Posts tagged with "exhibition"

Guggenheim Museum Museoa, Bilbao 2022 Foto: Erika Ede via 360 MAGAZINE

Bilbao Unveils Puppy

The Guggenheim Museum Bilbao unveils Puppy’s new appearance after a special change of flowers for its 25th Anniversary

The Guggenheim Museum Bilbao has unveiled Puppy’s new image after completing the change in flowers this springtime, a process that is sponsored by Seguros Bilbao, a company that is part of the Catalana Occidente Group. The usual process of replacing the 38,000 plants that cover this floral sculpture, which takes place twice a year, has a different outcome this year thanks to the new design made by the artist Jeff Koons in conjunction with the Museum’s curators to celebrate its 25th Anniversary. This is the first time the sculpture has worn this design.

Instead of the flowers being arranged to create spots of color, this season the huge West Highland White Terrier puppy will be predominantly white, while some colored flowers will highlight its outline and texture. Given that the plants take a few weeks to blossom, Puppy’s new image will be in full bloom later in the season. Once it is, the new monochromatic design will make Puppy resemble the breed it represents even more, which served as the inspiration behind the initial concept of this important installation.

In Jeff Koons’s words, “In honor of the Guggenheim Bilbao’s 25th Anniversary, I worked closely with the talented team at the museum to unveil a new planting of flowers for Puppy in celebration of this incredible milestone. My original concept for Puppy was based on a white terrier, so our spring planting is a harmonious composition of mainly white flowers in the spirit of the original model. There are some yellow, orange, red, and blue flowers that add definition to the swirls and folds of the fur and form of Puppy but primarily the flowers are white. This monochrome arrangement conveys peace, renewal, and love. It continues to communicate acceptance and the live flowering plants are symbolic of life’s energy. I always wanted the work to be a place for the community to gather and experience transcendence. Since it was installed, Puppy has embraced millions of visitors at the entrance of the iconic Guggenheim Bilbao, so it is a sincere honor to have Puppy become a part of the anniversary celebration and greet visitors in this fresh new way.”

Regarding the flower species, this time white petunias, begonias, dimorphothecas, alyssum and impatiens predominate.

Giving Puppy new flowers is a complex, intense process that requires the prior planting of thousands of flowers specifically for this work, along with a team of 20 gardening experts who work against the clock under the oversight of the experts from the Museum’s Conservation Department.

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Photo:
Puppy, 1992
Stainless steel, soil, and flowering plants
1240 x 1240 x 820 cm
©FMGB, Guggenheim Museum Museoa, Bilbao 2022
Foto: Erika Ede

Mixed media art by Vaughn Lowery in 360 MAGAZINE

Three Things You Should Know Before Starting an Art Career

A career in something you’re passionate about means every day at work can feel like an opportunity for self-satisfaction and personal growth. If you love being creative and artistic, then you may have considered a career in art before today and asked whether it was an opportunity for someone like you. The good news for would-be professional artists, is there are a multiple of fantastic ways to monetize your skills today. 

Everything from hand-drawn designs on Etsy to print-on-demand selling and custom art websites give you an opportunity to sell to people all over the world. You can even get hired by professional companies as an in-house artist for their branding and marketing campaigns. However, there are some important things to know before you jump in.

A Degree Does Help

While experience can go a long way in the art world, along with a strong portfolio, a degree can help you to unlock opportunities that other artists simply can’t access. With a degree, you can prove yourself to potential companies who might be willing to hire an up-and-coming artist to join their team. A degree also helps you to attract potential clients as a freelancer or business owner. Getting a degree might seem like a complex task, but with access to various forms of funding like Earnest student loans, you can find the cash you need and start your degree in no time. There’s even the option to learn online for some people.

Greatness Takes Time

The road to success for a lot of professionals can be very long, but for an artist, it often feels particularly complex. It takes a lifetime to build your craft, and there’s likely to be a lot of tears and headaches along the way. People can be cruel and unconstructive in the art world, and you’ll need to make sure you can achieve a positive mindset and that you are patient enough to move past it. If you really want to succeed in this complex space, you’ll need to focus on consistently working on your craft, looking for new opportunities, and building your network, so you can get your work in front of as many people as possible. 

Running Your Own Business Could Be Your Best Bet

Finally, while there are traditional hiring opportunities out there for artists, most find they get better opportunities in the freelance route. Today, countless platforms exist for different kinds of artists to offer their services with everything from custom portraits, to animation and logos. Running your own business could be the best way to make sure you’re constantly earning a source of income from different clients. However, there are pros and cons of being a small business owner, so this also means you’ll need to tackle the challenges that come with it, from learning how to market yourself, to making sure you keep an accurate inventory at all times. Becoming a professional artist won’t always be an easy road, but it could be worth it if it means you get to start a career in something you truly care about.

*Featured art by Vaughn Lowery

Enter the Void via Nychos for use by 360 Magazine

SPOTLIGHT: NYCHOS

Blending themes of morbid corporeality with the colorful, hyper-loony aesthetic descended from comics and cartoons, Nychos has developed a unique style that performs with powerhouse effect whether on the street or in the gallery.

Raised in a traditional Viennese hunting family, death and dissection were daily business for Nychos. The proximity to animal viscera had a profound effect on him psychologically and visually–he now explores the theme of dissection in his art, pushing it to playful extremes.

In Nychos’ world, Spongebob has a skeleton, people live inside rabbits and there is always something wicked underneath. Pumped up on the visual adrenaline of comics, heavy metal and graffiti, Nychos’ work reflects the immense energy and technical focus necessary to produce work on the massive scale he has reached on the streets.

Colliding style and subject matter, Nychos slices up animals and innocent childhood characters with unflinching graphic precision. His work confronts the viewer with wicked insistence, using the shock of cartoon violence as a vehicle for exploring subtler themesof mortality and temporality. Nychos pays homage to these deathless cartoon heroes by peeling them open and giving them human substance. His artwork reflects the psychology of an art scene in which creations are sometimes swept away as soon as created.

Nychos also uses subtle imagery such as plastic in an orca’s belly, weaving political commentary seamlessly into his pieces. Using delicious color-scapes and wild, fuming lines to create his characters–whether with paintbrush or spray can–Nychos works with unmatched dynamism.

His command over his tools indicates a work ethic that promises only more staggering output from thisartist. Nychos’ paintings and drawings have been exhibited in galleries worldwide, including six solo exhibitions (Turino, Detroit, New York, San Francisco, Singapore, Paris) in the past two years alone.

These pieces serve as unique compliments to his massive public works that give character to cities all over the world. The artist’s last solo show took place in Zurich and was opened in October 2015. A cooperation with Jonathan Levine is planned for 2016. Nychos currently lives and works out of Rabbit Eye Movement, his studio and art space located in Vienna.

Nychos art inside of 360 MAGAZINE.
Nychos art inside of 360 MAGAZINE.
Nychos art inside of 360 MAGAZINE.
Jean Debufet art via The Guggenheim Museum for use by 360 Magazine

Jean Debufet: Ardent Celebration

The Guggenheim Museum Bilbao presents Jean Dubuffet: Ardent Celebration, sponsored by BBK, an exhibition surveying the defining decades of the career of Jean Dubuffet, spanning his first years of committed artistic production in the 1940s through his final fully developed series, completed in 1984. The exhibition is drawn primarily from the rich holdings of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, and supplemented by important selections from the Peggy Guggenheim Collection, Venice. At the end of World War II, Jean Dubuffet (b. 1901, Le Havre, France; d. 1985, Paris) began exhibiting paintings that defied entrenched artistic values. He rejected principles of decorum and classical beauty, along with pretensions of expertise. Instead, he looked to the commonplace and the unheralded, employing crude materials, mundane subjects, and a style that spurned any outward sign of academic training. In this approach, Dubuffet was challenging norms that he believed obstructed authentic expression and devalued everyday experience. However, his goal was not only to reveal how threadbare cultural conventions were; he also wanted to illustrate the vitality of life freed from them. As he once claimed, “I would like people to see my work as a rehabilitation of scorned values and… make no mistake about it, a work of ardent celebration.” 

Dubuffet was committed to this aim throughout his career, though he continually transformed the means he used to pursue it. He tested different mediums, including painting, drawing, collage, lithography, sculpture, and performance. Meanwhile, he moved fluidly between figuration and abstraction, explored multiple compositional strategies, and periodically reinvented his palette. Throughout these changes, Dubuffet’s work stayed grounded in its dedication to sharing new and revitalizing perspectives with viewers, as well as its refusal of convention. Jean Dubuffet: Ardent Celebration will focus on this celebratory impulse, as it offers an overview of the breadth of Dubuffet’s production. The ability to present a full survey of the artist’s career largely from the collection of New York’s Guggenheim Museum is thanks to the close relationship the museum established with Dubuffet. The museum hosted three major exhibitions on the artist during his lifetime, including Jean Dubuffet 1962– 66 (1966), Jean Dubuffet: A Retrospective (1973), and Jean Dubuffet: A Retrospective Glance at Eighty (1981). The institution also collected his work in depth, beginning with the acquisition of the Door with Couch Grass (Porte au chiendent) (1957) in 1959. 

About Jean Debufet 

Dubuffet was born in Le Havre, France, in 1901. At seventeen, he began studies at Académie Julian, a respected art school. However, he soon became disenchanted with the curriculum’s distance from real-world concerns and dropped out. In the following years, he remained engaged with the creative community in Paris, circulating with artists like Raoul Dufy, Juan Gris, Fernand Legér, André Masson, and Suzanne Valadon. In 1923, he came across the work of the visionary artist Clémentine Ripoche, and the next year, he discovered Dr. Hanz Prinzhorn’s book Artistry of the Mentally Ill. These two encounters began Dubuffet’s life-long, integral engagement with art made by psychics, children, and people experiencing mental illness— a kind of artistic production he would later term “Art Brut.” For much of the 1920s and 1930s, Dubuffet worked in his family’s wine distribution business. It was not until 1942, at the age of forty-one, while living in Nazi-occupied Paris, that he decided to devote himself to being an artist. The works he made in the ensuing years were a direct challenge to commonly held ideals about beauty, skill, and the elevated status of art, as revealed in Miss Cholera (Miss Choléra) and Will to Power (Volonté de Puissance), both made in January of 1946. Dubuffet complemented this production with publications and talks in which he explicated his belief that the mechanisms of mainstream culture were moribund, stifling, and should be cast aside. Alongside his clear criticality, Dubuffet was experimenting with alternate paths forward, paths that he believed would lead to more fruitful, genuine modes of expression. During the 1940s and 1950s, he invited audiences to fundamentally reconsider the concept of beauty and demonstrated how worthy of admiration ordinary things could be. His work of this era delights in the qualities of quotidian and base materials. To emphasize the physicality of his paint, he used additives like lime, cement, or sand to thicken his oil paint into a paste he called “haute pâte.” With this medium, he could create deeply textured, complex surfaces, and he could shape his compositions in more immediately physical ways. Dubuffet sometimes went a step further in his explorations of materials, using found objects like rocks, rope, and, later, aluminum foil in his paintings. In parallel, he sought to overthrow socially enforced notions of beauty with nontraditional choices of subjects and the inventive ways in which he depicted them. This goal is particularly apparent in his early portraits, like Portrait of Soldier Lucien Geominne (Portrait du soldat Lucien Geominne) (1950) and his series of nudes, Ladies’ Bodies (Corps de Dames) (1950–51), but it extends to his depictions of frequently ignored objects, including dilapidated walls, rustic doors, soil, and rocks. From 1962 into the 1970s, Dubuffet pursued his most extended body of work, the Hourloupe cycle. These paintings and sculptures are distinguished by networks of interlocked cells, many filled with parallel stripes, most often in red, blue, and white. Though this cycle marks a significant stylistic shift, it continues Dubuffet’s commitment to constructively realigning his and his audiences’ engagement with art and the world more broadly. With the Hourloupe, cycle, which is represented in this exhibition with the works Nunc Stans (1965) and Bidon l’Esbroufe (1967), Dubuffet established a vocabulary that enabled him to create and explore an ever-expanding, fantastical universe, unified by its shared visual expression. It also allowed him to more pointedly take on phenomenological and epistemological issues. The intricacy of the patterning can lead to visual ambiguity, especially when multiple pieces are seen together. This enigmatic quality suggests the transience of what seems permanent and the contingency of an object’s supposedly defining form. Together these effects occasion a rethinking of the relationship between perception and reality, an aim that was of deep importance to the artist. For the last decade of his life, Dubuffet continued to focus on the workings of the mind, especially as they relate to the external world. By drawing attention to these mental functions, he hoped to inspire new, liberated ways of thinking. In the Theaters of Memory (Théâtres de mémoire) series (1975–79), Dubuffet established a vocabulary for expressing how the mind mixes perception, memories, and concepts as it tries to make sense of events and surroundings. His last two series, Sights (Mires) (1983–84) and Non-Places (Non-lieuxs) (1984), represented in this exhibition by Sight G 132 (Kowloon) (Mire G 132 [Kowloon]) (1983), and Given (Donnée) (1984), respectively, are characterized by tangles of lines and are largely absent of recognizable imagery. With these paintings, Dubuffet considered what experience would be like if the mind did not sort the outside world into preconceived, socially defined categories—extending even to the distinction between the real and imagined. Free of such constraints, the artist believed people would be able to access new, limitless possibilities of experience and creativity.

Mon Laferte for use by 360 MAGAZINE

Mon Laferte × District 13 International Art Fair

Artist Mon Laferte joins in at the District 13 International Art Fair in Paris this week amongst leading artists from the realms of street and pop art. The exhibition opens to the public from January 13 to 16.

Gracias,” the acrylic, mixed media piece of art created by Laferte will be auctioned off on Sunday, January 16 at 4:00 PM. (CET), by Drouot Group. To be eligible to bid on the auction day, make sure to register before Sunday, January 16 HERE.

Mon Laferte places her artwork on exhibit at the District 13 International Art Fair, represented by the Bahía Utópica Art Gallery in Valparaíso, at the Hôtel Drouot. The art fair brings together the edginess but energetic ambiances from galleries of street and pop art. An auction house showcased at the fair elevates the cohabitation of varying media forms to support urban artists.

Spanning from January 13 to 16 Laferte’s paintings will be available for sale, accompanied by a group of six other Chilean artists from Valparaíso, at Stand 10-B located at 9 Rue Drouot Paris. Her painting, “Gracias,” joins the special final auction with 27 other top artists from the world of street and pop art, on January 16. View the catalog HERE.

The piece “Gracias” is an Acrylic and mixed technique piece on canvas with dimensions of 122 x 91 centimeters. Laferte speaks about the piece, stating, “Some of these paintings I did while I was undergoing hormonal treatment to get pregnant. I have never heard anyone talk about the terror they feel, every day is an achievement. These have been the months in which I have felt the most fear in all my life. Never before did I take care of myself as much as I do now. Before I could drink and not sleep for many days and nothing mattered to me, now everything has changed for me. Every decision is critical to the successful end of my pregnancy. Also the hormones have been completely violent. Sometimes I go from happiness to deep depression. Pregnancy is not all tender and rosy. There are days when I feel like a black hole that lives in me is swallowing me.”

About Mon Laferte

Singer, songwriter and visual artist Mon Laferte has a unique artistic point-of-view that spans over a range of creative branches. The Chilean artist generates modern and stylish Latin music that captivates her audiences. Her personal songwriting charm snatched Laferte the Best Singer-Songwriter Album for Seis at the 2021 Latin GRAMMY’s. Recently, the album also received a GRAMMY nomination for “Best Regional Mexican Music Album (Includes Tejano).”

Amidst her career in the music industry, Laferte is a fully fledged artist with artwork notarized in differing countries. Laferte’s work continues to be established in exhibitions throughout numerous cities, including “Gestos” at the Museum of Mexico City. Her unique murals stand out amongst street art in Chile, Mexico and Los Angeles.

Ferne Jacobs × Craft in America

Fiber artist Ferne Jacobs’ lifetime art collection spanning from the mid-1960s to 2022 will be on display exclusively at the Craft in America Center.

The Los Angeles artist has been innovating in the art world for over fifty years. The exhibition will showcase around 30 pieces of work created by Jacobs across the timeline of her career. Though Jacobs has lived in Los Angeles for many years, her art has never been on display in such a way. The experience will take visitors through the evolution of her career as an artist and highlight her unique tactics and techniques.

Jacobs serves as a pioneer in the development of fiber as an artistic form. She is renowned for the methods she uses to manipulate the rare material. While embracing traditional techniques of knotting, coiling and twinning, Jacobs has continued to elevate these practices into something revolutionary. Though she may work in fiber, Jacob’s artwork are sculptured pieces of art.

The display of Jacobs’ artwork allows the public to admire and be inspired by her artistic approach. All of Jacobs’ work signifies a personal artistic journey constructed and apparent in her artforms. With years of dedication, Jacobs has perfected and transformed her unique craft.

The exhibition will run from April 2, 2022, to June 18, 2022, at the Craft in America Center in Los Angeles, California.

Related Programming

While the exhibition is an in-person experience, Craft in America is creating a virtual exhibition for those who cannot be in attendance. The virtual exhibition is complemented by an assortment of public programs such as an artist talk, demonstration, and hands-on workshop. Students from the Craft in Schools program, which works to encourage underprivileged K-12 Los Angeles schools, will be attend the exhibit. They will have the chance to learn about Jacobs’ creations, which serves as an opportunity for the students to explore the artistic method of fiber.

About Ferne Jacobs

After moving to Los Angeles at a very young age, Ferne Jacobs dedicated her life to her craft. After taking a weaving workshop with the artist Arline Fisch in the mid-1960s, Jacobs discovered her passion. After obtaining her M.F.A. from Claremont Graduate University in 1976, Jacobs has been showcased in several solo and group exhibitions throughout the United States and internationally. Accumulating varying awards for her groundbreaking art, Jacobs artwork is also featured in public collections such as the Smithsonian National Museum of American Art (Washington D.C.), the Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York City) and the Museum of Arts and Design (New York City).

ferne jacobs inside 360 MAGAZINE.

Museum created by Mina Tocalini at 360 Magazine for use 360 Magazine

Sharon Lockhart – Guggenheim Museum

The Guggenheim Museum Bilbao will be presenting Sharon Lockhart. Rotation Notation, the third and last exhibition of 2021 in the Film & Video Gallery, a Museum space devoted to showing fundamental works of video and moving image art, and sound and video installations.

This exhibition shows a video installation and photographs by Sharon Lockhart (b. 1964, Norwood, USA) based on her encounter with the works of Israeli choreographer Noa Eshkol (b. 1924, Degania Bet kibbutz–d. 2007, Holon, Israel) soon after Eshkol died. Lockhart’s discovery of Eshkol’s works led her to further her formal exploration of human motion and expand the collaborative dimension of her work through her engagement with the choreographer’s manifold and largely communally-enacted practice.

The works of Lockhart pay particular attention to human activity and its modes of organization, be it social or solitary. 360 Magazine is pleased to watch this video as it truly shows a very different aspect.

Exhibition given by The Untitled Space for use by 360 Magazine

The Untitled Space × Fahren Feingold – Wet Dreams

The Untitled Space is pleased to present “WET DREAMS” a solo exhibition of watercolor paintings by artist Fahren Feingold on view from October 21st through November 13th, 2021. “WET DREAMS,” curated by Indira Cesarine, premieres the latest series of works on paper and panels by the artist known for her ethereal feminine nudes that emphasize the female gaze through vibrant brush strokes using her signature wet-on-wet watercolor technique. The exhibition will be the third in-person solo exhibition of artwork by Feingold presented by The Untitled Space. The artist, who has been represented by the gallery since 2017, has been featured in a number of group exhibitions and online solo shows presented by the gallery and is featured in numerous notable international collections.  

“In my new series of work, WET DREAMS, I return to the female form. I explore the relationships between beauty, sensuality, and nudity through my own female narrative lens.  I want my viewer to feel the colors of that expression. I want my watercolors to wash over them, gently inviting them to sink deeper into the subjects, not just in the erotic sense.  The series exposes the unclothed form, not as a sexual act but rather as a revelation in body and mind connectedness. 360 Magazine is amazed at the work of Fahren Feingold for this exhibit. 

In WET DREAMS, my practice has evolved. Instead of taking inspiration from vintage imagery, I am working from my own photographs as visual references. Many of the models are personal friends, giving me an insider point of view to their real lives and presence rather than creating imaginary narratives about who the women are and the past lives they may have led. By taking time to really look at and get to know the women, their stories, and their bodies, my paintings are like a love letter to my subjects, shared with the world so they can see what I feel. I don’t literally paint my models but the emotions they radiate.” – Artist Fahren Feingold

“Using watercolors to paint my bright and bold figures gives me access to those who usually shy away from nudity. In my work, I uncover women’s pre-sexualized bodies to explore the beauty and intuitive emotions of my feminist gaze. For this exhibition, I worked on growing in scale, with several pieces on multiple panels. As a physically petite person, I struggle with feeling seen and heard. Through the act of painting, I let my work speak loudly for me. Thus, expanding the watercolors from the confines of single paper dimensions, my voice becomes that much harder to ignore. WET DREAMS is a demand for people to listen and see women as equals while sharing the visual poetry of their unique intimate stories.” – Artist Fahren Feingold

Optimistic Vivacity via Tim Tadder for use by 360 Magazine

Interview with Tim Tadder

If you have ever seen photos of an Olympic athlete, you have no doubt seen Tim Tadder‘s work. As a photographer, he has captured the likes of Michael Phelps and Simone Biles. Recently, Tadder hosted an exhibition at Avant Gallery in New York City. 360 was given the opportunity to ask him about his artistic inspirations and his style.

How did you get into art? Was there a moment you realized you wanted to do art professionally?

I’ve always been involved in some capacity with art as a major thematic in my life. It was always what I most enjoyed in school, as a hobby, & just overall being creative. I left a career as a teacher and pursued photography as a craft and a creative expression form when I was 27, after realizing I needed to enjoy my occupation and creating was a massive part of that. 

When did you realize art was the career choice for you? Was there a moment when you realized you were gaining recognition and success in the art world?

People see me as a highly creative photographer and artist. The way that I see the world has a particular point of view that is sought after. I think embracing that as who you are and what you do and how you perceive and see has value and therefore is a viable career once you can monetize that vision. Everything else falls into place from there. 

People will collect and want to own a piece of your vision and hang it on a wall, which ultimately empowers you as an artist to continue to create and explore your vision knowing that you have the financial support in order to do so. 

When ‘Nothing to See’ first was shared as large format prints, the response was overwhelming. It was at that point that I knew there was serious traction in a new marketplace, one that I had always dreamed of being a part of and was fortunate that this particular series of images was embraced by collectors and galleries. 

How does knowing a multitude of art mediums help you with your artwork?

I come from a background of 20 years of creating advertising campaigns for the world’s biggest brands and our job is to create on demand art that sells a product. And in doing so, you learn to use all the tools at your disposal to make the most powerful image for that purpose. I have been able to use all of that skill and knowledge and channel it into my personal fine art work to create images that convey messages that are important to me and that should be heard around the world. 

What do you look at to get inspiration to create?

Pre-COVID I attended a lot of art fairs and contemporary museums to look at trends, masters, & to find inspiration on how people explore visual presentation. I found that going to those events and seeing the art in person really helped me refine my message and refine my voice. In a COVID world, I try to follow artists on IG and Twitter who I’m inspired by and keep abreast of their new work and from there I try to find my own lane to blend out, be distinct, and be noticeable. Right now there’s so many rabbit holes that one can go down to find inspiration, whether it’s instagram or twitter or the NFT space.

You use bright and vibrant color schemes in your artwork, when and how did that start? What’s your process when deciding about the colors you will use?  

I’ve always been attracted to bold use of color. It’s been a monochord in my commercial work since my career began. For me that’s an instinctual choice. To use bold colors to help story tell. In choosing, a lot of it comes from instinct and a lot comes from what those colors represent. For ‘Nothing to See,’ I chose the bed, black, & white hues because they were historically represented of fascist banners and that collection was born out of a desire to create iconic, anti-fascist imagery. 

You photograph both still-lives (mostly mannequins) and people. Is there one you prefer to photograph? What led to you choosing a humanoid inanimate object as your main subject in many photos/series? 

I choose to use real people and not mannequins. I select models that have very androgynous, mannequin-esque features because I want my images to represent humankind and not just a type of individual, which sometimes comes from casting talent with defining characteristics. It’s not a picture of someone, it’s a picture of something

You edit with high contrast, high-saturation as your signature style. What drew you to this editing style?

Instinctive choices. It’s how I see, it’s how I visualize, it’s what I as an artist feel is beautiful. It wasn’t a choice to follow a trend, it was my own visual aesthetic.

art illustration by Gabrielle Marchan for use by 360 magazine

THE MOAD PRESENTS THREE NEW EXHIBITION

MUSEUM OF ART AND DESIGN AT MDC PRESENTS

THREE NEW EXHIBITIONS FOR FALL 2021

Museum of Art and Design (MOAD) at Miami Dade College (MDC) presents three one-person exhibitions for the Fall 2021 season. Exhibitions by the Icelandic artist Hreinn Fridfinnsson, Cuban American Jorge Pardo, and Miami-based Venezuelan American Loriel Beltrán offer viewers comprehensive looks at the practices of three of the most compelling artists—both local and international—working today. The exhibitions will be on view from Nov. 6, 2021, through May 1, 2022.

Hreinn Fridfinnsson: For the Time Being, the first American museum exhibition of the influential Icelandic artist spans six decades and highlights his use of minimal gestures to transform everyday materials into poetic, allusive, and revelatory works of art. Born and raised in Iceland, Fridfinnsson moved to Amsterdam in 1971 and began exhibiting his work in museums and galleries across Europe. His early works align with contemporaneous cutting-edge art movements, such as land art and photo conceptualism, but still suggest the distinctively romantic, lyrical, and wry sensibility that continues to define his practice.

A kind of poetic restraint characterizes many other Fridfinnsson works, which take ordinary materials and objects as their starting point. With a light touch, the artist minimally intervenes to alchemically transmute pedestrian things into allusive and enigmatic artworks—what we might call, in Duchampian terms, “slightly assisted readymades.” Sometimes these works carry a tacit mystical or spiritual charge, such as Sanctuary, 1992–2010, a regular cardboard carton with a sheet of fluorescent paper placed inside. Upended and mounted on the wall, the splayed box makes a cruciform shape and unearthly light seems to emanate from within.

Fridfinnsson’s art is often dependent on vagaries of atmosphere and perception for its effect. Most of his major exhibitions, including this one at MOAD, gather works from across the multiple decades of his career, without regard for chronology or ideas of artistic development. For the Time Being marks a provisional summation of the artist’s achievement, less a traditional retrospective than an assembly of instantiations of his unique sensibility.

Jorge Pardo: Mongrel, a site-specific installation, features a new series of quasi-abstract drawings along with modernist chairs, custom-fabricated chandeliers, and a carpet designed by the artist in MOAD’s expansive Skylight Gallery. The immersive exhibition poetically conjures the artist’s own history and biography, including his childhood memories as a Cuban refugee, processed with his family at MDC’s Historic Landmark Freedom Tower, which now houses the museum.

An untitled series of 25 new drawings created expressly for this exhibition meld a wide variety of images into arresting abstractions of pulsing color and form, while still occasionally revealing their representational sources. The artist emigrated to the United States as a child, passing through the Freedom Tower, which then served as a processing center for Cuban refugees. His memories of the welcoming architectural landmark intertwine with those of displacement, trauma, and loss caused in part by the Cuban regime’s confiscation of the emigrants’ family photographs and documents. Pardo’s drawings use family photos—his own and others’—as their starting point, along with historic photos of the Freedom Tower. He combines these with a vast array of other images, including many artworks crucial to his development as an artist and others meant to evoke the cultural milieu of his formative years.

The artist manipulates his source materials on the computer, resizing, superimposing, colorizing, and otherwise transforming images that recall personal and cultural memories into dazzlingly hued, intricately textured near-abstractions. Pardo translates these into vector graphics, which are then printed on cotton Guarro paper and brilliantly tinted by hand with colored pencils. Pardo has compared the montage and assimilation of source images into the provisionally unified whole of his drawings to the process of assimilation undergone by any immigrant to a new land, including himself. He views his reconstruction of an image from recognizable fragments into a new, often unfamiliar, mixed configuration as analogous to his own hybrid or “mongrel” condition, existing between cultural, ethnic, or racial identities.

Loriel Beltrán: Constructed Color presents recent works by the artist, innovative abstract paintings of dazzling opticality and metaphorical density made by affixing slabs of layered pigment, sliced from blocks hardened in boxlike molds, to panels. Beltrán’s panels appear as stacked structures, assemblages, or objects. But the optical mixing of the colors perceived by viewers also makes the paintings seem somewhat intangible. This contradiction between object and opticality constitutes only one of the works’ paradoxes. Beltrán uses such contradictions to create a tension-filled space within which he explores possible modes for contemporary painting.

Beltrán’s exhibition inaugurates MOAD Projects, a new series of exhibitions that features work by Miami-based artists, including distinguished MDC and New World School of the Arts alumni and faculty. MOAD Projects provides a platform for local artists to realize new projects or exhibit recent bodies of work, as well as for investigations of understudied historical developments in Miami’s cultural past. MOAD Projects expands upon the swing/SPACE/Miami alumni exhibition series that began in 2013.

“We are thrilled to present solo shows by three fascinating artists this fall,” says Rina Carvajal, MOAD’s Executive Director and Chief Curator, who organized all three projects. “Introducing Hreinn Fridfinnsson’s intelligent and poetic work to America is a great honor. And we are proud to host Jorge Pardo’s engrossing semi-autobiographical installation, which engages his own artistic development in tandem with the history of exile, of Miami, and of the Freedom Tower itself. These two projects, combined with the rigorous and brilliant paintings of Loriel Beltrán, produced here in Miami by an alumnus of the New World School of the Arts, give our audiences a view of the vast range of contemporary art’s possibilities.”

Hreinn Fridfinnsson: For the Time Being is curated by Rina Carvajal, MOAD’s Executive Director and Chief Curator, with the assistance of Isabela Villanueva, Consulting Assistant Curator. Jorge Pardo: Mongrel and Loriel Beltran: Constructed Color are curated by Rina Carvajal. All three exhibitions are made possible by the Miami-Dade County Department of Cultural Affairs and the Cultural Affairs Council, the Miami-Dade County Mayor and Board of County Commissioners; and the State of Florida, Department of State, Division of Arts and Culture, and the Florida Council on Arts and Culture. For their generous assistance in realizing the exhibition of Hreinn Fridfinnsson, MOAD wishes to thank Hrafnhildur Helgadóttir; Claes Nordenhake and Nadia Heinsohn of Galerie Nordenhake; Börkur Arnarson and Bryndís Erla Hjálmarsdóttir of i8 Gallery; and Elba Benítez and Pamela Cañizo of Galería Elba Benitez. For invaluable assistance in his research, Jorge Pardo wishes to thank the Cuban Heritage Collection and the Cuban Refugee Center Records, both at the University of Miami Libraries, Coral Gables; the Research Center at HistoryMiami Museum; and the Florida International University dPanther Digital Repository.