Posts tagged with "exhibition"

Exhibition given by The Untitled Space for use by 360 Magazine

The Untitled Space × Fahren Feingold – Wet Dreams

The Untitled Space is pleased to present “WET DREAMS” a solo exhibition of watercolor paintings by artist Fahren Feingold on view from October 21st through November 13th, 2021. “WET DREAMS,” curated by Indira Cesarine, premieres the latest series of works on paper and panels by the artist known for her ethereal feminine nudes that emphasize the female gaze through vibrant brush strokes using her signature wet-on-wet watercolor technique. The exhibition will be the third in-person solo exhibition of artwork by Feingold presented by The Untitled Space. The artist, who has been represented by the gallery since 2017, has been featured in a number of group exhibitions and online solo shows presented by the gallery and is featured in numerous notable international collections.  

“In my new series of work, WET DREAMS, I return to the female form. I explore the relationships between beauty, sensuality, and nudity through my own female narrative lens.  I want my viewer to feel the colors of that expression. I want my watercolors to wash over them, gently inviting them to sink deeper into the subjects, not just in the erotic sense.  The series exposes the unclothed form, not as a sexual act but rather as a revelation in body and mind connectedness. 360 Magazine is amazed at the work of Fahren Feingold for this exhibit. 

In WET DREAMS, my practice has evolved. Instead of taking inspiration from vintage imagery, I am working from my own photographs as visual references. Many of the models are personal friends, giving me an insider point of view to their real lives and presence rather than creating imaginary narratives about who the women are and the past lives they may have led. By taking time to really look at and get to know the women, their stories, and their bodies, my paintings are like a love letter to my subjects, shared with the world so they can see what I feel. I don’t literally paint my models but the emotions they radiate.” – Artist Fahren Feingold

“Using watercolors to paint my bright and bold figures gives me access to those who usually shy away from nudity. In my work, I uncover women’s pre-sexualized bodies to explore the beauty and intuitive emotions of my feminist gaze. For this exhibition, I worked on growing in scale, with several pieces on multiple panels. As a physically petite person, I struggle with feeling seen and heard. Through the act of painting, I let my work speak loudly for me. Thus, expanding the watercolors from the confines of single paper dimensions, my voice becomes that much harder to ignore. WET DREAMS is a demand for people to listen and see women as equals while sharing the visual poetry of their unique intimate stories.” – Artist Fahren Feingold

Optimistic Vivacity via Tim Tadder for use by 360 Magazine

Interview with Tim Tadder

If you have ever seen photos of an Olympic athlete, you have no doubt seen Tim Tadder‘s work. As a photographer, he has captured the likes of Michael Phelps and Simone Biles. Recently, Tadder hosted an exhibition at Avant Gallery in New York City. 360 was given the opportunity to ask him about his artistic inspirations and his style.

How did you get into art? Was there a moment you realized you wanted to do art professionally?

I’ve always been involved in some capacity with art as a major thematic in my life. It was always what I most enjoyed in school, as a hobby, & just overall being creative. I left a career as a teacher and pursued photography as a craft and a creative expression form when I was 27, after realizing I needed to enjoy my occupation and creating was a massive part of that. 

When did you realize art was the career choice for you? Was there a moment when you realized you were gaining recognition and success in the art world?

People see me as a highly creative photographer and artist. The way that I see the world has a particular point of view that is sought after. I think embracing that as who you are and what you do and how you perceive and see has value and therefore is a viable career once you can monetize that vision. Everything else falls into place from there. 

People will collect and want to own a piece of your vision and hang it on a wall, which ultimately empowers you as an artist to continue to create and explore your vision knowing that you have the financial support in order to do so. 

When ‘Nothing to See’ first was shared as large format prints, the response was overwhelming. It was at that point that I knew there was serious traction in a new marketplace, one that I had always dreamed of being a part of and was fortunate that this particular series of images was embraced by collectors and galleries. 

How does knowing a multitude of art mediums help you with your artwork?

I come from a background of 20 years of creating advertising campaigns for the world’s biggest brands and our job is to create on demand art that sells a product. And in doing so, you learn to use all the tools at your disposal to make the most powerful image for that purpose. I have been able to use all of that skill and knowledge and channel it into my personal fine art work to create images that convey messages that are important to me and that should be heard around the world. 

What do you look at to get inspiration to create?

Pre-COVID I attended a lot of art fairs and contemporary museums to look at trends, masters, & to find inspiration on how people explore visual presentation. I found that going to those events and seeing the art in person really helped me refine my message and refine my voice. In a COVID world, I try to follow artists on IG and Twitter who I’m inspired by and keep abreast of their new work and from there I try to find my own lane to blend out, be distinct, and be noticeable. Right now there’s so many rabbit holes that one can go down to find inspiration, whether it’s instagram or twitter or the NFT space.

You use bright and vibrant color schemes in your artwork, when and how did that start? What’s your process when deciding about the colors you will use?  

I’ve always been attracted to bold use of color. It’s been a monochord in my commercial work since my career began. For me that’s an instinctual choice. To use bold colors to help story tell. In choosing, a lot of it comes from instinct and a lot comes from what those colors represent. For ‘Nothing to See,’ I chose the bed, black, & white hues because they were historically represented of fascist banners and that collection was born out of a desire to create iconic, anti-fascist imagery. 

You photograph both still-lives (mostly mannequins) and people. Is there one you prefer to photograph? What led to you choosing a humanoid inanimate object as your main subject in many photos/series? 

I choose to use real people and not mannequins. I select models that have very androgynous, mannequin-esque features because I want my images to represent humankind and not just a type of individual, which sometimes comes from casting talent with defining characteristics. It’s not a picture of someone, it’s a picture of something

You edit with high contrast, high-saturation as your signature style. What drew you to this editing style?

Instinctive choices. It’s how I see, it’s how I visualize, it’s what I as an artist feel is beautiful. It wasn’t a choice to follow a trend, it was my own visual aesthetic.

art illustration by Gabrielle Marchan for use by 360 magazine

THE MOAD PRESENTS THREE NEW EXHIBITION

MUSEUM OF ART AND DESIGN AT MDC PRESENTS

THREE NEW EXHIBITIONS FOR FALL 2021

Museum of Art and Design (MOAD) at Miami Dade College (MDC) presents three one-person exhibitions for the Fall 2021 season. Exhibitions by the Icelandic artist Hreinn Fridfinnsson, Cuban American Jorge Pardo, and Miami-based Venezuelan American Loriel Beltrán offer viewers comprehensive looks at the practices of three of the most compelling artists—both local and international—working today. The exhibitions will be on view from Nov. 6, 2021, through May 1, 2022.

Hreinn Fridfinnsson: For the Time Being, the first American museum exhibition of the influential Icelandic artist spans six decades and highlights his use of minimal gestures to transform everyday materials into poetic, allusive, and revelatory works of art. Born and raised in Iceland, Fridfinnsson moved to Amsterdam in 1971 and began exhibiting his work in museums and galleries across Europe. His early works align with contemporaneous cutting-edge art movements, such as land art and photo conceptualism, but still suggest the distinctively romantic, lyrical, and wry sensibility that continues to define his practice.

A kind of poetic restraint characterizes many other Fridfinnsson works, which take ordinary materials and objects as their starting point. With a light touch, the artist minimally intervenes to alchemically transmute pedestrian things into allusive and enigmatic artworks—what we might call, in Duchampian terms, “slightly assisted readymades.” Sometimes these works carry a tacit mystical or spiritual charge, such as Sanctuary, 1992–2010, a regular cardboard carton with a sheet of fluorescent paper placed inside. Upended and mounted on the wall, the splayed box makes a cruciform shape and unearthly light seems to emanate from within.

Fridfinnsson’s art is often dependent on vagaries of atmosphere and perception for its effect. Most of his major exhibitions, including this one at MOAD, gather works from across the multiple decades of his career, without regard for chronology or ideas of artistic development. For the Time Being marks a provisional summation of the artist’s achievement, less a traditional retrospective than an assembly of instantiations of his unique sensibility.

Jorge Pardo: Mongrel, a site-specific installation, features a new series of quasi-abstract drawings along with modernist chairs, custom-fabricated chandeliers, and a carpet designed by the artist in MOAD’s expansive Skylight Gallery. The immersive exhibition poetically conjures the artist’s own history and biography, including his childhood memories as a Cuban refugee, processed with his family at MDC’s Historic Landmark Freedom Tower, which now houses the museum.

An untitled series of 25 new drawings created expressly for this exhibition meld a wide variety of images into arresting abstractions of pulsing color and form, while still occasionally revealing their representational sources. The artist emigrated to the United States as a child, passing through the Freedom Tower, which then served as a processing center for Cuban refugees. His memories of the welcoming architectural landmark intertwine with those of displacement, trauma, and loss caused in part by the Cuban regime’s confiscation of the emigrants’ family photographs and documents. Pardo’s drawings use family photos—his own and others’—as their starting point, along with historic photos of the Freedom Tower. He combines these with a vast array of other images, including many artworks crucial to his development as an artist and others meant to evoke the cultural milieu of his formative years.

The artist manipulates his source materials on the computer, resizing, superimposing, colorizing, and otherwise transforming images that recall personal and cultural memories into dazzlingly hued, intricately textured near-abstractions. Pardo translates these into vector graphics, which are then printed on cotton Guarro paper and brilliantly tinted by hand with colored pencils. Pardo has compared the montage and assimilation of source images into the provisionally unified whole of his drawings to the process of assimilation undergone by any immigrant to a new land, including himself. He views his reconstruction of an image from recognizable fragments into a new, often unfamiliar, mixed configuration as analogous to his own hybrid or “mongrel” condition, existing between cultural, ethnic, or racial identities.

Loriel Beltrán: Constructed Color presents recent works by the artist, innovative abstract paintings of dazzling opticality and metaphorical density made by affixing slabs of layered pigment, sliced from blocks hardened in boxlike molds, to panels. Beltrán’s panels appear as stacked structures, assemblages, or objects. But the optical mixing of the colors perceived by viewers also makes the paintings seem somewhat intangible. This contradiction between object and opticality constitutes only one of the works’ paradoxes. Beltrán uses such contradictions to create a tension-filled space within which he explores possible modes for contemporary painting.

Beltrán’s exhibition inaugurates MOAD Projects, a new series of exhibitions that features work by Miami-based artists, including distinguished MDC and New World School of the Arts alumni and faculty. MOAD Projects provides a platform for local artists to realize new projects or exhibit recent bodies of work, as well as for investigations of understudied historical developments in Miami’s cultural past. MOAD Projects expands upon the swing/SPACE/Miami alumni exhibition series that began in 2013.

“We are thrilled to present solo shows by three fascinating artists this fall,” says Rina Carvajal, MOAD’s Executive Director and Chief Curator, who organized all three projects. “Introducing Hreinn Fridfinnsson’s intelligent and poetic work to America is a great honor. And we are proud to host Jorge Pardo’s engrossing semi-autobiographical installation, which engages his own artistic development in tandem with the history of exile, of Miami, and of the Freedom Tower itself. These two projects, combined with the rigorous and brilliant paintings of Loriel Beltrán, produced here in Miami by an alumnus of the New World School of the Arts, give our audiences a view of the vast range of contemporary art’s possibilities.”

Hreinn Fridfinnsson: For the Time Being is curated by Rina Carvajal, MOAD’s Executive Director and Chief Curator, with the assistance of Isabela Villanueva, Consulting Assistant Curator. Jorge Pardo: Mongrel and Loriel Beltran: Constructed Color are curated by Rina Carvajal. All three exhibitions are made possible by the Miami-Dade County Department of Cultural Affairs and the Cultural Affairs Council, the Miami-Dade County Mayor and Board of County Commissioners; and the State of Florida, Department of State, Division of Arts and Culture, and the Florida Council on Arts and Culture. For their generous assistance in realizing the exhibition of Hreinn Fridfinnsson, MOAD wishes to thank Hrafnhildur Helgadóttir; Claes Nordenhake and Nadia Heinsohn of Galerie Nordenhake; Börkur Arnarson and Bryndís Erla Hjálmarsdóttir of i8 Gallery; and Elba Benítez and Pamela Cañizo of Galería Elba Benitez. For invaluable assistance in his research, Jorge Pardo wishes to thank the Cuban Heritage Collection and the Cuban Refugee Center Records, both at the University of Miami Libraries, Coral Gables; the Research Center at HistoryMiami Museum; and the Florida International University dPanther Digital Repository.

Image via A&O PR for 360 Magazine

Hidden Threads Art Exhibition

Hidden Threads

A multidisciplinary group exhibition explores the spontaneous side of memory.

HOT•BED is pleased to present Hidden Threads, a group exhibition curated by Bryan Hoffman that explores the subconscious memories that inform our identities. As we navigate daily life, sensory stimuli may provoke unrelated recollections or emotions from the past. The work in the show is inspired by these involuntary memories, also known as mind-pops, which form the hidden threads that weave together our everyday experiences. Inspired by this idea, artists Katee Boyle, Carlos Alejandro, Alex Griffin, and János Korodi are exhibiting works spanning painting, photography, videography/projection mapping, sculpture, installations, and works on paper. In addition to their individual pieces, Boyle, Alejandro, and Nelson have also contributed new collaborative projects created especially for this exhibition. This is the first exhibition that will utilize the entirety of HOT•BED’s space, including its main gallery and MICRO•GALLERY. Hidden Threads will flow through the gallery, intensifying as it goes, while acting as a subconscious space that visitors are invited to explore. Staff will intentionally provide little direction, as to ensure total autonomy over how deeply visitors would like to dive into the recesses of the space and mind. Hidden Threads will be on view from September 11 – November 12, 2021 with an opening event on September 11, 2021 at 6-10 pm EST. To RSVP, please visit the site.

Mind-pops occur without effort or exerted influence, often during habitual activity. Everyone experiences these moments — when you taste, see, hear, smell, or touch something and suddenly a rush of memory surfaces. These memories can be powerful catalysts for creative expression or harmful triggers for negative emotions. What it shows us is that our subconscious often knows the meaning of an experience, even if consciously we don’t, Professor Lia Kvavilashvili of the University of Hertfordshire told Scientific American. Inspired by this phenomenon, each artist in Hidden Threads references or explores the idea through their own distinct style and conceptual lens.

Korodi considers memory by portraying the visceral experience of moving through space and time. His never-before-exhibited Transfer series (2020) continues his work with street views in a new medium; the artist takes images from Google Maps and prints them onto raw plywood sheets using a dye sublimation process. The romantic yet ghostly works retain the patterns and textures of the wood, with the street view images superimposed on top of them, mirroring the way memory is layered over the present. Korodi will also be showing works from his Motion and Bridges in Motion series.

Boyle gives us an intimate window into the place where past, present, and future are always meeting, fighting, coexisting, and collaborating. Her work resonates with a tug of memoir, the desire to move forward but always with a strong gravitational pull of the past. For Hidden Threads, Boyle has teamed up with Alejandro and Matt Nelson of N.E. Thing Productions on a series of flip book video projections, which expand upon the narrative of Boyle’s paintings and sculptures. The projections — shot by Alejandro and featuring Boyle — will be exhibited mapped over Boyle’s installation pieces, on top of horticulture displays designed by curator Bryan Hoffman, and against the walls of the gallery, creating an immersive experience that echoes the disarray of the subconscious.

In addition to the projections, Alejandro also contributes individual works to the show, including photographs and enlarged negatives hung in a line to mimic the setup of a dark room. By utilizing the traditional medium of analog photography — including a variety of uniquely complex techniques for developing and printing his images — Alejandro reflects on memory, artistic craft, and what is lost or preserved in the passage of time.

Griffin paints landscapes and architectural spaces in a raw, fuzzy style that mimics the haze of the past, but retains its emotional resonance. Though the pieces are often somber and visually sparse, Griffin gives structure to memory, making it visible in new ways. Rather than striving for photorealistic perfection, the artist captures what it feels like to almost grasp a memory before it slips back into the subconscious layers of the mind. (Griffin and Boyle have previously shown work together at Scarlett Thicket Farms in Chester County.)

Altogether, the exhibition presents a rich and layered depiction of memory and its elusive mind pops. In probing the possibilities of this complex, confounding, and distinctly human experience, Hidden Threads asks us to consider what we know we know, as well as that which we can only hope to catch a glimpse of someday. For more information and additional updates on Hidden Threads, please visit the site.

About Carlos Alejandro

Born in New York City. Grew up in public housing projects. Classically trained musician. 35 years of successful editorial, commercial, and fine art photography. Advocate for creativity, children, education and the environment.

About Katee Boyle

Katee Boyle, Scarlett Forge; Kennett Square, Pennsylvania explores a wide range of media including drawing, painting, sculpture, photography, words, sound, and installation to create the artifacts and narratives attributed to her work. A conceptually-driven expressionist, her stories stem from personal tributes to the human experience and unyielding faith in the power of emotional responses. Boyle’s work responds to the question: what does it mean to feel human, unapologetically from the female perspective. The manifestation of Her documents offers a representation of memory energized by a sense of momentum. Her work shares a strong temporal dimension – a place where the past, present, and future are always meeting, often colliding or in conflict. Boyle’s work resonates with a tug of memoir, the desire to move forward but always with a strong gravitational pull of the past. Speaking in a viscerally raw language of unbridled honesty on female invisibility and social conditioning, Boyle presents the viewer with a deconstructed female perspective on emotional life.

Boyle’s Artifacts reflect on cultural and gender-nuanced elements of life: birth, death, mother, family, discord, trust, and healing. Her work explores the mapping of connections and growth between that which is tangible and that which is most often unmentionable and fleeting. Her narratives embody the external social messages that speak to personal and private but simultaneously mingle and resonate with her audience as emotionally responsive, collectively shared experiences.

Boyle’s work is in private collections internationally. She has exhibited at SOFA Chicago, is a Winterthur Museum Maker- Creator Fellow, and a United States Artist Nominee.

About Alex Griffin

Alex Griffin creates landscapes that move among the past, present and future. Taking on multiple roles of painter, historian and storyteller, he reconstructs realities by inviting the viewer into imaginary scenes – a field, an urban landscape, a quiet walkway. His paintings have a cinematic effect and are filled with dreamlike imagery and structure. He builds up the surfaces of his canvases with layers of narratives and surrealist images. Griffin received a BFA from Virginia Commonwealth University in 2008. He lives and works in Philadelphia, PA.

About János Korodi

János Korodi was born in Budapest, Hungary in 1971. He is a visual artist, primarily a painter, and deals with different forms of printmaking, murals, and occasionally participates in interdisciplinary collaborations. By the time he received his doctoral degree in visual arts from the Hungarian University of Fine Arts, at the age of 42 in 2013, he was already in the process of relocation to the US. In the last 25 years, his works have been shown in various countries in Europe and the US. He has spent a six-months artists residency at TerraCycle Inc. in Trenton, NJ in 2015, awarded the 2010 Eötvös Scholarship of the Hungarian State–a studio residency in New York City, a 2008 scholarship at the Hungarian Academy in Rome, the 1999–2001 Derkovits Fellowship for emerging artist in Hungary, and the 1996 scholarship from the Tóth Menyhért Foundation of Kecskemét, Hungary. Korodi’s works are in permanent public and private collections internationally. He has lived and worked in Philadelphia since 2015. Through the 2000’s, Korodi has dealt with architecture and urbanism, and its visual and theoretical aspects for his Genius Loci – Spirit of the Place paintings and program, which concluded in his thesis. Later, he found his new self in “motion”, and the phenomenon of transition between places. This move colluded and bound together with the human exodus of the recent decade, as well as with his own immigration, and it reflects on the Spirit of the Place problem, too.

About HOT•BED 

Established in 2017, HOT•BED is a gallery and creative lifestyle space in Philadelphia that unites art, horticulture, and design. Helmed by Creative Director, Bryan Hoffman, HOT•BED is a catalyst and a conduit for futures not yet realized. It’s a gathering place, not unlike the Paris Salons of the Nineteenth century, where visitors and artists alike have the opportunity to collaborate, exhibit, and explore new ideas in a welcoming and judgment-free environment.

Image via Gruin Gallery for 360 Magazine

Keelin Montzingo – Cosmic Latte Nostalgia

Keelin Montzingo’s Cosmic Latte Nostalgia

Opening Thursday, September 9th, 2021 from 6-8pm with artist in attendance

Exhibition through October 10th, 2021

Make an appointment here

Location: 1515 N Gardner St, Los Angeles, CA, 90046

We are homesick most for the places we have never known. – Carson McCullers

Gruin and Show Gallery are pleased to present Keelin Montzingo’s first solo exhibition in Los Angeles entitled Cosmic Latte Nostalgia. 

Longing for a time that never was and a place that is accessible only within the imagination, Keelin Montzingo presents a collection of exciting new work that navigates the space between notions of home and the projected world we occupy online. Here, home refers not to where we live, but how we exist within our bodies and how this has changed over time as technology has developed and our sense of self has become increasingly warped and abstracted.

Cosmic Latte is known to be the average color of the universe, the compression of all we know to exist, a milky beige which is found in all of Montzingo’s new paintings. Referencing the mirroring of the cosmos within the Internet, these works explore the dichotomy between self-expression and entrapment within simulation. The search for authenticity in the contemporary world is inextricably linked to public displays of fictionalized behavior. As we seek to find ourselves we develop increasingly more sophisticated ways to invent who we are for others.

The mirror and the real meet and connect at a threshold where we can either try to untangle the facade or find ways of working with where we have arrived, understanding that we cannot revert back to the myths we have cultivated. This journey of controlling representation is nothing new, the Internet is simply a contemporary vehicle for a process we have been undergoing for centuries. The difference is that now we are accelerating at a pace we cannot keep up with or control.

Montzingo does not seek to judge those who cultivate personas, she does not perceive this behavior as duplicitous but rather as an act of creativity. Our ability to imagine is what has led us to turn the camera on ourselves and use the body as a platform for storytelling. Ironically the most extraordinary aspect of humanity, our ability to envision, is also what leads us to invent ever more creative ways to attack the psyche and enact destructive behaviors. Whenever something verges towards a deeper truth, a deeper facade comes with it. Reflected in the cosmos we cannot escape the laws of attraction and opposition.

Montzingo longs to escape the complexity of the now, to dwell in the pastel landscapes of a 1970s Palm Springs utopia where all is simplified and we are distilled to archetypes, the female body a symbol of the mother, the creator, the lover, the seer. But this is impossible, so instead she affords her subjects the freedom of time travellers, moving back and forth through data, creating a link between an imagined past, the contemporary world and projections of the future. For this reason, instead of painting women she knows, Montzingo paints models who are anonymous to her, employing the silhouette of the conventionally celebrated body to free this stereotype and speak of all female identity.

Keelin Montzingo (b.1992) is New York based painter. She studied Communications at the University of Massachusetts and Modern and Contemporary Art at Christies. Montzingo’s paintings are housed in collections in the USA, UK, Singapore, Switzerland, Lebanon, Italy and Thailand. She has exhibited in Paris, New York, and Los Angeles.

VISITOR INFORMATION

Show Gallery is located between Hollywood and Sunset at 1515 N. Gardner Street off of Sunset Boulevard. There is limited parking in the lot directly behind the gallery. Show Gallery is open by appointment only.

Visit Keelin’s artwork on Gruin and learn more via their website and Instagram.

- Bluestrokes - artwork by Atanda Quadri Adebayo, Mamus Esiebo | Daniel Tetteh Nartey Moustapha Baidi Oumarou via GR gallery for use by 360 Magazine

– BLUE STROKES –

Atanda Quadri Adebayo | Mamus Esiebo | Daniel Tetteh Nartey Moustapha Baidi Oumarou 

Sept 9 – Oct 9

GR Gallery is pleased to announce – BLUE STROKES – a groundbreaking group exhibition showcasing multi-talented artists from different states of Africa: Mamus Esiebo, Daniel Tetteh Nartey, Atanda Quadri Adebayo, Moustapha Baidi Oumarou. This exciting show will reveal, for the first time in a public exhibition in the U.S. , the latest series of artworks that the artists have been working on for the past months. Appositely conceived for this occasion, this bold body of new works will independently invade the gallery space, contrasting and counterbalancing each other. The show will put together in total twenty original artworks, including paintings on canvas, works on paper and a print.

When: Opening: Thursday September 09 , 5:00pm – 8:00pm (Exhibition Dates: September 09 – October 9  2021). Members of the press can contact GR gallery in advance to schedule a private viewing and/or an interview with the artists before the exhibition is officially open. Reception will be held with no restrictions and drinks will be served. Visitors who want to attend the opening can RSVP by contacting the gallery.

Where: GR gallery,  255 Bowery (between Houston & Stanton) New York, NY 10002

Who: Atanda Quadri Adebayo (b. 1999, Nigeria) | Mamus Esiebo (Lagos Nigeria, 1985) | Daniel Tetteh Nartey (Ghana, 1991) | Moustapha Baidi Oumarou (Cameroon, 1997).

– BLUE STROKES – includes artists from Ghana, Nigeria and Cameroon – all of whom have experienced and contributed to a rich history in local culture and personal heritage. Besides the shared extensive use of the blue tint and the technique used to apply it, the title refers to the color the sky and the sea, associated with freedom, elegance, inspiration, wisdom and the saturnine behavior that defines artists and keeps under control the powerful striking act of wrath. From the vivid imagery, immense balance of rich contrast, to a super concentrated explosion of color, every unique shade, texture and identity of the artists have been interwoven to create this unique exhibition. The artists hail from a variety of communities and homelands; their stories and embracement are portrayed on each piece of artwork that was specifically made to present their vision, their commitments, and their actual life.

-Featured Artwork is “Summertime”, 2021, digital painting on canvas 36 x 48 inches by Mamus esiebo*

 "Untitled", 2021, acrylic on canvas, 150 x 100 cm. (Moustapha) via BlueStrokes exhibit at GR Gallery for use by 360 Magazine

“Untitled”, 2021, acrylic on canvas, 150 x 100 cm. By: Moustapha Baidi Oumarou

"survival's gaze", 2021, acrylic and charcoal on canvas, 72 x 61 in. By: Atanda Quadri Adebayo  via the -Bluestrokes- exhibit at GR Gallery for use by 360 Magazine

“survival’s gaze”, 2021, acrylic and charcoal on canvas, 72 x 61 in. By: Atanda Quadri Adebayo

Image courtesy of Flying Horse for 360 Magazine

Mirah Lehr’s Residency at Flying Horse

Flying Horse Editions Selects Mira Lehr For 2021 Visiting Artist Residency Program

Lehr’s New Editions of Original Works Created in Residency will Debut During Art Basel Miami Beach 2021 at INK Miami

Nationally Acclaimed Studio Invites World’s Leading Artists to Push Boundaries with Cutting-Edge Technology
Flying Horse Editions, the nationally acclaimed printmaking studio that invites some of the world’s leading artists for its Visiting Artist Residency Program, has chosen Mira Lehr for their select roster of artists for 2021. The studio is celebrated for cutting-edge technology and inspiring artists to push the boundaries of printmaking, in a kinetic setting among its team of master printmakers. In her new series, Lehr, now at the bold age of 86, is experimenting with explosives, fuses, plexiglass, watercolor, and inks ‒ exploring new ways to use nontraditional materials in the art of printmaking. Mira Lehr is a force of nature to be reckoned with, said Theo Lotz, the Director of Flying Horse Editions. She is a fearless explorer. Lehr’s body of work spans all media, not bound by one process. Her artistic energy and spirit are boundless. We knew that her bold approach to artmaking would lead to a great collaboration. Lehr thrives in our studio, which relishes the unexpected. Lehr’s new work created at this residency will debut during Miami Art Week/Art Basel Miami Beach 2021, at the INK Satellite Fair (December 1-5 at the Dorchester Hotel).
This fair is produced by the International Fine Print Dealers Association, and is recognized worldwide as one of the leading presentations of works on paper by internationally renowned artists. Lehr’s new limited editions will then tour nationwide with Flying Horse throughout 2022 at several art fairs across the U.S. and internationally. Her new work will also be presented at an opening reception at the studio, featuring live demonstrations of her process of igniting gunpowder and fuses to create her artworks. Flying Horse Editions was established in 1990 at the University of Central Florida. The artists invited to participate in the residency has included: Diana Al-Hadid, Elia Alba, Chakaia Booker, Will Cotton, Ke Francis, Luis Gispert, Eddie Martinez, Odili Donald Odita, and Toyin Ojih Odutola.
Lehr completed the first part of her studio residency in the spring, and will return to Flying Horse later this year to complete her new editions there. Every artwork in Lehr’s new editions will each be an original work of art that was created exclusively during the residency. They were each imagined with these trailblazing printmaking techniques in mind, and are each one of a kind. So far, Lehr has created a series of monotypes with watercolor prints created on plexiglass. She has also created a new lithograph with collage pieces that will be burned and ignited using the artist’s signature technique with fuses and gunpowder, for a new varied edition.
My experience at Flying Horse Editions has been a powerful new adventure in artmaking for me. I am honored to have been invited to their artist residency this year, said Mira Lehr. Their passionate commitment to the craft of printmaking is evident, they really put their hearts into the visiting artist’s experience . I was able to experiment with great freedom ‒ they encourage the artists to take risks, while remaining true to your voice.
This research space houses professional visiting artists for short term residencies with assistance from master printmakers and students. The artists’ drawings are scanned, manipulated digitally, and then put on a copper plate similar to what would have been used during Rembrandt’s time. Lehr’s nature-based imagery includes painting, design, sculpture and video installation. Her processes include innovative usage of resin, gunpowder, fire, Japanese paper, dyes and welded steel. Her paradoxically destructive yet creative fire techniques burn holes and leave imprints in her prints resulting in an even more layered and complicated final artwork. The resident artists invited to Flying Horse Editions have the benefit of working with a massive 300-ton hydraulic press that is dramatically colored red. This behemoth machine produces complex relief prints that expand the creative possibilities of what artists may have previously envisioned. Unlike traditional presses, this hydraulic press applies an immense amount of pressure, downward onto the printed area, yielding much more precise images, with several blocks in multiple colors. Because the printer requires such fine tuning, Siemens donated a sophisticated electronic system that tricks out the controls enabling unparalleled precision. Watch the high-tech colossus in action here.
The Visiting Artist Residency Program at Flying Horse Editions is made possible by the members of the institution, a grant from the Winifred Johnson Clive Foundation, and with funding by the Judith and David Albertson Endowment in the Arts. The goal of the program is to create a world-class initiative that promotes creative interaction between professional artists and students, while also creating sustainability within the printmaking field ‒ training the next generation of artists and printmakers.
Flying Horse Editions is a collaborative research center in the College of Arts and Humanities at the University of Central Florida, and a non-profit publisher of limited-edition prints, artist books, and art objects by internationally renowned artists.

About the Artist
Mira Lehr’s solo and group exhibitions number more than 300. She is a graduate of Vassar College (1956) with a degree in Art History, under the mentorship of Linda Nochlin, the renowned feminist art historian. Lehr will be the subject of a new, 420-page international monograph by the leading art book publisher Skira Editore, to be published in the spring of 2022. She has been invited to present a solo exhibition at the Deering Estate in the fall of 2021.
Lehr has been collected by major institutions across the U.S., including the Smithsonian Museum of American Art (Washington), the Getty Museum Research Center (Los Angeles), the Boca Raton Museum of Art, the Perez Art Museum Miami, the Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center (NY), the Margulies Collection, the Mennello Museum of American Art, MOCA North Miami, the Jewish Museum of Florida-FIU, and the Orlando Museum of Art. Her work is in the private collections of Elie and Marion Wiesel, Jane and Morley Safer, and Judy Pfaff, among others. She is included in the Leonard Lauder Corporate Collection in New York. Thirty of her paintings were commissioned for the collection of Mount Sinai Hospital. Her work can be seen in American Embassies around the world and is permanently on view in the Sloan Kettering Memorial Center.
Lehr’s 2020 solo museum show at the Mennello Museum of American Art was selected by The New York Times as one of the leading museum exhibitions nationwide in the U.S. in the 2020 special Museums Section. Her solo museum exhibition headlined Art Basel Miami Beach 2019 at the Jewish Museum of Florida-FIU, and also received national and international critical acclaim. Her museum-wide exhibition at the MOCA North Miami spanned across 10,000 square feet of installations. She has currently been chosen by Flying Horse Editions as an invited artist for the Visiting Artist residency.
Mira Lehr’s nature-based work encompasses painting, sculpture, and video. She uses nontraditional media such as gunpowder, fire, fuses, Japanese paper, dyes, and welded steel. Lehr is known for igniting and exploding fuses to create lines of fire across her paintings. Critics are calling Lehr the Godmother of Miami’s art scene because in 1960 she created one of the nation’s first co-ops for women artists. At the age of 86 and with a career that spans more than six decades of artmaking, Lehr is creating more new work now than at any other point in her life ─ with a heightened sense of urgency about the planet and climate change. In the 1950s, Lehr studied and worked in New York as an artist, where she met some of America’s most prominent masters including: Joan Mitchell, Lee Krasner, and Helen Frankenthaler. She studied with James Brooks, Ludwig Sander, Robert Motherwell, and within the Hans Hofmann circle.
When Lehr moved back to Florida in 1960, she was shocked at the lack of an art scene, especially for women. She convinced many of the masters from New York to visit and lead workshops for her league of women artists. This helped the evolution of art in Florida. She was selected in 1969 by Buckminster Fuller, as one of only two artists, to participate in his World Game Project about sustainability and his groundbreaking Spaceship Earth concept which preceded the world’s very first Earth Day in 1970. Lehr’s video installation, V1 V3, was on view at the New Museum, NY. Her work has been included in numerous art fairs during Art Basel Miami Beach. She was the recipient of the Vizcaya Museum Lost Spaces Commission, where she was commissioned to create a site-specific installation for Vizcaya Museum and Gardens as part of the Museum’s centennial celebrations.

Three-Wheeled Batmobile illustration by Alex Bogdan based on Shelbi Nicole's art from from Sinclaire Johnson and the band amp agency for use by 360 Magazine

Shelbi Nicole Slingshot

With immense passion for creativity, Nicole is turning heads at the From Houston, With Love (FHWL) collaborative exhibit as the renowned artist’s work appears on a three-wheeled Polaris Slingshot. Known for its dynamic styling and customization capabilities, the Batmobile-like vehicle is serving as the ultimate canvas for Nicole’s art. 

 

Shelbi Nicole has decorated many unexpected things in her colorful career. But FHWL presented her with the ultimate platform for self-expression and creativity: transforming the Slingshot into a remarkable work of art. Polaris Slingshot itself is a statement, as each one is as unique as its driver with limitless customization opportunities. Few vehicles offer such an approachable and unique canvas for personalization through customization. As you’ll see, Nicole uses eye-catching colors and whimsical designs to let her personality shine through the Slingshot.

View Shelbi Nicole’s customized vehicle art here.

Nicole’s Slingshot will be on display at the 60-day collaborative exhibit, featuring over 20 local as well as globally recognized visual artists from Houston, TX, running from June 16, 2021 through August, 15, 2021 in Downtown Houston’s GreenStreet (1201 Main Street Houston, TX 77002).

Art Exhibition illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

A Conversation with Grandmother Edna in Franklin County, PA

Franklin County Visitors Bureau Invites All to A Conversation with Grandmother Edna: Fabric Artist and Storyteller

Franklin County Visitors Bureau hosts Edna Williams, a fabric artist and storyteller, at the 11/30 Visitors Center on July 17.

Franklin County Visitors Bureau invites the public to A Conversation with Grandmother Edna: Fabric Artist and Storyteller on July 17 at 1 PM in the Great Room of the 11/30 Visitors Center, on the square in Chambersburg PA. Visitors can enjoy more than a dozen quilts and pillow covers, created by Grandmother Edna and learn how she expresses herself through art to tell stories of her life and America’s history. The art, called Pillow Talk is on display in the lobby of the Franklin County 11/30 Visitors Centers.

Williams hails from Baltimore and is displayed at the 11/30 Visitors Center through the Franklin County Visitors Bureau’s relationship with the African American Historical Association of Western Maryland.

I reach back to move forward. It is the only way to grow, said Grandmother Edna. Her Pillow Talk display includes stories that connect directly to her mother, father, and grandmother as well as highlight her meetings with poet Maya Angelou and actor Harry Belafonte. Others tell stories related to enslavement and civil justice. Williams believes storytelling is a means to connecting people and endorses the importance of history stating, Why create a mountain when you can cross a hill.

Pillow Talk is displayed as part of the Franklin County 11/30 Visitors Center’s Let The Journey Begin…People, Places, Possibilities. In addition to the storytelling quilts of Grandmother Edna, the exhibit looks at the quest for freedom from the earliest European settlers to the importance of the Pennsylvania Constitution’s Environmental Amendment.

A Conversation with Grandmother Edna is free and open to the public. Following the presentation, Grandmother Edna will offer a quilting and storytelling activity to participants who want to learn a little more. To reserve seating, please register here. A Conversation with Grandmother Edna is presented by the Franklin County Visitors Bureau as part of the July 17 Chambersburg Comes To Life Celebration, which includes the living history portrayal and light show depicting the 1864 Ransoming, Burning & Rebirth of Chambersburg.

The Franklin County Visitors Bureau invites all to explore Franklin County PA and enjoy trails of history, arts and architecture, recreation, natural beauty, fresh foods, and the warm hospitality of communities like Chambersburg, Greencastle, Mercersburg, Shippensburg, and Waynesboro. Franklin County PA is located just north of the Mason Dixon Line and is an easy drive from Washington DC, Philadelphia, and Pittsburgh. Discover more and plan a visit at their website or by contacting 866-646-(8060).

Q×A with Grandmother Edna 

By: Emily Bunn

Showcasing over a dozen quilts and pillow covers, Grandmother Edna weaves stories of her own life and chronicles American history into her fabric fashioning. The complex interweaving of Edna’s own life fluidly connects with the United States’ grappling with enslavement, civil justice, and the quest for freedom. Depicting familial relations, as well as Edna’s encounters with Maya Angelou and Harry Belafonte, Grandmother Edna brings history to life with her quilting and storytelling. 360 Magazine spoke with the artist about the success of “Pillow Talk”, what inspires her to create art, and her upcoming CD release.

When did you begin creating fabric art?

Really, I mentally began in the 1950’s [while] sitting on a stairway watching my grandmother quilting. Then, maybe somewhere around the late 80’s, I decided to pick my poems up from midnight brown paper bags writings to hand sewn quilting.

What first got you interested in American history?

Being Black in the 50’s going with my grandmother to be the help/maid. And, in the 60’s, attending an all white school.

If you were to create fabric art to express our current moment in time, what would that design look like?

I have a new quilt on exhibit titled: “There Was A Time When The Universe Was FREE.”

What inspired you to start selling your quilted creations, pillow covers, and fabric art?

First of all, my quilts will never be for sale. My pillow covers sales will I hope help fund my free educational mobile classroom called “A Grandmother’s Pilgrimage, INC.” and my Grace Wisher Reparation Recovery Youth Scholarship Fund, LLC. 

What inspired the name “pillow talk” for your exhibition?

I travel through the country as an invisible soul, no one seems to listen to anything I had to say. I decided to create a nightcap to relax the busy minds of everyone–and just maybe they would have time to hear me.

What has the reaction to “pillow talk” been like?

Amazing, fresh. It’s a newness in the art world.

What has working with the The Franklin County Visitors Bureau and The African American Historical Association of Western Maryland been like?

Exciting, cool and [represents] that change is coming, History being over-hauled. Janet and Ron have been great to partner with. I hope this [exhibit] will … improve that culture sock everyone keep avoiding in this America.

Your fabric art often reflects stories from your own life. What milestones from your life have you felt were most important to include in your artwork?

It’s that front door entry thing for me. The lost traditions of my people.

Are you currently working on any exciting fabric art projects that you can reveal to 360 Magazine’s readers?

Yes, I have my new CD on release. I have a file cabinet packed with poems to be quilted. I have faith the money will come. It’s appears to be easy, but it’s very hard to get paid for a job very well done. This is all fun and relaxing for me. I tell everyone to Just sew your emotions. Thanks 360 Magazine for this new media.

Jewelry story illustration by Nicole Salazar for 360 MAGAZINE

MAD About Jewelry – Virtual Events

Amy Fine Collins, Tiffany Dubin, Lynn Yaeger, and Museum of Arts and Design curator Bryna Pomp are hosting a special series of virtual events with international jewelers EN Jewelry Studio (Malu Byrne and Rick Low), Marie-Hélène de Tailla, and Elie Top. Each style icon is paired with an eminent jeweler in conversation for this series put on by the Museum’s MAD About Jewelry initiative. Fashionistas from all over the world have the opportunity to step inside the jewelers atelier, learn about the makers’ process, and purchase directly from the designers. Last week Dame Zandra Rhodes was paired with longtime friend Andrew Logan.

July 15, 2021 at 5pm ET – Elie Top + Amy Fine Collins

  • Amy Fine Collins will bring her ‘International Best Dressed List’ knowledge to her conversation with Elie Top; best known as the jewelry designer for Lanvin under Alber Elbaz and as the last official assistant of Yves Saint Laurent. Following his desire for self-expression, the Parisian designer conceived a new kind of jewelry, far away from Place Vendome’s classicism. Enter the magical world of Elie Top in which he invents and interprets in his own way a sophisticated galaxy made of spheres, stars and signs of the zodiac, in which woman shines at the center in playful pieces.

August 5, 2021 at 5pm ET – EN Jewelry Studio (Malu Byrne and Rick Low) + Lynn Yaeger

  • Long-standing Vogue Fashion Editor Lynn Yaeger will host EN Jewelry Studio designers Malu Byrne and Rick Van Streain Low. Learn how Malu and Rick started their careers in the industry working with some of the most prodigious artists in the field (Gabriella Kiss and Jill Platner respectively) before finding creative and symbiotic partners within one another. Through the lens of EN, which means “to come together” and “within”, they endeavor to highlight the inherent beauty of material through their use of elemental forms with unexpected connections.

October 7, 2021 – Marie-Hélène de Taillac + Tiffany Dubin 

  • “Vintage Style” author and Sotheby’s jewelry aficionado Tiffany Dubin sits down with Parisian jewelry designer Marie-Hélène de Taillac to chat about her work with semi-precious gems and her signature colorful jewelry. Marie-Hélène will showcase her creations while delving into her inspirations, from whimsical fairy tales to her extensive travels.

About The Museum of Arts and Design
The Museum of Arts and Design (MAD) champions contemporary makers across creative fields and presents the work of artists, designers, and artisans who apply the highest level of ingenuity and skill. Since the Museum’s founding in 1956 by philanthropist Aileen Osborn Webb, MAD has celebrated all facets of making and the creative processes by which materials are transformed, from traditional techniques to cutting-edge technologies. Today, the Museum’s curatorial program builds upon a rich history of exhibitions that emphasize a cross-disciplinary approach to art and design, and reveals the workmanship behind the objects and environments that shape our everyday lives. MAD provides an international platform for practitioners who are influencing the direction of cultural production and driving twenty-first-century innovation, and fosters a participatory setting for visitors to have direct encounters with skilled making and compelling works of art and design. Proceeds from MAD About Jewelry will benefit participating artists and support the museum’s educational programs. For more information, visit MAD Museum.