Posts tagged with "France"

Totem Fashion × BESFXXK

Totem is pleased to announce its collaboration with the talented label BESFXXK.

About BESFXXK

BESFXXK is a play on words ”bespoke + fucked up”, and is pronounceable as /bi’s fak/.

Founded in 2017 by Jae Hyuk Lim and Bona Kim, BESFXXK is an experimental fashion house that takes a surgical approach to design and product development.

Lim and Kim’s technique involves combining items with diverse backgrounds and histories. The outcome is always both innovative and wearable.

BESFXXK set out to reinterpret symbols from both streetwear and luxury fashion. The brand reexamines the definitions of both current and past trends. 

Designers Jae Hyuk Lim & Bona Kim studied at the prestigious Royal College of Arts In London and the London College of Fashion respectively, before launching BESFXXK in 2017.

Their collection is now stocked in more than 40 stores in over 15 countries worldwide.

About Totem Fashion Paris

Totem is a communications agency that promotes both French and international fashion labels. Totem has discovered and launched designers and institutional brands for over 10 years. Their clients include designer labels Raf Simons, Jeremy Scott, and more, as well as institutional brands like Diesel, Mustang Jeans, and l’Atelier Renault.

BESFXXK, totem fashion, runwayBESFXXK, SS20, Totem Fashion, Runway

BESFXXK SS20

Diptyque

PARIS IS YOURS

Although born in the 5th arrondissement, its toe almost in the waters of the Seine, and although still a resident, not once in almost 60 years since Diptyque was founded has it shared the story of its life in Paris.

A simple omission, like looking for your glasses, when all the time they were resting on your forehead? A Freudian slip that makes you wonder of which repressed emotion it might be a symptom? Or after all, and as everyone knows, since it is the guardian divinity of the House, might it be a chance inconsistency? Rather than founder in speculation, there was an urgent need to right this wrong. To remind those, perhaps large in number, who imagining it anchored in London or New York, may not know that diptyque is primarily a child of the Parisian Left Bank.

To make amends for such a long silence, and after the Venice of Olène, the Greece of Philosykos, the Vietnam of Do Son and the Japan of Oyédo, it is simultaneously paying dual homage to its native city.

HOW SHOULD WE CELEBRATE SUCH A CITY?

Embracing it all would be utopian. Shedding light on a single aspect impossible. Why the cheeky Paris of Mistinguett or Gavroche and not the revolutionary Paris of Camille Desmoulins and Louise Michel? Why prefer the Butte-aux Cailles, between half-timbered pavilions and the forgotten banks of the Bièvre, to the artistic, surrealist and cinematographic Paris of Montparnasse? Is the seclusion of the 7th arrondissement fairer than the picturesque 18th? But obviously, as always, and as ever at diptyque where we believe so strongly in serendipity, it was an unforeseen event, an unexpected incident, that brought the solution to light.

It happened on avenue de l’Opéra, or to be more precise, at home. Not long ago, the House moved into a beautiful apartment on the “noble floor” of a Haussmann-style building located on this major road. What seduced us? The incredible ceiling heights, large windows, bordering balconies, marble fireplaces, herringbone parquet floors, and moldings. On pushing open a hidden door, we discovered the bathroom of a former occupant, Sarah Bernhardt.

We believe so, since the address was then one of the chicest in the capital… Lined with ceramic frescoes teeming with parrots, multicolored peacocks, ocean views and flourishing vegetation, this Art Nouveau masterpiece – listed in the inventory of Historic Monuments – immediately oiled creative wheels, opening the way to a composition dedicated to Paris before the Great War.

BIRTH OF CHYPRE

In addition to this bathroom, it is astounding how many things, on closer inspection, tie diptyque to these short years at the turn of the 19th to the 20th century: the swan, then a symbol of female grace, has been present in the iconography of the House for thirty-six years, as part of the identity of l’Ombre dans l’Eau; just like the peacock, its feathers and plumage, another bird in vogue in the 1900s, and found since 1968 on the panoramic illustration of l’Eau; orientalism, a true passion of the founders Desmond, Christiane and Yves (Knox-Leet, Gautrot and Coueslant); the English painters and graphic designers, Arthur Rackham, Aubrey Beardsley and William Morris and their formidable stylized illuminations that went on to inspire Desmond and define the graphic identity of the vignettes adorning future bottles. Not to mention, of course, perfumery, a craft reinvented by chemical synthesis, then making its entry into the modern world.

Joseph Marie François Spoturno, better known under the alias François Coty, is said to have been its leading light. What is left of hisworks? Materially: hardly anything, a few estagnons lounging in a safe at the Osmothèque de Versailles. Culturally: the very foundation of what for decades constituted the epitome of “à la parisienne” chic, the most famous olfactory structure in history, condensed into a simple noun: chypre. This is how it comes into being: Chypre is an architecture created by the boiling points and degrees of evaporation of the materials used.

EAU CAPITALE

Eau Capitale is the first diptyque chypre. As such, it follows a principle conceived more than a century ago. Olivier Pescheux, a high-flying perfumer and faithful companion, nevertheless took care to illuminate it with the lights of the 21st century! An “abstract”, enigmatic fragrance, it embodies a form of slightly detached refinement of the elegance exuded by the aura of the “city of light”. It opens with the freshness of “vert de bergamote” tempering its consummate voluptuousness. Fruity, yes, yet lively and zesty. Was it studded with pink peppercorns to recall the pomanders – oranges pricked with cloves – once brought back from England by Desmond? Or to orchestrate the eagerly awaited “olfactory accident”? Between the flower and the spice is like an exclamation mark, a Capital letter.

In the center of the triangle is a bouquet of flowers bordering on excess. Wide-open petals, on the verge of falling, intense, rich scents of roses from Bulgaria and Turkey and ylang-ylang from the Comoros. No doubt François Coty used the Grasse variety of centifolia, also known as May rose. Now almost impossible to find, botanists have managed to replace it with extremely fine cultivars planted in Eastern Europe, on the fringes of Asia, of which even the residual water, also contained in this fragrance, smells divine. Ylang-ylang, on the other hand, has accents of English candy, highly palatable and long on fidelity. Cinnamon bark essence heralds the woods to follow. It stands for freedom: no lichen, no moss or oak or pine! But, yes, patchouli. With its leaf, distilled to the heart in Indonesia in line with the ethical qualities of sustainable development. And the peppery facet of “Akigalawood” produced by an enzymatic reaction of the plant in contact with ad hoc bacteria. And finally, “Georgywood” for its earthy and dark vetiver-like aspects. Ambrofix, between musk, dry tobacco and ambergris, closes the chapter.

SEE BETTER FOR A BETTER SENSORY EXPERIENCE

At the start of the diptyque saga, there were brushes, pencils, colors, paper. And canvases. Long before fragrances, it was, principally, art that united Yves, a former student of the École du Louvre, Desmond who studied Fine Arts and Christiane, a Decorative Arts graduate. The first became a scenographer, the others having already teamed up to create upholstery fabrics. They painted all the time. Once you are aware of this, you realize the importance of the visual element in their approach to perfumes, as each has a story to tell. All three friends had a specific activity within their partnership – Yves was the project manager, Christiane the nimble-fingered artist, Desmond the natural inspirer – and it was he who was responsible for designing labels, boxes and signatures. His Chinese ink line contrasted black with white, at times marked by sinuosity, at others symmetry. His lettering is enclosed in the recurring oval, his logo recognizable among a thousand.

On the back stands a peacock with magnificent plumage, dots, and lines intertwined, saturating each square millimeter with patterns.

On the front is an Eiffel Tower, roses, bergamots, recurring patchouli leaves and the words “Eau Capitale” in rolling calligraphy.

PARIS EN FLEUR

A candle is the very least that diptyque could add to this celebration – a rose candle, of course.

Roses like those of Bagatelle in the Bois de Boulogne(and the Flower Market, that lovers still offer to their amour. Some are an aromatic delight, most are not. But the idea we make of it matters almost as much: a certain spring emotion, the pleasure of living here and watching the Seine flow by from a bistro terrace. The scent that goes up in smoke (chypre, of course) has a pleasant freshness, a host of petals and the memory of patchouli that lingers long on drapes.

The eau de parfum and the scented candle are accompanied, in limited-edition boxes, by a solid perfume and a scented wax oval.

“Being a Parisian is not about being born in Paris, it is about being reborn there” Sacha Guitry once said.

Wine Enthusiast, 360 MAGAZINE, Vaughn Lowery, Alejandra Villagra

WINE ENTHUSIAST

Today, Wine Enthusiast – the leading authority on all things wine – released its highly anticipated travel guide. Unlike years past, the completely rethought feature showcases seven wine experiences, rather than destinations, to give readers an immersive perspective on wine and wine travel from those that know vino best. The digital feature is available online here and the print issue will be on newsstands in February.

Curated by Wine Enthusiast’s intrepid global editors, the list takes readers on a journey from the vineyards of Mendoza, Argentina to the soils of Piedmont, Italy to the rolling surf breaks of Margaret River, Australia, and beyond. A quick list of experiences include:

  • Touring the Storied Cellars of Champagne, France
    • Located beneath the picturesque landscapes of Champagne lies a cavernous network of tunnels and caves known as Champagne’s crayères. Originally constructed by Romans to quarry chalk, the system has had many uses over the years, including wine storage for Benedictine monks and housing for hidden cities of French citizens when Germany occupied the area during World War I. 
  • Safari and Wine Experiences in South Africa
    • As South African wine entered a new era, so, too, did the safari experience—especially once legacy and avant-garde wine producers who raised quality began to capture the attention of beverage directors at game lodges. If an ideal vacation includes a Kruger game drive followed by sunset sips of the country’s best Chenin Blanc, guests can now turn that dream into a reality. 
  • Wine and Surf in Australia’s Margaret River Region
    • This Western Australia wine region, located about three hours south of Perth, offers a number of welcoming wineries set amid beautiful beaches. Featuring a plethora of surf schools, tasting tours and an annual professional surfing competition, Margaret River offers the perfect locale to sip and surf the day away.
  • Be Winemaker for a Day in Napa Valley, California
    • Step into the shoes of a winemaker during a trip to Napa Valley, California – known as one of the world’s top wine destinations. Whether considering a career change or looking to hone a new skill, guests will have the opportunity to learn from successful wine makers at some of the most breathtaking vineyards.

“This year, we focus on specific wine-centric experiences that aren’t just about location, but about the deeper insight and excitement that wine lovers in the know can find in those regions,” says Susan Kostrzewa, Editor-in-Chief of Wine Enthusiast. “Our editors travel extensively and have access to incredible insider adventures; this list makes those available to anyone eager for discovery in and beyond the glass.”

PIRELLI DEBUTS 18-INCH TIRES

Marking a revolution in Formula 1 history, Pirelli‘s newest 18 inch tires were seen in action yesterday during a special 2020 Formula 2 demonstration at Monza with Jean Alesi behind the wheel. These tires will be used in Formula 2 next year, paving the way for a brand-new look in Formula 1 starting in 2021.

Following Alesi’s lap, the iconic tire brand unveiled its 18-inch Formula 1 tire which will be put to the test for the first time at Paul Ricard this Thursday and Friday. Formula One Managing Director Ross Brawn, FIA Single Seater-Commission President Stefano Domenicali, FIA Formula 2 Championship CEO Bruno Michel and Pirelli’s Head of F1 and Car Racing Mario Isola were in attendance.

According to Isola, “The eye-catching demonstration run with the new 18-inch tires at Monza, courtesy of a legendary driver who will always be associated with this track, provided a fascinating glimpse of a future that will be with us before we know it. The link between Formula 2 and Formula 1 have never been closer, symbolized by this latest demonstration and display at our home circuit. Now we look forward to track testing some 18-inch Formula 1 prototypes for the first time next week in France.”

AUTUMN EVENTS AT THE LOIRE VALLEY

Autumn is the perfect time of year to explore the Loire Valley, when the wine harvest is at its peak and the vibrant foliage surrounding the region’s famous chateaux is at its best. Along with the region’s current celebrations of the 500th Anniversary of the French Renaissance, a number of chateaux throughout the Loire Valley will also be hosting festive seasonal events in honor of the fall season. Below is a selection of some of the top autumnal events taking place this year:

Fall Events at Chateau-hotel de la Bourdaisière

In the fall, tomatoes and dahlias are the stars at Chateau-hotel de la Bourdaisière. Until October, the gardens are lit up by over 5,000 different types of dahlia bulbs. The chateau is also famous for its National Tomato Conservatory, boasting more than 650 varieties of tomatoes, which earned its owner the nickname of “the Gardener Prince.” The chateau’s annual Tomato Festival takes places from September 7-8 this year, celebrating the incredible number of tomatoes grown on the estate. Later in the fall, the chateau will host the “Festival of the Forest & Wood” from October 19-20, which will include wood-sculpting workshops and more for the whole family. Guests can also stay overnight in one of the chateau’s 29 rooms and apartments.

 

Pumpkin Feast & Autumn Festival at Chateau du Rivau

On September 8, the fairy-tale inspired Chateau du Rivau will host a Pumpkin Feast at which guests can revel in the chateau’s pumpkin gardens, sample pumpkin dishes, see incredible pumpkin sculptures, and enjoy entertainment by jugglers, acrobats, magicians and more. On October 26 and 27, the chateau will host an Autumn Festival, featuring a display of hundreds of stunning chrysanthemum flowers. Guests can now stay overnight in one of the chateau’s seven newly opened guest rooms.

Vegetable Garden Days at Chateau du Villandry

The Chateau du Villandry is thought of as a real gem of the Renaissance age thanks to its famous gardens with a distinctly French charm. On September 28 and 29, visitors can celebrate the local produce and plants during the chateau’s Vegetable Garden Days, which include regional products and local crafts. Even more, From September 14 through November 11 guests can view an exhibit of nature-inspired paintings by Marie-Laurence Gaudrat.

Autumn Splendors at the Regional Domain of Chaumont-sur-Loire

Taking place from October 19 to November 23, The Autumn Splendors festival celebrates the fall season with incredible flower arrangements, collections of colorful squash, displays of seasonal vegetables and more. This is also the last opportunity for travelers to visit the International Garden Festival for the year.

Autumn Festival at Chateau du Cheverny

The second edition of Chateau du Cheverny’s Autumn Festival takes place on November 16 and 17, during which the Orangery will transform into a Magical Forest. Guests will be transported to an autumnal wonderland, including fall colors and crafts, as well as a soup-tasting bar, and an exhibition of sculptures and paintings. Also offered will be horse-drawn carriage rides and a pop-up miniature farm for kids. Even more, from October 18 through November 30, more than 2,500 chrysanthemums will be in bloom in the gardens.

RENAISSANCE EVENTS

Below are some of the many ongoing events happening in the Loire Valley this year in honor of the 500th Anniversary of the French Renaissance that shouldn’t be missed:

• Renaissance Sound and Light Show in Tours (until September 7)

• A spectacular sound and light show will feature the anniversary of the French Renaissance.

• Folies Mélodiques Exhibit at Chateau de Bouges (until September 29)

• Guests can visit Cécile Le Talec’s sculpture garden, which aims to represent 18th-century livestock farming through her artworks as well as recorded sounds that play throughout the exhibit.

• Dance to the Renaissance at Chateau de Langeais (until September 30)

• During the entire month of September, the Château de Langeais invites guests to explore 16th-century music and dance inside the castle’s two ‘Renaissance Rooms.’

• Rinascenza Exhibit at Chateau du Chateaudun (until October 13) 

• An exceptional photography exhibit from French visual artist Sabine Pigalle, which brings together 30 photographs on display throughout the castle, inspired by works from the Renaissance and more. 

• The Extended Concert at Noirlac Abbey (until October 15)
A unique virtual sound installation highlighting the relationship between space and sound, in which listeners will gently drift through a multi-sensory musical concert experience.

Destination France: The Ingres Museum in Montauban (France) reopens in December 2019

Located in the heart of one of the most attractive cities in the south of France, the Ingres Museum reopens after three years of major expansion and complete renovation. The only museum in the world dedicated to Ingres, this flagship of the french culture houses an exceptional collection of paintings and drawings of the master, the largest after the Louvre Museum. It is a unique heritage to discover from december this year and a very nice trip to plan.

A unique museum in the world

More than 4.500 drawings by Ingres, 44 paintings and his violin as well as his personal collection and documentation.

Here is a summary of an exceptional heritage of the museum of Montauban featuring Ingres. Housed in a listed building in the heart of Montauban, beautiful city from Occitanie in the south-west of France between Toulouse and Bordeaux, the museum houses the legacy of the talented child born in the country : Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres.

Created in the early nineteenth century, the museum reopens after a complete renovation who lasted three years. Next december visitors will discover the total exhibition in a 21st century museum.

A museum enlarged, modernized and…renamed !

The Ingres museum benefits of its renovation to change his name and become the Ingres Bourdelle Museum. The sculptor Bourdelle who was the pupil of Ingres was the other famous artist from Montauban. All along these periods he is represented by marbles, bronzes, plasters, models and finished works, as well as a beautiful set of graphic works. Rich in history and exceptional heritage, the city of Montauban pays tribute to his two great artists : Jean- Auguste-Dominique Ingres (1780-1867) and Antoine Bourdelle (1861-1929).

Enlarged, modernised and digitalized, the renovated museum spread over 2700m2 with new exhibition areas, enhanced accessibility , a sumptuous conservatory housing Ingres drawings, an entire floor dedicated to Bourdelles’s work, and magnificent areas to display temporary exhibitions.

A museum known all around the world for its treasures
Due to the preservation of a cultural heritage, the Museum Ingres Bourdelle is known worldwide.
Through the loan of artworks, the organisation of exhibitions outside the museum, or the signing of partnerships with the biggest international museums, the french museum MIB exhibits its collection all over the world wheter it is in Europe (from Villa Medicis in Rome at the Louvre Museum in Paris, through the galleries of the Palazzo Reale in Milan, the
Victoria and Albert Museum in London or the Stadel Museum in Frankfurt), or even in China, in the States and in Canada more recently.

The new Museum Ingres Bourdelle will reopen on the 14th of december and will receive its visitors again at home. A wonderful invitation to travel in the past, art and history.
And a cultural event not to be missed!

NYC, 360 MAGAZINE, Vaughn Lowery

The Top 5 Places to Study Abroad in Europe

If you know you want to study abroad but you haven’t yet decided on a country or city where you’ll be attending college, beginning your search in Europe is usually a good start. More than half of all U.S.-based students who choose to study abroad wind up opting for a European city. Europe provides a unique opportunity to travelling students because there are more than 50 countries crammed into a relatively small area. This means you can see and experience so many different cultures without having to travel far. In particular, here are five European cities that are popular options for students looking to study abroad.

1. Lisbon, Portugal

Lisbon is the capital city of Portugal and is continental Europe’s westernmost city, situated along the scenic Tagus River with a coastline on the Atlantic Ocean. This place is rich in history and has managed to keep its old-fashioned charm over the years, despite being home to more than 500,000 residents. Lisbon is one of the most popular study abroad locations in Europe and will usually take up most of the results when you search for “student accommodation Portugal” in Google, with rental listings from providers like Collegiate accommodations being the most popular with discerning students.

2. Barcelona, Spain

Home to the Spanish architectural style known as Catalan Modernism, Barcelona is a uniquely appealing city that has become one of the most popular options for students looking to study abroad in Europe. This place is known for having an excellent nightlife, 5-star dining venues, and exotic beaches.

3. Milan, Italy

While you might be expecting to receive a recommendation for one of Italy’s more popular cities like Florence or Rome, Milan is a better option for students who want to avoid the crowds while still seeing all of the same beauty that the country has to offer. This is a great study abroad location for students who are interested in Italian history, art, fashion, and culture.

4. Berlin, Germany

The city of Berlin has come a long way since the days of the Berlin Wall and is now a melting pot of social progress. Germany has the largest economy in Europe and the country’s interesting capital is an ideal place for students to study abroad. With a population of more than three million residents, this is a place where you should have no problem finding plenty of friends as well.

5. Lyon, France

Lyon is an intriguing French city that’s a popular destination for students looking to study abroad thanks to its rich heritage, architecture, and culinary scene. Located near the border of Switzerland, this is a great city to choose if you want to see the Alps and experience some of the best restaurants that France has to offer.

Do Your Own Research Before Making a Choice

With so many great European cities to choose from, it can be difficult to decide on just one. Start with the list above and expand your search into other areas to make sure you’re considering all of your options before making your selection.

Pittsburgh, 360 MAGAZINE

Savoring the Moment: Five Coffee Rituals from Around the World

Believe it or not, people around the world have their very own quirky or interesting coffee rituals. If you are a fan of coffee, check out how other nations enjoy their favorite hot drink. Here are five of the most interesting coffee rituals from around the world.

Ethiopia

This country loves coffee so much that it has actually been named as the Ethiopians national drink. To make coffee here, first you need to add sugar, followed closely by coffee and hot water. When making a coffee in the home or in a restaurant, three cups are usually made and then each of these servings are named. One example of this is awol, tona, and baarka. In Ethiopian this translates as “to be blessed.”

Italy

Italy is one of the most well-known countries for coffee making and many of the best cups of coffee originate from here. The most popular coffee in Italy is the espresso, which is a single or double shot of coffee usually consumed on its own in a small cup. Usually the Italians drink this while standing too. In Italy, you should not order a coffee late at night, especially a cappuccino. If you were to order one of these while out, it would not be considered the norm, as these should only be enjoyed in the morning according to the Italians.

Turkey

The Turkish love their coffee just as much as the rest of the world and usually serve black coffee after a meal. Just like many of the other countries here, Turks enjoy their coffee strong and it is usually accompanied with a Turkish candy. If you do visit here, be careful of ordering a double shot as the coffee really is strong, especially when compared to the coffee of the U.S. Another tradition in Turkey is reading the coffee grounds once the cup of coffee has been drunk.

France

Coffee and croissants go hand in hand in France and is a popular French breakfast choice. Coffee’s here are usually served in a huge mug and it is polite to hold the mug with two hands. The French also do not like those who order whipped cream on the coffee, or those who order flavored syrups to go in their coffee and in some cafés; this can be seen as an insult. Coffee here is often served after dessert regardless of time.

Spain

One of the most popular coffee drinks in Spain is named cortado. This coffee is based on the famous espresso, but warm milk is then added to the coffee in order to reduce its acidity. Coffee is often drunk at breakfast as well as after siesta. In Spanish, this time after siesta in which the locals drink coffee is called La Merienda and translates to snack time.

Making Your Own Perfect Coffee

If you are a coffee lover, then being able to make the perfect cup of coffee in your own home is essential. Coffee machines have become increasingly popular around the world to help people make a barista style coffee in the comfort of their own kitchen. Nespresso machines are one of the leading brands and these Gourmesso pods come in a variety of flavors. They fit perfectly in Nespresso machines and allow you to make the best coffees without having to visit your local Starbucks.

Each country has a different way in which they consume coffee, and many countries prefer to have their coffees strong and black. This is because farmers take pride in making the best coffee grounds, and these flavors should be appreciated on their own.

THE WORLD’S 50 BEST RESTAURANTS

The World’s 50 Best Restaurants, sponsored by S.Pellegrino & Acqua Panna, announces the 51-120 list of restaurants ahead of its annual awards ceremony, which takes place in one week’s time on Tuesday, 25th June 2019 at Marina Bay Sands in Singapore. For 2019 only, the list expands from 51-100 to 51-120 restaurants, in celebration of the 120th anniversary of S.Pellegrino, partner of the gastronomy community since the beginning of its history in 1899. Deloitte, a professional services consultancy, is again independently adjudicating the list that is compiled by a diverse voting Academy which comprises over 1,000 international chefs, food writers and traveling gastronomes.

The 51-120 list in numbers – developing diversity

  • The 51-120 boasts 21 new entries from 15 countries, marking a near 30% increase in new territories this year
  • The full 51-120 list includes restaurants in 25 countries across five continents, with four new countries joining the list
  • There are six re-entries from four countries: Denmark, Japan, France and South Africa
  • It’s been a fine year for Italy with three first-time entrants
  • The highest new entry on the 51-120 list at No.61 is Uliassi in Senigallia, Italy
  • Nobelhart & Schmutzig in Berlin, Germany rises an impressive 31 places from last year to No.57, with
    Indian Accent in New Delhi, India following in close second, advancing 30 positions to No.60
  • USA leads in volume with seven restaurants on the 51-120 list, including one new entry
  • Japan and Spain are hot on the heels of USA with six restaurants each, including four new listings

Female Forward
There is a strong female presence this year, most notably with an exciting new entry from Core by Clare Smyth in London (No.66), the restaurant led by the winner of The World’s Best Female Chef Award 2018. Other female-led restaurants include Elena Arzak’s Arzak in San Sebastian, Spain (No.53), Pim Techamuanvivit’s Nahm in Bangkok, Thailand (No.69), Helena Rizzo’s Maní in São Paulo, Brazil (No.73),Garima Arora’s Gaa in Bangkok, Thailand (No.95) and Anne-Sophie Pic’s eponymous restaurant in Valence, France (No.98).

50/50 Split
As a result of the gender-balanced voting Academy announced in early 2019, more than 500 female experts, chefs, food writers and restaurateurs, make up 50% of the total voting Academy, establishing equal representation within the group of 1,000-plus international restaurant industry experts.

Widening the net
Some less celebrated gastronomic locations now appear on the 51-120 list, including the Marche region in Italy with Uliassi (No.61); southern Spain’s Aponiente (No.94) in El Puerto de Santa Maria; Guadalajara in Mexico with Alcalde (No.109); Ghent in Belgium with Chambre Séparée (No.111); and the Dolomites in Italy with St. Hubertus (No.116).

William Drew, Director of Content of The World’s 50 Best Restaurants, comments: “This year’s 51-120 listmarks the most expansive representation of geographic diversity we’ve seen during the 18 years that 50 Best has been celebrating culinary excellence. Restaurants from world-renowned countries as well as lesser-known destinations are voted for and will be acknowledged at The World’s 50 Best Restaurants awards in Singapore on 25th June. The advent of S.Pellegrino’s landmark anniversary marked the ideal opportunity for us to extend the list for one year only. We hope to see as many of them as possible again next year.”

In a collection of restaurants marked by their geographic spread, 21 new entries appear on this year’s 51-120 list of The World’s 50 Best Restaurants, marking a notable increase of represented countries and cities compared to previous years. There are three new entries apiece for Japan, Italy and China (including two from Hong Kong and one from Macau). Russia sees two new entries, both from St. Petersburg, challenging what has previously been Moscow’s domination. Lido 84 on Lake Garda, Italy (No.78) – this year’s winner of the Miele One To Watch Award – is another significant newcomer to the list, alongside Uliassi, which is the highest new entry in the 51-120 list.

Berlin’s Nobelhart & Schmutzig, last year’s No.88, has climbed the ranking an impressive 31 places to No.57, followed by Indian Accent in New Delhi, which advanced 30 places from last year to No.60.

SingleThread of Healdsburg, USA, last year’s Miele One To Watch winner, continues to demonstrate its predicted progress to No.71, jumping 21 places. Other notable climbers include Rio de Janeiro’s Lasai,bumping up 26 places to No.74, and Diverxo of Madrid landing at No.75 from No.96.
USA boasts an impressive seven restaurants on the 51-120 list, with Atomix, New York, debuting at No.119. Spain and Japan closely follow with six restaurants each, and Denmark, France, Germany, Italy and the UK are each represented by four restaurants.

The Voting Process
The World’s 50 Best Restaurants 2019 list is voted for by more than 1,000 international restaurant industry experts and well-travelled gourmets who make up The World’s 50 Best Restaurants Academy. The gender- balanced Academy comprises 26 separate regions around the world, each of which has 40 members including a chairperson. No sponsor from the event has any influence over the voting process. Professional services consultancy, Deloitte, independently adjudicates the World’s 50 Best Restaurants list. This adjudication ensures that the integrity and authenticity of the voting process and the resulting list of The World’s 50 Best Restaurants 2019 are protected.

Results
The best way to follow the announcement of the list and individual awards is via our social media channels:

CLASSIC JOURNEYS × LUXURY TOURS

CLASSIC JOURNEYS LAUNCHES

“LUXURY PRIVATE TOURS WITHIN A CRUISE”

ON EUROPE’S GREAT RIVERS

Luxury tour operator Classic Journeys is introducing a unique slant on European river cruises, providing a limited admission “private tour within a cruise” aboard some of the most elegant vessels journeying to Europe’s most magnificent cities and landscapes.

The river-based adventures combine a relaxing luxury five-star river cruise experience with a wide array of exclusively handcrafted cultural and walking activities. Classic Journeys’ “tours within a cruise” are capped at 18 participants, making them among the most intimate cruise experiences available. River travel is becoming increasingly popular – enabling travelers to see substantial and glorious sections of Europe “from the inside,” without the bother of packing and unpacking.

A local expert Classic Journeys tour guide and escort will travel with the guests and be their on-board host providing unique insights into the each area’s history, customs and sights. He or she will guide private shore excursions available uniquely to Classic Journeys travelers, including exclusive wine tastings and dining experiences unavailable to other passengers.

Classic Journeys has selected ships providing the finest amenities, including gourmet dining, concierge service, fitness facilities and spas. Each ship offers panoramic lounges as well as an open-air sun deck where travelers can watch European shores drift by outside. Once ashore, guests have the opportunity to experience Europe like never before – with everything from countryside hiking trails, to visits to olive oil plantations and even home visits to Michelin-starred chefs. Perfect for reunions, multi-generational travel, girls’ getaways and more, the river cruise option allows travelers with different interests and activity levels to pick and choose their individual tours each day.

Classic Journeys’ European River Cruises include:

Portugal & SpainDouro: Porto to Salamanca – Glide upriver from coastal Porto to a scenic land of olive groves, vineyards and medieval hilltop villages all the way to Salamanca and the glorious Spanish countryside

Austria, Hungary & Czech RepublicDanube: Cultures of Central Europe – Explore Austrian villages and vineyards, Vienna and Budapest, and perfectly preserved Cesky Krumlov in the Czech Republic

FranceRhone: Burgundy and Provence – Discover the legendary countryside bordering the Rhone river from Lyon to Avignon, meet olive growers, discover culinary thrills with a Michelin-starred chef and discover some of the world’s most glorious and celebrated wines and vineyards

For more information about Classic Journeys’ exclusive European River Cruises and all other Classic Journeys itineraries, visit: www.classicjourneys.com.

ABOUT CLASSIC JOURNEYS

Since its founding in 1995 with one style of travel in a total of three countries, Classic Journeys has expanded to offer five styles of travel (culture + walking, culinary, family, multi-sport, and river cruising) and 100 itineraries in 50 countries across six continents. With its focus on providing every guest a handcrafted trip of a lifetime, Classic Journeys has won awards from a variety of publications including Saveur, National Geographic and Travel + Leisure – the latter having named it a “World’s Best Tour Operator” every year since 2007.