Alliance for Young Artists & Writers, said: The creativity of our city’s teens has continued to flourish despite a year of unprecedented challenges. It has never been more important to celebrate diverse student voices and encourage the artistic expression of a generation of rising leaders. The Alliance for Young Artists & Writers is thrilled to partner with The Met to showcase the exceptional young winners of the 2021 New York City Scholastic Awards.

The Alliance partners with Parsons School of Design at The New School and Eugene Lang College of Liberal Arts at The New School to present the regional New York City Scholastic Art & Writing Awards. The 2021 Scholastic Art & Writing Awards: New York City Regional Exhibition at The Met is presented with generous support from The New York Times, the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, The Maurice R. Robinson Fund, and Scholastic Inc.

To learn more about the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards, visit the Scholastic Media Room online.

About the Alliance for Young Artists & Writers

The Alliance for Young Artists & Writers, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, identifies teenagers with exceptional creative talent and brings their remarkable work to a national audience through the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards. Founded in 1923, the Awards program is the longest-running, most prestigious initiative of its kind, having fostered the creativity and talent of millions of students through recognition, exhibition, publication, and scholarships.

About The Met

The Metropolitan Museum of Art was founded in 1870 by a group of American citizens, businessmen and financiers as well as leading artists and thinkers of the day, who wanted to create a museum to bring art and art education to the American people. Today, The Met displays tens of thousands of objects covering 5,000 years of art from around the world for everyone to experience and enjoy. The Museum lives in two iconic sites in New York City: The Met Fifth Avenue and The Met Cloisters. Millions of people also take part in The Met experience online. Since its founding, The Met has always aspired to be more than a treasury of rare and beautiful objects. Every day, art comes alive in the Museum’s galleries and through its exhibitions and events, revealing both new ideas and unexpected connections across time and across cultures.

Art Exhibition illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Loribelle Spirovski Exhibition

In what is set to be the highlight of their Summer 2021 calendar, HOFA Gallery, London, will host ‘Coronation‘, a solo exhibition by prolific contemporary figurative painter Loribelle Spirovski, between the 2– 16 June this year. The upcoming exhibition, comprised entirely of new artworks created during the 2020 lockdown, delves into the effects of recent international epoch-making events on private life as distilled through the lens of the artist’s mind.         

‘Coronation’ builds on many of the themes and motifs audiences have seen in her past critically acclaimed collections like ‘Hommes’ and ‘Memento Mori’. It is also a potent play on words whose double meaning points to the Covid-19 pandemic as well as the political power shifts and significant moments occurring simultaneously which continue to exert mammoth influences on the external and internal lives of people everywhere. 

In her new collection, Loribelle explores familiar and poignant themes with an urgency that speaks to the moment, employing her signature line technique to delineate eyes, faces and human forms entangled and abstracted into the minimalist geometric background which represents the room of the mind. She notes that “With the pandemic reducing the worlds of many to the confines of their phone screen, [the] ‘room’ motif seems more pertinent than ever…as a metaphor for the mind and the characters and scenes inhabiting it, signifying the external world filtered into the subconscious.”

The tenuousness of a reality mediated by technology and social media distortions is yet another strong theme of ‘Coronation’. However, the overarching theme is undoubtedly the inescapable reckoning all must face with history. As power shifts in the US reverberate around the world, ‘Coronation’ compels viewers to interrogate the things that hold sovereign power in their lives, prefaced on the recognition that there is need for a re-orientation, repudiation, or re-affirmation of individual commitments.

By her own account, Loribelle was no stranger to the emotional turmoil many experienced during lockdown. The pressures of living with restricted access to family, friends, and the outdoors while news of Covid-19 casualties trickled in forced the artist to take a stand against looming mortality by rediscovering and reaffirming the purpose of her art as a medium for self-expression and for exhuming the hidden contentions of the mind. ‘Coronation’ is an outcome of this defiance and the show will run at HOFA’s flagship gallery in Mayfair for 2 weeks from 2 to 16 as both an in-gallery show and a virtual exhibition, for all to enjoy.

Coronation‘ opens at HOFA Gallery, London on 2 June and runs for two weeks until 16 June 2021. 

A parallel virtual show will also be accessible to all online via a secure weblink.

In compliance with Covid-19 safety protocols, all visits to the gallery will be strictly on RSVP basis.

HOFA Gallery Website

Instagram

Photo courtesy of artist
Photo courtesy of artist
Nairy Baghramian, "Jumbled Alphabet" shot by Nick Ash, Courtesy the artist and Marian Goodman Gallery, for 360 Magazine

NAIRY BAGHRAMIAN – MISFITS

FURLA SERIES #03
NAIRY BAGHRAMIAN. Misfits
Curated by Bruna Roccasalva

Promoted by Fondazione Furla and GAM – Galleria d’Arte Moderna, Milan

GAM – Galleria d’Arte Moderna, Milan
NEW DATES: May 26 – September 26, 2021

From May 26 to September 26, 2021, Fondazione Furla and GAM – Galleria d’Arte Moderna, Milan, will present Misfits, the first solo exhibition in an Italian institution by Nairy Baghramian, curated by Bruna Roccasalva.

Part of the Furla Series program, Misfits is a project conceived specifically for the GAM spaces that explores some key themes of the artist’s research: from her interest in intervening in spaces that mark a boundary to the relationship between the artwork and its institutional context.

Misfits began with the specific urban setting of the GAM, that is, a garden open to adults only when accompanied by children. A series of large-scale sculptures will inhabit both the museum’s interior and exterior spaces, combining the idea of play with a reflection on the aesthetic experience of inadequacy and imperfection.

Furla Series #03 – Nairy Baghramian. Misfits is the outgrowth of a partnership between Fondazione Furla and GAM – Galleria d’Arte Moderna, Milan, with the generous contribution of Fondazione Henraux for the production of the works in marble.

Beyond Van Gogh by Beyond Exhibitions for 360 Magazine

Beyond Van Gogh: An Immersive Experience

This April, “Beyond Van Gogh: An Immersive Experience” is coming to one of Miami’s hottest venues, the Ice Palace. The exhibition, created by French-Canadian Creative Director Mathieu St-Arnaud and his team at Montreal’s world-renowned Normal Studio, features more than 300 of Vincent Van Gogh’s iconic artworks and takes the art lover into a three-dimensional world that exhilarates the senses.

After tremendous successes in Europe, cinematic Van Gogh exhibitions have crossed the ocean to great North American acclaim in recent years. In a rich and unique multimedia experience using cutting-edge projection technology developed by some of the world’s greatest AV designers, Beyond Van Gogh takes on the challenge of breathing new life into Van Gogh’s vast body of work. Using the artist’s own dreams, thoughts, and words to drive the experience as a narrative, guests move along projection-swathed walls wrapped in light and color that swirls, dances, and refocuses into flowers, cafes, and landscapes.

While journeying through Beyond Van Gogh, guests witness over 300 masterpieces, including instantly-recognizable classics such as “The Starry Night”, “Sunflowers”, and “Café Terrace at Night”, now freed from their frames. Van Gogh’s art comes to life by appearing and disappearing, flowing across multiple surfaces, and heightening the senses with their immense detail. Through his own words set to a symphonic score, guests come to a new appreciation of this tortured artist’s stunning work. It’s no surprise that millions of people all over the world credit Van Gogh with enhancing their relationship with art. Beyond Van Gogh will only deepen it further.

About Beyond Exhibitions

Beyond Exhibitions is a company comprised of like-minded individuals who have worked across the globe with some of the greatest entertainers and brands known to man. With Beyond Van Gogh, the team brings their collective understanding of audiences, entertainment, and art together to proudly present Vincent Van Gogh as he has never been seen before.

Tickets Onsale Now – Grand Opening Thursday, April 15th

Ice Palace Studios Miami (1400 N Miami Avenue, Miami, FL 33136)

To purchase tickets or for more information, please visit the museum’s website.