Posts tagged with "exhibition"

Leica and BAPE camera via 360 MAGAZINE

Leica × BAPE

Leica, “A BATHING APE” and Stash have collaborated on a limited-edition camera, merging industry-leading technology with a chic, urban sensibility. The Leica D-Lux 7 “A BATHING APE®︎ X STASH” consists of a black-finish compact camera sold exclusively through Leica, and a silver-finish version available exclusively through pioneering streetwear brand, A BATHING APE®︎. Both special editions feature the signature ABC CAMO look of BAPE® covering the camera body, the brand’s APE HEAD insignia, as well as the distinctive wild style tag of American graffiti artist, STASH. The result is a camera that integrates the power of street photography with icons of streetwear and street art.

The streetwear label BAPE® (A BATHING APE®︎) encapsulates the youthful spirit of an entire generation, bringing Tokyo’s urban street style to the world with its contemporary designs. From the Asian metropolis, we turn our attention to New York, where pioneering street-art legend STASH (aka Josh Franklin) paved the way for a new genre of graffiti by moving his creations from the anonymity of subway tunnels into the public eye. Finally, we turn to Wetzlar: the German city that has become almost synonymous with the art of optical engineering and camera design. This special-edition camera combines the creative energies of Tokyo and New York. Photography has always been used to document both street art and street fashion – now the Leica D-Lux 7 “A BATHING APE®︎ X STASH” is a tangible manifestation of this connective link.

“When I started doing graffiti in the early 1980s, the term ‘street art’ didn’t exist. It was only later, when we emerged from the tunnels and train stations, that we became much more visible. Documenting my art through photography has always been part of my creativity. With the advent of digital cameras, I got my first Leica,” STASH recalls, who recognizes many parallels between the three art forms. “They are visual, based on color, form and expressive freedom. I think they are strongly youth-driven, and there is so much creativity between them that one feeds into the other to help complete the story.”

When designing the limited special edition of the Leica D-Lux 7, the Brooklyn-based artist incorporated both the famously graphic-heavy style of the BAPE® label, and his own distinctive visual approach.

The Leica D-Lux 7 “A BATHING APE®︎ X STASH” offers the same technical specifications as the serial production model, including a Micro Four Thirds sensor, fast 24–75mm (35mm camera equivalent) zoom lens with optical image stabilization, and an aperture range of f/1.7–2.8 to deliver outstanding images, anytime, anyplace. For the effective resolution of 17 megapixels, the lens utilizes a central portion of the sensor (whose total resolution is over 21 million pixels), resulting in an even higher image quality and a sensor that delivers 4K 30fps and full-HD 60fps videos. The black-finish Leica D-Lux 7 “A BATHING APE®︎ X STASH” retails for $1,895, and comes with an additional carrying strap, a specially designed camera pouch, and an auto lens cap that opens and closes as the lens retracts and extends.

To mark the launch of the limited-edition Leica D-Lux 7, a selection of photographs by STASH will be presented in a special exhibition at Leica Store Los Angeles.

A BATHING APE®︎

Situated in the heart of Tokyo, one of the leading fashion hubs of the world, Nowhere Co., Ltd. strives to introduce Japanese fashion culture to the world. Since the brand’s establishment in 1993, it has remained as a symbol of street fashion for more than 28 years. Thus far, it has produced iconic design items, original patterns, and characters such as “APE HEAD”, “BAPE® CAMO”, “BAPE STA™”, “SHARK HOODIE” and “BABY MILO®” etc. It has now expanded into Mens, Ladies and Kids line and is carried throughout stores in Japan, US, UK, France, China and various Asian countries. It has also created successful collaborations with established international brands and reputable artists. These collaborations are recognized as being genreless and flexible, not limited to fashion and apparel categories only.

STASH

One of the pioneers of New York’s graffiti scene, STASH (Josh Franklin) is firmly established as an innovator and influencer in the world of urban design. His vision of integrating graphic graffiti elements and fonts into commercial product designs captured the attention of a broad audience and helped graffiti culture rise from the shadows of subway tunnels into the light of public acceptance. His hidden (‘stashed away’) messages and iconic signature have become a brand in their own right, immortalized in high-profile collaborations with major brands in the streetwear cosmos. In his search for new forms of expression, the photography enthusiast has found a perfect match in Leica: the collaboration is another milestone for the street artist to manifest his concept of capturing the fleeting moment.

Leica Camera – A Partner for Photography
Leica Camera AG is an international, premium manufacturer of cameras and sports optics. The legendary reputation of the Leica brand is based on a long tradition of excellent quality, German craftsmanship and German industrial design, combined with innovative technologies. An integral part of the brand’s culture is the diversity of activities the company undertakes for the advancement of photography. In addition to the Leica
Galleries and Leica Akademies spread around the world, there are the Leica Hall of Fame Award and, in particular, the Leica Oskar Barnack Award (LOBA), which is considered one of the most innovative sponsorship awards existing today. Furthermore, Leica Camera AG, with its headquarters in Wetzlar, Hesse, and a second production site in Vila Nova de Famalicão, Portugal, has a worldwide network of its own national organizations and Leica Retail Stores.

ROBOT DIGIT LEARNS PAINTING via 360 magazine

ROBOT DIGIT LEARNS PAINTING

Robots have been given the gift of human creativity. 

Artist Agnieszka Pilat is currently out West at the headquarters of Agility Robotics, where she has made a new friend with the humanoid robot DIGIT, and started a series of paintings with him that will be included in her upcoming show, ROBOTa. 

“This is the era of the new, intelligent machine,” says Agnieszka. “The works created by DIGIT are full of mistakes. This innocence in mark-making gives them a sense of spontaneity, like children playing with crayons.”  

Watch DIGIT paint here

Agnieszka is no stranger to painting with robots. She has worked closely with Boston Dynamics‘ SPOTselling one piece created by the robot canine for $40,000 during a fundraiser to benefit Ukrainian refugees. The pieces with DIGIT and SPOT will be featured in Agnieszka‘s upcoming fall show at the gallery Modernism in San Francisco. 

Agnieszka’s Talking Points: 

  • This is the era of the new, intelligent machine. This is not a printer – an enhancement of a human hand, or a camera lens – an amplified human eye. The new machine is close to man’s nature – interested in the sublime, the essence of what it means to be human. It’s slow and curious and playful. Unlike clean, perfect classical machine esthetics, new machine esthetics are fraud with errors and imperfections.
  • If a human is the ideal – then robots strive to imitate their human creators. We are the parents to the machine – and intelligent machines like proper children believe in their naivete, that they can someday surpass their creators.
  • The new machine is close to man’s nature – interested in the sublime, the essence of what it means to be human. It’s slow and curious and playful. Unlike clean, perfect classical machine esthetics, new machine esthetics are fraud with errors and imperfections.

Agnieszka Pilat Bio: 

Polish born artist, Agnieszka Pilat studied painting and illustration at the Academy of Art University in San Francisco, CA. She is an award-winning artist and her works can be found in public and private collections in the United States, Poland, and Canada. Pilat currently lives and maintains a full time studio in San Francisco and is represented by numerous galleries throughout the United States and has exhibited at the Carnegie Museum of Art.

ANTHONY’S COLLECTION REDISCOVERED

A selection of important Chinese porcelain that formed part of the world-renowned Anthony de Rothschild Chinese porcelain collection has been rediscovered at his daughter Renée Louise Marie de Rothschild’s (1927-2015) home. The pieces had been gifted to her in 1948 when Anthony de Rothschild (1887-1961) donated the family home, Ascott House to the National Trust and dispersed the contents of it to several museums and amongst his family. While most of it had been passed on through other generations and was accounted for, this particular selection of works had been packed away and was only recently brought to the family’s attention. The pieces bear the unique labels that correlate with the meticulous inventory that Anthony de Rothschild maintained for his spectacular museum-quality collection, as he added to it over the years.

Anthony de Rothschild was one of the earliest collectors of Oriental works. He amassed his extensive collection from his travels, which were instigated by an initial trip to China with his brother in 1911. He would later travel extensively, keeping meticulous records of everything he bought and chose only museum-quality pieces. Dreweatts is therefore thrilled to offer the opportunity to obtain such exceptional works with impeccable provenance, in a sale of Chinese Ceramics and Works of Art on November 9th and 10th 2022.

Anthony de Rothschild began collecting predominantly after serving in the First World War. A very passionate collector like his father, he amassed the majority of his works throughout the 1920’s and 30’s and was an early lender to the Oriental Ceramics Society exhibitions, which were founded in 1921. The bulk of Anthony de Rothchild’s collection was kept at the family’s country home, Ascott House in Buckinghamshire. His role in the family business meant that he lived between his London residence and Ascott house. He and his wife Yvonne Lydia Louise de Rothschild (1899-1977) were well-known for their commitment to public service. In 1933, they were among several prominent Jewish founders of the Central British Fund for German Jewry, the British refugee relief agency providing emergency

The Rothschilds offered Ascott house for use as a hospital during the war and when the Chelsea Pensioners were bombed out of their home, it became a safe haven for them for several years. It was also used by the army for a time and in 1948 the Rothschilds gifted the house to the National Trust, with whom it remains to this day. The contents of the house were divided amongst the family, with several important works being donated to leading museums, where they are on display to this day.

Commenting on the collection, Dreweatts Chinese and Asian Art specialist Yingwen Tao said: “We are very honoured to sell this rare group of rediscovered works that graced the collection of one of the greatest pioneer collectors of Chinese ceramics of the 20th century. I’m sure they will cause excitement and attract attention from collectors around the globe.”

A fine pair of Chinese gilt-metal mounted candelabra are comprised of Kangxi period porcelain parrots with a turquoise and aubergine glaze. They stand on French mid-18th century mounts with fine details around the rim, which includes a lizard to the foot and carry an estimate of £4,000-£6,000.

A pair of stunning Chinese white glazed figures of horses from the Kangxi period depict them lying down, but with legs bent as if about to stand. Their manes, forelocks and pricked ears are brown-glazed and they rest on shaped bases. The pair carries an estimate of £3,000-£5,000.

Amongst several Chinese jade and hardstone works is a white and russet jade model of a quail dating from the Qianlong period. Very finely detailed it features a vase and lingzhi fungus on a pierced rock base and has an estimate of £3,000-£5,000. Another highlight from the jade collection is the white jade carving of cats, also dated back to the 18th century.  In ancient China the cat was considered to be a symbol of happiness. The cats are carved recumbent and grasping a lingzhi fungus stem which denotes longevity in Chinese culture. Made of very fine quality white jade, the group carries an estimate of £2,000-£3,000.

Monkeys feature consistently in Chinese culture, often portrayed as mischievous and cheeky, however they were believed to have the ability to drive away evil spirits and were therefore believed to be able to bring good fortune. A Chinese pale celadon and brown jade model of a monkey from the Qing Dynasty depicts the monkey seated, holding its young. With its unusual large size of over 12cm high, it carries an estimate of £2,000-£3,000.

Zeitz mocaa museum south Africa via 360 Magazine

ZEITZ MOCAA’S NEW SCULPTURE

Zeitz Museum of Contemporary Art Africa (Zeitz MOCAA) announces a riveting site-specific commission of monumental scale by Malagasy artist Joël Andrianomearisoa titled The Five Continents of All Our Desires. The installation is supported by Fonds Yavarhoussen, Madagascar, and will be on view from 2 August 2022 to 25 June 2023 in the museum’s atrium. 

Andrianomearisoa’s practice encompasses working in multidisciplinary ways — with materiality and scale as important considerations. Imbued with complex emotional experiences, his delicate, often ambiguous works are an ongoing series of ever-evolving exercises that consider the aesthetic and architecture of feelings that all perceive yet cannot put a name to.

Zeitz MOCAA Executive Director and Chief Curator Koyo Kouoh says: “It is a revelation and honour to host an artwork of this scale and ambition in our museum. The generosity and intentionality with which Joël approached this commission is a testament to the extraordinary, multiplistic views of our world for which this institution is intended. To hold, to speak, to listen and to love — sentiments and values that echo our mission are brought centre stage with this incredible work.”

The Five Continents of All Our Desires is a celebration of relations and connections. For Andrianomearisoa, the work speaks to both migration and language — and the ongoing search for zones of engagement and desire. He constructs a view of the world that is fragile, ambiguous, open-ended and about new possibilities for human contact.

The awe-inspiring work consists of six large-scale sculptures that form a suspended archipelago in a poetic reference to land masses and geographies of the imagination, and are constructed from Andrianomearisoa’s signature material, black silk paper. Installed in the figurative and literal ‘heart’ of the museum building, the work is the first site-specific commission to grace Zeitz MOCAA’s atrium in two years. 

The Five Continents of All Our Desires is conceived in dialogue with the concrete interior of the museum, and what remains of the original silos of the building,” adds Storm Janse van Rensburg, Zeitz MOCAA Senior Curator and Head of Curatorial Affairs. “It is both in play and in visual tension with its surroundings. Whilst appearing as large black masses, the thin and soft materiality of the work allows for subtle atmospheric responses to become visible —such as paper rustling due to airflows caused by human movement.” 

The Five Continents of All Our Desires is accompanied by a sound installation, and a display of 40 drawings — a first, significant showing of the artist’s graphic works in an exhibition. Visitors can also experience a set of specially designed furniture by the artist. Andrianomearisoa has further collaborated with the Zeitz MOCAA curatorial team and retail partners of the museum to develop an exclusive range of objects that will be on sale. All proceeds from sales will support the museum’s work.

The Five Continents of All Our Desires is on view in the Zeitz MOCAA atrium from Thursday, 2 August 2022. Zeitz MOCAA’s curatorial and exhibition programming is proudly supported by GUCCI.

Photo of COLOMA CHAIR in LALANA via Gnazzo Group for use by 360 Magazine

LALANA EXHIBITION

The LALANA Exhibition is an entirely original and provocative art concept that is currently on display in the Miami Design District, which presents art as people have never seen- or used- before. LALANA is a design initiative that works with modern and contemporary Argentine artists to reimagine their original artworks as functional pieces bred in local techniques and noble materials. The exhibition features three textile pieces based on artworks by Roberto Aizenberg alongside a floor piece and sculptural chair by Luis Fernando Benedit

These resulting pieces have been hand-woven artisanally in silk and wool or built as prototypes from sketches, enabling new ways of engagement with the artworks which can now be used, touched, and inhabited. Designed for those curious at heart, this exhibition sets your inner child free.

Architect, designer, and visual artist, Benedit began his career in the arts in the early sixties. He explored Informalism and Neo-figurative art, and later approached the aesthetics of Pop with bright solid colors and a hint of humor. In the seventies, he explored the connection between art, science, and nature. A recurring subject in Benedit’s work is the historical and cultural identity of Argentina. Parallel to his artistic and architectural career, he designed a vast variety of interiors and every-day items, such as lamps, tables, chairs, and other furniture. Conceived as unique pieces, they frequently feature materials and elements that evoke this local imagery, from a modern and often satirical point of view.

Aizenberg studied architecture for a year before devoting himself to painting. He joined the workshops of Antonio Berni and Juan Batlle Planas, both Surrealist pioneers in the Argentine art scene at the time. Architectural structures and geometrical shapes would soon become a key element in the development of a very personal iconography, rooted in surrealism and metaphysical painting. Throughout a five-decade-long career, he worked in multiple techniques, including oil painting, drawing, collage, etching, sculpture and jewelry design. The objects represented, with sharp edges and muted colors often resemble buildings or towers, with endless rows of tiny empty windows, much like ancient monuments or abandoned cities. They are set in unlikely landscapes, where the earth is a dark and reddish hue, against huge bright skies in gradients of blue, green or yellow, which might evoke those of Aizenberg’s birthplace in Entre Ríos. Often, the central feature of these enigmatic compositions are multi-faceted shapes -resembling fans or umbrellas- suspended in space. In others, it is curvilinear figures recognizable as human. Treading a fine line between figuration and abstraction, these striking images arouse feelings of uncertainty and existential uneasiness. The impossible combination of these elements create dreamlike atmospheres, sometimes peaceful, other times nostalgic, but in all cases unsettling, like an unapproachable symbolic language.

House of Lucie Budapest via Awards Inc. for use by 360 MAGAZINE

THE HOUSE OF LUCIE

An Exhibition of the IDA Winners’ Photographs at The House of Lucie, Budapest

Budapest, Hungary –  The House of Lucie in Budapest will host an exhibition of a curated selection of photographs of extraordinary winning submissions from the International Design Awards (IDA) commencing on August 17.

The International Design Awards has become one of the leading design awards globally attracting thousands of entries from around the world.  The event was launched by the Farmani Group in 2007 to recognize, celebrate and promote legendary design visionaries and to uncover emerging design talent across five disciplines – Architecture, Interior, Product, Graphic, and Fashion Design.  

“ The IDA has always been about seeking out truly visionary designers.   We are delighted to invite you to this beautiful selection of fourty photographs of the IDA winners showcasing extraordinary diversity and imagination across the five IDA disciplines. ”  commented Jill Grinda, VP Marketing and Business Development for the IDA.

 Jury member, Dawn Garcia, Publisher and Editor-in-Chief, ATOD Magazine added, “Last year as I viewed the architecture and interior design submissions, it was like a wave of optimism, hope and ingenuity.  The way designers took such a difficult moment in time and used it to create projects that brought life and innovation to the very essence of their vision was truly inspiring. This year it felt like each designer and design firm put love into their work, more so than in any other years passed. It was an honor to view each and every one. COVID may have halted a lot of things, but it birthed creativity in ways I’ve never seen.” 

The exhibition commences at the House of Lucie on the 17th of August, 2022 at 18:00 where attendees will gather in support of the talented international award winners, and will then be open to the public from 12:00-18:00 on Tuesdays and Fridays until the 9th of September.

*mul·ti·po·lar—ex·ist·ence by Kyle Denman

Tire via 360 Magazine by 360 Magazine

New Gallery at Harley-Davidson Museum

If it seems like there’s something new popping up on the campus of the world’s only Harley-Davidson Museum every month, you’re right! The 10,000-square-foot Harley-Davidson® Shop – with its eclectic collection of exclusive apparel, collectibles and accessories – has been wowing customers since opening in June. And now, the all-new Experience Gallery has been unveiled, bringing the thrill of the open road to guests from all corners of the globe.

With this new multimedia experience, guests will be able hear straight from the H-D team how Harley-Davidson® motorcycles are designed and engineered to be the most desirable in the world. Find inspiration from your fellow riders’ stories or discover how easy it is to take the first step in learning how to ride. And of course, finish off your visit by throwing a leg over one of five fresh-from-the-factory Harley-Davidson® models – including the Pan America™, a premier two-wheel multi-tool built to endure, designed to explore, and engineered for adventure.

Plus, the Harley-Davidson Museum is thrilled to announce that guided tours have made their triumphant return. And they’re all new in ’22! The guided-tour portfolio has been updated with new experiences and content. Choose from the Spotlight Tour, the Beyond the Gate Tour or the VIP Tour.

And another community event will be headed back to campus this month. The H-D Museum is partnering with WISN-TV and 102.9 The Hog to host “Coffee with the Morning Crew.” Mark your calendars for Friday, July 29 as we welcome everyone to stop down to 6th & Canal for a morning of fun, prizes and free coffee.

PROGRAMMING / EVENTS

H-D Museum™ Bike Night Concert Series powered by Budweiser® King of Beers and Bulleit® Bourbon, Thursdays, 5 – 9 p.m.

All wheels unite every Thursday from 5 to 9 p.m. at the Harley-Davidson Museum. Join riders (and non-riders) for free live music from some of Milwaukee’s favorite bands, fun, drool-worthy rolling sculptures and outdoor food and beverage. The Bike Night Koozie Special is back. Enjoy $3 Busch Light all season long.

7/14 The Cactus Bros

7/21 Milwaukee Tool Shed Band

7/28 Andrew Wayne & Mud Creek Road

Coffee with the WISN Morning Crew, Friday, July 29, 8 – 10 a.m.

Hey Milwaukee! Come and drink some free Colectivo Hillclimber Coffee with the WISN 12 News This Morning team on Friday, July 29. WISN 12 is teaming up with 102.9 The HOG and the Harley-Davidson Museum to host YOU for a morning of fun, prizes, and free coffee.

Saturday Demos powered by H-D Insurance, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.

Visit the Museum campus on Saturdays to experience the fun and freedom of a Harley-Davidson® motorcycle. Visitors with their motorcycle endorsement/license will be able to choose from a dozen of the latest and greatest #FreedomMachines from Harley-Davidson, including Touring, Softail®, Sportster®, Adventure Touring and Electric models. A pre-determined scenic route through the Menomonee Valley will give riders the chance to explore the Museum’s surrounding neighborhoods. Sign-up is on a first-come, first-serve basis. Riders and passengers must be at least 18 years of age. All riders (and passengers) must wear proper riding gear including a helmet, eye protection, shirt / jacket, long pants and closed-toe shoes with heel strap.

Annual Pass

Looking for interesting things to do and ways to fully enjoy our programs and exhibits? The Harley-Davidson Museum’s new Annual Pass offers individual, family and VIP levels to fit your lifestyle. Just some of the perks of the new Annual Pass include: virtual access to the H-D Museum with various Harley history topics covered in our Virtual Gallery Talk series, admission discounts, free admission for children under age 18, merchandise discounts at The Shop, dining discounts at MOTOR® Bar & Restaurant and more. Visit H-D Museum.com for details and other terms and conditions.

Guided Tours

All new in ’22. Our guided tour portfolio has been updated with new experiences and content. Choose from the Spotlight Tour, the Beyond the Gate Tour or the VIP Tour. Some tours are available to the public; this schedule will vary. To book a private group tour, please call 414-287-2799 or email for more information. Advance reservations and prepayment required at least 2-weeks prior to tour date. Please note: Tour fee does not include General Admission.

Engineering Merit Badge, Saturdays at 11 a.m. and 1:30 p.m

All scouts are welcome to come earn their Engineering Merit Badge at the Harley-Davidson Museum! This experience will be launched by our merit badge counselor. Then, scouts will explore the history of Harley-Davidson as well as the engineering of motorcycles as they complete the nine merit badge requirements. Advance registration is required. Program registration closes one week prior to the scheduled program date. Ticket includes: downloadable activity booklet used for the program, partially facilitated program, blue card signed by the facilitator (one blue card per scout registration) and an exclusive H-D Museum™ patch.

Scout Virtual Engineering Merit Badge, Saturdays at 8:30 a.m. and Tuesdays at 6:30 p.m.

This new 90-minute online program is open to scouts from all over the country. Our program facilitator will guide the troops and explore the role an engineer plays while creating a Harley-Davidson® Motorcycle. Nine requirements for the Engineering Merit Badge will be discussed during this virtual, interactive program. Advance registration is required. Program Fee: $20 per Scout, which includes an activity booklet used during the program and a special H-D® patch upon completion of the program.

MUST-SEE EXHIBITS AND INSTALLATIONS

Experience Gallery (on display now)

With inspiring stories from riders who have turned their dream of learning to ride into reality, a look at the epic journeys you can only experience behind the bars of a Harley-Davidson® motorcycle, plus the chance to throw a leg over a new Harley-Davidson #FreedomMachine, the reinstalled and all-new Experience Gallery shows the world how United We Ride! 

1977 FLH “Blackula” (on display beginning May 13)

Milwaukee man about town Freddie Franklin purchased his Electra Glide® motorcycle from its original owner, 95-year-old Wallace Brzezinski, with only 4,500 miles on its odometer. And in short order, he completely re-envisioned the bike to reflect his timeless style. The motorcycle incorporates some hallmarks of Franklin’s disparate tastes. A dash of the Coney Island-style bikes – decked out with lights and reflectors – he adored mixed in with elements of Willie G.’s seminal Knucklehead and topped off with details that harken to the 1970s blaxploitation films Franklin watched back in the day. A clear statement of Black pride via the language of vintage motorcycles, this is a bike you must see in-person.

Keith Brammer (Die Kreuzen) leather jacket (on display now)

Perhaps no other genre of music is so closely associated with the classic black leather jacket than punk rock. Keith Brammer, of Milwaukee’s hardcore punk band Die Kreuzen, has graciously lent his well-worn leather to the H-D Museum. The jacket was purchased in New York City in the 1980s and was a constant companion for Brammer throughout his touring days. Check out the Custom Culture gallery to view this piece of Milwaukee music history.

Revolution® Max Engine (on display now)

The brand-new Revolution® Max 1250cc engine powers a new generation of Harley-Davidson® motorcycles. See the liquid-cooled, 60-degree V-Twin that delivers for the Pan America™ adventure touring model and the performance cruiser Sportster® S motorcycle. On view in the Museum lobby.

Clubs & Competition (on display now)

In the early part of the 20th century, motorcycle culture was a homegrown phenomenon. It grew out of the passion of riders for their evolving sport. The camaraderie that developed around riding and attending competitive events led to the formation of motorcycle clubs that hosted destination rides, family picnics with motorcycle games and other riding competitions.

The newly reinstalled display case in the Clubs & Competition gallery highlights clothing from club members from primarily the 1930s and 1940s. The clothing selections on view include full dress uniforms, shirts, sweaters, jackets and caps, customized by the owners with their club’s name and logo, and pins or patches indicating membership in the American Motorcyclist Association. The H-D Archives collection includes Motorclothes® apparel sold in H-D® product catalogs but also non-H-D produced clothing items that have been proudly customized by riders.

Harley Fox (on display now) Gail Anderson’s 1986 Softail® Custom motorcycle, “Harley Fox,” built by her partner Bob Burrows, took top prize at the first Ladies of Harley® (LOH) ride-in show during Daytona Beach Bike Week in 1987. With her custom bike and themed riding gear, Anderson presented a striking image that fit the growing visibility and exciting new options for women riders in the 1980s.

Alfonso Sotomayor’s 1957 Model FL (on display now)

The Harley-Davidson Museum is proud to announce its collection has recently grown with the addition of a 1957 Model FL that was ridden by famed Mexican stunt rider and racer Alfonso Sotomayor Canales.

Harley-Davidson’s history in Mexico dates back to at least 1913. In the 1920s, the brand was more frequently spotted throughout Mexico City as the motorcycles proved popular with the local traffic police who would also perform stunts with their Harley-Davidson® bikes. After racing from the 1930s into the 1960s, Sotomayor launched his own stunt riding career by performing the famed “Salto de la Muerte” or Jump of Death. Learn more about Sotomayor’s feats of derring-do and Harley-Davidson’s early entry into Mexico with this new display located in the Custom Culture area.

“Off-Road Harley-Davidson” (on display now)

In the decades before America paved its highways, early riders had to be prepared for all sorts of terrain: sand, clay or dirt – and wandering those makeshift byways were Harley-Davidson® motorcycles. Today, it’s called off-road or adventure touring; back then it was just called riding. Since 1903, Harley-Davidson® motorcycles proved their toughness by riding over wooded hills, through stone-choked creek beds and up mountain sides. “Off-Road Harley-Davidson” tells the history of motorcycles designed for rough roads, the people who rode them and the adventures they shared.

“Building a Milwaukee Icon: Harley-Davidson’s Juneau Avenue Factory” (on display now)

A recently recovered cache of architectural drawings includes plans for the original Juneau Avenue facility. The pencil drawings, along with archival photographs, demonstrate the whirlwind pace of the company’s early growth. While building an international business—going from producing just over 1,000 motorcycles in 1909 to manufacturing 27,000 motorcycles in 1920—the company’s Milwaukee factory experienced near-constant expansion. Construction through this relatively brief period created the buildings that today, a century later, are still the proud home of Harley-Davidson.

“Building a Milwaukee Icon” provides a snapshot of Harley-Davidson’s formative years and illustrates a chapter of Milwaukee history when the city was known as the “Machine Shop to the World.”

Google Arts & Culture, Bring a 1919 Window Display to Life (on display now)

We scoured the Harley-Davidson Archives to identify the colorful pamphlets used to catch the attention of those passing by this dealership window.

MOTOR® BAR & RESTAURANT

As Milwaukee enters the dog days of summer, it’s a good time to remember that MOTOR’s waterfront patios are pup friendly. Whether you’re hoping to try the new Sunday brunch (complete with bloody mary bar), meeting up for lunch or listening to the tunes coming from the Bike Night stage, Fido will love the scene at MOTOR.

July monthly specials

Teriyaki Salmon (grilled Atlantic salmon glazed with house-made teriyaki sauce, served on a bed of udon noodles, fresh vegetables and Thai chili sauce, $22.95), Turkey Cobb Wrap (smoked sliced turkey breast, avocado, applewood bacon, shredded cheddar cheese, sweet corn, romaine lettuce, tomatoes, and ranch dressing, wrapped in a whole wheat tortilla and served with French fries and pickle spear, $17.95) and Grilled Berry Shortcake (grilled sweet corn cakes, berry medley compote and vanilla ice cream, $8.95) – celebrate the season of outdoor dining.

Make your reservations (for two- or four-legged friends) today.

SAVE THE DATES

Hometown Rally™ Event, Sept. 1 – 5

Louvre

LOUVRE FANTASTIQUE

Experience some of the world’s most spectacular masterpieces in a completely reimagined way as they come to life at Louvre Fantastique: The Exhibition opening to the public Friday, July 15, and running through October, with a VIP Opening Night Soiree on Thursday, July 14 with tickets available for purchase here. Patrons of all ages will have the opportunity to step into the world’s most famous art collection without stepping out of the country. The exhibit will be at the Oakbrook Center, 2120 Oakbrook Center, the former location of the Sistine Chapel Exhibition, and will run from Wednesday to Sunday. Tickets are available now and are already in high demand. Click here to purchase today!

This dynamic and interactive new exhibition was brought to Chicagoland through SEE Global Entertainment and CBF Productions. Leading entertainment discovery platform, Fever, will bring the magic of the Louvre with new interpretations of the timeless masterpieces through projection mapping, three-dimensional recreations, and augmented reality elements that allow exhibitgoers to interact with the art using the smartphone’s hands-on interactive features. With over 70 masterpieces to marvel at, visitors will have the chance to engage with the artwork in ways that were never before possible. The exhibit focuses on some of the most iconic highlights from the original museum, including Jacques Louis David’s Oath of the Horatii, Raphael’s Young Woman on a Balcony, a three-piece animation of The Winged Victory of Samothrace, as well as a three-dimensional replication of the Louvre Museum pyramid exhibitgoers will have the chance to enter and walk through, and an homage to Leonardo Da Vinci’s Mona Lisa, to name a few.

“This exhibition is our tribute to the world’s most visited museum,” said Martin Biallas, CEO of Global Entertainment. “Art appreciation can take many forms, and we hope it will educate and inspire patrons, regardless of age, to one day visit Paris to experience and appreciate, firsthand, some of these incredible pieces of art that continue to stand the test of time.”

Upon arrival, each visitor will explore the artwork up close and at their own pace with an informative, engaging audio guide that takes about one hour to complete. Children will also be offered a unique audio guide narrated by the voice of the Mona Lisa. As patrons make their way through the exhibit, they will have the unique opportunity to use their smartphones to view and interact with augmented reality reimaginations of some of the most timeless masterpieces. A gift shop will conclude the experience for those looking to commemorate their visit.

Tickets to Louvre Fantastique are now on sale on Fever’s marketplace, with prices for adults starting at $32.90 and children starting at $22.90 and can be purchased by clicking here. Group bookings are also available for corporate events, school field trips, family gatherings, and more. A full schedule of signature events will also be hosted throughout the exhibition run, with more details to be announced on their website.

Travel graphic via Samantha Miduri for use by 360 Magazine

2023 ZEITZ MOCAA × UNIVERSITY OF THE WESTERN CAPE MUSEUM

The 2023 Zeitz MOCAA & University of the Western Cape (UWC) Museum Fellowship Programme call for applications officially opens on 15 June 2022.

This call marks the second iteration of the year-long programme, developed to educate a new generation of art and museum professionals from Africa. With the aim to foster the growth of curatorial practice and advance scholarship on contemporary art discourse from the continent, the programme offers fellows exposure to museum practice facilitated by Zeitz MOCAA senior staff and is underpinned by rigorous academic scholarship at UWC’s Department of History and Centre for Humanities Research (CHR). 

“We are pleased to once again be collaborating with the University of the Western Cape on this incredible initiative to educate the next generation of exhibition makers and curatorial thinkers. We remain committed to merging scholarship on contemporary art production and circulation from Africa and its diaspora and hope to contribute to a new group of skilled professionals looking to work within museums, galleries, art centres, private and public collection management, biennials, art publishing, festivals, universities and more,” says Koyo Kouoh, Executive Director and Chief Curator at Zeitz MOCAA

During the 12-month Museum Fellowship Programme, fellows will engage in discourse around contemporary art, curatorial practice, art education, conservation, heritage and museology from Africa and the African diaspora. They will study and work with both institutions towards an accredited BA Honours qualification. This includes enrolling in courses on historiography, curatorship, museums, heritage and public history at UWC’s Department of History as well as obtaining work experience at Zeitz MOCAA in the Curatorial, Collections & Exhibition Management, Art Education and Institutional Advancement departments. Successful fellows will actively contribute to the research, planning, execution and management of museum projects, ranging from exhibitions, publishing and public programming to art education and fundraising.

“It is fitting that applications for the 2023 Zeitz MOCAA & University of the Western Cape (UWC) Museum Fellowship Programme opens one day before South Africa’s Youth Day on 16 June and during Youth Month. Our aim is to continue promoting narratives that are important to the building of artistic and curatorial communities and this feeds directly into the South African government’s goals of developing plans for a more effective arts and culture curriculum and supporting income and funding models for arts and culture initiatives,” says Rory Bester, Associate Professor in the Department of History at UWC.

The Fellowship begins in January 2023 and is open to individuals who are citizens of an African country. It covers the costs of tuition, accommodation, basic health insurance and a monthly stipend. Travel to South Africa and visa costs are not included. 

Applications for the 2023 programme close on 15 July 2022 and successful applicants will be contacted directly by 5 September 2022. Only the first 150 applications received will be considered for review.

For more information and to apply, visit zeitzmocaa.museum

Zeitz MOCAA and the University of the Western Cape (UWC) celebrate diversity in all its forms, including gender, ethnicity and sexual orientation. 

The Zeitz MOCAA & University of the Western Cape (UWC) Museum Fellowship Programme is supported by Zeitz MOCAA, the University of the Western Cape, AKO Foundation and Africa No Filter.

NYBG – ATT

The New York Botanical Garden‘s major, institution-wide exhibition Around the Table: Stories of the Foods We Love examines the art and science of foodways and food traditions, many dating back thousands of years. Visitors can explore the rich cultural history of what we eat and learn that – from global dietary staples such as rice, beans, squash, and corn to the regional spice and flavor provided by peppers, greens, and tomatoes – plants are at the base of all culinary customs. The presentation features expansive displays of living edible plants; art and science installations; weekend celebrations; wellness, culinary-themed, and children’s programming; and opportunities to gather at artist-designed tables set throughout NYBG’s 250 acres, bringing to life stories about the featured and other notable edible plants. Around the Table: Stories of the Foods We Love is on view June 4 through September 11, 2022.

“We are thrilled and gratified to be able to present Around the Table: Stories of the Foods We Love,” said Jennifer Bernstein, CEO and The William C. Steere Sr. President of The New York Botanical Garden, “The creation of this exhibition has truly been a collaborative and communal experience and a labor of love. We hope everyone will visit the Botanical Garden this summer and take a little time to uncover the botanical origins of the foods they think they already know, cultivate deeper understanding of the environmental and social impacts of our food choices, and discover the diversity and beauty of plants that are grown for cuisine around the world.”

Displays of Living Edible Plants at the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory

Showcasing hundreds of varieties of edible plants, including peppers, squash, cabbage, beans, grains, corn, banana, sugarcane, taro, and breadfruit, three installations in and around the Haupt Conservatory beckon visitors to explore the diversity and beauty of food plants grown around the world.

  • In the Conservatory’s Seasonal Exhibition Galleries, a wide assortment of edible herbaceous plants and fruit-bearing trees flourishing in containers, entwined in overhead trellises, and reaching skyward from green walls ideal for compact urban spaces inspire appreciation of the plants that nourish us.
  • The Conservatory Courtyards offer an array of familiar and surprising edible plants from across the globe – from dietary staples of the tropical regions of the world, including rice, taro, and banana, to crops suited to arid regions of the globe, including figs, citrus, and pearl millet. Peppers and tomatoes and other nightshades, grapes and olives, a gourd trellis, and a spirits garden featuring plants used in the creation of beer, wine, and liquors round out this diverse display.
  • A portion of the Botanical Garden’s Conservatory Lawn is transformed into an undulating field of dwarf sorghum and barley, traditional grains well-suited to NYBGߣs climate, allowing observation of the sowing, nurturing, harvesting, and replanting processes of these foundational food plants over the course of the exhibition.

African American Garden at the Edible Academy

Curated by Dr. Jessica B. Harris, America’s leading scholar on the foods of the African Diaspora, African American Garden: Remembrance & Resilience celebrates African American food and gardening histories and the contributions of essential plants to American foodways. Dr. Harris has worked with historians, heritage seed collectors, and NYBG’s Edible Academy staff to present a sequence of eight garden beds arranged in a semi-circle that celebrate African American food and gardening histories and their ongoing contributions to America’s plant and food culture. The experience also includes an orientation center, shaded seating areas, and a Hibiscus Drink Station designed by scenic designer Lawrence E. Moten III, whose include Broadway’s Chicken & Biscuits. The African American Garden also features a Poetry Walk curated by Cave Canem Foundation, the premier home for Black poetry, committed to cultivating the artistic and professional growth of African American poets.

Art and Science Installations Throughout the Garden

After a call for artists that resulted in many impressive submissions, The New York Botanical Garden selected 30 local artists, living or working in the Bronx, to design and create tables that explore central themes from Around the Table. On display across the Botanical Garden’s 250 acres, the artist-designed tables incorporate notable food plants, highlighting the plants’ history and cultural significance as well personal stories of food traditions and celebrations. The tables and accompanying interpretation encourage sitting, sharing, and storytelling. Visitors are prompted to learn more via the Bloomberg Connects mobile application, and at select tables, to create artworks or tell their own food stories.

In the LuEsther T. Mertz Library Building Art Gallery, visitors can examine the social and cultural impacts of the American food system through displayed works by contemporary Colombian-American artist Lina Puerta in Lina Puerta: Accumulated Wisdom. Puerta celebrates and acknowledges the essential, often invisible, role of farmworkers, the relationship between nature and the human-made, and ancestral knowledge in mixed-media sculptures, installations, collages, hand-made paper paintings, and wall hangings that incorporate materials ranging from textiles and handmade paper to found, personal, and recycled objects.

Launched in 2021, NYBG’s Bronx Foodways Oral Histories Project is a multiyear effort to collect, record, and archive personal food narratives from Bronx urban farmers and gardeners who focus on community gardens as centers for food, heritage, community, and social justice – making them accessible to the public. Each year, The New York Botanical Garden commissions two public murals celebrating the gardens and farmers from the Oral Histories Project. As part of the Around the Table exhibition, celebrated Bronx-based artist Andr Trenier is creating the initial murals. In NYBG’s Arthur and Janet Ross Gallery, . . .la tierra es nuestro alimento/the land is our nourishment presents oral history videos and photos of Bronx gardens taken by students from the Bronx Documentary Center as well as highlights Trenier’s murals.

Also in the Mertz Library Building, the creativity and ingenuity of plant scientists and plant-based chefs is exhibited, revealing the science and art of agriculture and cuisine. In Sowing Resilience: Origins and Change in Agriculture in the Elizabeth Britton Science Gallery, visitors learn how scientific knowledge from both ancient and recent pasts’ traditional and Indigenous methods of agriculture to new genetic technologies’ can provide insight into creating a more resilient food system to feed the growing planet in the face of the climate crisis and other environmental challenges. The work of NYBG scientists and others highlights how far domesticated plants have come from their origins and the importance of conserving crop biodiversity into the future. In the Rondina and LoFaro Gallery, Steam, Sear, Saut: 150 Years of American Vegetarian Cookbooks showcases 19th- and 20th-century plant-based cookbooks from the LuEsther T. Mertz Library‘s William R. Buck Cookbook Collection, as well as colorfully illustrated seed catalogs, to highlight the ways home chefs’ relationships to vegetables have changed through time. Recipe Roundtable in the Nathaniel Lord Britton Science Rotunda offers visitors an interactive opportunity to connect with Around the Table exhibition content by responding to various prompts calling for drawings of favorite veggies to reflections on culturally significant plants and ingredients to be recorded on recipe cards, which are then displayed throughout the Rotunda.

Bountiful Programming for All Ages

Visitors to Around the Table: Stories of the Foods We Love can enjoy diverse and engaging public programming for all ages. Highlights include artist-designed table tours, food demonstrations, children’s activities, themed weekend celebrations, and more.

On Saturday, June 18, 10 a.m.ߝ12p.m., a symposium, A Seat at the Table, includes two compelling sessions exploring how Black farming informs American history and culture in New York City and across the country:

  • In “Celebrating the African American Farmer,” Natalie Baszile, author of the 2021 anthology We Are Each Other’s Harvest, joins Dr. Jessica B. Harris, food historian and scholar, for a conversation in Ross Hall. Their wide-ranging dialogue covers topics from the historical perseverance and resilience of Black farmers and their connection to the American land, to the generations of farmers who continue to farm despite systemic discrimination and land loss.
  • “Stories from the Farm,” moderated by farmer, urban gardener, food advocate, activist, and NYBG Trustee Karen Washington, is a multigenerational panel discussion devoted to stories of Black farmers from many historical perspectives: North and South, Upstate New York and the Bronx, sharecroppers to family growers and urban farmers. Panelists including “chefarmer” Matthew Raiford and farmer/cultural anthropologist Dr. Gail Myers give historical and contemporary context for Black farmers’ contributions to communities and food justice movements in urban and rural America.

Each week during Around the Table, Wellness Wednesdays serves up the NYBG Farmers Market, food demonstrations, and health and wellness activities.

Offerings at the Edible Academy include food demonstrations and tastings, participatory gardening activities, , and food-themed celebration weekends such as Totally Tomatoes throughout the run of the exhibition.

In “Around the Kids’ Table,” guided by Everett Children’s Adventure Garden Explainers, children and their families tell stories about the foods that are most meaningful to them and enjoy exhibition-related writing, art, and nature-based activities. A Story Walk showcases author Tony Hillery’s children’s book Harlem Grown (Simon & Schuster/Paula Wiseman Books, 2020)about a community garden started by schoolchildren in an empty lot in Harlem, New York, in 2011 that has grown into a network of gardens throughout the city.

On select days, complementary exhibition programming includes “The Art of the Table,” during which individual table artists engage with visitors in special activities such as demonstrations, group painting, or storytelling.

About the Exhibition Advisory Committee

The New York Botanical Garden engaged advisors with expertise in documenting recipes and food histories, edible gardening past and present, food justice and food insecurity, global and local foodways, nutrition, the science of edible plants, and the visual arts to join a committee and participate in the development of Around the Table: Stories of the Foods We Love. Members include:

  • Toby Adams, Gregory Long Director of the Edible Academy, The New York Botanical Garden
  • Journei Manzayila Bimwala, leader and co-chair, Foodway at Concrete Plant Park
  • Garrett Broad, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Communications and Media Studies, Fordham University, and author of More Than Just Food: Food Justice and Community Change (University of California Press, 2016)
  • Kate Gardner Burt, Ph.D., R.D., assistant professor, DPD Director, and Undergraduate Program Director, the Dietetics, Foods, and Nutrition Program at Lehman College, City University of New York
  • Ursula Chanse, Director of Bronx Green-Up and Community Horticulture, The New York Botanical Garden
  • Winston Chiu, chef and co-founder, Rethink Food NYC, Inc.
  • Von Diaz, documentary producer, author of Coconuts & Collards: Recipes and Stories from Puerto Rico to the Deep South (University Press of Florida, 2018), and recipe and essay contributor to The New York TimesThe Washington PostBon AppetitFood & WineEater, and Epicurious
  • Sheryll Durrant, urban farmer, educator, and food justice advocate; Food and Agriculture Coordinator for New Roots Community Farm, and resident manager of Kelly Street Garden in the South Bronx
  • Jessica B. Harris, Ph.D., Americaߣs leading expert on the food and foodways of the African Diaspora, author of 12 critically acclaimed cookbooks, and 2020 James Beard Lifetime Achievement Award recipient
  • Mohammed Mardah, chairman, the African Advisory Council to the Bronx Borough President, and co-founder and executive director of Africans Help Desk
  • Alex McAlvay, Ph.D., Kate E. Tode Assistant Curator in the Institute of Economic Botany, The New York Botanical Garden
  • Lauren Mohn, Ph.D., Visiting Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies, Swarthmore College
  • Dario Mohr, New York-based educator and interdisciplinary artist who creates interactive sanctuary experiences, and founder and director, AnkhLave Arts Alliance, Inc.
  • Gary Paul Nabhan, internationally celebrated nature writer, agrarian activist, and ethnobiologist who works to conserve the links between biodiversity and cultural diversity
  • Henry Obispo, founder and CEO of Born Juice and ReBORN Farms
  • Lina Puerta, mixed-media contemporary artist whose work has been exhibited at the Ford Foundation Gallery, El Museo del Barrio, Wave Hill, and 21c Museum Hotels, and who recently completed an artist residency and exhibition at the Sugar Hill Children’s Museum of Art & Storytelling
  • Michael Purugganan, Ph.D., Silver Professor of Biology and former Dean of Science at New York University

About The New York Botanical Garden

Founded in 1891, The New York Botanical Garden is the most comprehensive botanical garden in the world and an integral part of the cultural fabric of New York City, anchored in the Bronx. Visitors come to the Garden to connect with nature for joy, beauty, and respite, and for renowned plant-based exhibitions, music and dance, and poetry and lectures. Innovative children’s education programs promote environmental sustainability and nutrition awareness, graduate programs educate the next generation of botanists, while engaging classes inspire adults to remain lifelong learners. The 250-acre verdant landscape, which includes a 50-acre, old-growth forest, and the landmark Enid A. Haupt Conservatory support living collections of more than one million plants. Unparalleled resources are also held in the LuEsther T. Mertz Library, the world’s most important botanical and horticultural library with 11 million archival items spanning ten centuries, and William and Lynda Steere Herbarium, the largest in the Western Hemisphere with 7.8 million plant and fungal specimens. Committed to protecting the planet’s biodiversity and natural resources, Garden scientists work on-site in cutting-edge molecular labs and in areas worldwide where biodiversity is most at risk.

For more information about and to purchase tickets for Around the Table: Stories of the Foods We Love, please go HERE.