Posts tagged with "art exhibition"

UKRAINIAN artist, painter, professor via 360 MAGAZINE

Yana Bystrova

Yana Bystrova is a third-generation Ukrainian artist, born to create undeniably conceptual, enticing pieces of art. Having her body of work showcased in galleries around the world, Yana has continuously stunned audiences with her meticulous creations full of color, concept and mixed media.

Listen to Yana’s full conversation with the 360 team on the 360 MAG Podcast HERE.

No stranger to pouring her countries rich history into her designs, we now see Yana’s paintings amongst the traveling exhibition Painting in Excess: Kyiv’s Art Revival, 1985 – 1993,” originally set to be showcased in her homeland of Ukraine.

Engulfed in the world of artistry since before she can remember, Yana often questions whether she had a choice on becoming an artist. Her professional ability has been evident from a young age; with Yana’s mother often telling a story about a painting she created in her adolescence. The piece, showcased at a children’s museum, was suddenly stolen from their home. Yana created the painting at the mere age of three years old.

Having doubted her position as an artist, Yana, too, experimented with differing professions before returning to her craft. She dabbled in design and programming, in which she gained mass success with. Nonetheless, she knew that the corporate environment did not suit her appropriately and went back to her original passion for creating art.

Amidst the ongoing war in Ukraine, Yana has been deeply affected by the destruction to her country. A daunting task, Yana spoke about the devastation she felt from hearing about the Russian invasion when stating, “It is horrible, I was in shock and very disoriented in the beginning [of the war].”

Yana’s thoughts pour into her work, evoking a new era of her works. She finds that her most recent paintings are a version of the distilled reality of the situation at hand. Each hue used in her art represents something deeper than the color wheel could ever encompass, it exemplifies the weight of Ukraine on Yana’s heart.

She often considers the conflict endured by everyone affected by the war; those who have fled and those who are still in the country. The situation at hand in Ukraine has had an everlasting affect on her personal and professional wellbeing.

“[It is] one thing is to be a tourist; another thing is to be a refugee.”

Her latest participation in the new exhibition “Painting in Excess: Kyiv’s Art Revival, 1985 – 1993” was organized a few years back, postponed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Held at the Coral Gables Museum through October of 2022, the showing was originally conceived by the Zimmerli Art Museum at Rutgers. The project embraces a life of its own, taking a new shape and meaning modernly with the tragedy occuring in Ukraine.

Yana utilizes delicate use of color to personify her artistry, creating new narratives. In the way that verbal communication only accounts for a small portion of human interaction, Yana attributes color to bridging these gaps and expressing what cannot be stated in words. Often investigating new mediums for her artistry, Yana carefully crafts art that is theoretical and impactful.

Amongst her upcoming exhibitions, Yana has a New York residency opening on June 3. Entitled “Yana Bystrova: Approaching a Chaotic Reality,” the showing will be held at Gallery Arte Azulejo. A gallery walk will be sported on June 16 as well.

Additional resource on Yana.

Article by: McKinley Franklin x Vaughn Lowery

Yana Bystrova Ukranian artist image via Yana Bystrova for use by 360 MAGAZINE
Mon Laferte for use by 360 MAGAZINE

Mon Laferte × District 13 International Art Fair

Artist Mon Laferte joins in at the District 13 International Art Fair in Paris this week amongst leading artists from the realms of street and pop art. The exhibition opens to the public from January 13 to 16.

Gracias,” the acrylic, mixed media piece of art created by Laferte will be auctioned off on Sunday, January 16 at 4:00 PM. (CET), by Drouot Group. To be eligible to bid on the auction day, make sure to register before Sunday, January 16 HERE.

Mon Laferte places her artwork on exhibit at the District 13 International Art Fair, represented by the Bahía Utópica Art Gallery in Valparaíso, at the Hôtel Drouot. The art fair brings together the edginess but energetic ambiances from galleries of street and pop art. An auction house showcased at the fair elevates the cohabitation of varying media forms to support urban artists.

Spanning from January 13 to 16 Laferte’s paintings will be available for sale, accompanied by a group of six other Chilean artists from Valparaíso, at Stand 10-B located at 9 Rue Drouot Paris. Her painting, “Gracias,” joins the special final auction with 27 other top artists from the world of street and pop art, on January 16. View the catalog HERE.

The piece “Gracias” is an Acrylic and mixed technique piece on canvas with dimensions of 122 x 91 centimeters. Laferte speaks about the piece, stating, “Some of these paintings I did while I was undergoing hormonal treatment to get pregnant. I have never heard anyone talk about the terror they feel, every day is an achievement. These have been the months in which I have felt the most fear in all my life. Never before did I take care of myself as much as I do now. Before I could drink and not sleep for many days and nothing mattered to me, now everything has changed for me. Every decision is critical to the successful end of my pregnancy. Also the hormones have been completely violent. Sometimes I go from happiness to deep depression. Pregnancy is not all tender and rosy. There are days when I feel like a black hole that lives in me is swallowing me.”

About Mon Laferte

Singer, songwriter and visual artist Mon Laferte has a unique artistic point-of-view that spans over a range of creative branches. The Chilean artist generates modern and stylish Latin music that captivates her audiences. Her personal songwriting charm snatched Laferte the Best Singer-Songwriter Album for Seis at the 2021 Latin GRAMMY’s. Recently, the album also received a GRAMMY nomination for “Best Regional Mexican Music Album (Includes Tejano).”

Amidst her career in the music industry, Laferte is a fully fledged artist with artwork notarized in differing countries. Laferte’s work continues to be established in exhibitions throughout numerous cities, including “Gestos” at the Museum of Mexico City. Her unique murals stand out amongst street art in Chile, Mexico and Los Angeles.

Ferne Jacobs × Craft in America

Fiber artist Ferne Jacobs’ lifetime art collection spanning from the mid-1960s to 2022 will be on display exclusively at the Craft in America Center.

The Los Angeles artist has been innovating in the art world for over fifty years. The exhibition will showcase around 30 pieces of work created by Jacobs across the timeline of her career. Though Jacobs has lived in Los Angeles for many years, her art has never been on display in such a way. The experience will take visitors through the evolution of her career as an artist and highlight her unique tactics and techniques.

Jacobs serves as a pioneer in the development of fiber as an artistic form. She is renowned for the methods she uses to manipulate the rare material. While embracing traditional techniques of knotting, coiling and twinning, Jacobs has continued to elevate these practices into something revolutionary. Though she may work in fiber, Jacob’s artwork are sculptured pieces of art.

The display of Jacobs’ artwork allows the public to admire and be inspired by her artistic approach. All of Jacobs’ work signifies a personal artistic journey constructed and apparent in her artforms. With years of dedication, Jacobs has perfected and transformed her unique craft.

The exhibition will run from April 2, 2022, to June 18, 2022, at the Craft in America Center in Los Angeles, California.

Related Programming

While the exhibition is an in-person experience, Craft in America is creating a virtual exhibition for those who cannot be in attendance. The virtual exhibition is complemented by an assortment of public programs such as an artist talk, demonstration, and hands-on workshop. Students from the Craft in Schools program, which works to encourage underprivileged K-12 Los Angeles schools, will be attend the exhibit. They will have the chance to learn about Jacobs’ creations, which serves as an opportunity for the students to explore the artistic method of fiber.

About Ferne Jacobs

After moving to Los Angeles at a very young age, Ferne Jacobs dedicated her life to her craft. After taking a weaving workshop with the artist Arline Fisch in the mid-1960s, Jacobs discovered her passion. After obtaining her M.F.A. from Claremont Graduate University in 1976, Jacobs has been showcased in several solo and group exhibitions throughout the United States and internationally. Accumulating varying awards for her groundbreaking art, Jacobs artwork is also featured in public collections such as the Smithsonian National Museum of American Art (Washington D.C.), the Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York City) and the Museum of Arts and Design (New York City).

ferne jacobs inside 360 MAGAZINE.

Image courtesy of Flying Horse for 360 Magazine

Mirah Lehr’s Residency at Flying Horse

Flying Horse Editions Selects Mira Lehr For 2021 Visiting Artist Residency Program

Lehr’s New Editions of Original Works Created in Residency will Debut During Art Basel Miami Beach 2021 at INK Miami

Nationally Acclaimed Studio Invites World’s Leading Artists to Push Boundaries with Cutting-Edge Technology
Flying Horse Editions, the nationally acclaimed printmaking studio that invites some of the world’s leading artists for its Visiting Artist Residency Program, has chosen Mira Lehr for their select roster of artists for 2021. The studio is celebrated for cutting-edge technology and inspiring artists to push the boundaries of printmaking, in a kinetic setting among its team of master printmakers. In her new series, Lehr, now at the bold age of 86, is experimenting with explosives, fuses, plexiglass, watercolor, and inks ‒ exploring new ways to use nontraditional materials in the art of printmaking. Mira Lehr is a force of nature to be reckoned with, said Theo Lotz, the Director of Flying Horse Editions. She is a fearless explorer. Lehr’s body of work spans all media, not bound by one process. Her artistic energy and spirit are boundless. We knew that her bold approach to artmaking would lead to a great collaboration. Lehr thrives in our studio, which relishes the unexpected. Lehr’s new work created at this residency will debut during Miami Art Week/Art Basel Miami Beach 2021, at the INK Satellite Fair (December 1-5 at the Dorchester Hotel).
This fair is produced by the International Fine Print Dealers Association, and is recognized worldwide as one of the leading presentations of works on paper by internationally renowned artists. Lehr’s new limited editions will then tour nationwide with Flying Horse throughout 2022 at several art fairs across the U.S. and internationally. Her new work will also be presented at an opening reception at the studio, featuring live demonstrations of her process of igniting gunpowder and fuses to create her artworks. Flying Horse Editions was established in 1990 at the University of Central Florida. The artists invited to participate in the residency has included: Diana Al-Hadid, Elia Alba, Chakaia Booker, Will Cotton, Ke Francis, Luis Gispert, Eddie Martinez, Odili Donald Odita, and Toyin Ojih Odutola.
Lehr completed the first part of her studio residency in the spring, and will return to Flying Horse later this year to complete her new editions there. Every artwork in Lehr’s new editions will each be an original work of art that was created exclusively during the residency. They were each imagined with these trailblazing printmaking techniques in mind, and are each one of a kind. So far, Lehr has created a series of monotypes with watercolor prints created on plexiglass. She has also created a new lithograph with collage pieces that will be burned and ignited using the artist’s signature technique with fuses and gunpowder, for a new varied edition.
My experience at Flying Horse Editions has been a powerful new adventure in artmaking for me. I am honored to have been invited to their artist residency this year, said Mira Lehr. Their passionate commitment to the craft of printmaking is evident, they really put their hearts into the visiting artist’s experience . I was able to experiment with great freedom ‒ they encourage the artists to take risks, while remaining true to your voice.
This research space houses professional visiting artists for short term residencies with assistance from master printmakers and students. The artists’ drawings are scanned, manipulated digitally, and then put on a copper plate similar to what would have been used during Rembrandt’s time. Lehr’s nature-based imagery includes painting, design, sculpture and video installation. Her processes include innovative usage of resin, gunpowder, fire, Japanese paper, dyes and welded steel. Her paradoxically destructive yet creative fire techniques burn holes and leave imprints in her prints resulting in an even more layered and complicated final artwork. The resident artists invited to Flying Horse Editions have the benefit of working with a massive 300-ton hydraulic press that is dramatically colored red. This behemoth machine produces complex relief prints that expand the creative possibilities of what artists may have previously envisioned. Unlike traditional presses, this hydraulic press applies an immense amount of pressure, downward onto the printed area, yielding much more precise images, with several blocks in multiple colors. Because the printer requires such fine tuning, Siemens donated a sophisticated electronic system that tricks out the controls enabling unparalleled precision. Watch the high-tech colossus in action here.
The Visiting Artist Residency Program at Flying Horse Editions is made possible by the members of the institution, a grant from the Winifred Johnson Clive Foundation, and with funding by the Judith and David Albertson Endowment in the Arts. The goal of the program is to create a world-class initiative that promotes creative interaction between professional artists and students, while also creating sustainability within the printmaking field ‒ training the next generation of artists and printmakers.
Flying Horse Editions is a collaborative research center in the College of Arts and Humanities at the University of Central Florida, and a non-profit publisher of limited-edition prints, artist books, and art objects by internationally renowned artists.

About the Artist
Mira Lehr’s solo and group exhibitions number more than 300. She is a graduate of Vassar College (1956) with a degree in Art History, under the mentorship of Linda Nochlin, the renowned feminist art historian. Lehr will be the subject of a new, 420-page international monograph by the leading art book publisher Skira Editore, to be published in the spring of 2022. She has been invited to present a solo exhibition at the Deering Estate in the fall of 2021.
Lehr has been collected by major institutions across the U.S., including the Smithsonian Museum of American Art (Washington), the Getty Museum Research Center (Los Angeles), the Boca Raton Museum of Art, the Perez Art Museum Miami, the Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center (NY), the Margulies Collection, the Mennello Museum of American Art, MOCA North Miami, the Jewish Museum of Florida-FIU, and the Orlando Museum of Art. Her work is in the private collections of Elie and Marion Wiesel, Jane and Morley Safer, and Judy Pfaff, among others. She is included in the Leonard Lauder Corporate Collection in New York. Thirty of her paintings were commissioned for the collection of Mount Sinai Hospital. Her work can be seen in American Embassies around the world and is permanently on view in the Sloan Kettering Memorial Center.
Lehr’s 2020 solo museum show at the Mennello Museum of American Art was selected by The New York Times as one of the leading museum exhibitions nationwide in the U.S. in the 2020 special Museums Section. Her solo museum exhibition headlined Art Basel Miami Beach 2019 at the Jewish Museum of Florida-FIU, and also received national and international critical acclaim. Her museum-wide exhibition at the MOCA North Miami spanned across 10,000 square feet of installations. She has currently been chosen by Flying Horse Editions as an invited artist for the Visiting Artist residency.
Mira Lehr’s nature-based work encompasses painting, sculpture, and video. She uses nontraditional media such as gunpowder, fire, fuses, Japanese paper, dyes, and welded steel. Lehr is known for igniting and exploding fuses to create lines of fire across her paintings. Critics are calling Lehr the Godmother of Miami’s art scene because in 1960 she created one of the nation’s first co-ops for women artists. At the age of 86 and with a career that spans more than six decades of artmaking, Lehr is creating more new work now than at any other point in her life ─ with a heightened sense of urgency about the planet and climate change. In the 1950s, Lehr studied and worked in New York as an artist, where she met some of America’s most prominent masters including: Joan Mitchell, Lee Krasner, and Helen Frankenthaler. She studied with James Brooks, Ludwig Sander, Robert Motherwell, and within the Hans Hofmann circle.
When Lehr moved back to Florida in 1960, she was shocked at the lack of an art scene, especially for women. She convinced many of the masters from New York to visit and lead workshops for her league of women artists. This helped the evolution of art in Florida. She was selected in 1969 by Buckminster Fuller, as one of only two artists, to participate in his World Game Project about sustainability and his groundbreaking Spaceship Earth concept which preceded the world’s very first Earth Day in 1970. Lehr’s video installation, V1 V3, was on view at the New Museum, NY. Her work has been included in numerous art fairs during Art Basel Miami Beach. She was the recipient of the Vizcaya Museum Lost Spaces Commission, where she was commissioned to create a site-specific installation for Vizcaya Museum and Gardens as part of the Museum’s centennial celebrations.

Artwork courtesy of Fondazione Antonio Dalle Nogare for use by 360 Magazine

Michael Krebber – Studiofloor and Diamond Paintings

From 29th May 2021 to 8th January 2022, the Antonio Dalle Nogare Foundation presents Michael Krebber’s first solo exhibition in Italy, entitled Studiofloor and Diamond Paintings. Find more information here

Michael Krebber (b. Cologne, 1954) is an internationally acclaimed artist and a figure central to the German art scene between the 1980s and ‘90s. Over the years he has become a reference point for a generation of younger artists, thanks to his constant and attentive focus on questioning the conventions and limits of the medium of painting, which he sees as a space for dialogue and a cross-genre hotbed, rather than something focused on the production of an object. 

For decades, Krebber’s art has been distinguished by a conceptual approach to painting, based on the conviction that it is impossible to invent anything new in art, as everything has already been invented. Rather than inventing something new, Krebber’s minimal and apparently unresolved interventions present the viewer with canvases that are open and full of possibilities. Like an unfinished sentence, his works leave the viewer free to imagine what might happen. 

The painting is viewed by the artist almost as a performance. It has been defined as a system of hesitations in which opposing forces simultaneously motivate and block one another, an approach that expands painting beyond the conventional notion of the artwork as an object. 

Krebber’s incomplete aesthetic, however, is not the result of an attempt to sabotage the medium, but stems rather from an explicit desire to extend dialogue beyond the canvas and space traditionally attributed to painting. This intention emerges clearly in the two series displayed in the exhibition.  

The series entitled studiofloor MK/P MK19/087/1-8 (2000), was presented with an enigmatic image on the cover of Artforum in 2005. In an exhibition staged several years ago, Krebber asked collectors to loan a series of his own paintings that he laid out on large tables in the centre of the room. Turning the common notion of display on its head, the walls – on which the paintings would normally have hung – were left empty and covered with large masonite panels from the artist’s floor, cut and positioned on the wall like paintings.

The second series displayed in the exhibition also replaces traditional painting techniques with a readymade approach.

In the fourteen Diamond Painting (2003) canvases, Krebber systematically demystifies, as the title of the series suggests, the centrality of subject and technique in painting by proposing a space that is open to suspension and incompleteness. So, store- purchased fabrics, decorated with pre-printed patterns, replace the traditional canvas, and become the surface on which Krebber paints simple geometrical white diamond shapes. As often happens in his work, the reference to influential German artists, in this case that have used fabric, like Rosemarie Trockel and Sigmar Polke, reveals his profound knowledge of art history and contemporary painting. La

The exhibition is staged in collaboration with Greene Naftali, New York.

Find more about the Antonio Dalle Nogare Foundation by visiting their website.

Art Exhibition illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Loribelle Spirovski Exhibition

In what is set to be the highlight of their Summer 2021 calendar, HOFA Gallery, London, will host ‘Coronation‘, a solo exhibition by prolific contemporary figurative painter Loribelle Spirovski, between the 2– 16 June this year. The upcoming exhibition, comprised entirely of new artworks created during the 2020 lockdown, delves into the effects of recent international epoch-making events on private life as distilled through the lens of the artist’s mind.         

‘Coronation’ builds on many of the themes and motifs audiences have seen in her past critically acclaimed collections like ‘Hommes’ and ‘Memento Mori’. It is also a potent play on words whose double meaning points to the Covid-19 pandemic as well as the political power shifts and significant moments occurring simultaneously which continue to exert mammoth influences on the external and internal lives of people everywhere. 

In her new collection, Loribelle explores familiar and poignant themes with an urgency that speaks to the moment, employing her signature line technique to delineate eyes, faces and human forms entangled and abstracted into the minimalist geometric background which represents the room of the mind. She notes that “With the pandemic reducing the worlds of many to the confines of their phone screen, [the] ‘room’ motif seems more pertinent than ever…as a metaphor for the mind and the characters and scenes inhabiting it, signifying the external world filtered into the subconscious.”

The tenuousness of a reality mediated by technology and social media distortions is yet another strong theme of ‘Coronation’. However, the overarching theme is undoubtedly the inescapable reckoning all must face with history. As power shifts in the US reverberate around the world, ‘Coronation’ compels viewers to interrogate the things that hold sovereign power in their lives, prefaced on the recognition that there is need for a re-orientation, repudiation, or re-affirmation of individual commitments.

By her own account, Loribelle was no stranger to the emotional turmoil many experienced during lockdown. The pressures of living with restricted access to family, friends, and the outdoors while news of Covid-19 casualties trickled in forced the artist to take a stand against looming mortality by rediscovering and reaffirming the purpose of her art as a medium for self-expression and for exhuming the hidden contentions of the mind. ‘Coronation’ is an outcome of this defiance and the show will run at HOFA’s flagship gallery in Mayfair for 2 weeks from 2 to 16 as both an in-gallery show and a virtual exhibition, for all to enjoy.

Coronation‘ opens at HOFA Gallery, London on 2 June and runs for two weeks until 16 June 2021. 

A parallel virtual show will also be accessible to all online via a secure weblink.

In compliance with Covid-19 safety protocols, all visits to the gallery will be strictly on RSVP basis.

HOFA Gallery Website

Instagram

Photo courtesy of artist
Photo courtesy of artist
Art illustration by Gabrielle Marchan for 360 Magazine

Taby Launches The Digital Street 

The traditionally physical medium comes to an online platform, featuring cutting edge artists from around the world.

Taby, a powerful new digital player in the art gallery scene, is proud to announce the launch of its second exhibition, The Digital Street. Conceived with the pandemic as a backdrop, Taby’s curator Emerson Radisich has carefully selected works from an international group of artists that are vibrant representations of our times. The new exhibition touches on several themes: the emotional reflections of dealing with the post-COVID era, the blending of our everyday lives with the digital realm, and thoughtful geo-political commentary, to name a few surface points.

The Digital Street engages the viewer on several levels, whether it’s the symbols of the collective unconscious tapped into by Polish artist Karifurava, representing our inner world, or the brutal honesty of Judy Rhum’s quarantine series, demonstrating the outward reality of how the structure of our daily lives has changed.

In keeping with Taby’s tradition of exhibitions benefiting charities associated with the theme of each show, CEO Mo Al Khater has selected Street Art For Mankind (SAM) as this exhibit’s recipient. SAM produces large murals, interactive exhibitions and live performances to support human rights and bond communities across the planet. The charity primarily focuses on fighting against child labor & trafficking and funding raid and rescue programs through the Kailash Satyarthi Children’s Foundation.

Show Description

Graffiti and street art is an ever-expanding and popular genre of artmaking that has found an increased role and dedicated significance during the coronavirus pandemic. It is a practice that has evolved entirely within the public realm, and often comes with the capacity to challenge, critique and contort both public places and public knowledge. At a time where museums, galleries and institutions have closed their doors, street artists have remained steadfast in their craft, and many artists from other genres have migrated to the medium to be able to continue to share work publicly.

Muralism today has seeped into many services throughout the art world; significant institutions regularly exhibit street art and graffiti shows, with artists such Banksy and KAWS­–now household names who routinely break sales records at auction houses, and the aesthetic of graffiti is embedded in our society and spans advertising through to technical inclusions in fine artist’s practices, a process often referred to as Post-Graffiti.

Digital artmaking is no exception – several highly stylized comics, illustrators, designers and artists have appropriated the specific aesthetic qualities of graffiti and mark making, as well as the pursuit’s capacity to critique and challenge norms. The Digital Street seeks to examine these qualities through the works of artists globally. It presents an array of artmaking which utilizes digital reproduction in a graffiti-influenced style, and demonstrates a range of artists who openly critique the world around them within this particular practice – ultimately showcasing the beauty and necessity for graffiti in today’s climate.

The Digital Street features 18 works from 6 artists working around the globe:

  • Karifurava, Poland: is a Polish graphic designer, illustrator and fine artist currently based in Warsaw. Influenced by contemporary Eastern graphic designers and illustrators such as Keiichi Tanaami, his bold and colorful works explore mysticism, neo-religion, and the magical. Karifurava has exhibited extensively across the globe at galleries including Backwoods Gallery, Australia, and venues including VIKTAC, Poland.
  • Judy Rhum, Milan: a graffiti artist, illustrator and lecturer currently based in Milan. Her works are lucid and ludic, combining a playful and illustrative feel into the monumental platform that is graffiti. They are slick: graffiti with layered breakdowns, expanded geometric shapes and purposeful abstraction. Rhum is also the co-founder of Drinchendro, a Milan-based arts program.
  • Tom Gerrard, Australia: a graphic designer cum fine artist currently based in Melbourne, Australia. His unique practice involves the painting of simple characters, architecture and nature through a minimal color palette, where his works are often inspired by people he has met and places he has visited. Gerrard has exhibited work extensively across the globe at galleries including Stolen Space, London, RVCA, Tokyo and 1xRUN, Detroit.
  • Morris Vogel, Switzerland: a self-taught fine artist and illustrator currently based in Basel, Switzerland. Vogel examines surreal manifestations of politics, existentialism, awareness and human nature through a highly stylized black and white drawing style. His works have been exhibited at Kunsthallekleinbasel, Switzerland, Cvijeta Zuzorić Art Pavilion, Serbia and YOPE project space, Mexico.
  • Indie184 is a New York-based artist who has been active in graffiti culture for over 2 decades. Influenced by abstract expressionism and pop art, her paintings are raptures of color and textures. Fused with her original graffiti and street art, imagery, and designs juxtaposed with personal messages, Indie’s art has been exhibited in galleries and museums worldwide, including El Museo del Barrio, New York and Völklingen Ironworks Museum, Saarbrücken, Germany.
  • Nini Sum is a mixed-media artist based in Shanghai, China. Her work depicts urban scenery and characters from everyday life in a captivating and surreal setting, which is strongly influenced by modern city life and eastern philosophy. The form of Nini’s work varies from silkscreen prints and mural paintings, to collage on canvas and album art. She is also the founder of IdleBeats, China’s first independent screen-printing studio.

About Taby

Taby is a premium digital art gallery specializing in contemporary art. We provide several rolling digital exhibitions throughout the year which bring together hand-selected quality artworks under a specific curatorial theme. Taby only exhibits exclusive, limited edition artworks, shipped to your door, which are designed and manufactured to the highest quality. Our objective is to provide every customer with an exceptional piece of art that is ready to hang as soon as it is unpacked. Alongside every digital exhibition, Taby also selects a charity related to the theme of that exhibition, which then receives a portion of our revenue.

Taby is a global team. We are artists, curators and seasoned collectors who have developed exhibitions and worked with galleries all over the world. Our mission is to make choosing and collecting contemporary art as simple as possible; this is why we provide ready to hang artworks through our premium printing, stretching and framing service, offering bespoke curatorial services so that every client is able to find an artist and artwork to match their collection, and partner with a range of specialists to select the best artists for each theme and series. We look forward to serving you.

Artwork for 360 Magazine

GRAPHIC ART TRENDS FOR 2021

Artwork is often the center of a home and brings life and character to a space. As time progresses, artwork trends change and as the new season approaches new art trends are arising. 

With the start of a new year, Desino is excited to present the graphic art trending this spring! Abstract art is at the forefront for the coming season, with organic shapes, arches and geometric lines adding an artsy element to our walls. Check out the latest graphic prints created by our very own Design Studio.

ARCHED DESIGNS

The rounded arch can be spotted through architectural history, and this year the classic curved shape is leading the way in the interior world. Arched furniture, doorways and home accessories are being spotted everywhere! This spring we’ll be decorating our walls with arched designs that bring a classic and stylish feel to our homes. Many people have used the arched design as a makeshift headboard, a DIY that blends in with the trends. 

ORGANIC SHAPES

For abstract art lovers, the organic shapes coming this spring are the perfect addition to your walls! Featuring warm, earthy tones, this graphic art featuring soft shapes and curves will bring a fresh feel to your gallery wall. These pair perfectly with less abstract pieces of art and tie together any gallery wall. 

FIGURATIVE FUTURE

In contrast to the abstract art trending right now, figurative art is coming on strong this season. With a more simplistic approach to this art style, we’re loving these simple portrait drawings honoring our human shapes. These pieces of art encapsulate the beauty of human features. 

GEOMETRIC STRIPES

Monochrome art complements all kinds of interior styles and this season we’re embracing these geometric patterns in black and white. A great choice if you want a modern accent piece for your wall, these graphic prints will look great in minimalist and colorful homes alike. Pairing these with silhouettes, as seen in the gallery wall below, instantly creates a beautiful contemporary wall. 

Visit desenio.com for more graphic gallery walls and inspiration.

Artwork for 360 Magazine
Artwork for 360 Magazine
Artwork for 360 Magazine
Graffiti and art article illustrated by Gabrielle Archuleta for 360 magazine

Guggenheim Presents José Manuel Ballester

The Guggenheim Museum Bilbao presents José Manuel Ballester [2020/03/15], which will be open to the public over the next three months. The project consists of a series of photographs taken by the artist around the deserted streets of locked-down Bilbao last spring, exhibited alongside About the Guernica, 2009/2020 by Ballester, an emptied-out version of Picasso’s painting that conveys a contemporary perspective on the historical event and human tragedy.

This project as a whole offers a reflection on the consequences of serious events such as wars or pandemics. Thus, the dialogue between the ‘emptied out’ Guernica and the photographs of the apparently uninhabited city presents the viewer with an interesting and open reflection.

This project bears witness to the period of lockdown through a selection of large-scale photographs that reflect the deserted streets and spaces of Bilbao such as La Salve Bridge, Elcano, the Metro and Calle Bailén, casting an almost unreal image that could represent the current situation anywhere in the world.

In the words of Ballester, “The human absence on the streets created unusual images of totally empty roads, avenues, and squares, but the most disturbing part was knowing that all the inhabitants were there, that they were just a few meters from me, protected within the walls of their homes. Despite being so close, silence reigned supreme.”

This portrait of the uninhabited city has many parallels with the artistic vision José Manuel Ballester has been developing for years through his impressive series of works called Hidden Spaces, in which he reinterprets key paintings in the history of art devoid of their characters, giving them a new artistic and human sense.

About the Guernica is a photographic reproduction printed on linen, the same size as Picasso’s original canvas, digitally treated to empty the space of all its human characters. Thus, the architectural interior, with its interplay of light and shadow, remains a silent witness to the bombing of Gernika in 1937. Ballester shifts Picasso’s chosen time sequence to a later time, in which all of the protagonists have disappeared, but in which, in the artist’s words, “the signs of the inhuman remain, as do the flames of the fire that still burns, like the flower that blossoms from the sword”.

The experience provided within the museum itself is complemented by a digital project that develops the concept of emptiness so strongly present in Ballester’s work, accessible from the Museum’s website. In addition, a book has been published that includes the series of twenty photographs taken by the artist in the streets of Bilbao alongside his reinterpretation of Picasso’s work, with comments by Carlos del Amor.

A Collaborative Project

This project is presented to the public in a time of restrictions. After the lockdown and the Museum’s temporary closure last spring, current mobility constraints and economic difficulties make it hard for initiatives to move forward. It is in these challenging times when collaborations and the sum of efforts acquire new value, working together to make a project became a reality.

[2020/03/15] José Manuel Ballester would have been impossible without the generous collaboration of three companies: Estudios Durero has been responsible for the production of the large-scale photographic reproductions with special high-quality printing solutions, in addition to the creation and publication of a homonymous book; Giroa-Veolia has carried out the installation and lighting of the works in the special context that we are going through, and LIN3S has developed the digital experience that, for the first time in the Museum, shows in an innovative way not only the pieces presented in the Museum space but also some others by the artist that complete his project for the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao.

 Hidden Spaces in the Museum Collection

José Manuel Ballester’s intervention on Guernica and on the other works included in the Hidden Spaces series is, in his own words “an attempt to bring into the present moment the events that motivated the creation of these works and to equate them with the current conflicts that exist in the world. These are events that scandalize and move us, but, at the same time, they fade away in our consciousness when they are far away.”

“When you strip paintings of their characters, you’re faced with a desolate, absurd landscape that brings out the horror in the wake of human savagery,” said Ballester.

Three works by José Manuel Ballester belonging to the Hidden Spaces series are present in the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao Collection: The Third of May (2008), The Royal Palace (2009) and The Raft of the Medusa(2010). These works are reinterpretations, respectively, of The 3rd of May 1808 (1814) by Francisco de Goya, Las Meninas (1656) by Diego Velázquez, and The Raft of the Medusa (1818–19) by Théodore Géricault.

RELATED ACTIVITIES
Session of bertsos Hustuari Hitzak (Words about Emptying Out)
Renowned bertsolaris Andoni Egaña and Maialen Lujanbio will offer a session of bertsos from the Museum gallery that houses the work About the Guernica and José Manuel Ballester’s images of uninhabited spaces. This session will be accessible via streaming.

A Conversation- January 14
Artist José Manuel Ballester, curator Petra Joos, and journalist Carlos del Amor will discuss the most relevant aspects of this unique project in a talk that can be followed both in person at the Museum Auditorium and via streaming. The experience can be found here.

Gaggenau Impossible Skies illustration by Mina Tocalini

Gaggenau Exhibition

From 9 July to 22 September, the luxury design brand Gaggenau and Cramum present in Milan the solo exhibition Impossible Skies by Davide Tranchina, curated by Sabino Maria Frassà. The works on display are mostly unpublished and are made with the off-camera technique for which the artist is famous.

The “distance” is the key concept to get closer to understanding the world of Davide Tranchina. Human beings have always been driven to look from the earth to the sky and the horizon. From such contemplation arise unsolvable ontological doubts that move mankind to act for better or for worse. But what the viewer sees, as often in Tranchina’s work, in reality does not exist and has never existed, so what we see today are deliberately “Impossible Skies”. The artist triggers a sensory short-circuit between perceived figuration and recorded reality that provokes a vertigo not only because of the distance between us and the sky, but also because of the ambiguity of the image itself. For Tranchina, art and photography do not record what we perceive, but rather an ontological reality, that is, they provide the elements to see what the human eye – a mere organ – alone cannot grasp.

Exhibition Information

Monday – Friday 10 am – 7pm

Gaggenau Hub, Corso Magenta 2, Milan

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