Posts tagged with "connecticut"

Transgender Sports illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

NCAA LGBTQ OneTeam

NCAA LGBTQ OneTeam facilitators publish open letter condemning anti-transgender legislation

The NCAA LGBTQ OneTeam, a group of NCAA- trained facilitators at colleges across the country published an open letter condemning the actions taken by 28 states across the country to introduce, pass, and sign anti-transgender legislation. 2021 has been a record year for anti-transgender legislation, with 93 anti-transgender bills introduced across the country, the vast majority of which attempt to ban transgender women and girls’ participation in girls’ sports or ban transgender youth from accessing medically necessary, gender-affirming health care.

Laws have been signed banning transgender women and girls’ participation in girls’ sports in Mississippi, Tennessee, and Arkansas, with Executive Orders being signed to the same effect in South Dakota.  Legislators across the country have failed to provide examples of issues in their states to attempt to justify these attacks, laying bare the reality that these are attacks on transgender youth that are fueled by discrimination and not supported by fact.  Collegiate and professional sports organizations have had trans-inclusive policies for years without incident, and there is no reason any state would need a ban on transgender participation in sports.

The NCAA LGBTQ OneTeam open letter reads as follows:

An Open Letter in Support of Transgender Student-Athletes

We, the undersigned, are facilitators of the National Collegiate Athletics Association’s (NCAA)Division III LGBTQ OneTeam Program, which is a national training program that fosters LGBTQ+ inclusion in NCAA Division III athletics, and members of the NCAA’s Division III LGBTQ Working Group. Given the recent rise in legislation that is focused on excluding transgender people from athletics across the country, we have decided to use our collective voice to condemn such actions. We call on elected officials across the country to immediately halt legislation that is aimed at excluding transgender youth and young adults from equal and equitable participation in sport.

In our role with the NCAA’s LGBTQ OneTeam Program, we train coaches, athletics administrators, and student-athletes across the whole of Division III athletics. This program is aimed at helping to understand the importance of LGBTQ inclusion in college athletics, while also identifying strategies and best practices for institutions and conferences to better ensure that all student-athletes–regardless of their sexuality, gender identity, and/or gender expression–can participate in an inclusive and safe athletic climate. We cannot, in good conscience, fail to speak out at this critical moment.

In the past several weeks, actions–which are aimed at excluding transgender youth and young adults from equal and equitable participation in sport–have been taken by elected officials inseveral states, including Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Maine, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, and West Virginia. At the time of this writing, the Governors ofArkansas,Idaho,Mississippi, andTennessee have already signed such dangerous legislation into law. 

Legislation aimed at categorically banning transgender people–and particularly transgender girls and women–from sport is inherently discriminatory. Such legislation is often “informed” by hate and misinformation rather than science, and it is most certainly “informed” byfear instead of fact. Conversely, trans-inclusive policies, such as those established by theNCAA and theInternational Olympic Committee (IOC), are better informed by the current scientific evidence, and this evidence shows that transgender women do not have an inherent competitive advantage over cisgender women.

Furthermore, discriminatory legislation that is aimed at excluding transgender people from sport has a number ofserious consequences for transgender students. Such legislation dehumanizes transgender students, refuses them the opportunity to participate equally and equitably in athletics, undermines their support in educational settings, damages their mental health, and ultimately harms these students, while also contributing to an exclusionary athletic environment and a more hostile school climate for all students.

We immediately call for 1) an end to such legislation in all states and 2) a repeal of such laws in Arkansas, Idaho, Mississippi, and Tennessee. And finally, we also encourage our legislators to better consider theNCAA best practices and importance of an inclusive athletic environment for all student-athletes.

Sincerely,

The Undersigned

Timothy R. Bussey, Ph.D.

Pronouns: they/them

Associate Director, Office of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion | Kenyon College

Kayla Hayes, M.Ed.

Pronouns: she/her

Associate Head Women’s Basketball Coach Dept. of Athletics | Denison University

Kyrstin Krist, Ph.D.

Pronouns: she/her

Associate Professor of Kinesiology and Faculty Athletic Representative | Methodist University

Melynda Link, M.B.A.

Pronouns: she/her

Director of Athletic Facilities & Game Day Operations, Dept. of Athletics | Haverford College

Kathleen M. Murray

Pronouns: she/her

President, Office of the President | Whitman College

Jess Duff

Pronouns: she/her

Assistant Athletic Director for Student Athlete Services & Internal Operations Dept. of Athletics | Bates College

Jessica Weiss

Pronouns: she/her

Head Field Hockey Coach, Dept. of Athletics | Randolph-Macon College

Jennifer Dubow

Pronouns: she/her

Executive Director | Southern California Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (SCIAC)

Maura Johnston

Pronouns: she/her

Head Field Hockey Coach, Dept. of Athletics | Fairleigh Dickinson University

Scott McGuiness

Pronouns: no pronouns

Director of Athletics, Dept. of Athletics | Washington & Jefferson College

Danielle Lynch, M.S.Ed.

Pronouns: she/her

Senior Woman Administrator and Head Track and Field/Cross Country Coach Athletic Department | Penn State University – Harrisburg

Melissa Walton

Pronouns: she/her

Senior Associate Athletic Director Athletic Department | Albion College

Amy Reed

Pronouns: she/her

Senior Woman Administrator and Head Women’s Basketball Coach Dept. of Athletics | Rochester Institute of Technology

Donna M. Ledwin

Pronouns: she/her

Commissioner | Allegheny Mountain Collegiate Conference (AMCC)

Donnesha Blake, Ph.D.

Pronouns: she/her

Director of Diversity and Inclusion Dept. of Student Affairs | Alma College

Tim Wilson

Pronouns: he/him

Assistant Track and Field Coach, Dept. of Athletics | Stevens Institute of Technology

Anne Kietzman

Pronouns: she/her

Head Field Hockey Coach, Dept. of Athletics | Washington College

Ashley Crossway, D.A.T., A.T.C.

Pronouns: she/her

Assistant Professor and Coordinator of Clinical Education Dept. of Kinesiology | SUNY Cortland

Melissa Brooks

Pronouns: she/her

Head Women’s Basketball Coach Athletic Department | Fairleigh Dickinson University – Florham 

Tiffany Thompson

Pronouns: she/her

Associate Director of Gender and Sexuality Initiatives, Intercultural Center | Swarthmore College

Kirsten Clark

Pronouns: she/her

Associate Athletic Director, Dept. of Athletics and Recreation | Clark University

Kate Levin

Pronouns: she/her

Assistant Sports Information Director Dept. of Athletics | Ramapo College

Cori Collinsworth

Pronouns: she/her

Head Softball Coach, Athletic Department | Hanover College

Bethany Dannelly

Pronouns: she/her

Associate Director of Athletics, Dept. of Physical Education and Athletics | Washington and Lee University

Jennifer Childress-White, M.Ed.

Pronouns: she/her

Assistant Athletic Director and University Title IX Coordinator Dept. of Athletics | Pacific Lutheran University

Elise Fitzsimmons, M.S., A.T.C.

Pronouns: she/her

Assistant Athletic Trainer, Dept. of Athletics| SUNY Oswego 

Amanda Walker

Pronouns: she/her

Athletic Program Coordinator Athletics Department | Lake Forest College

Danielle O’Leary

Pronouns: she/her

Senior Woman Administrator and Head Women’s Lacrosse Coach Athletics Department | Mount Aloysius College

Crystal Lanning

Pronouns: she/her

Director of Athletics, Dept. of Athletics | University of Wisconsin – River Falls

Neil Virtue

Pronouns: he/him

Assistant Director of Athletics and Head Swimming Coach | Dept. of Athletics, P.E., and Recreation Mills College

Jose’ Rodriguez, M.Ed.

Pronouns: he/him

Chief Diversity Officer, Office of University Diversity Initiatives | Cabrini University

Karen Moberg, M.Ed., L.A.T., A.T.C.

Pronouns: she/her

Associate Athletic Trainer, Athletic Department | Macalester College

Yishka Chin

Pronouns: she/her

Coordinator for Tutoring Services and Trailblazer Program Director, Dept. of Student Success | Notre Dame of Maryland University

Renee Bostic

Pronouns: she/her

Director of Athletics & Wellness Dept. of Athletics & Wellness | Notre Dame of Maryland University

Megan Cullinane

Pronouns: she/her

Assistant Athletic Director and Deputy Title IX Coordinator for Athletics Dept. of Athletics and Recreation | University of Massachusetts – Boston

Maureen Harty

Pronouns: she/her

Executive Director | College Conference of Illinois and Wisconsin (CCIW)

Stephanie Dutton

Pronouns: she/her

Commissioner | North Eastern Athletic Conference (NEAC)

Sharia Marcus-Carter

Pronouns: she/her

Senior Woman Administrator and Director of Compliance, Athletics Department | Brooklyn College

Mister Rogers illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Happy Birthday Mister Rogers

Virtual “Happy Birthday, Mister Rogers” Celebration Streams This Saturday, March 20th to Commemorate the Legacy of America’s Favorite Neighbor, Fred Rogers

Premiering on Saturday, March 20 at 10 am CT, Tom Bergeron (America’s Funniest Videos, Dancing with the Stars) will host a special virtual presentation of “Happy Birthday, Mister Rogers,” to commemorate America’s favorite neighbor, Fred Rogers’ 93 birthday. The virtual show will stream at the Mister Roger’s website, Facebook and on YouTube. It includes cameos and birthday shout-outs by celebrity recording artists Kellie Pickler, Vanessa Williams, Lee Greenwood, The Cowsills, Jaci Velasquez, Jim Brickman, Jon Secada, Marilyn McCoo & Billy Davis Jr, Micky Dolenz, and Sandi Patty. The virtual celebration is also dedicated to the late Joanne Rogers, wife of Fred, who passed away earlier this year.

The virtual birthday bash is the brainchild of two-time Grammy and Emmy winning producer, Dennis Scott, who has produced two albums of Fred Rogers’ music: Songs from The Neighborhood – The Music of Mister Rogers (2005) & Thank You, Mister Rogers – Music & Memories (2019). Scott also interviewed numerous fans and supporters of Mister Rogers and was surprised by how many people received personal letters from him over the years. One compelling story is that of a young Connecticut girl who was visited by Fred while she was in a coma recovering from brain surgery.

“I wanted to give folks a chance to tell their stories and express their gratitude to Fred on what would have been his 93rd birthday,” said Scott.

Coincidently, producer Dennis Scott is simultaneously spearheading a grassroots campaign to get Fred Rogers nominated to the Songwriters Hall of Fame. A petition in support of that is viewable here.

“Fred loved writing songs and becoming a member of the Songwriters Hall of Fame, alongside other great American composers, is the best birthday present we could give him,” said Scott. “Happy Birthday, Mister Rogers!”

elderly illustration by 360 Magazine

Caring for Elderly Parent Without Financial Burden

Ron Craft of Bristol is typical of many adult children who lovingly care for their aging parents. He considers it “a blessing” to be able to keep his mother, Shirley Dunphy, comfortably living in her own home. Also typical for family caregivers, Ron gave up his salary when he left his job as a financial advisor ten years ago to help his mom. However, Ron was able to ease his financial stress three years ago when he enrolled in the Connecticut Adult Family Living (AFL) program that pays him to provide care. Ron is supported by Assisted Living Services, Inc. in Cheshire, a credentialed provider of the AFL program.

“A lot of elderly parents don’t want to be a burden to their children, so they don’t ask for the assistance they need until there’s a crisis,” explains Mario D’Aquila, MBA and COO of Assisted Living Services. “The AFL program stipend eases any guilt parents may have about their child losing income, as well as financial stress for the caregiver.”

D’Aquila explains that a caregiver can receive a tax-free stipend of over $500 per week, depending on the complexity of care, under AFL. The program is part of the Department of Social Services’ Connecticut Home Care Program for Elders (CHCPE).

Shirley, 80, required care after falling down the stairs 13 years ago and sustaining second degree burns on her legs. She never fully recovered. Ron, 57, lives with his mother and does all of the cooking & laundry, gets her dressed, drives her to doctor’s appointments, bathes her and pays her bills. Prior to the fall, Shirley was extremely active, travelled a lot, was involved in church and other activities and hobbies, and socialized with friends. Dunphy is still full of mental energy, but uses a walker and cane to move around.

“It was difficult at first for me to admit that I physically needed help as I was always very independent and took care of others,” shares Dunphy. “I had to learn how to allow others to care for me. There’s always a sense of pride in all of us not wanting to admit you need help. But it is so natural for a mother and son to care for and help each other.”

The pair also share a spiritual bond as they are both retired ordained ministers. Dunphy writes faith-infused, Christian-based books. She authored Windfall: A Cut Above on Amazon and Kindle with four more books in the works based on her life experiences.

Shirley learned about the AFL program during a home visit from the CCCI (Community Care of CT, Inc) organization. Ron had previously volunteered at a nursing home, so he was already comfortable with caregiving.

“Before we could even apply for the program, Mary Scagliarini RN, Director of the Adult Family Living Program at Assisted Living Services (ALS), came to our house to get it prepared by installing fire alarms, life alert, etc.,” said Ron. “She then guided us through the application process and it was approved within a few days.” He is grateful that today, ALS offers a huge support network to give guidance and answer questions. Mary and Nurse Andrea Murray are just a phone call away.”

In its formal role as a credentialed provider of the program, ALS provides Ron and other caregivers with the “tools” needed to be comfortable and successful at caregiving, such as:

  • Provide the caregiver with orientation, education and on-going support.
  • Ensure that the home is properly maintained as required by the State.
  • Make sure the Caregiver is meeting the homecare and safety needs of the participant.
  • Pay the Caregiver weekly and offer direct deposit for convenience.
  • Provide respite coverage for the Caregiver for time off or vacations as needed.
  • Enlist resources, such as a Certified Dementia Care Specialist, to assist in training for certain circumstances.
  • Utilize the company’s unique and innovative program called CarePlus that combines caregiving and technology to help address client needs at no additional cost. “Personal care supplemented with wireless devices is the perfect combination,” said D’Aquila.

In order to qualify, applicants must be a Connecticut resident, 65 years of age or older, at risk of nursing home placement, meaning, the applicant needs assistance with critical personal care such as bathing, dressing, eating, taking medications, toileting or transferring, as well as meet the program’s financial eligibility criteria.

“Most elderly people want to remain in their own home and home care is more cost-effective than an in-patient care facility,” said D’Aquila.

“God bless this program!” exclaims Dunphy. “It has allowed me to live with my son in my own house. My son is my eyes, heart and soul, he is my guide and I am so grateful to be cared for by him.”

For his part, Ron is thrilled to see his mother not just living, but thriving. “I encourage anyone not yet enrolled in the AFL program to reach out to Assisted Living Services, as it’s going to alter your life!”

About Assisted Living Services, Inc.

For almost 25 years, award-winning home care agency Assisted Living Services, Inc. in Cheshire with branch locations in Clinton and Fairfield has provided quality care to residents across Connecticut. Their unique CarePlus program blends personal care with technological safety and monitoring devices from sister company Assisted Living Technologies, Inc. Learn more by visiting www.assistedlivingct.com or calling 203.634.8668.

Benzel-Busch Motor Car Hosted AMG Road Rally

Elite New Jersey motorcar enthusiasts participated in the exclusive Benzel-Busch Motor Car Road Rally Race that recently took place at Lime Rock Park in Lakeville, Connecticut. Touted as the “Road Racing Center of the East” for nearly 55 years, Lime Rock Park is a classic 1.53 mile, 7-turn course nestled in the scenic Berkshire Mountains in northwest Connecticut, the ultimate driving event featured world class Mercedes Benz AMG vehicles. Guests met the State’s foremost niche car aficionados and witnessed an exclusive AMG lineup including a GTR and the 2020 G-wagon. These awe-inspiring vehicles are handcrafted and tailored to elite Benzel-Busch client specifications, running from $50,000 to $200,000.

Watch Video here

SUMMER ReFRESH!

SUMMER ReFRESH!

Works from the collection

On view through September 21, 2019

Gilles Clement Gallery presents a gathering of their latest collection of cutting- edge Contemporary, Pop, Op and Street Art. An array of artwork delights and inspires the viewer with iconic imagery, vivid colors, and culturally significant themes. Rotating throughout the season, the exhibition will showcase an eclectic mix from the gallery’s stable of artists, and a range of mediums and techniques including photography, painting, mixed media, collage and neon. Fresh additions to the gallery are the vibrant abstract works of Philadelphia-based modernist painter Michael Gallagher; Spanish artist Lino Lago’s clever oil paintings that juxtapose classical and contemporary art; and the exploded pop sculptures of French artist Francois Bel. Other featured artists include: Curtis Cutshaw (oil enamel on birch), David Datuna (mixed media), Robert Mars (vintage collage and neon), Clement Kamena (acrylic on canvas), MARCK (video sculpture) and TRAN$PARENT (money art).

SUMMER ReFRESH: works from the collection will be on view through September 21, 2019 at the Gilles Clement Gallery, 45 East Putnam Avenue, Greenwich CT 06830.

WEBSITE: http://www.gclementgallery.com/upcoming-exhibitions

Images:

Michael Gallagher, Pink and Green Acrylic on canvas on panel, 36” x 48”

Francois Bel, Warhology Turquoise Caps Mixed media, acrylic glass, 17”x 5.5”x 4” (feature photo)

Lino Lago, Fake Abstract Blue Oil on canvas, 43.3” x 39.4”

Tom Burr at the Wadsworth Atheneum

Portraits by Tom Burr Propel MATRIX Exhibition Series at the Wadsworth Atheneum

Connecticut-born sculptor Tom Burr’s expansive body of portraiture takes a different approach to the relationship between the built environment, material, subjectivity, and historical personalities. Coinciding with the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots and the museum’s presentation of two other portrait centered exhibitions, Tom Burr / MATRIX 182 / Hinged Figures unites a selection of the artist’s reclining figures, several of which are portraits of individuals from queer history and American Modernism. Burr began the series in 2005, and MATRIX 182 constitutes the largest museum presentation of the reclining figures to date. The sculptures will be shown both within the MATRIX Gallery and around the museum, in dialogue with specific artists and architectural spaces, and also at the Austin House.

“I wanted to see the figures spread throughout the different spaces in the museum–spaces that resonate with the history of 20th-century art being shown–but also in other, less expected settings, such as Chick Austin’s house,” says Tom Burr. “I wanted to create a constellation of figures and sites that would engage, in a sense, the museum and the house as a total stage set.”

Burr’s sculptures combine Minimalist forms with figures and material attributes, such as books, magazine pages, notecards, tinsel, and a Chanel dress. He is interested in the way certain figures shape and are shaped by the spaces they inhabit. In this MATRIX project, Burr directly addresses the Wadsworth’s prominent role in the history of Modernism in several portrait subjects, including former director A. Everett ‘Chick’ Austin, and two creatives, writer Gertrude Stein and composer Virgil Thomson. They were commissioned in the 1930s to make the opera Four Saints in Three Acts to inaugurate the newly completed Avery Memorial and its purpose-built theater. Two 33 rpm records of the opera and are featured in Burr’s Chicks, 2008

One foot in the grave (reclining), 2010 references photographer Robert Mapplethorpe whose career is embedded in the Wadsworth’s history.A MATRIX artist in 1984, Mapplethorpe’s work has also been presented in exhibitions in 1990, 2015 and will be included in Be Seen: Portrait Photography Since Stonewall opening June 22, 2019. Burr’s portrait of Mapplethorpe (below) includes a postcard featuring one of the photographer’s black-and-white flower images and a small pile of soil evoking a meditation on illness and the AIDS epidemic.

“Tom Burr’s continual engagement with queer historical figures and modernism identified him as a strong choice for an expanded MATRIX project for the summer of Stonewall 50,” says Patricia Hickson, Emily Hall Tremaine Curator of Contemporary Art at the Wadsworth. “Although most of these sculptures were made some years ago, the personas

they evoke resonate with the Wadsworth’s history in terms of collections, exhibitions, and programming. Burr has remarked on the noteworthy inversion of these departed figures’ ‘return’ to the Wadsworth as memories in the form of sculptures.”

Artist Biography

Tom Burr was born in 1963 in New Haven, Connecticut. Burr has exhibited in group and solo shows throughout the world since 1988, in institutions and museums including the SCAD Museum of Art, Savannah, GA; FRAC Champagne-Ardenne, Reims, France; SculptureCenter, New York, NY; Skulptur Projekte, Münster, Germany; Contemporary Arts Museum, Houston, TX; Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia, Madrid, Spain; The New Museum, New York, NY, and the 2004 Whitney Biennial, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY. The works of Tom Burr are included in numerous private & public collections, including the Art Institute of Chicago, Chicago, IL; Hammer Museum, Los Angeles, CA; The Israel Museum, Jerusalem, Israel; Lenbachhaus Museum, Munich, Germany; Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, CA; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, MN; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY.

Related Programs

Tom Burr / MATRIX 182 / Hinged Figures opens during Art After Dark, Thursday, June 6 from 5-8pm, and the artist will give a Gallery Talk at 6:30pm. A docent-led Art In Focus tour of Tom Burr’s Chicks (2008) will take place on Friday, August 21 at noon. Curator Patricia Hickson will lead a Gallery Talk on Thursday, August 29 at noon.

About MATRIX

Inaugurated in 1975, MATRIX is the Wadsworth’s groundbreaking contemporary art exhibition series featuring works by artists from around the world. From its inception, MATRIX has been a forum for art that is challenging, current, and sometimes controversial. Through clear explanation and thoughtful engagement with the viewer, MATRIX exhibitions call into question preconceptions about art and increase understanding of its possibilities. Many MATRIX artists, such as Christo, Sol LeWitt, Gerhard Richter, Cindy Sherman, Andy Warhol, and Carrie Mae Weems are now considered seminal figures in contemporary art.

Exhibition and Program Support

MATRIX 182 is generously supported by the Howard Fromson Exhibition Fund.

The MATRIX program is supported by the Wadsworth Atheneum’s Contemporary Coalition. Sustaining support for the Wadsworth Atheneum is provided by Newman’s Own Foundation and the Greater Hartford Arts Council’s United Arts Campaign

About the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art 

Founded in 1842 with a vision for infusing art into the American experience, the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art is home to a collection of nearly 50,000 works of art spanning 5,000 years and encompassing European art from antiquity through contemporary as well as American art from the 1600s to today. The Wadsworth Atheneum’s five connected buildings–representing architectural styles including Gothic Revival, modern International Style, and 1960s Brutalism–are located at 600 Main Street in Hartford, Conn. Hours: Wednesday-Friday: 11am-5pm; Saturday and Sunday: 10am-5pm Admission: $5-15; discounts for members, students, and seniors. Free admission for Hartford residents with Wadsworth Welcome registration. Free “happy hour” admission 4-5pm. Public phone: (860) 278-2670; website: thewadsworth.org.

 Image:

Tom Burr, Chick, 2008. Plywood, paint, steel hinges, canvas medical straitjacket, white rubber, steel drafting lamp, steel ashtray. Installation view. SculptureCenter, 2008. Collection of Shelley Fox Aarons and Philip Aarons. © Tom Burr.

Zucker and Cutler To Release brent

JEREMY ZUCKER AND CHELSEA CUTLER TO RELEASE brent ON MAY 3RD

“you were good to me” OUT NOW

LISTEN HERE

“a pop power duo” – PAPER Magazine

Singers, songwriters and producers Jeremy Zucker and Chelsea Cutler are surprising their fans with an extended play titled brent, releasing on May 3rd. Their new single, “you were good to me,” is out now—watch the video HERE!

In just three days, “you were good to me” amassed more than one million Spotify streams and is currently featured on Spotify’s New Music Friday, It’s A Hit and Pop Rising playlists. brent was written and recorded by Zucker and Cutler in a remote cabin in upstate Connecticut last December. Read their letter to their fans announcing brent HERE!

When Jeremy Zucker and Chelsea Cutler joined forces for “you were good to me,” it was much more than two rising stars combining their natural-born talents; it was two friends sharing their personal conversations (set to music) with the rest of the world. Over the past few years, Zucker has galvanized a dedicated fan base with his early independently-released EPs and continued with his breakout singles “talk is overrated” ft. blackbear in 2017 and “all the kids are depressed” in 2018. He’s continued his upward mobility by outdoing himself with “comethru,” which has reached a staggering 80 million Spotify streams and 35 million video views. Meanwhile, Cutler has become a force, starting with a series of covers on Soundcloud that gave way to her own self-written and self-produced work, like 2017’s “Your Shirt,” which cracked the Spotify charts with over 62 million streams, and her two-part Sleeping With Roses mixtape series in 2018. Both artists have been paving the way in their respective lanes; however, their union was serendipitous, happening in 2016 at a college neither of them attended: The University of Connecticut. Fast forward three years and two signings with Republic Records, there was no better time to make music together. Returning to a cabin in Connecticut where they first collaborated on their duet single “better off,” Zucker and Cutler wrote and recorded “you were good to me,” a reflective piece on lost love.

JEREMY ZUCKER

FACEBOOK | INSTAGRAM | TWITTER

CHELSEA CUTLER

FACEBOOK | INSTAGRAM | TWITTER

SHIFT ARTS FESTIVAL

Kick off summer with live arts and films that explore the human/nature conundrum

Across the globe, humans face enormous questions: how do we find balance in our relationship with Nature? How do we transform what has been a quest for dominance into a sustainable collaboration? 

 

The Hopkins Center for the Art at Dartmouth College launches its second annual SHIFT festival, a 10-day suite of live, arts, film and discussions that explore the push and pull of that Human/Nature bond. Feel humans contend and at times cooperate with the forces of nature in a stage version of Moby-Dick, a spectacle of physical theater by Australian company Circa, and film screenings with special guests that probe the oceans and night skies. Wander among human percussionists interacting with nature world in Inuksuit; celebrate nature in song in a pop-up chorus. The schedule is a mix of free and ticketed events.

 

This year, SHIFT is bookended by concerts by Cory Henry & the Funk Apostles and Iris DeMent—artists who join past and present and speak to what it means to be an American in 2019. It also includes the Dartmouthpremiere of Dance Heginbotham, the acclaimed Brooklyn-based dance troupe led by John Heginbotham, director of the Dartmouth Dance Ensemble.

 

The performances in SHIFT will be enriched by a series of talks and master classes by Dartmouth scholars and visiting artists, who will unpeel various layers of how humans connect and impact the natural world. These include talks on energy, whaling, Melville and Americana music, as well as a discussion between Heginbotham and his collaborator, composer Tyondai Braxton.

 

Along with exploring big questions, SHIFT is also a great way to kick off summer in the Upper Valley, complementing the area’s wealth of opportunities to hike, bike, boat and otherwise enjoy the outdoors.

 

Tickets to SHIFT events go on sale to Hop members on Friday, April 26, and to the general public on Tuesday, April 30. SHIFT runs June 21 through 30 at locations in the Hop and on the Dartmouth campus. Tickets will be available at hop.dartmouth.edu or 603.646.2422.

 

SHIFT events

 

Cory Henry & the Funk Apostles

Friday, June 21, 8 pm

Spaulding Auditorium, $42/32/22

 

“I believe that love will find a way,” sings Corey Henry. And he’ll make you believe, too.

With his supple voice, soulful songwriting and chops on the Hammond B-3 organ, Henry “serves up a sermon of soulful bliss” (Denver Post) of R&B, Afrobeat, gospel and jazz. Graced with Grammy awards for his work with Brooklyn’s Snarky Puppy and his own namesake band, Henry has been called one of the finest organ players of his generation.

 

Moby Dick

Gare St. Lazare Players

Saturday, June 22, 8 pm

Sunday, June 23, 3 & 8 pm

The Moore Theater, $42/32/22

 

“For there is no folly of the beast of the earth which is not infinitely outdone by the madness of men, ” Herman Melville wrote in Moby-Dick. Compressing the novel’s details, characters and gigantic themes into one riveting night of theater, veteran Irish actor reels us into the harsh world of 19th-century whale hunting. In this battle with nature, the humans are determined to win–but at what cost? This engrossing, one-man refresh of Melville’s 1851 novel is backed by 10-string fiddler Caoimhin O’Raghallaigh (of The Gloaming). An American literary anchor splashes on stage.

 

Public talks, 6:30 pm, Top of the Hop, free

June 22: Irving Institute director Elizabeth Wilson on the interconnected histories of energy and whaling

June 23: Professor Donald E. Pease’s acclaimed talk on Melville and the American Renaissance

 

 

A Portal to the Sky: Cinema and Space

Mon, Jun 24, 8 pm 

Loew Auditorium, Free

 

Travel among the moon and stars with an evening of singular short films presented by Professors Jodie Mack and Dan Rockmore. Each film is an artistic celebration of the sky, space and worlds beyond, using real images as the source material.

 

 

Sing For the Earth

Tuesday, June 25, 8pm

Spaulding Auditorium, free

 

Come sing together in gratitude for earth’s abundant beauty!  In this program, you are invited to reflect on the relationship between humans and nature as the group reads through diverse short choral works related to nature, led by Handel Society director Robert Duff 

Recommended for all singers 12 and up; sight-reading skills are helpful but not required.

 

Dance Heginbotham and Alarm Will Sound

Wednesday, June 26

The Moore Theater, $32/22

 

Eight-member Dance Heginbotham brings its celebrated athleticism, humor

and theatricality to live music by the 22-member new music band Alarm Will

Sound (“original, vivid, reckless”-Los Angeles Times). DH is led by John

Heginbotham, who also directs the Dartmouth Dance Ensemble and

choreographed the acclaimed remake of Oklahoma that just moved to

Broadway. The evening includes new Heginbotham choreography to

selections from AWS’s new CD Acoustica—unprecedented acoustic versions

of electronica—as well as his Hop-commissioned new choreography for

composer Tyondai Braxton’s chamber work Common Fate.

 

Heginbotham and Braxton discuss their collaboration, June 26, 6:30 pm, Top of the Hop, free

 

The International Ocean Film Tour

Thursday, June 27, 8 pm

Spaulding Auditorium, $15

 

Swim among seething schools of sharks, ride the waves with adventurers transforming the sport of surfing, or cruise the world’s oceans with some  “anti-Ahab” activists–protecting, not hunting, whales. The subjects of these films inspire you with their ardor for the oceans and adventure. Eco-activist Henry Lystad (formerly MountainFilm Tour Director) introduces each movie with insider details and naturalist knowledge.

 

Humans by Circa

Friday and Saturday, June 28 & 29, 8 pm

Sunday, June 30, 3 pm

The Moore Theater, $47/37/22

 

Body, space, force and balance. In this heart-stopping nouveau cirque adventure that earned rave reviews on several continents, Australian circus artist/athletes test the limits of the human body. Forms fly through the air. Towers emerge and tumble. This virtuosic meditation on the body plays with the laws of physics, ratcheting up the tension between us and the space we move through.

 

Master class with Circa, Tuesday, June 25, details to come

 

Inuksuit

Saturday, June 29, 3 pm

Outdoor location on Dartmouth campus TBA, free

Rain date: Sun, June 30 at 3 pm.

 

Wander through a landscape of instruments–conch shells, gongs, drums, glockenspiels and more–accompanied by the ambient sounds of nature. Named after the stone piles used by native people to orient themselves in Arctic spaces, Inuksuit was created by environmental composer John Luther Adams. This event will involve up to 99 professional and community musicians in an outdoor campus location. As they walk among the musicians, listeners shape their own experience, discovering the listening points that call out most to them. Directed by Dartmouth music lecturer Amy Garapic.

 

Want to clang, whistle or whirr or otherwise play in the band? Go to hop.dartmouth.edu for more information.

 

Iris DeMent

Saturday, June 29, 8 pm

Spaulding Auditorium, $42/32/22

 

Iris DeMent is a voice for an America seeking roots and meaning. As Cory Henry marries retro-funk with Afro-Futurism, so DeMent brings a modern sensibility to the timeless pentecostal gospel twang of her native Ozarks. Twenty-seven years after she pioneered what we now call “Americana” with her debut album Infamous Angel, she is still sharing powerful stories and shining a light into dark places.

 

Dartmouth musicologist Ted Levin discusses DeMent’s place in American music,  June 29, 6 pm, Top of the Hop, free

NYC-Based Band “All Types of Kinds”

Mixing A Unique Blend of Influences From Rock to Blues, Folk, and Hip-Hop – The Bands Unique Multi-Genre Approach Lends A New Perspective to Alternative Music

 

In a city often oversaturated with musicians of every genre constantly performing and creating, it takes a special group of artists to truly stand out amongst the crowd that produce a truly unique sound, and New York City’s All Types of Kinds truly live up to the namesake.

All Types of Kinds (or ATOK) plays a wide variety of music ranging from rock to pop, folk, punk, funk, hip-hop, blues, jazz, and country – even sometimes all at once. The members come from diverse backgrounds that make for an amalgamation of musical textures and vibes. Their EP, “Love Songs (Or Songs For Your Ex)” debuted on Valentine’s Day 2018 and they are currently gearing for dates all over the country.

The band consist of Ray Rubio (Guitar), Billy Conahan (Guitar), Berk 0 (Percussion), and Rocco Stroker (Guitar) – all of whom have unique musical backgrounds. Ray, 20, a multi genre artist and singer/songwriter, hails from Harlem NY and has also been on stage from young age, mainly theater productions. Ray attended the American Academy of Dramatic Arts in 2014, and since then has been performing his music in the New York Metro Area and Richmond, Virginia. Billy, 25, is a queens native whose been on the stage since his early teens as a stand-up comedian, singer/songwriter folk artist playing his own folk tunes as well as cover tunes. Berk O, singer and percussionist, is from Brooklyn and also contributes to the band’s songwriting process, while Rocco is the newest member of the band – playing bass, guitar and as an incredible vocalist. He hails from New Fairfield, Connecticut.

WATCH: All Types of Kinds – Keep In Touch (Official Music Video)

WATCH: All Types of Kinds – Colorblind (Official Music Video)

With the goal of becoming a full-time, self-sufficient, self-produced band, able to tour and create their own audio and video products on a regular basis, they plan to soon follow up their debut with a sophomore effort in late 2018. Unlike other bands who strive for major-label greatness, ATOK shys away from fitting into an industry mold, and often scoff at the idea of being referred to as a ‘boy band’.

Believers in finding a way to share their music while remaining firmly in the driver’s seat, they continue to write, practice, and enjoy playing their music for any crowd that will have them. Making friends from all over the world by busking on the NYC streets has even allowed them to meet and collaborate with like-minded musicians.

These recent “Your Big Break” contest winners who’ve been praised for their “polished precision, sweet harmony, musicianship, artistry, versatility and originality in their smart lyrics” are ready for the big time. That time is now.

To Purchase All Types of Kind’s “Love Songs (Or Songs For Your Ex)” via iTunes, VISIT: http://apple.co/2MN7W5o

LISTEN: ATOK “Love Songs” via Spotify

For More Information on All Types of Kinds, VISIT: Facebook.com/ATOKMusic

Reverbnation.com/AllTypesofKinds

ATOK’s YouTube Channel

New Music From Jeremy Zucker and Chelsea Cutler

Today, multi-talented singer, songwriter and producer, Jeremy Zucker, debuts his latest song, “better off” with rising artist Chelsea Cutler—listen and share the track here.

Of “better off,” Zucker says, “I spent a whole week up in rural Connecticut at a studio that was built inside of an old carriage house. The last day I was there, Chelsea came up to write some new music with me and my best friend. I just remember Chelsea sitting down and playing this beautiful acoustic riff; I asked her what it was, and she responded, “I don’t know, I just came up with it.” For the next three hours, we wrote nonstop, cut vocals and passed out in the studio. I stayed up until sunrise finishing the production, and then Chelsea added those beautiful piano hits you can hear at the end of the track. The song probably took us 16 hours start to finish—it was one of the most organic, beautiful sessions I’ve ever done, and I’m so excited about how the song came out.”

“better off” follows Zucker’s previously released single, “all the kids are depressed,” which The New York Times hailed as “icy, minimal but tuneful electronic pop.”

Before entrancing listeners across the world, 21-year-old singer, songwriter and producer Jeremy Zucker had been quietly carving out his distinct sound from a bedroom in suburban New Jersey. A self-described “social introvert,” Zucker cites Jon Bellion, blackbear, EDEN, Bon Iver and Wet among his strongest influences. In the summer of 2015, Zucker released his first official EP titled Beach Island. The project saw a small amount of success, and from there Zucker steadily began to build a dedicated fan base.

Later that year, he released a stream of singles that would eventually be packaged together as an EP titled Breathe. The project’s breakout single “Bout It” quickly garnered millions of streams as it organically spread across Soundcloud and Spotify, drawing the attention of curators and fans across the world. In 2016, Zucker released his third EP, Motions, which features “Heavy,” a song that was later remixed by the recording artist blackbear who reached out to Jeremy after stumbling across his music on Soundcloud. The remix, “Make Daddy Proud,” was released on blackbear’s latest LP Digital Druglord. In 2017, Zucker was signed with Republic Records and released his third EP, idle. The EP features his breakout hit, “talk is overrated(feat. blackbear), which has over 14 million Spotify streams to date. Further music is set for release this spring.

LISTEN TO “BETTER OFF” HERE

JEREMY ZUCKER: FACEBOOK | INSTAGRAM | TWITTER | SOUNDCLOUD