Posts tagged with "designer"

Thanks, it's Cashmere via Elysian Brewing for use by 360 Magazine

Story Behind the Can

January 24th is National Beer Can Appreciation Day, which celebrates the historic and thirst-quenching day beer was first sold in cans! In celebration, here are a few of Elysian Brewing’s most iconic beer cans through the years including Salt & Seed, the hit summer seasonal rose released last year which features a photograph of an actual watermelon, and Dayglow, which showcases a tiger with laser beams shooting out of its eyes (yes, you read that right).

The in-house design team at Seattle-based craft brewery Elysian Brewing is known for its art-forward approach to beer can creation. The small design team is constantly pushing the boundaries and exploring how they can drive excitement and inspiration through label design, often through a mixed-medium and DIY creative take on label design.  

The creativity and imagination that goes into their labels are endless, leading to everything from sculptures, photography, and even shampoo being featured on product labels. In celebration of the upcoming holiday, the Elysian design team talked about their favorite labels throughout the years.

Dayglow IPA

Elysian Design Team: “What company proudly puts a tiger shooting laser beams out of its eyes on a bottle and pushes print? As ridiculous as the concept seems, the visual was a hit. Dayglow was the winner of the 2014 Beverage World Global Packaging Design Awards, paving the way and setting a standard for all future Elysian label designs to come.”

Mother Pig Fresh Hop IPA

Elysian Design TeamL “The art for Mother Pig was inspired by the hop picker at the farm that provided the hops for this IPA. The picker is a specialized machine the growers refer to as ‘Mother Pig’ as it herds up all the little piglets (Hop bines).”

Salt and Seed Watermelon Gose

Elysian Design Team: “This tongue-in-cheek ‘still life’ reveals itself as an impossible object; similar to a ship-in-bottle, it begs out consumers to question—’how the heck did they do that?’ The creation of this label was done in-house and all by hand for an elaborate, albeit lo-fi photoshoot.”

Thanks, It’s Cashmere Hazy IPA

Elysian Design Team: “This label was a first in our history in that it cleverly highlighted the hop used within its name, leaned into it, and turned it into a full-on story. It set a high bar for beers following its footsteps and reimagined what it means to write a beer description.”

Dinner Photo via Zach Witford for BFA for use by 360 Magazine

Fai Khadra x Oliver Peoples

To celebrate their newly launched collaboration, Fai Khadra and Oliver Peoples‘ CEO, Rocco Basilico, hosted an intimate dinner on a helipad in Los Angeles, at 6100 Wilshire Blvd. Designed by Fai Khadra, guests sat under a helium light balloon, on a custom style harkness table.

Among the attendees were: The Weeknd, Kendall Jenner, Hailey Bieber, Luka Sabbat, Kendall Visser, Steve Lacey, Simi & Haze, Zack Bia, Pedro Cavaliere, Jasmine Daniels, Syd Tha Kyd, Travis Bennett, Christina Nadin, Charlotte Day Wilson, and Gabriella Karefa Johnson, among others.

Oliver Peoples and Fai Khadra collaborated to launch an exclusive range of sunglasses that fuses the design aesthetics of Oliver Peoples with the influential mindset of Fai. Fai Khadra is a multidisciplinary creative who has built a strong profile in the design world, captivating an audience of musicians, luxury brands, and galleries across the globe. His cultural relevance and innovative perspective bring an impactful, avant-garde point of view to the collaboration.

The event was creatively directed by Fai. He conceptualized every element of the evening from the custom-built layout, from the original table and bar set-up to the several course menu. Overall, Fai Khadra’s goal was to create a holistic aesthetic designed for his peers.

“We are thrilled to collaborate with Fai Khadra. Fai will become a leader in the creative space of design and brought a clear vision to the collaboration. As a brand, Oliver Peoples has always been defined by vintage-inspired details made for the modern wearer. Fai’s innovative creative direction aligned with our aesthetic seamlessly,” said Rocco Basilico (CEO).

About Oliver Peoples

Oliver Peoples was founded in 1987 with the opening of its first boutique on the iconic Sunset Strip. The frames were inspired by an estate collection of vintage American made eyewear purchased by the Founders of the brand in the late 1980s. This vintage aesthetic, along with the unique culture of Los Angeles, elements of fashion, film, art, music, and the Southern California lifestyle, remains at the core of the brand’s DNA and serves as inspiration for designs with global appeal. Oliver Peoples eyewear is hand-crafted of the finest quality materials, with a focus on exclusive product details and superior lens technology.

Zara Biggs, Nike Communications, for use by 360 Magazine

BOMBAY SAPPHIRE HOLIDAY DISPLAYS LIGHT UP NYC

BOMBAY SAPPHIRE hosted its inaugural holiday window display to honor and rejuvenate imagination and creativity in New York City. The BOMBAY SAPPHIRE holiday windows gain inspiration from the traditional 5th Avenue holiday window displays while serving a greater purpose. The intention of the displays is to revive the creativity that has been deprived of downtown Manhattan since the beginning of the pandemic.

The storefront series was held in SoHo through December 19, in partnership with artist Shavanté Royster, fashion designer Romeo Hunte and NYC dancer Nicole von Arx.

Shavanté Royster

The Brooklyn-based Shavanté Royster is a graphic designer and illustrator, working in the creative industry since 2009. Growing up in a military family, often having to travel during her life motivated Shavanté’s innovation. Through her art, Shavanté often takes inspiration from travel, expressing this through shapes and rich colors. Shavanté’s work is comprised of digital illustration, painting and mixed media.

Romeo Hunte

Romeo Hunte New York is a lifestyle apparel brand designed in NYC for consumers who appreciate sophisticated details. The edgy aesthetic that the collection radiates mixes both feminine and masculine characteristics. Romeo Hunte pieces blend lavish outerwear with contemporary apparel. The Romeo Hunte woman and man can be described as a “dynamic duo” that appreciates the arts and pop culture with a modern flare.

Nicole von Arx

Nicole von Arx (NVA) studied Ballet, Contemporary and Hip Hop in Geneva, Switzerland at Dance Area, shortly after traveling to New York in 2008 to attend school at the Alvin Ailey School, graduating in 2011. Currently based among NYC and Geneva, NVA is a dancer and choreographer in both dance scenes. NVA has collaborated with the most notable choreographers in New York as a creator, dancer and teacher. Continuing her career, NVA has also worked independently as a choreographer with musicians, film directors and photographers.

The visionaries that were created through the course of the display aimed to fill the empty storefronts with avant-garde ‘windows of art.’ The pandemic has transformed the lives of creatives, small businesses and retail in New York and all over the world. BOMBAY SAPPHIRE worked to ensure that the artistic society would be celebrated and uplifted this holiday season with their holiday displays.

Each window highlighted a winter dreamscape created by artist Shavanté Royster. Both Shavanté and Romeo Hunte’s creative point-of-views joined forces to emulate the holiday magic of 5th avenue. Live models were seen wearing Romeo’s winter apparel upon Shavanté’s backdrops, with performances by NYC dancers.

Romeo’s devoted window showcased people draped in his designs that were created personally for the display. Romeo set the scene of a holiday celebration before a show over cocktails. The garments were designed with inspiration from Shavanté, with the backdrop and fashion coinciding throughout the display.

Romeo spoke on the experience of designing for the holiday displays, stating, “It’s been a joy to work on BOMBAY SAPPHIRE’s Holiday Storefront Series which pays homage to exciting young creative talents everywhere and the tenacity of New York City coming back after the pandemic. It was refreshing to collaborate with artist Shavanté Royster and the dancers as mixed media has always been an important part of my work, so it was cool to build and see the narrative of the holiday windows come to life with them through different facets, such as the dancers wearing some of my designs. I hope everyone can leave the windows feeling a burst of creativity and inspiration for the holidays, and hope for the year ahead!”

Dog via Gutter Cat Gang for use by 360 Magazine

GCG: The Outpost

The Gutter Cat Gang (GCG), a leading NFT collection in the crypto space, announced their long-anticipated event, “Gutter Cat Gang: The Outpost,” slated to take place during Miami’s Art Week at Ace Props + Studios located at 398 NE 78th Street Miami, FL 33138. In collaboration with Gutter Cat Gang partners and sponsors Sandbox, REEF Technology, BarLab, Nicky Diamonds of Diamond Supply Co., Lot 11, and Blackdove, the event will bring the metaverse into reality throughout the back alleys of Gutter City. The three-day immersive exhibition runs from December 2-4, 2021, with events from 4:00 PM to 12:00 AM ET.

Showcasing members of the GCG community, the event will feature a curated selection of rare NFT’s from The Gang’s members, among other NFT collections. These collections will be seen in the real-life space alongside numerous community-centric activities. Additionally, various auctions and displays by Pop Wonder, Felix Semper, Mark Watts, Pindar Van Arman, Gxng Yxng, ARTIS4LOVERS, Alien Queen, Mokibaby, and others will be available.

Thursday, December 2, 2021

  • Beginning at 4:00 PM daily, the Kibble Klub, a themed social hub where the Gutter Gang can socialize and let off steam, will be open to the GCG community members and their guests. Kicking off with sounds by Spottie Wifi + Bun B and Richard Vagner. Nearby, at the Gutter City SkatePark, the Diamond Supply Co. x Gutter Cat Gang Pop-up will unveil a limited edition Miami Art Week Merch for purchase alongside the unveiling of an Exclusive Surprise for Gutter Cat Gang and Diamond Crypto Dunk Holders.
  • At Carl’s Contraband Van those who wish to partake can get their fix from friendly neighborhood Carl’s Contraband, where Limited Edition Gutter Cat Gang Merch will be available for purchase, that is if you can find Carl’s elusive Van.
  • As the sun sets, the Kibble Klub will transform into Gutter City’s Premier Venue. Opening night features Miami’s award-winning Party, Peachfuzz, “Your Girl’s Favorite Party”, set to take over Gutter City with a Miami Art Week special edition “Get Down” hosted by Nicky Diamonds of Diamond Supply Co. from 9:00 PM to 12:00 AM at the Kibble Klub. Complimentary Kraft Kocktails prepared by BarLab accompany R&B and Hip-Hop music flowing from Peach Fuzz’s usual suspects.

Friday, December 3, 2021 

  • Teeing off at 8:00 A.M. at Normandy Shores Golf Club on Miami Beach, consider a trip up to the attic to dust off your set of golf clubs because the Gang is hitting the links for their inaugural golf tournament.
  • REEF Technology will host an exclusive and private late-lunch featuring its limited-time-only “Bling Wings” from “Another Wing” by DJ Khaled and burgers with vegan options at the Diamond Supply Co. x Reef Technology x Lot 11 from 4:00 PM – 6:00 PM ET with sounds by DL Los de la Vega.
  • Gutter Grub (GG), a collaboration between Gutter Cat Gang and REEF Technologies, the largest operator of delivery restaurants and parking real estate in North America, will be bringing a specially tailored selection of their signature bites from Burger Fi, Krispy Rice, and Another Wing by DJ Khaled. Guests can purchase these all day. GCG will also provide the community with complimentary vegan and traditional burgers from 4:00 PM until 7:00 PM ET. daily.

Saturday, December 4, 2021

  • Adjacent to her NFT debut and a presentation of her continuing body of work as an installation artist, Mokibaby, known for upcycling vintage TV’S + found beach plastics and archive videos, will teach you how to give your trash a second life + make unique collectible art using discarded items from 4:00 PM – 5:00 PM ET.  Four (4) exciting original NFTs encapsulated within Gutter City collateral will be available at an exclusive auction.
  • Other immersive experiences that will be part of the Gutter Cat Gang event at The Outpost for Miami Art Week include:
  • Exclusive GCG back alley meet-ups will bring together sponsors and those selected for the best bites, hot releases, and insider introductions.
  • Species Stretch Feeling tense after a long week? Release that tension with a species-specific stretch session.
  • Gutter Cornhole Tournament hosted by Pawl Wall for all community members in Gutter City’s Back Alley. Saturday, December 4, 4:00 – 7:00 PM ET.
  • Shrimp Society will host a private high-glass Gutter Dinner that will introduce Miami’s community of Tech entrepreneurs to those visiting the Magic City. Expect other secret gatherings from more private street gangs to emerge from within the city.
  • Those interested in attending can learn more HERE.

About Gutter Cat Gang

The Gutter Cat Gang launched in June 2021 as a generative art avatar collection of 3,000 NFTs consisting of 123 unique traits. Since its inception, GCG has grown through organic and grassroots marketing built by the community for the community. The Gutter Cat Gang includes three additional species and cats as part of the Gang: rats, pigeons, and dogs bringing the Gutter Cat Gang brand to 12,000 NFTs. The Gutter Cat Gang is a luxury web3 social club that brings together a new generation of digital social entrepreneurs that use their Gutter Cat Gang NFT avatars for collectability, IP development, IRL experiences, social status, and worldwide virtual reach.

About Diamond Supply Co. 

Diamond Supply Co. was founded in 1998 when Nicholas Tershay (aka Nicky Diamonds) created a skateboarding hardware line in San Francisco. Today, the brand remains one of the few owner-operated skate brands from the era. Diamond designs and manufactures a full range of skateboarding products along with a large assortment of clothing, accessories, and other limited edition products. Diamond also houses some of skateboarding’s most prominent names on their skate team, such as Shane O’Neill, Nyjah Huston, Paul Rodriguez, Eric Koston, Guy Mariano, Boo Johnson, Torey Pudwil, and a host of others. Under Nick Diamond’s signature design and aesthetic, Diamond Supply Co. maintains a strong focus on delivering skateboarding goods with high integrity and matching the quality, and always keeping true to its roots while pushing the envelope forward.

Desenio Illustration by Reb Czukoski for use by 360 Magazine

Desenio AW21 Collection

Interior design group, Desenio, has launched four trend collections for autumn and winter this year, AW21. Each collection has a distinct color scheme and vibe, so no matter your taste, there is a fit for everyone. Easily match prints together to create a beautiful gallery wall and find your favorites in all of their palettes.

WOODLAND RETREAT

The Woodland Retreat trend invites you to imagine taking time to experience the purity of nature. Walk through dewy forests filled with birdsong, breathe in the cool, pure air, and take time for yourself.

“Sustainability and natural materials continue to be a huge trend in interior design. The Woodland Retreat trend ties together rustic elegance with an eco-friendly approach to design,” says Annica Wallin, Executive Creative Director at Desenio.

If you feel at your calmest when surrounded by nature, this is the trend for you. Complete the look by adding luscious plants and cozy textures to a room that features the Woodland Retreat collection of wall art.

CLASSIC CONTRASTS

The Classic Contrasts trend is all about juxtaposing shapes and textures for the ultimate elegant touch. Mix soft beige shades with defining darker tones for a balanced, classic finish.

“The Classic Contrasts collection hones into one of the key interior trends we’re seeing for AW21. Timeless elegance takes a modern twist to bring about a refreshing take on the monochromatic look,” says Annica Wallin.

If you’re someone who prefers to choose statement pieces rather than gravitate towards the latest styles, the Classic Contrasts collection is the perfect choice. After choosing your favorite prints, add the  monochromatic accessories to your home to achieve a sophisticated look.

ROMANTIC REBELLION

The Romantic Rebellion collection enables you to bring your personality to life in your home by choosing art that’s as bold as you are. Whether you want to create a beautiful thematic experience in your dining room or add radiant pinks to your bedroom, it’s time to get creative and reimagine your walls.

“The Romantic Rebellion trend is a chance to embrace glamour and opulence within your interiors. Baroque imagery is remixed with a modern and edgy twist to create a playful vibe,” says Annica Wallin.

The Romantic Rebellion collection is the choice for you if you want to make your home feel glamorous and feminine with a hint of edginess. Pinks, purples, and hints of gold is the way to embrace this to its fullest. Alternatively, you can go for a more pared-back look by choosing prints as statement pieces in a more minimalistic room.

SOFT MOMENTS

The Soft Moments trend is about breathing into the present and resetting your space with warm tones and relaxing neutral prints. Sink into soft blankets with a hot drink and a good book because the world can wait.

“The Soft Moments trend collection celebrates elegance and serenity through a curated and clean nordic style with a Japanese touch. Natural browns and shadow grays come together to create a comforting, natural, and modern space where one can be at peace,” says Annica Wallin.

Choose the Soft Moments collection if you crave a calming space to retreat to after a hectic day. The quotation prints from get you in the right headspace and you can style your room with neutrally-toned accessories for the ultimate zen.

Photo by Desenio for Use by 360 Magazine
Photo by Desenio for Use by 360 Magazine
Photo by Desenio for Use by 360 Magazine
art illustration by Gabrielle Marchan for use by 360 magazine

Seven Powerful Graphic Design Tips

Being a graphic designer is so much more than what meets the eye. It’s about visual communication; it uses typography, images, textures, colors to transmit specific messages to social groups, with specific objectives.

Although every designer is not just a portrait hanging on the wall, is a specialist who has their own style and specialties, there are some principles of design and basic concepts that seem to span across all areas of design.

Accordingly, I asked graphic designers what design principles they follow and what they would share with their peers-designers.

By gathering a variety of different opinions and fundamentals of graphic design, I rounded up ten essential design tips that can help you create a better-looking design in no time.

What things can you do to help refine your skills and prepare for a career in graphic design? Keep reading for insights from professional graphic designers. 

1. Explore different learning methods

There are tons of resources out there for learning the fundamentals of graphic design – beyond books and traditional academic routes. You can learn so much from practicing on your own and checking out case studies from other designers.

Here are a few great resources:

  • Behance –Behance is one of the best sources of inspiration. But you can also learn a lot from the community by sharing and receiving feedback from other designers.
  • Skillshare – Watching tutorials is a smart addition to your learning process. Just remember it’s not all about learning color theories, or font hierarchy — tutorials on how to train your mind to think like a graphic designer and understanding customer’s wants and needs are also key.
  • Networking – Networking is a fantastic way to communicate with people with a common profession and special interest and with potential clients — this is equally important as the work you produce.

2. Look for inspiration outside of your niche

When making up a logo, it makes sense to look at other logos for inspiration, right? It does. But it also makes sense to look for inspiration elsewhere.

For instance, you might look to fashion for texture inspiration or paintings for color palette ideas. Look at the shape of furniture or the way various textures interact with one another for ideas on how to combine elements together effectively.

Looking for inspiration outside of your niche allows you to understand the core principles of what makes a design “good” without the boring conceptions you have about how a design should look.

3. The typography is a king

Typography has a profound impact on the way individuals perceive a product. The right typography creates an enjoyable experience, while a type that’s hard to read or doesn’t match the message of the product can negatively impact. That’s why it’s absolutely worth spending the time and effort to find just the right typographic fit.

If you want to learn how to choose the right fonts for your product, 3 most important considerations:

  1. Don’t overdo the number of fonts
  2. Use contrasting fonts to stand out
  3. Give each letter its personal space

Keep in mind that choosing the right typography for your product projects takes experimentation — expect to try different options until you find the perfect option. That said, the investment’s completely worth it: don’t underestimate the impact that thoughtfully selected type will make on your work.

4. Colors are powerful – especially in graphic design

When it comes to designs, selecting a stunning color palette is no easy feat—and it’s certainly one that any designer or illustrator could spend hours achieving excellence.

Here’s a brief rundown of insights and tricks:

  • Start with a limited color palette. When you’re just starting out, stick to 3 to 4 colors. With a limited color palette, you can see whether the colors work well or make your eyes bleed. Then explore more complex combinations as you go along.
  • Use contrasting colors. When your colors don’t have the right amount of contrast, your customers will not know where or how to look at your illustration. Worse, your audiences’ eyeballs could get strained, especially if your chosen colors all fight for attention. To check if your illustration has the right amount of contrast, add a black-and-white adjustment layer on your illustration. That helps you adjust the brightness and darkness, play around with the colors and see what works.

5. Understand color psychology

This is a well-known fact: color impacts a user’s perception and interaction with your design. Believe it or not, the right color can keep the customers returning, while the wrong one can scare the audience away.

These are the commonly accepted meanings in most of the Western countries for the most common colors (or hues):

  • Red: love, passion, anger, courage
  • Orange: joy, warmth, sunshine, creativity
  • Yellow: happiness, enlightenment, spring
  • Green: freshness, growth, wealth, balance, health, youthfulness.
  • Blue: freedom, imagination, inspiration
  • Purple: spirituality, the subconscious, dignity
  • Black: power, elegance, sophistication
  • White: purity and innocence

It’s worth mentioning that different cultures interpret color meaning differently.

6. Hierarchy

Visual hierarchy is a vital component of good design. If everything on your page looks like it has the same importance, that’s not a good sign. You need to use visual cues to tell people what to pay attention to first, second, third, etc.

Create visual hierarchy through things like size, perspective (that creates an illusion of depth), or color. Typographic hierarchy can be created by using different typefaces, sizes, and font weights.

The point is to give visual importance to some elements over others.

7. Practice, practice, practice

So what is one biggest piece of design advice for newcomers and veteran creatives alike?

No matter the size or scale of the project, or the trajectory of your career: “You’ve got to do the work.”

Practice makes perfect! Take time every week to create designs exceptionally for the practice. Pick a type of design, a brand, or a concept you want to scrutinize, and then make a design or two.

Consider redoing existing designs to see what you might do differently or enhance. This can be an excellent exercise in figuring out why designs work the way they do and exploring your own creativity.

Looking For Some Stunning Mockups?

Looking for some high-quality mockups to make your designs shine? We’ve got you covered.

Head on over to the site for a complete collection of beautiful mockups – for more details check ls.graphics, to find mockups – made for designers, by designers.

Whether it be for a client presentation or to enhance your design portfolio, use these mockups to present your designs in the best possible light.

Wrapping Up

Like everything else, skills take time to hone and sharpen. Trust your gut, go down a rabbit hole of researching things you like, use those things for your design content, and follow these 7 graphic design tips.

Image via Bspoke Associates for 360 Magazine

These White Walls at Nordelaia

Nordelaia – a new masterpiece by the award-winning design studio These White Walls

A marriage between rustic and luxe deep in the heart of Piedmont

Independent boutique hotel Nordelaia, situated in the UNESCO world heritage site of Montferrat, showcases design spearheaded by These White Walls. The 12 room estate, set in an 800-year-old farmhouse, was respectfully reinvented by British design studio These White Walls – best known for the multi-award-winning interiors of HIDE restaurant in Mayfair, London.

Our design for Nordelaia is centred around wellbeing and escapism; the aim being to create a holistic and nurturing environment in which guests can relax, switch off and connect – not only with each other – but also with the stunning landscape that surrounds them”, – says Rose Murray, Founder of These White Walls. We define this design as ‘rustic-luxe’, where rest and reconnection with nature go hand-in-hand with cultivated indulgence. Designers decided to maintain most of the old building’s original rustic appearance, trying to maintain a balance between rich cultural history and modern luxury. This union between the old and the new, the rustic and the lux, is what sets this project apart and makes it feel truly special – Rose notes.

These White Walls have carefully planned the concept of the rooms, embodying the philosophy of freedom in it. Some bedrooms have two wardrobes and two workspaces, symmetrically positioned opposite each other, as a reminder that we are all independent individuals connected by a common experience. The idea of solitude and reconnection with nature continues with the absence of TVs – thus Nordelaia invites guests to enjoy the digital detox that is so necessary in the modern world.

Following the aim to save connection with the authentic look of the estate and its history, designers chose textures and materials for the rooms that are in harmony with the unique atmosphere of the place. Surrounded by ornamental green spaces that extend from the guests’ own terraces, the ground floor Garden rooms feature textured materials, including rustic woods, natural stone burnished metals, and wrought iron. These sit in contrast to the Legacy rooms on the second floor that feature a more dramatic feel with luxurious materials such as velvet and brass. Tucked away at the top of the building are the cozy and wonderfully private Attico rooms. Much of the furniture is bespoke, created by local artisans with some key pieces and fittings from notable Italian designers.

The design of the restaurants is also inspired by their surroundings: the ground floor reflects bonds between earth and nature, revealed in deep shades of green and a palette reminiscent of soil and roots. In contrast, the first-floor restaurant is a reference to a blooming garden, embodied in shades of pink and peach.

Every element of the hotel’s design is crafted with thoughtful attention and symbolism. The kitchen counter is decorated with laser-cut brass detailed with the image of a dandelion blowing seeds into the wind. Designers also decided to add laser-cut insects to the light fitting as a reference to the emergence and spread of new ideas into the world. Such a concept echoes Nordelaia’s dining concept: Michelin starred chef Andrea Ribaldone and the resident chef Charles Pearce aim to respect local culinary traditions while simultaneously pushing boundaries and inviting guests to a gastronomic journey with brave experiments.

Nordelaia sees in nature not only inspiration but also a healing power: the hotel’s swimming pool offers incredible views of Montferrat Valley. At the spa facilities – one of a kind in the region – guests will be able to enjoy privacy and peaceful tranquillity with hammam, sauna and Kneipp pool, as well as yoga and gym spaces.

Follow Nordelaia via their website or Instagram

About Nordelaia

With easy access from Milan, Genoa and Turin, this 12-room hotel is set among five hectares of agricultural land. The hotel, respectfully built around a farmhouse dating back to the year 800, has been restored in full respect of the building’s historical elements, and to create a direct connection to the local nature and terroir. A striking new three-tier structure houses the hotel’s restaurant, bar and events space. In addition to the out door pool, the property includes 450 m2 spa area, overlooking both the valley below and Cremolino castle, featuring wet and dry facilities, treatments rooms. A hammam, sauna, Kneipp pool and light sensory herb room make up the wet area. There is also a yoga room and NOHrD equipped gym.

About These White Walls

These White Walls is a multi-award-winning luxury-led and concept-driven interior design studio based in London. Founded in 2017 by Rose Murray, the studio is recognised for its blank canvas approach to creativity that results in unique and beautifully crafted interiors. The studio creates bespoke interiors for the high-end hospitality and residential sectors as well as private clients and commercial brands. Previous projects include the renowned HIDE restaurant in Mayfair, London.

"Best Driving Song" Survey Result image by Rita Azar for use by 360 Magazine

FLEETWOOD RV FACTORY TOUR VIDEOS

FLEETWOOD RV® SHARES “HOW THEY’RE MADE” SERIES OF FACTORY TOUR VIDEOS

REV Recreation Group brand Fleetwood RV has released a series of five videos showcasing how their luxury motorhomes are made at their 480,000-square foot manufacturing headquarters in Decatur, IN. The exclusive, behind-the-scenes tour delivers a peek into a few of the steps involved in manufacturing a 16,000 to 30,000 lb. Class A motorhome. The video also introduces some of the engineers, managers, welders, and technicians who design, manufacture, and assemble the various elements of a Fleetwood RV.

Fleetwood RV is one of the most-established brands in the motorhome industry and is known for its quality, innovative features, and family-friendly design options. One of Fleetwood’s most popular models, the Bounder®, is celebrating its 35 anniversary in 2021 and has the distinction of being one of the best-selling motorhomes ever.

The factory tour videos deliver a top-to-bottom look at Fleetwood RV and cover the foundation, lamination process, cabinet shop, assembly, and paint process.

Factory Tour Video Details

The foundation video shares the different types of chassis used for a gas or diesel motorhome and the steel bridging system that is custom built for each floor plan.

The lamination process video shows how the walls, floor, and ceiling are created. Light-weight aluminum framing is welded together, and the cavities are packed with bead foam insulation. The pieces undergo a lamination process that applies consistent pressure for nearly an hour, creating a permanent bond and solid structure.

The cabinet shop video looks at how the cabinetry in a Fleetwood RV is made on-site with the bases, frames, doors, and drawers fashioned from solid wood. The video also shows how the wood scraps and leftover pieces don’t go to waste, instead, they are used to heat the building during the winter months.

The assembly video brings all the individual elements together, including the slide outs. Fleetwood RV uses a proprietary process to ensure a positive slide out fit that eliminates gaps and helps prevent water infiltration. Each slide out is also slightly sloped to the outside to direct water away from the coach.

Finally, there is a video visit to the 120,000-square-foot paint facility. Fleetwood RV has 10 paint booths, and each year applies 164,000 gallons of paint to its coaches. Dependent on the motorhome, there are either three or four base colors applied. After a quality inspection, several layers of clear coat are used to deliver a deep shine and provide years of protection.

To watch the factory tour videos, visit HERE. Select the “About” tab, click on “Factory Tours,” and provide an email address.

Fleetwood RV is a brand from REV Recreation Group, a subsidiary of REV Group, Inc. (NYSE: REVG). For more information on Fleetwood RV, visit HERE.

The Bounder® model from Fleetwood RV is celebrating its 35-year anniversary in 2021, and has the distinction of being one of the best-selling motorhomes ever.

About REV Recreation Group

REV Recreation Group, Inc. (RRG) is a REV Group® subsidiary and a leading manufacturer of Class A Gas and Diesel recreational vehicle brands. This company has one of the best and longest standing distribution networks in the industry and boasts some of the industry’s most recognized and iconic brand names such as American Coach®, Fleetwood RV®, and Holiday Rambler®. REV Recreation Group is headquartered in Decatur, IN, which is also its principal manufacturing location. In addition, RRG operates two state-of-the-art service and repair centers and a genuine parts online warehouse.

About REV Group, Inc.

REV Group® companies are leading designers and manufacturers of specialty vehicles and related aftermarket parts and services. Our companies serve a diversified customer base, primarily in the United States, through three segments: Fire & Emergency, Commercial, and Recreation. They provide customized vehicle solutions for applications, including essential needs for public services (ambulances, fire apparatus, school buses, and transit buses), commercial infrastructure (terminal trucks and industrial sweepers) and consumer leisure (recreational vehicles). REV’s diverse portfolio is made up of well-established principal vehicle brands, including many of the most recognizable names within their industry. Several of our brands pioneered their specialty vehicle product categories and date back more than 50 years. REV Group trades on the NYSE under the symbol REVG.

Brittany Farinas of House of One image via Shaye Price of A Design Partnership for use by 360 Magazine

House of One Q×A

Brittany Farinas fiercely and fashionably has entered the world of interior design. The designer of both residential and commercial spaces resides in South Florida, where she launched her company, House of One. After graduating from the University of Miami with a degree in interior design, Farinas utilized her life-long passion to help others beautify their spaces. Streamlined, sleek, and polished, Farinas has an impeccable eye for style that makes her stand out. 360 Magazine spoke with the designer about her favorite interior aesthetics, House of One’s recent blog launch, and upcoming projects.

When did you first get into designing residential and commercial spaces?

About four years ago.

What type of look does House of One try to imbue in its clients spaces?

I try to make each of my client’s spaces very much a reflection of who they are, while creating a visually exciting yet timeless look. At House of One, we strive on creating unique spaces with bold moments.

How would you describe your personal favorite interior aesthetic?

My personal design aesthetic is minimal eclectic. I love sculptural elements in a space and I have a great appreciation for luxurious textures. When it comes to designing an interior space for myself- I like to neutralize the primary pieces (larger furniture items such as sofas, tables, cabinetry) and add character in secondary pieces (i.e accent chairs, pillows, accessories, accent lighting).

What visual design software does House of One utilize?

We use AutoCAD, SketchUp, and multiple rendering softwares.

What is the most important thing to consider when designing an interior space?

The most important thing to consider when designing spaces for our clients is to envision exactly how they will use their space daily and how the space will evolve through time.

 How does designing a residential space differ from designing a commercial space?

When designing a commercial space, it’s about promoting the brand image and creating a setting for productivity and growth for the company as a whole. It’s necessary to be conscious of how multiple groups of people might be using the space- whereas designing for a residential client is more specific and lifestyle driven. While designing residential and commercial spaces are targeted towards a different end goal, both need to be extremely functional while aesthetically pleasing.

On your website, I saw that you are launching a blog. That is so exciting! What type of content will be published on House of One’s blogspace?

Yes! I am extremely excited about the blog as well. This will be a place where I can elaborate more on the projects in different categories. For example, we will have a section labeled “Project Tours” where you will be able to get an in depth look at some of our recently completed work. I’ll also be featuring posts on different trends, and a behind the scenes look of our design process.

Where do you find interior design inspiration?

I find inspiration everywhere I go. However, I’ve always been inspired by fashion. When I go eat at restaurants I can’t help but touch the different fabrics and materials. I have always been so curious that way.

Did you always have an eye for detail, or are there ways in which you’ve sharped your interior design vision over time?

I would say I’ve always had an eye for detail. My mom worked at a furniture store when I was about the age of 3-15. I spent a lot of days with her hanging around the showroom. I always gravitated towards certain colors/details. At a young age I was very opinionated about what I liked and didn’t like when it came to design. Over time, I feel my eye for design has definitely evolved, and I know it will keep doing so over time. I think it’s just a part of life and growing as a person and designer.

Are there any exciting projects coming up for House of One that you can speak about?

Yes! We’re currently working on a 8500 square-foot office space that we’re all really excited about- the palette is gorgeous. We’ve also been working on restoring a Mediterranean home in Miami Beach, which will be completed in about two months. This project is very special for us, and we’re excited to get this one styled and photographed soon.

House of One image via Shaye Price of A Design Partnership for use by 360 Magazine
House of One image via Shaye Price of A Design Partnership for use by 360 Magazine
Marta Klopf photo from Grace Topalian for use by 360 Magazine

Digital Artist/Designer Marta Klopf QXA

By: Ally Brewster

Marta Klopf is graphic designer that works in web and brand design. When talking about her artwork Klopf says, “My projects focus on clear communication while highlighting the values, thoughts and stories behind a brand and translating conceptual ideas into cohesive visual worlds.” Originally from Italy, Klopf graduated from Minneapolis College of Art & Design and soon moved to New York City, quickly falling in love with the city and finding inspiration in it. She loves being able to help with change through her art and design. Klopf looks forward to getting back to creating art for local community focused organizations in the future. We had the opportunity to ask Marta Klopf about her artistic journey and what’s next for the artist: 

How did you get into graphic design? Was graphic design always the direction you wanted to go?

I wasn’t one of those people who know as children what they are going to be when they grow up: for a long time I didn’t see a path that seemed right for me. I was always interested in a lot of things, and always wanted to follow new ideas and start new projects. What I did know was that I was interested in art, and that I was passionate about communicating. So I discovered design, which is at its very core visual communication. I moved to Minneapolis to pursue my BFA in graphic design and have worked in the field since. And I think it worked out, because design gives you the opportunity to be interested in a lot of things, to approach different projects with different ideas and interests.

Do you have a preference for working digitally or physically? Why?

I love working digitally: I feel like the digital world is where a lot of people today go to find information, learn things, discover brands, buy things, make connections, and therefore it is a dynamic place that is always evolving, which makes it exciting to be a part of it. I also think digital projects challenge you in a different way, because they need to make an impact while also remaining flexible and adaptable.

You stated: “New York is vibrant and makes you feel alive. You always feel like you are part of something big. It always pushes you creatively because there is always something new to inspire you.” What initially drew you to work in New York? Do you have a favorite thing in New York you always go back to for inspiration if you ever feel burnt out?

I think that, at first, what drew me to New York was the sheer quantity of creatives and creative endeavors, which gives you the opportunity to really find a path that works for you and matches your interests. But I didn’t expect to really fall for the city as much or as quickly as I did: I met a lot of inspiring designers and creatives who were pursuing their passions in so many different ways. I think the people are what always inspires me: it may be a bit cliché, but the energy that comes from surrounding yourself with other creative people can be very energizing. I also love to take long walks: you always end up somewhere new, and getting out of your usual environment and what is comfortable usually helps.

You’re a freelance graphic designer “with experience in web and brand design.” What is your favorite aspect of being a freelance artist? The most difficult?

I work for an agency and also do freelance projects, so I get the best and worst of both. I love the freedom of freelance work. You are in charge of what projects you take on, and the directness of working directly with the person who will use your work makes it empowering. The most difficult part would be that you are alone: you have to be the one who does all the organizing, the designing, the coordinating, the email writing, the zoom calls. Which I like, but can be quite a lot.

How do you begin your process of starting a new project with a brand?

The first thing I do is learn as much as I can about the project, first to determine whether it’s something I am able to take on, and then to find out what makes the project special. I would then typically meet with the client, talk about big picture things (their ideas and needs, their philosophy, and so on) as well as practical things (timeline, other people involved in the project, etc). Depending on the project I would then come up with a few ideas and see whether they will work and are well received. From there, it becomes a matter of getting more and more detailed and continuing to incorporate feedback from the client until the final product is ready.

Of the projects you’ve worked on, which is your favorite? What about it makes it so memorable/special for you? 

I recently finished a website called letstech.at. It is geared towards kids 10-18 in age and is meant to be a science/engineering portal for them: get them interested in more scientific or technical subjects, present ideas through videos and blog articles, as well as show role models (especially female ones) who work in the field and be a place where they can find information about careers in engineering. I loved working on it both because it was a design challenge (trying to speak to a relatively broad age range), and because it truly is a great resource for kids: it feels great to be part of something that empowers them through learning and through highlighting female role models.

As someone who loves being able to help change the world through your artwork, which causes are you passionate about that you would want to design for in the future?

I try not to set limits on what want to do, but generally I feel strongly about projects that are of value to people: in the case of the project above, kids who want to learn, but also, for example, design for community based organizations who help women, minorities, or in any way empower people by offering them resources that may be otherwise difficult to access. As another example, I also was part of a mentoring program, where professional designers helped create logos for groups of high schoolers who wanted to pitch ideas to help their community to investors. I love being able to use my skills that way: making an impact through design.

With your artwork, what direction do you feel like you want to go in next? Is there any new pattern, style, process, person, media, etc, that you feel has grabbed your attention and inspired your work? Is there anything you’ve done in the past you want to continue with? 

I feel that style changes constantly, and the more we focus on style the less longevity a project has. What matters to me the most are good ideas, and I think the time of the pandemic (having to stay home and mostly focus on work) really reinforced the idea of wanting to make work that has an impact. I always look at the work of Partner & Partners (where I used to work) and Hyperakt in New York as inspiration for beautiful work that is backed by great ideas and also makes an impact on the communities and the world we live in.

Marta Klopf is currently accepting freelance projects here.

Marta Klopf design for LetsTech from Grace Topalian for use by 360 Magazine

Marta Klopf design for LetsTech