Posts tagged with "music"

Ari Lennox – BUSSIT

Soulful vocalist Ari Lennox (Dreamville/Interscope Records) returns with a flirty new video for her latest single, “BUSSIT.” Donning an array of vibrant colors, Ari and her sassy clique bring their fun energy and sensual moves to the Tajana B. Williams directed visual. The track itself is equally enjoyable, pairing Ari’s neo-soul vocals with a memorable, ear-catching melody. “BUSSIT” was one of the lead tracks from the Revenge of the Dreamers III: Director’s Cut deluxe album. You can view the video HERE.

Last month, Ari surprised fans with the release of her three-track Shea Butter Baby (RemixEP). Soliciting crooner Durand Bernarr, rapper Smino and the popular Doja Cat, the project featured remakes of “FaceTime,” “I Been” and “BMO.” Ari’s acclaimed debut album, Shea Butter Baby, garnered the artist significant press while landing on eight year-end lists for “Top Album,” including those compiled by the Associated PressBillboardNPR and Complex. You can listen to the Shea Butter Baby (Remix EP) HERE

Ari is still reeling from an exciting 2019, which included: a sold-out Shea Butter Baby Tour; a guest spot on Lizzo’s Cuz I Love You Tour; and an impressive set in front of 40,000 fans at the inaugural Dreamvile Fest. Additionally, she earned three 2019 Soul Train Award nominations. This year, Ari earnednominations at the NAACP and now postponed iHeart Music Awards, andshe received a coveted GRAMMY nomination for her work on the Dreamville album, Revenge of the Dreamers III

Ari Lennox “BUSSIT”eSingle

Retail: https://smarturl.it/BUSSITAriLennox

Video: https://smarturl.it/BussitVid

Ari Lennox Shea Butter Baby Remix eEP

Retail: https://smarturl.it/SBBRemixes

Preston Lovinggood – Moon Fever

Preston Lovinggood has released “Moon Fever.” CLICK HERE to listen. “Moon Fever is about wanting something that’s always out of reach,” Lovinggood told Glide Magazine, who premiered the new single, “The insatiable desire for one another, for walking into the sunset with the girl of your dreams and waking up and realizing, in fact, that’s all it was, a dream, a mirage in the distance.”

Preston says he drew upon the idea of “beach anxiety” while writing the song. “Wanting to take your shirt off and dive into the ocean. It’s about a fantasy and being afraid to take risks when you have feelings for someone.”

“Moon Fever joins “Everything Will Be Okay” as the second single released from Lovinggood’s forthcoming album Consequences, set for release May 17 via Last Gang Records. Digital pre-order is available now HERE.

“Moon Fever” is arguably the spiritual centerpiece of the album. Managing to conjure a unique soundscape of its own, like sun-kissed, modern pop that pulls off the neat trick of appearing straightforward when, upon further inspection, the music often trails off into subtle psychedelic curls, Lovinggood’s third full-length release, is his most concise, hook-laden album to date. At just under 40 minutes, Consequence, with its rich productions and scrupulous observations peppered through the lyrics begs for repeat listening. “Everything Will Be Okay,” “Taken in the Night,” “Divorce,” and the beautifully orchestrated title-track are breathtaking, sweet, hilarious hallucinatory, and devastating – often all at once.

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Beethoven’s Effect on Test Results

Students Who Listened to Beethoven During Lecture — and Heard the Same Music in Dreamland — Did Better on Test Next Day

But scores on the material nine months later dropped to ‘floor level,’ Baylor University study finds

College students who listened to classical music by Beethoven and Chopin during a computer-interactive lecture on microeconomics — and heard the music again that night — did better on a test the next day than did peers who were in the same lecture, but instead slept that evening with white noise in the background.

Over the long haul — when students took a similar test nine months later — the boost did not last. Scores dropped to floor levels, with everyone failing and performance averaging less than 25% percent for both groups. However, targeting memory reactivation (TMR) may aid during deep sleep, when memories are theorized to be reactivated and moved from temporary storage in one part of the brain to more permanent storage in other parts, researchers said.

The study, supported by the National Science Foundation and conducted by Baylor’s Sleep Neuroscience and Cognition Laboratory (SNAC), is published in the journal Neurobiology of Learning and Memory.

“All educators want to teach students how to integrate concepts, not just memorize details, but that’s notoriously difficult to do,” said Michael K. Scullin, Ph.D., director of Baylor’s sleep lab and assistant professor of psychology and neuroscience. “What we found was that by experimentally priming these concepts during sleep, we increased performance on integration questions by 18% on the test the next day. What student wouldn’t want a boost or two to their letter grade? The effects were particularly enhanced in participants who showed heightened frontal lobe activity in the brain during slow wave sleep, which is deep sleep.”

He noted that the effects emerged when using gold standard procedures: neither participants nor experimenters knew who received a particular treatment, sleep was measured using EEG in a laboratory setting, and the learning materials matched those that would actually be used in a college classroom, in this case an undergraduate microeconomics lecture.

Poor sleep is widespread in college students, with 60 percent habitually sleeping fewer than the recommended seven hours on 50 to 65 percent of nights. While students may be more concerned about immediate test results — and TMR may help them cram for an exam — learning by rote (item memory) does not normally benefit grasping and retaining a concept.

For the study, researchers recruited 50 college students ages 18 to 33 for a learning task with a self-paced, computer-interactive lecture; and for two overnight polysomnography sessions, with the first night an adaptation to the lab and screening for sleep disorders, and the second done the evening of the lecture.

During the lecture, soft background selections were played from a computer: the first movement of Beethoven’s “Moonlight” Piano Sonata, the first movement of Vivaldi’s “Spring” Violin Concerto and Chopin’s Nocturne in E-flat major, Op. 9, No. 2.

That night in Baylor’s sleep lab, research personnel applied electrodes and used computers to monitor sleep patterns of both test and control groups. Once technicians observed a person was in deep sleep, they played either the classical music or the white noise — depending on whether the individual was in the test or control group — for about 15 minutes.

“Deep slow wave sleep won’t last super long before shifting back to light sleep, so we couldn’t play them endlessly,” Scullin said. “If we played it during light sleep, the music probably would have awoken participants. The first slow wave cycle is the deepest and longest.”

The music choice was important, researchers said.

“We ruled out jazz because it’s too sporadic and would probably cause people to wake,” Scullin said. “We ruled out popular music because lyrical music disrupts initial studying. You can’t read words and sing lyrics — just try it. We also ruled out ocean waves and ambient music because it’s very easy to ignore. You’re going to have a heck of a time forming a strong association between some learning material and a bland song or ambient noise.

“That left us with classical music, which many students already listen to while studying,” he said. “The songs can be very distinctive and therefore pair well with learning material.”

In the microeconomics exam the next day, the TMR of classical music more than doubled the likelihood of passing the test when compared with the control condition of white noise.

Scullin cautioned against confusing the Baylor study’s findings with the so-called “Mozart Effect” — the finding that having students listen to Mozart pieces led to better scores on intelligence tests. Subsequent tests of the “Mozart Effect” found that it either did not replicate or that boosts were strictly due to increased arousal when listening to energetic music.

“Mozart doesn’t make memories,” Scullin said.

Previous researchers have found that memories associated with sensory cues — such as an odor or song — are re-activated when the same cue is received later. When that happens during deep sleep, the corresponding memories are activated and strengthened, said co-researcher Chenlu Gao, a doctoral candidate of psychology and neuroscience at Baylor.

Early experimenters also played audio tapes during sleep to test whether individuals can learn new knowledge while sleeping. But while those experiments failed to create new memories, “our study suggests it is possible to reactivate and strengthen existing memories of lecture materials during sleep,” Gao said. “Our next step is to implement this technique in classrooms — or in online lectures while students complete their education at home due to COVID-19 social distancing measures — so we can help college students ‘re-study’ their class materials during sleep.”

“We think it is possible there could be long-term benefits of using TMR but that you might have to repeat the music across multiple nights,” Scullin added. “After all, you wouldn’t just study material a single time and then expect to remember it months later for a final exam. The best learning is repeated at spaced-out intervals — and, of course, while maintaining good sleep habits.”

*The study was supported by the National Science Foundation. Paul Fillmore, assistant professor of communication sciences and disorders in Baylor’s Robbins College of Health and Human Sciences, also was a co-researcher.

ABOUT BAYLOR UNIVERSITY

Baylor University is a private Christian University and a nationally ranked research institution. The University provides a vibrant campus community for more than 18,000 students by blending interdisciplinary research with an international reputation for educational excellence and a faculty commitment to teaching and scholarship. Chartered in 1845 by the Republic of Texas through the efforts of Baptist pioneers, Baylor is the oldest continually operating University in Texas. Located in Waco, Baylor welcomes students from all 50 states and more than 90 countries to study a broad range of degrees among its 12 nationally recognized academic divisions.

ABOUT THE COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES AT BAYLOR UNIVERSITY

The College of Arts & Sciences is Baylor University’s oldest and largest academic division, consisting of 25 academic departments and seven academic centers and institutes. The more than 5,000 courses taught in the College span topics from art and theatre to religion, philosophy, sociology and the natural sciences. Faculty conduct research around the world, and research on the undergraduate and graduate level is prevalent throughout all disciplines. Visit www.baylor.edu/artsandsciences.

ABOUT THE SLEEP NEUROSCIENCE AND COGNITION LABORATORY

The goal of the Sleep Neuroscience and Cognition Laboratory at Baylor University is to understand the basic processes supporting cognition and to translate that knowledge to promote health and flourishing across the adult lifespan. The two lines of inquiry focus on the sleep-based underpinnings of health and cognitive flourishing; and how technology can be leveraged to support prospective memory and quality of life in persons with Alzheimer’s disease and their caregivers.

 

Pearl Jam – “Gigaton” Debut

PEARL JAM’S CRITICALLY ACCLAIMED GIGATON DEBUTS AS #1 ROCK ALBUM

“Pearl Jam come roaring back with a superb new album.” – Associated Press

“Pearl Jam Combine Fury and Maturity on Gigaton.” – Rolling Stone

“Pearl Jam’s best in a generation.” – Paste Magazine

“Their legacy will remain set.” – Stereogum

Pearl Jam’s Gigaton has been hailed “superb”, “fascinating and ambitious”, “inspiring and engaging”, “their finest studio hour” and “Pearl Jam’s best in a generation.” The critics and fans alike have praised the bands latest release and it has now bowed at #1 on the Billboard Top Rock Albums Chart this week. Additionally, it landed in the Top 5 of the Billboard Top 200. Internationally the album debuted #1 in Italy and Austria, Top 5 in Netherlands, Switzerland, Australia, Germany, Belgium, Norway, Canada, and Finland and Top 10 in the UK, Ireland, and New Zealand.

Get it at www.pearljam.com

At Metacritic, Gigaton registered the group’s second highest cumulative critical score—only bested by their diamond-certified 1991 debut, Ten. Among numerous positive reactions, Associated Press exclaimed, “Pearl Jam come roaring back with superb new album.” In a four-out-of-five star review, Rolling Stone wrote, “The group has blended the miasmic angst of ‘Jeremy’ and ‘Alive’ with a sense of tenderness and even flashes of hope.” UPROXX promised, “Pearl Jam is reliable on ‘Gigaton’ at a moment when nothing else is,” and Spin christened it “Their best album since the late nineties.”

Opening up about the album, Eddie Vedder and Jeff Ament appeared on the
Bill Simmons Podcast for a marathon two-hour interview. Check it out HERE.

Speaking on their eagerness to return to the road, Vedder said:

“We’re kind of reclusive by nature. So, in some ways it feels normal to be away from people, that’s not necessarily out of my wheelhouse…but I just keep thinking that first time we’ll be in front of people, it’s even hard to imagine when or how, it’s going to be different. It’s not like we didn’t appreciate it before, it’s just even tenfold.” Regarding the seven-year creative journey to Gigaton, he revealed: “It grew on its own. It just started different, and it ended different, and everything that happened in the middle was different, and that’s what felt great about it. At some point, we had to finish. At some point, we zeroed in and thought, ‘Okay, I think we got this and now let’s nail these bits and pieces” …This last fall we really leaned in heavy and hard and gave ourselves a little bit of a deadline finally, which was cool, I thought it was very mature and grown-up of us to say, ‘Okay, now let’s actually finish! That can be the hard part’…After all of that fun, now we have to set it down in concrete.” In terms of the full sequence and final vision, he related it to a formative childhood memory:

“Certain things find their spot. It’s like a setlist. I think that’s why they maybe let me take a first crack at some of that stuff, because of the whole setlist thing. We still make records to be listened to—not that everyone will listen to a record track one to twelve in a row or side A or Side B—but we still make ‘em in case somebody does want to listen to it like that, that’s how we make em…In a way, it’s also like a live show, we put the songs together in a way that have a flow and an energy, the one song passes the torch to the next…Really I think a lot of comes back to keeping score when I was a little kid in baseball games…Obviously, I wasn’t good at math and didn’t go to school for acounting, but what I did do was stare at the scoreboard at Wrigley Field and I think that really helped me.” Gigaton represents Pearl Jam at the peak of progression. From moments of guitar-fueled catharsis such as “Who Ever Said” through the icy absolution of “River Cross,” the lyrics, riffs, and rhythms transmit a message of hope, culminating on Eddie Vedder’s final words, “Here and now…won’t hold us down…share the light…won’t hold us down.”

Produced by Josh Evans and Pearl Jam, Gigaton marks the band’s first studio album since GRAMMY® award-winning, Lightning Bolt, which was released on October 15, 2013. Internationally, the album is available and distributed by Universal Music Group.

Pearl Jam, Gigaton, Universal Music, Vaughn Lowery, 360 Magazine,

RCA RECORDS, ISAAC DUNBAR, 360 MAGAZINE

ISAAC DUNBAR – comme des garçons

Trailblazing new artist Isaac Dunbar releases his new track “comme des garçons (like the boys)” via RCA Records. The song is written by Isaac and Rory Adams and produced by Isaac. Listen HERE. His forthcoming EP isaac’s insect’s is set to be released next Thursday, April 9th.

E! News included Isaac in their Next-Gen of Pop article calling him an artist you need to know and he was included in Idolator’s 40 Artists To Watch In 2020. “comme des garçons (like the boys)” follows Isaac’s previously released tracks “scorton’s creek” which Idolator called “His Best Single Yet”, “makeup drawer” which PAPER exclusively premiered the video, “isaac’s insects” where Billboard called him “the real deal”, “onion boy”  and “body” which led TIME magazine to call his voice “lovely” and stated that he has “a keen ear — and intuition — for turning pop into relatable confessions.”

About Isaac Dunbar

The 17-year-old budding artist supported girl in red on her North American and European run of show dates last fall and released his highly anticipated EP balloons don’t float here last summer. It garnered the attention of notable tastemakers like Zane LoweThe FADEROnes To Watch, and Hillydilly, which stated: “it’s only a matter of time until he gets worldwide recognition.” Hailing from Cape Cod, Massachusetts, Isaac’s EP melds complex sounds and atmospheric, beat-driven production to create melodic and introspective tracks. The unique brand of distorted ballads combined with lush, multilayered dream-pop harmonies and malleable, heady synth drops creates a genre-bending EP. Isaac is looking forward to releasing his new EP under RCA Records this spring and will hit the road on his first headlining tour later this year.

To Buy/Watch/Stream “comme des garçons (like the boys)”:

Multi – https://smarturl.it/commedesgarconsx

Follow Isaac Dunbar at:

Website | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram

(Photo credit: Harshvardhan Shah)

Rod Wave, 360 MAGAZINE

Rod Wave – The Greatest

Rapper-singer Rod Wave (Alamo/Geffen Records) has unveiled the video for his newest song, “The Greatest,” directed by All The Smoke. The video provides a more intimate look into the St. Petersburg, FL native’s world, intermingling tour and performance b-roll. The song, which fans will find to be a riveting anthem, will appear on Rod Wave’s sophomore album, Pray 4 Love, due April 3rd. The album also features singles “Thief in the Night” and “Pray 4 Love,” both of which were released last month.

Watch the video HERE

The exciting news continues for Rod Wave who has just been announced as one of YouTube Music’s Artists on the Rise. As part of the campaign, Rod Wave will collaborate with YouTube Music on a unique content series which will live on his official channel; giving fans an opportunity to engage with him even further. The series is a major accomplishment for the artist who has built his buzz organically, first garnering attention with a series of mixtapes; the Hunger Games trilogy and 2019’s PTSD. He strengthened his catalog even further through the release of his debut studio album, Ghetto Gospel, which spawned the platinum single, “Heart on Ice” while also peaking at #10 on the Billboard 200. At only 21 years of age, he has captivated fans with his classic sound. Rod Wave looks forward to rescheduling his sold out 22-stop Ghetto Gospel Tour, which was postponed due to the current global pandemic. 

Rod Wave’s “The Greatest” eSingle

Retail: http://smarturl.it/TheGreatestRW

Video: https://youtu.be/WO-jOWpwkk4

shaggy, hot shot, hot shot 2020, mr bombastic

Shaggy – It Wasn’t Me (Hot Shot 2020)

REGGAE ICON SHAGGY TO RELEASE “IT WASN’T ME (HOT SHOT 2020)” A NEW, MODERN VERSION OF HIS CLASSIC SMASH AVAILABLE APRIL 10

IN CELEBRATION OF THE 20TH ANNIVERSARY OF HIS 10 MILLION-SELLING ALBUM ‘HOT SHOT,’ A BRAND-NEW ALBUM  ‘HOT SHOT 2020’- FEATURING UPDATED VERSIONS OF HIS BIGGEST HITS TO BE RELEASED

Reggae/dancehall icon, SHAGGY will unleash a new single, “It Wasn’t Me (Hot Shot 2020)” featuring vocalist, Rayvon, available April 10 on all digital platforms worldwide. Pre-save the new single HERE.

“It’s been 20 years since my album, Hot Shot and the now infamous ‘anthem’ “It Wasn’t Me” was released, says Shaggy, “and to commemorate this milestone, I decided to reproduce this classic hit. In doing so, I wanted to make sure we stayed true to the integrity of the original recording while finding ways to modernize it, being that the song remains a recurrent hit, garnering a new & younger fan base each year.”

He continues, “While it may come as a surprise, “It Wasn’t Me” is actually an anti-cheating song! In the original version, the ‘apology’ from Rik Rok comes at the very end, yet by then, most DJ’s had mixed or gone into another song, so it was often missed … the point is that the guy who was cheating didn’t follow the player’s advice.”

“I enlisted my longtime collaborator, Rayvon – one of the smoothest reggae voices in the game – to be on the new track,” he adds. “The end result feels fresh and revitalized while maintaining its pop sensibility and dancehall roots.”

To celebrate the 20th anniversary of his diamond-selling album, Hot Shot, a brand-new album entitled Hot Shot 2020 will soon be released featuring revamped and modernized versions of all of Shaggy’s most beloved hits such as “Angel,” “Boombastic,” “Oh Carolina,” among many others, plus a few other surprises! Additional details to soon be announced.

About Shaggy

When it comes to making dancehall reggae hits that rock the world and stand the test of time, nobody does it better than Shaggy.

The two-time GRAMMY Award-winning reggae icon has sold more than 30 million albums to date, racking up no fewer than eight singles in the Billboard Hot 100, including two No. 1 hits, as well as seven albums on the Billboard 200 and four in the Top 40. Shaggy’s success in the UK is equally impressive: 16 Top 40 singles, nine of them reaching the Top 10, and four that shot to No. 1 including “It Wasn’t Me”—the largest-selling collaboration in UK chart history.

The smash records from Shaggy have kept on coming, from the certified diamond 2000 album Hot Shot, which boasted two No. 1 singles, through to 2018’s 44/876, a collaborative project with British rock icon Sting. 44/876 clocked millions of streams, entered the Top 40 in 14 different countries, remained atop the Billboard Reggae Album chart for over five months, and earned Shaggy another GRAMMY Award for Best Reggae Album.

A proven hitmaker, Shaggy has also been using his platform to help his community and beloved home, Jamaica. His Shaggy & Friends charity concerts have raised millions for the Bustamante Children’s Hospital in Kingston, Jamaica.

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Jack Curley – Tomorrow

ENGLISH SINGER-SONGWRITER JACK CURLEY ANNOUNCES ‘TOMORROW’ EP OUT APRIL 24TH ON PARLOPHONE

LISTEN TO THE TITLE TRACK HERE

English singer-songwriter Jack Curley announces his debut EP ‘Tomorrow’, due for release on April 24th via Parlophone. The announcement comes alongside the release of the title track. ‘Tomorrow’ follows ‘Wait For Me’, the 21-year-old’s most recent single and his debut ‘Alice’, which have accumulated 9 million streams combined and seen support from Spotify’s New Music Friday, Clash, Music Week and Spindle Magazine, to name a few. It’s easy to hear why Jack’s career is moving as fast as it is – his voice. Effortlessly soulful, expressive and with a maturity far beyond his years, it’s that rare thing, completely timeless. The delicate yet simple instrumentation and production bring Jack’s vocals to the fore, while the songwriting, inspired by greats such as The Beatles, Freddie Mercury, and Elton John is instantly classic. Lyrically, Jack deals with relatable everyday experiences and universal themes. In the case of ‘Tomorrow’, the fear of having to tell a partner that the relationship isn’t working, as Jack elaborates, “Tomorrow is a song about a past relationship not really going to plan, but struggling to tell her that it wasn’t working, and then bottling it last minute when you planned to tell her.”

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