Posts tagged with "associated press"

Netflix – Cuties

By Cassandra Yany

One of Netflix’s newest films, Cuties, has garnered much attention and backlash since its Sep. 9 release on the streaming platform. The coming-of-age film depicts a young girl as she tries to navigate her life as a pre-teen growing up in a Muslim family living in Paris.

Many critics have spoken out against the film, which currently holds the no. 7 spot in Netflix’s ‘Top 10,’ for its depiction of 11-year-old girls dancing and behaving in an indecent manner. According to the New York Times, the movie was first deemed controversial in the U.S. in August when Netflix released the promotional artwork. The original marketing for the film displayed an image of four young girls in skimpy dance costumes posing provocatively.

This, along with the trailer, prompted opposers to start petitions online and call for the removal of the film from Netflix’s catalog. Netflix apologized and changed the artwork for the film to a more innocent photo of the same four characters walking down the street with shopping bags, donning bras and underwear over their clothes.

Last week’s release of the film has sparked conversation once again amongst parents, politicians and others, causing #CancelNetflix to trend on Twitter. Lina Nealon, the Director of Corporate and Strategic Initiatives at the National Center on Sexual Exploitation has spoken out against the film saying “While we commend Director Maïmouna Doucouré for exposing the very real threats to young girls having unfettered access to social media and the internet, we cannot condone the hypersexualization and exploitation of the young actresses themselves in order to make her point.” She called for Netflix to cut the “sexually-exploitive” scenes from the film, or remove the film from the platform altogether.

On Friday, Hawaii Rep. Tulse Gabbard tweeted, “@Netflix child porn ‘Cuties’ will certainly whet the appetite of pedophiles & help fuel the child sex trafficking trade. 1 in 4 victims of trafficking are children… Netflix you are now complicit.”

Texas Sen. Ted Cruz penned a letter to Attorney General William P. Barr Friday calling for the Department of Justice to start an investigation into the production and distribution of the film to “determine whether Netflix, any of its executives, or anyone involved in the making of ‘Cuties’ violated any federal laws against the production and distribution of child pornography.”

Cruz wrote that “the film routinely fetishizes and sexualizes these pre-adolescent girls as they perform dances simulating sexual conduct in revealing clothing, including at least one scene with partial nudity” falsely claiming that there’s a scene exposing a “minor’s bare breast.” The Associated Press reported that one of Cruz’s representatives, Lauren Aronson, said that the senator has not seen the film.

According to the Washington Times, some critics are even calling on the Obama’s— who have a production deal with Netflix— to take action against the film. Deadline stated that “The reality appears to have been lost in the storm, and the truth is very few of the people reacting so strongly will have actually seen the film.”

Netflix told USA TODAY “‘Cuties’ is a social commentary against the sexualization of young children. It’s an award winning film and a powerful story about the pressure young girls face on social media and from society more generally growing up— and we’d encourage anyone who cares about these important issues to watch the movie.”

Director Maïmouna Doucouré defends the film, saying that it works to shed light on these issues so they can be fixed. Cuties first premiered at the 2020 Sundance Film Festival on Jan. 23, where it won the Directing Jury Award for the dramatic film category. According to the New York Times, the movie did not stir up much conversation in France after its theatrical release (as Mignnonnes in French) in August.

Deadline reports that Doucouré did not see the promotional material prior to when it was circulated on the internet. She said that she received death threats as the outrage grew over these images. She told the news site that the film is not apologetic about the hypersexualization of children, but instead is her “…personal story as well as the story of many children who have to navigate between a liberal western culture and a conservative culture at home.”

Cuties was Doucouré’s feature directorial debut. Similar to the film’s main character, Amy, Doucouré is of Senegalese descent and grew up in a Muslim culture in Paris. In an interview at Sundance, she said she first had the idea for the movie after attending a neighborhood gathering in Paris where she saw a group of 11-year-old girls doing a stage performance of a “sensual” dance. She was shocked to see girls that age dance like that in short clothing. “We can’t continue to close our eyes about that,” she told the interviewer.

Doucouré researched for a year and a half, meeting with hundreds of pre-teens who told her their stories. She learned about their ideas of femininity, and how their self image is affected by the emphasis of social media in today’s society. According to IndieWire, the young actresses’ parents were on board with the project to spread awareness of the issue, and there was a psychologist working with the girls throughout filming who is still helping them throughout the release process.

The film is centered around Amy, an 11-year-old girl who has recently moved to a housing development in a poor suburb of Paris with her Senegalese, observant Muslim family. She looks out for her brothers, takes care of responsibilities around the house, and is in the process of being taught how to ‘be a woman’ by  her aunt.

One day after prayer, Amy walks by the laundry room and sees a girl her age dancing to music playing from her phone. In a subsequent scene, Amy is seen trying to straighten her hair with a clothing iron, burning part of it off as a result. 

Amy learns that her father, who is still in Senegal, has taken a second wife and will be coming to Paris soon to have the wedding. Her mother, Mariam, tries to hide her reaction to the news, but Amy sees her grow upset and take her frustrations out on herself. This is where Amy’s behavior begins to shift; she starts to reject her culture and identity, and instead tries to conform to fit in with the other girls at school. 

At school, Amy is teased for her clothes and lack of fashion sense, so she begins to wear her younger brother’s t-shirt to match the crop tops that her classmates wear. After seeing a group of girls her age dancing after school, Amy steals her cousin’s iPhone to learn how to dance, herself. She comes across their social media accounts and begins taking selfies, imitating what she sees on their profiles. 

Amy finds herself a spot in the girls’ friend group and dance troupe, and as a result, begins to neglect her responsibilities at home. Amy starts to show more self expression, wearing her hair natural rather than pulling it back. She also begins to explore the internet more, finding videos of almost-naked women dancing rather suggestively and moving their bodies in ways that an 11-year-old probably shouldn’t be watching. 

Taking what she found online, Amy practices dancing with her friends and teaches them how to twerk. This is where the movie begins to make viewers slightly uneasy. It was jarring to see these young, innocent girls tainted by this inappropriate content and doing dance moves that they didn’t understand the implications of. It appears that this was the intention of director Doucouré, as she stated in an interview with Netflix that the film is “…a mirror of today’s society; a mirror sometimes difficult to look into and accept but still so true.”

Some of the scenes, frankly, are very disturbing to watch. These include the girls dancing provocatively for two older male workers at a laser tag facility so that they wouldn’t get in trouble for sneaking in, as well as Amy beginning to undress for her cousin once he found she had stolen his iPhone in an attempt to smooth over the situation. Perhaps the most disturbing scene is when Amy takes a picture of her genitals to post on her social media profile so that people at school would think she’s mature. While there was no nudity shown in this scene, the implied action was horrifying to watch. 

At the end of the film, Amy performs with her dance troupe at a local competition. Dressed in revealing outfits, they dance immodestly in front of a crowd of people who quickly seem unsettled. (This is the scene from which the original promotional photos were taken.) Toward the end of the song, Amy freezes as she begins to think about her mom, then runs off the stage crying. She goes home where she asks her mom not to attend her father’s wedding. Her mom continues to get ready for the event, but tells Amy that she doesn’t have to go.

Instead of going to the wedding, Amy steps outside and begins jumping rope. This scene depicts a mixture of her two identities: she is wearing jeans and a crop top with her hair down, but is surrounded by people of her culture dressed in traditional garments. After suppressing her family’s background for a majority of the movie, Amy is finally able to find the balance where her multiple cultures intersect in order to be her honest self. 

After watching Cuties, it is evident that it is not meant to promote this behavior among young girls, but instead provide commentary on what is happening today and warn the adults who see the movie. The harsh reality is that more pre-adolescents are exposed to this type of content than we think. Any child who has access to a smart device and social platforms have the potential to see a video not meant for them. Take TikTok for example: racy dances to Cardi B and Meg Thee Stallion’s “WAP,” as well as a recent trend where women make “thirst traps” to Beyoncé’s “Rocket” are some of the most popular videos on the app right now. Young TikTok users can easily see creators on their For You Page enjoying themselves while engaging in these trends, causing the young viewer to want to do the same.

When speaking to Deadline, Doucouré said, “What happens is young girls see images of women being objectified, and the more the woman becomes an object, the more followers and like she has— they see that as a role model and try to imitate these women, but they’re not old enough to know what they’re doing.” In a separate interview, she posed the question, “Isn’t the objectification of a woman’s body that we often see in our Western culture not another kind of oppression?”

Overall, Cuties shows the dangers of uncensored media for young children and displays how impressionable they can be. It also shows the journey of Amy’s self-discovery and learning how to blend her multiple cultures in order to shape her identity. Unfortunately, the risqué nature of the film overshadows the storyline and the message is lost for a number of audience members.

In various articles, Doucouré is quoted discussing the meaning of the film in the broad context of femininity and what it means for young girls to enter womanhood in this digital age. During her aforementioned interview with Netflix, she stated “The real question of Cuties is can we, as women, truly choose who we want to be, beyond the role models that are imposed upon us by society?”

Refugees flee Greek camp after fires as illustrated by Kaelen Felix for 360 MAGAZINE.

Refugees Displaced After Camp Fire

By Payton Saso

The Greek Islands attract thousands of tourists every year, but many are oblivious to the refugee crisis that is plaguing the country. Greece is an access point to Europe for those fleeing countries in the Middle East and South and Central Asia.

On September 9, 2020 over 12,000 of the countries 50,000+ refugees were displaced after a fire raged at the Moria refugee camp. The Moria camp is Europe’s largest refugee camp, according to The New York Times, and is overrun with overpopulated tents, makeshift toilets and little to no access to water and healthcare.

The camp, which is located on the Greek Island of Lesbos, burned as fires were set by those living there over two days, the Associated Press reported. “The first one Tuesday evening set by residents angered by quarantine measures imposed to contain a COVID-19 outbreak after 35 people tested positive.”

While officials say the fire was started my the refugees in the camp, some migrants told BBC, “the fire had broken out after scuffles between migrants and Greek forces at the camp. Several blamed “far-right Greeks” for the blaze after the announcement of coronavirus cases.”

While no deaths have been reported in the aftermath of the fires, “some people experienced breathing problems because of smoke inhalation,” NPR reported.

Many feared that a disaster was on the brink for years as the 12,000 refugees were living on land only meant for about 3,000 in extreme inhumane conditions.

Since 2015, the Moria camp has taken in refugees when almost 850,000 people seeking asylum travelled into the EU. When the camp first started, people would only stay for a few days before being let into other European countries; however, “that changed drastically in March 2016, when the EU signed its so-called refugee deal with Turkey. Since then, refugees have had to endure long stays before being sent to other EU countries or being deported,” DW.com explained.

With the refugee crisis once in the headlines again, humanitarian groups are urging people to get involved and also educated themselves on the crisis.

The International Rescue Committee (IRC) says that most refugees end up settling in Greece and need help with unemployment as the rate of unemployment is high across the country. Many unaccompanied minors and women make up the population of refugees in Greece and are at risk of sexual exploitation and human trafficking.
With many refugees displaced, these dangers are at an all time high.

Adam Hambrick, Between Me and the End of the World, Umusic, Vaughn Lowery, 360 Magazine,

Adam Hambrick – “Between Me and the End of the World”

ADAM HAMBRICK RELEASES COVID-19 INSPIRED SONG “BETWEEN ME AND THE END OF THE WORLD”

FEATURED BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS’ ‘REFLECTING THE TIMES’ 

Capitol Records Nashville / Buena Vista Records’ Adam Hambrick released his new song, “Between Me and the End of the World,” today. Listen HERE.

The song is a heartfelt tribute to Adams’s wife, a physician assistant who has been treating patients throughout the Covid-19 pandemic, and what it has been like for Adam watching her help those in need despite the risk to own self. “This song is for all the people who step in and serve people when things go horribly wrong,” says Adam. “I have spent this quarantine watching my wife go off to work as a physician assistant to do her version of that, testing and treating people for the virus. It has given me a new appreciation for all the people who spend their lives serving others in difficult times. It’s terrifying seeing someone you love do what they were made to do but have to do it in harm’s way.”

In a departure from the norm, Adam wrote “Between Me and the End of the World” during a solo write and recorded the vocal in his bedroom while his wife was working alongside him. All of the additional recording was done remotely from each musicians’ home studio. The track was featured earlier this week by The Associated Press in their piece ‘reflecting the times’ describing the song as “a tearjerker.”

Follow Adam Hambrick on social media:

Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | YouTube

 

Adam Hambrick, Between Me and the End of the World, Umusic, Vaughn Lowery, 360 Magazine

Cultivating Company Culture

TRAVEL JOURNALIST THOMAS WILMER INTERVIEWS 360 MAGAZINE PUBLISHER VAUGHN LOWERY

Small to medium sized business often fall short due to high turnover. Vaughn Lowery, Publisher of 360 Magazine, provides listeners with first-hand knowledge on the ever-shifting world of digital publishing and content creation through a youthful lens. Likewise with his innate ability to be accessible, he speaks to working in tandem with emerging generations and how their input could be detrimental to the survival of a brand.

LISTEN HERE

An Additional Conversation with 360 Magazine’s Publisher Vaughn Lowery

By Tara McDonough

If Vaughn Lowery was asked what his idea of success was 10 years ago, his answer would be very different from what it is today. He may have said that success means doing what he loves to do, being accomplished, or having a certain amount of material things.

“Success to me now is having a purpose in life and feeling passionate and fulfilled by it,” says Lowery.

Lowery got his first taste of the industry while interning for Vibe Magazine while on Summer vacation from Cornell University. His sister drove him into New York City every morning to drop him off and always advised him to be the first one at the office. One morning Lowery found himself alone with the publisher of the magazine at the time, Keith Clinkscales, which gave him the opportunity to speak with him one-on-one. It was due to his sister’s advice that he got the chance to do what no other intern would normally get to do.

After finishing up at Cornell in just three years, Lowery became an executive trainee with Saks Fifth Avenue. He was able to get along with everyone in the office and was doing great when he was called into his boss’s office one afternoon.

“She told me I was in the wrong business; that I was very charismatic and should try acting,” Lowery says, “but, I liked the path I was on at that time.”

It wasn’t until Lowery was asked by someone connected to the talent industry if he was a model that he truly considered breaking into the talent industry. Shortly after taking professional photos and getting them out to agencies, Lowery ended up with Ford Models. From there he did photoshoots, tv commercials, and ad campaigns, all while still working in outside sales at Aetna US Healthcare. Once he began modelling full time his face was in the pages of GQ, Harper’s Bazaar, Vogue, and Gap. By being around people of all different positions, primarily in the magazine publishing industry, Lowery came to understand how content was produced. It was right before the recession hit while he was living in LA that Lowery made the transition from modelling to the publishing industry.

It was his experience in modelling that inspired Lowery’s creation of the 360 Magazine. While working on any given shoot, Lowery was often one of just three or less black men. Often times he was the only black man on a set which drew his attention to the lack of representation in the media industry. Lowery’s goal for the 360 Magazine was that it would fill this niche and promote diversity across the publishing world, specifically the covers of its magazines.

For those wanting to work in the media industry, specifically in the publishing world, Lowery suggests starting from the ground up.

“Being self taught and learning as you go is something you need to be open to,” says Lowery, “Ask tons of questions, and learn everything you can from every position.”

Lowery warns that it’s important to be open and cordial to everyone, because you don’t know when your paths will cross again. Making connections and using them is how most people gain opportunities. He also adds that just by hanging out with people you’ll always learn something that you can apply to aspects of your work.  

Things in the industry have been changing and becoming more digitally focused since the beginning of 360 Magazine’s launch. The magazine was started during a time of e-zines, so it’s not a surprise that the website came first. Lowery had experience with creating websites from a young age so the move from print to digital was natural for him. It was clear to him where the industry was going.

“Print was getting costly, bookstores were looking dilapidated and even Barnes and Noble was focusing on their version of the tablet, the Nook,” says Lowery, “All the magazines were looking alike anyway.”

Print was still important though. Besides the fact that advertising agencies want to see a physical copy of a magazine before working with them, print is taken more seriously due to its cost. Other companies will be aware that a certain magazine has the funds to support itself if they have a print copy to show for it.

360 Magazine printed their first issue in 2009, but it was costly. Lowery began thinking that there had to be some other way to work with print. It was then that he decided to do print on demand publications. 360 Magazine linked with Blurb, which allowed anyone to order a print copy of the magazine right from our website. They’ve been distributing to them for 9 years now.

The magazine’s estimated circulation, which is based on print, is 110,000 from print on demand. This number doesn’t tend to move much, but most people end up reading 360 Magazine’s online articles through WordPress.

When asked what makes a media contributor most marketable, Lowery says that in this industry you need a social following and the ability to network. Being accessible and having a portfolio of published work is a great place to start as well.

Do it all,” Lowery says, “monetize, write, take photos, be on time, and take initiatives.”

The hardest thing about the industry in Lowery’s opinion is breaking into it and surviving on freelance jobs along the way. Writers should be prepared to sacrifice mentally, physically and financially. While working for a publication, Lowery says that writers need to do what they can to become a valuable asset to them. That way, a publication will be more likely to keep you on board and help you in the future.

As for internship positions at 360 Magazine, Lowery aims to teach interns everything that he didn’t learn. He’s assigns articles for interns to write, pushes them to network, has them do coverage and teaches them how to get published or to self-publish.

“We teach interns how to be resourceful and find themselves in the organization,” says Lowery.

When interns can bring business to the magazine, the magazine will bring business to them. Special assignment opportunities are available for interns who finish their program and are still looking to remain involved. Lowery says that while the magazine is specifically looking to groom editors, that if a publication wants to really pop, then they have to have a revolving door.

When asked what goals he has for the future of 360 Magazine, Lowery responded that he aims to keep it three dimensional with podcasts and web series.

“I want to be able to put the brand out to different countries and places in America,” says Lowery, Local presences would strengthen us.”

He also says that he’s interested in the possibility of a reality spin off or docu-series, as well as introducing more formal programs for educational purposes.

VAUGHN LOWERY:
360 Magazine
LinkedIn
Joe boxer TV Appearance
America’s Next Top Model Appearance
Sundance Film Trailer Appearance

Vaughn Lowery, art, 360 magazine, design, entertainer, Male model

TV On The Radio

“For various reasons this record means a LOT to us and we’re thrilled have a chance to play it in its entirety, in New York, nonetheless. I’d say it’s gonna be a special night.” -Tunde Adebimpe

Yesterday, TV On The Radio announced a concert to celebrate the 10th anniversary of their groundbreaking album “Dear Science” to be performed on September 20, 2018, at Knockdown Center in New York. The band will play the album in its entirety. Tickets may be purchase HERE.

TV on the Radio has been called “the most vital band in America” (Associated Press), “one the most compelling rock and roll stories of the modern age” (BBC), “the most innovative band on the planet” (AV Club) and simply “superb” (Rolling Stone). In short, TV on the Radio established themselves as the most groundbreaking musicians of this generation and one of the most influential bands of the decade.

The band’s 2008 album Dear Science was voted #1 by fans in Pitchfork’s Reader’s Poll and the #1 album in the Village Voice’s Pazz and Jop poll (composed of reviews by more than 800 critics). TV on the Radio consistently confounds expectations while managing to balance respect from critics and peers alike.

Grammy nominated, TV On The Radio – Tunde Adebimpe, Jaleel Bunton, Kyp Malone, Dave Sitek and formerly the late Gerard Smith has been awarded the Short List Music Prize, asked by David Bowie to collaborate, performed on every continent, sold out both the Apollo Theater and Radio City Music Hall, graced the stages of every late night show including Saturday Night Live, and shot a music video with Pee Wee Herman.

Praise for DEAR SCIENCE:

“TV On the Radio’s third album proper, managed to pull off something rather special: it boldly took guitars where no album had gone before. And it did so with more creativity, daring and flair than any record since Radiohead’s OK Computer.” -The Guardian

“Dear Science is a brilliant balancing act between pop aspiration and music-geek aesthetics.” -Rolling Stone

“On ‘Dear Science,’TVOTR embraces emotions of the here and now — lust, anger, the dancer’s bliss.” -Ann Powers Los Angeles Times

“Career-defining stuff.” -The Guardian

“Yes, this is shit-hot thrilling music. But it’s also brainy and ambivalent, and more engaging for it.” -Pitchfork

“TV on the Radio traded its noisiness for clarity, the better to reveal the workings of its ambitious, multilayered songs: programming and hands-on playing, rock and funk, elegies and dance grooves, accusations and embraces. Each song follows its own idiosyncratic path from mourning to affirmation.” – New York Times

www.tvontheradio.com

Meg Myers Releases New Album

Meg Myers’ new album ‘Take Me To The Disco’ is out today on 300 Entertainment and has been met with raves, leading the Associated Press to declare her “a genuine rock goddess,” saying “Myers definitely isn’t fooling around and there’s no denying the woman’s sheer talent, both as a songwriter and as a singer who can go from kittenish to face-melting in the same song.” The new album has also earned Meg a pick on NPR’s New Music Friday podcast, and praise from the New York Times, who dubbed Meg’s sound “seething and then exploding,” and Billboard, who called the new music “cathartic” and “life affirming.”

Meg appears today on Spotify’s New Music Friday billboard in NYC’s One Penn Plaza, and she’ll be doing a Reddit AMA about the album at 5 PM ET today via the IAmA subreddit. For more on the new record, read her recent interview with Uproxx here.

‘Take Me To The Disco’’ embodies dark pop sensibilities of Meg’s 2015 breakout record, with newly sharpened experience and maturity – where this time around, Meg explores love, loneliness and trauma with unflinching candor, facing her inner green-eyed monster head-on and attacking each bar with a primal ferocity. Watch Meg’s spine-tingling video for lead single “Numb” via NPR Music here: http://n.pr/2IAbyt6

Meg will embark on a national tour in support of ‘Take Me To The Disco,’ kicking off with a show at the Observatory in Santa Ana on September 15th and including stops at Brooklyn’s Music Hall of Williamsburg, LA’s El Rey Theatre and more. Before that, she’ll stop by Amoeba Music in Hollywood for a special in-store performance on July 30th. Full tour routing below.

‘TAKE ME TO THE DISCO’ TRACK LIST

1. Take Me To The Disco

2. Numb

3. Tourniquet

4. Tear Me To Pieces

5. Jealous Sea

6. The Death Of Me

7. Some People

8. Done

9. I’m Not Sorry

10. Little Black Death

11. Funeral

12. Constant

TOUR DATES

Jul 30 – Los Angeles, CA @ Amoeba Music

Aug 11 – San Diego, CA @ The Observatory

Sep 15 – Santa Ana, CA @ The Observatory

Sep 20 – Dallas, TX @ Dada

Sep 21 – Houston, TX @ House of Blues – Bronze Peacock

Sep 22 – Austin, TX – Antone’s

Sep 25 – Atlanta, GA @ Terminal West

Sep 26 – Nashville, TN @ Mercy Lounge

Sep 28 – Norfolk, VA @ Norva

Sep 29 – Washington, D.C. @ U Street Music Hall

Oct 1 – Brooklyn, NY @ Music Hall of Williamsburg

Oct 2 – Cambridge, MA @ The Sinclair

Oct 5 – Columbus, OH @ A&R Music Bar

Oct 4 – Detroit, MI @ El Club

Oct 6 – Chicago, IL – House of Blues

Oct 7 – Omaha, NE @ Slowdown

Oct 9 – Denver, CO @ Cervantes Other Side

Oct 10 – Salt Lake City, UT @ The State Room

Oct 12 – Portland, OR @ Dante’s

Oct 13 – Vancouver, BC @ Venue Nightclub

Oct 14 – Seattle, WA @ Chop Suey

Oct 16 – San Francisco, CA @ August Hall

Oct 17 – Los Angeles, CA @ El Rey Theatre

find Meg Myers: 

f a c e b o o k

i n s t a g r a m 

t w i t t e r 

y o u t u b e

o f f i c i a l 

BRIAN KEITH GREER

​Unionized (SEIU 721) LA County Employee & University of Redlands Alumni Gunned Down During A Robbery in Compton – Leaves Behind 3 Children

On Thurs., Dec., 28, 2017 at approximately 10:30PM – Compton, Calif. (between Willow Brook and Caldwell Streets) 37-year-old African American Brian Keith Greer was killed alongside of his cousin David Charles Greer, Jr. from fatal gunshot wounds to the torso during an alleged robbery.

Greer was a Union LA County employee for about a decade. He graduated from University of Redlands in May 2009 with a Bachelors of Science degree in Business & Management; and in February of 2017, he earned a Masters in Business Management from University of Redlands. Brian was a loving son, father of 3 (Tyden – 10yro; Brianne – 13yro and Jaylin -19yro), brother (Joshua – 26yro) and friend to so many within his community. Both family and friends are devastated by his untimely tragic death; and therefore, they are seeking assistance from anyone whom can provide additional information regarding the incident.

Brian Keith Greer, 360 MAGAZINE, la Times, CBS la, ktla, fox la

Brian Keith Greer (purple shirt) × friends

*Additional sources:

LA Times 

US NEWS

CBS NEWS (LA)

WATCH CBS Los Angeles Vigil Coverage 

**For all anonymous tips which can benefit this case please contact the following:

LA CRIME STOPPERS

(800) 222-8477

LA COUNTY SHERIFFS

(323) 890-5500

***CLICK TO DONATE TO VICTIM’S FAMILY.

****Candlelight Vigil  Thurs., Jan. 4th at 6:30PM.

Location: 530 W. 1st St San Pedro, CA