Posts tagged with "painting"

Art4Equality x Life, Liberty & The Pursuit of Happiness

The Untitled Space is pleased to present a group exhibition and public art series “Art4Equality x Life, Liberty & The Pursuit of Happiness” presented in collaboration with SaveArtSpace and Art4Equality. The two-part exhibition features an empowering public art series of 10 billboards each by different artists launching on September 21, 2020 in a variety of locations throughout New York City, to coincide with a gallery exhibition opening on September 26, 2020 at The Untitled Space featuring the work of over 50 contemporary artists. Revolving around the theme of “Art4Equality x Life, Liberty & The Pursuit of Happiness” the public art series and group exhibition is curated by Indira Cesarine, founder of The Untitled Space and Art4Equality.

The gallery will feature the unique artworks displayed on the billboards (presented by SaveArtSpace) along with an exhibition of many additional works in a variety of mediums including painting, drawing, photography, video, and sculpture inspired by the words “Equality,” “Life,” “Liberty,” and “The Pursuit of Happiness,” which will be on view at the gallery through October 17, 2020. The Untitled Space is honored to collaborate with non-profit SaveArtSpace and support the programming of Art4Equality, an initiative that supports the creation of empowering equality themed exhibitions and public art.

Curatorial Statement:

“’What do these words mean to you: “Equality,” “Life,” “Liberty,” “The Pursuit of Happiness”? We live in an unprecedented time, our liberties robbed by a global pandemic, which laid painfully bare the inequities that have plagued the most vulnerable in our society for far too long. Political polarization in the United States is reaching critical mass with a divisive political system at war. Realities of social inequality and racial injustice are challenging our ability to have confidence in a promising future. With the 2020 elections approaching, I felt that it was a crucial time to create an opportunity for artists to respond, with the artwork presented in a public platform where it can reach an audience of millions of people every day and promote an inclusive dialogue.

The billboard transformed into an art display is an innovative, and ultimately accessible way to present contemporary art, transforming spaces normally dedicated to advertising into public art that has power and impact. We received such an overwhelming response to the exhibit opportunity, which was presented via an open call, that I expanded the project to include a gallery group exhibition featuring over 50 artists who created artworks inspired by the theme – most of which were created during quarantine. The public art series and exhibition “Art4Equality x Life, Liberty, & The Pursuit of Happiness” seeks to empower, enlighten, and shed a ray of hope in a city that has been under a dark cloud, in a country that is in tatters not only by an invisible virus, but also by political and civil unrest. As we navigate through this difficult time, “Art4Equality x Life, Liberty, & The Pursuit of Happiness” celebrates art as activism, giving voices to a diverse array of contemporary artists from all backgrounds, ages, and genders. I’m honored to guest curate the public art series for SaveArtSpace and hope viewers will be inspired and motivated by the public art billboards and exhibition artwork.” – Artist & Curator Indira Cesarine

EXHIBITING ARTISTS:

Alexandra Rubinstein, Alison Stinley, Alysia Davis, Ann Lewis, Anne Barlinckhoff, Annika Connor, April Fitzpatrick, Ashley Chew, Buket Savci, Cabell Molina, Coco Dolle, D’nae Harrison, Dan Alvarado, Daniel Aros-Aguilar, Danielle Siegelbaum, Daryl Daniels, David Siever, Dessie Jackson, Devynity Wray, Diana Zipeto, Dolly Faibyshev, Donna Bassin, Egypt H., Fahren Feingold, Faustine Badrichani, Geoffrey Stein, Hana Zhang, Indira Cesarine, Jamia Weir, Jared Freschman, Jodie Herrera, Joel Tretin, Jose Baez, Karen Bystedt, Katya Zvereva, Kim McCarty, Leah Schrager, Linda Friedman Schmidt, Lola Jiblazee, Lynn Bianchi, Meg Lionel Murphy, Michele Pred, Osaze Stigler, Panteha Abareshi, Paolo Morales, Q’shaundra James, Rachel Van Der Nacht, Rebecca Bird, Robin Tewes, Robyn Gibson, Rosemary Meza-DesPlas, Sarupa Sidaarth, Travis Rueckert, Tslil Tsemet, Valerie Carmet, and Vaughan Larsen.

PUBLIC ART BILLBOARDS (in collaboration with SaveArtSpace):

Anne Barlinckhoff – Pulaski Bridge 11th St & 53rd Ave, Queens Ashley Chew – Flushing Ave & Waverly Ave, Brooklyn Donna Bassin – McGuinness Blvd & Calyer St, Brooklyn Fahren Feingold + Indira Cesarine – W 46th St & 12th Ave, Manhattan Jodie Herrera – Hamilton Pl & 12th St, Brooklyn Kim McCarty – Flushing Ave & Spencer St, Brooklyn Meg Lionel Murphy – Myrtle Ave & Cornelia St, Queens Panteha Abareshi – Park Ave & Emerson Pl, Brooklyn Sarupa Sidaarth – McGuinness Blvd & Calyer St, Brooklyn Travis Rueckert – 11th Ave & W 45th St, Manhattan

ABOUT SAVEARTSPACE

Founded in 2015, in Brooklyn, NY, SaveArtSpace is a non-profit organization that works to create an urban gallery experience, launching exhibitions that address intersectional themes and foster a progressive message of social change. By placing culture over commercialism, SaveArtSpace aims to empower artists from all walks of life and inspire a new generation of young creatives and activists. Since 2015, SaveArtSpace has installed the artwork of 180 artists on 212 advertising spaces in 10+ major US cities, coast-to-coast. Beyond transforming advertisement space into public art, we work with a variety of community groups including: schools, senior residencies, shelters, youth groups, special needs programs, art collectives, galleries, and museums. Together, we aim to foster community and cultural enrichment through the arts. While supporting underprivileged and emerging artists by providing them the opportunity to display work in the public space.

For more information click HERE.

ABOUT ART4EQUALITY

Art4Equality is an initiative supporting equality themed art exhibitions and special projects including films and public art by female identifying artists and allies. The mission of Art4Equality is to create empowering artwork and exhibitions that can impact social change, raise awareness and inspire our community. Art4Equality additionally facilitates opportunities by providing mentorship to artists, as well as special programming such as panel discussions, performances, and educational art events. Art4Equality empowers by creating a platform for progress. By supporting the work of underrepresented and marginalized artists, Art4Equality demonstrates the value, quality, and diversity of their contributions to the community, encourages an inclusive dialogue, and promotes equality for all.

For more information click HERE.

ABOUT THE UNTITLED SPACE

The Untitled Space is an art gallery located in Tribeca, New York in a landmark building on Lispenard Street. Founded in 2015 by artist Indira Cesarine, the gallery features an ongoing curation of exhibits of emerging and established contemporary artists exploring conceptual framework and boundary-pushing ideology through mediums of painting, sculpture, printmaking, photography, video and performance art. The gallery is committing to exploring new ideas vis-à-vis traditional and new mediums and highlights a program of women in art. Indira Cesarine’s curatorial for The Untitled Space includes solo shows for artists Sarah Maple, Rebecca Leveille, Alison Jackson, Fahren Feingold, Jessica Lichtenstein, Tom Smith, Loren Erdrich, Kat Toronto aka Miss Meatface, Nichole Washington, and Jeanette Hayes among many others. Notable group shows include “IRL: Investigating Reality,” “BODY BEAUTIFUL,” “EDEN” and “(HOTEL) XX” at SPRING/BREAK Art Show, “SHE INSPIRES,” and internationally-celebrated group shows “UPRISE/ANGRY WOMEN,” and “ONE YEAR OF RESISTANCE” responding to the political climate in America, as well as numerous other critically-acclaimed exhibitions. Recent press on Indira Cesarine & The Untitled Space includes Vogue (US), Vogue Italia, CNN, Forbes, Newsweek, W Magazine, Harper’s Bazaar, Teen Vogue, New York Magazine, i-D Magazine, Dazed and Confused, and The New York Times among many others.

For more information click HERE.

 

“Entertainment Unit” by artist Sarupa Sidaarth, Artwork featured in “Art4Equality x Life, Liberty, The Pursuit of Happiness” Exhibition and Public Art Series Presented by The Untitled Space in collaboration with SaveArtSpace and Art4Equality

 

“Our Land” by artist Meg Lionel Murphy, Artwork featured in “Art4Equality x Life, Liberty, The Pursuit of Happiness” Exhibition and Public Art Series Presented by The Untitled Space in collaboration with SaveArtSpace and Art4Equality

 

“Behind The Flag” by artist April Fitzpatrick, Artwork featured in “Art4Equality x Life, Liberty, The Pursuit of Happiness” Exhibition and Public Art Series Presented by The Untitled Space in collaboration with SaveArtSpace and Art4Equality

EXHIBITION CONTACTS:

The Untitled Space: info@untitled-space.com

Exhibition Website: HERE

SaveArtSpace Billboards: HERE

Mina Tocalini, 360 Magazine, Independence Day Drink

2020 Labor Day Celebrations

By Cassandra Yany

In the face of COVID-19, Labor Day weekend looked very different his year. Absent were the large family cookouts and pool parties, or the big end-of-summer beach crowds. Many cities even had to omit public fireworks to prevent mass gatherings. Though the long weekend did not bring the celebrations we’re used to, there were still plenty of safe ways to enjoy the holiday.

Virtual events allow you to take part in more activities in different locations than you would have been able to physically. Made in America, a festival started by Jay-Z in 2012, was set to take place in Philadelphia this past weekend. On July 1, festival organizers announced that it would be rescheduled to Labor Day weekend 2021. They said in a statement “Collectively, we are fighting parallel pandemics, COVID-19, systemic racism and police brutality. Now is the time to protect the health of our artists, fans, partners and community as well as focus on our support for organizations and individuals fighting for social justice and equality in our country.”

This year’s lineup went unannounced, but last year’s festival was headlined by Travis Scott and Cardi B. Since the physical festival was canceled, a livestream showcasing the best performances took place on the music streaming service TIDAL throughout the weekend. The virtual festival included sets from Beyoncé, Nicki Minaj, Lizzo, Coldplay, Rihanna and many other chart-topping artists.

Nationally, a Labor Day virtual race was held by The Best Races for runners to run anywhere on their own time and submit their results. Participants who registered for the full package received a personal coach who was available Monday through Friday to provide help and answer questions during training, and provided encouragement and support on the day of the race.

Runners across the country were able to choose the distance of the race they wanted to participate in. Depending on what package they signed up for, they received a certificate of completion and digital medal, a 3-inch medal sent to their homes, a printable custom bib, a custom digital photo card that contains the race results, a digital running journal, a t-shirt, optional course maps and an optional pen pal program. 

Based in Portland, the Oregon Labor Movement held a statewide virtual Labor Day celebration and call to action on Monday. The organizers brought light to issues taking place in the state saying, “Working Oregonians are facing three crises at once: a deadly global pandemic, an economic free fall, and long-standing institutional racism.”

The event began at noon and featured talks from Oregon’s labor leaders, elected officials, and working Oregon citizens regarding their desire for change and their pursuit toward justice for workers. This event came after Portland’s rise to national prominence for their Black Lives Matter demonstrations and federal agents entering the city in recent months.

A number of virtual events were held in Los Angeles this past weekend, as well. HomeState, the LA-based Texas Kitchen, held its first Margarita Showdown in 2019, but had to move it online this year due to the pandemic and social distancing measures. The virtual event took place Saturday via livestream. Margarita makers in the area competed to see whose drink was the best.

Voters received eight bottled margaritas, along with limes and garnishing salt to try the different submissions from the safety of their homes. The winner chosen was El Compadre, a local Mexcian restaurant. The event was hosted by comedian Cristela Alonzo, and featured musical performances by Chicano Batman, Spoon, Questlove, Fred Armisen, Local Natives and Angela Muñoz. All proceeds from the event benefit the organization No Us Without You! and the Watts Empowerment Center.

The Gourmandise School of Sweets & Savories in Santa Monica hosted a virtual Labor Day Pies class on Sunday. In the class, participants were taught how to make a s’mores pie and key lime pie. Registration for the class included access to the Zoom video meeting, as well as the recipe and shopping list. Recipes can also be found on Gourmandise’s Instagram.

Some cities were able to hold in-person events following social distancing guidelines. Boston’s Institute of Contemporary Art, located in the Seaport District, upheld its tradition of free admission on Labor Day. The museum is typically closed on Mondays, but was open from 10 am to 5 pm for guests who reserved tickets. 

Monday was the last day for guests to see the exhibits Tschabalala Self: Out of Body and Carolina Caycedo: Cosmotarrayas. Also on display were the Sterling Ruby, Nina Chanel Abney and Beyond Infinity: Contemporary Art after Kusama exhibits. The ICA has increased cleaning and follows Massachusetts COVID guidelines by requiring all staff and visitors to wear face coverings, and allowing a restricted number of guests each hour. Spaces that don’t allow physical distancing are temporarily closed, and exhibition labels and printed materials have been made available online to reduce touch surfaces.


In New York City, a Labor Day Paint in the Park event was held in Central Park. The two-hour socially distant class was led by a master artist who gave step-by-step painting instructions. Participants were required to wear masks and sit six feet apart. Admission included a pre-sketched canvas and painting supplies, and parties were encouraged to bring food and drinks to snack on during the class.

For those who wanted to enjoy the holiday by relaxing at home with their favorite movie or TV show, a number of stores had sales to mark the end of summer. There were countless deals that shoppers could take advantage of to celebrate their work.
Many workers have faced great adversity within the past eight months, some losing their positions and having to move quickly to find a new one, and others doing their job in a way they never thought they would have to. Whether you stayed in or got out of the house for some socially-distant fun, Monday was definitely a day worth celebrating.

Dont Fret New Street Art

Dont Fret, one of Chicago’s most recognizable street artists, today unveiled a new, large-scale art installation on the Chicago Riverwalk. Titled The People in Your Neighborhood, the installation is located at the Riverwalk’s most western point, known as The Confluence between E Lake St and N Franklin St, and features 55 portraits of Chicagoans, all portrayed in Dont Fret’s inimitable sardonic style. The unveiling is accompanied by the release of his new book, Dont Fret: Life Thus Far, now available for purchase.

Offering a microcosmic reflection of Chicago’s scrappy and hard-working residents, the portrait subjects of The People in Your Neighborhood range from the well-known to the obscure. Designer and restaurateur Kevin Heisner stands alongside Claudio, Chicago’s beloved tamale vendor, who in turn rubs elbows with Maria, longtime owner of Maria’s Bridgeport and Howard Brown Health doctor Abby Baus. Each is depicted with both comedic and piercing insight, caricatures that are reminiscent of the archetypical Chicagoans who have lived in the city for generations. The portraits and subject bios can also be seen on Dont Fret’s Instagram page.

“There are certain character traits that I think define a true Chicagoan. Tough, full-browed with a sense of ingenuity and midwestern humbleness, but always toiling, working, moving forward with an almost absurd laugh and grin about this crazy, wonderful city,” said Dont Fret. “I was asked to paint 55 portraits of Chicagoans who I think contribute to the hard work that defines our city, although it can only scratch the surface of the millions of stories moving through our streets. These are the people in your neighborhood.”

“Dont Fret’s proposal for celebrating everyday Chicagoans who make our City go – from the beloved Tamale Man to artists to bridge engineers – was really appealing to enliven a long stretch of the Riverwalk that otherwise fades into the background,” said Lydia Ross, Director of Public Art at the Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events. “The artist’s distinctive style isn’t intended to capture an accurate portrait, but rather the heartfelt spirit of the great people that surround us, some of whom we know, some we recognize, others we may be more attuned to looking out for…it was conceived pre-COVID but felt even more resonant to celebrate people in the midst of social distancing.”

Dont Fret’s unpolished aesthetics paired with pithy one-liners are recognizable features of Chicago’s built environment, in addition to being painted and wheat-pasted on buildings around the world, from New York to Berlin, Miami, São Paulo, London and Helsinki. Don’t Fret: Life Thus Far, the first comprehensive survey of the artist’s work, showcases a decade of his street and gallery work and features memories and anecdotes from fellow artists and friends including Louder Than A Bomb founder Kevin Coval, artist Cody Hudson and rapper Vic Mensa.

In the 256-page monograph, the figures and texts of consummate wise guy Dont Fret skewer the obvious and reflect the normalized-until-numbed issues of the city back at the passerby experiencing them firsthand. While his work populates city streets worldwide, he remains a true Wicker Park native, digging into the character(s) of Chicago—the stew of down-and-out and up-and-up, the meatpackers, the artists, the street-wise, and the stupid. Featuring 216 color images, this monograph also includes a foreword by writer and Brooklyn Street Art co-founder Steven P. Harrington.

In addition to The People in Your Neighborhood, the Chicago Riverwalk also recently unveiled a mural by Chicago-based artist Kate Lynn Lewis,The Radiance of Being, which celebrates 100 years of Art Deco. Lewis is also one of the 55 Chicagoans portrayed in Dont Fret’s installation.The Chicago Riverwalk has been going through a phased reopening which included the Community Marketplace opening July 17. Vendors are open by reservation for contact tracing purposes, walk-ups are welcome and will be asked for contact information. Vendor details are available at www.chicagoriverwalk.us.

About Dont Fret

Dont Fret is an artist born, raised, and currently working in Chicago. In addition to his wheat pasting, his practice includes drawing, painting, sculpture, performance, and installation-based work both on the street and in the gallery. He has produced large-scale public murals in a number of American cities, including Chicago, New York City, Miami, San Francisco, Grand Rapids, and Denver, as well as internationally in such cities as São Paulo, London, and Helsinki. His work has been in a number of galleries nationally and internationally, with shows in Chicago, New York, San Francisco, and London. Dont Fret’s work was also featured prominently in the Netflix original series Easy.

The Hunt for Quality Dish Towels: What to Look For

You may not have a dishwasher, prefer to wash dishes by hand or dishes that must be cleaned by hand, the importance of a having a high-performing dish towel is not lost on you. Dish towels clean dishes, dry them and even polish them to a sparkling shine. 

All efficient kitchens need dish towels, even those that lean heavily on dishwashers to do most of the work. This workhorse enables you to quickly dry your hands, wipe spills and help with meal prep, which is why it makes sense you want to know the most important features to look for when shopping for a new dish towel to bring into your home. 

The Features of a Good Dish Towel

Most dish towels that you’d commonly find at just about every big box store, are rarely worth the money, often being too thin, poorly woven and don’t wash very well. Avoid low-quality dish towels by purchasing towels with these features: 

  • High absorbency 

Hands down the most crucial aspect of any dish towel, the best ones will be able to absorb high amounts of water. You will most likely be drying with these towels much more often than cleaning with them, and if you get a towel with a low absorbency rate, you will find that it takes a lot longer to dry those dishes. 

When you have a dish towel that is thin and made with poor-quality materials, you may need multiple towels to get the job done, but you can avoid this by looking for towels made with thick cotton or linen and have higher thread counts. 

  • Natural  

The best towels are going to be made of 100% natural fibers, but more than that, you may want to look for brands that have untreated finishes. Flour sack towels are a top option, usually coming in a unbleached bright white color, but this dish towel is also available in a natural old-fashioned color that is more reminiscent of 1929 depression era. 

If a little too plain, these natural dish towels can be embroidered, painted or decorated for a personalized touch. 

  • Lint-free

Using a cheaper dish towel or the wrong kind of towel can lead to lint, a huge problem if you’re using it to dry dishes. If you notice that a dish towel is shedding with every use, get rid of it. These towels will make all the work you’ve done pointless, leaving behind unsightly tiny balls of lint on your dishes which can be hard to remove once they’ve dried and embarrassing if you happen to have company. 

Dish towels that have a loose weave or have an uneven appearance generally have fibers that easily separate from each other, causing lint. If you get a towel with a weave that’s too tight, it will not be very absorbent. Depending on what you’re primarily using your dish towels for, you’ll want to find the balance that works for you. 

  • Durable

Constant washing and drying are just a part of the life of a dish towel and it needs to withstand the abuse of that washers and dryers and dole out, without showing signs of wear or loss of absorbency. 

Dish towels that are high in quality hold up after hundreds of washes. For instance, flour sack towels get softer with each wash while retaining their ability to absorb large amounts of moisture. Look for towels with a tight weave and smooth edges. 

Long-lasting towels will also be hemmed on all sides, which further helps them stay in good condition, no matter how roughly they are use. 

  • Size

While having dish towels in an assortment of sizes is a good idea, it may not be possible or ideal for everyone. For those who are looking for the biggest bang for their buck, bigger dish towels are the better investment. 

The larger a towel, the longer you can use it before it needs to be cleaned. Bigger towels give you the option of folding them into layers, which gives them even better absorbency, or using multiple parts of the same towel for your different drying needs.

  • Style and design 

If your dish towels will be hanging in a visible location, you want them to look good, or at least not terrible. There are plenty of options in every color, print and style to match your kitchen’s aesthetic. 

Conclusion

Washing dishes and general kitchen cleaning won’t feel like a chore when you have the right tools for the job. With a few quality dish towels at your disposal, you’ll spend less time cleaning and get better results that lower quality towels can provide. 

John McAllister Hand-Embellished Series

Who can resist a portal into another world? Light and color beckon. The transport is swift: John McAllister‘s large-scale paintings and panoramas hold your hand while keeping you on a need-to-know basis as perspectives shift, borders interrupt, and the landscape saturates. Balance was achieved before you arrived. The world is dimensional but flat, sculptural with the serenity of a still life. In nature’s fertile decoration, we become immersed in the ordered chaos of pattern and colorful echoes of Pierre Bonnard, Henri Matisse, and Édouard Vuillard.

In ember blazons lazing daze, we are treated to a series of fifteen unique works by McAllister. The base print features a glowing scene of trees and brush surrounded by a massive border in which McAllister has taken pastel delight, electrifying each piece with hand-embellishments. The result is an intimate series, like a postcard from a dream.

John McAllister has a forthcoming solo exhibition at Wentrup Gallery (Berlin) this fall. Previous solo exhibitions have been held at James Fuentes (New York), Richard Telles Fine Art (Los Angeles), Shane Campbell Gallery (Chicago), and Carl Freedman Gallery (London) among others. His work has been included in group exhibitions at Le Consortium art center (Dijon, France), Marciano Art Foundation (Los Angeles), Almine Rech Gallery (Paris), and more. His work is included in both the Rubell Family Collection and the collection of the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles. McAllister lives and works in Northampton, Massachusetts.

Shop Limited Edition Prints:

John McAllister Unless Airy Dreams, Strike the Piercing Cord

Brad Phillips To Do List

Jesse Mockrin Garden of Love

Matthew Palladino Drapery

Brandi Twilley La Vie

Josh Reames Cowpoke

Le Kitsch × Virtual Exhibit

On View Now  – LE KITSCH: Anna Fasshauer, Matthias Schaufler

3D Virtual Tour

Robert Grunenberg is pleased to announce the double feature exhibition “Le Kitsch” with works by the painter Matthias Schaufler (1964) and the sculptor Anna Fasshauer (1975) – two artists, who both represent an original position in their respective discipline through their intensive formal and discursive engagement with the figurative and the abstract. Where Schaufler explores the possibilities and limits of oil painting, Fasshauer experiments with the material aluminum in space.

“Le Kitsch” is Schaufler’s first Berlin exhibition since 2014 and shows over 20 paintings in a variety of sizes from the past five years – a kind of mini-retrospective. In the three rooms of the gallery, the show is laid out as a chronological tour from 2016 to 2020, which at the same time provides an overview of Schaufler’s latest work, as well as the development of his practice, which documents a balancing act between abstraction and figuration.

“I often relate to myself negatively,” says Schaufler, describing his self-referentiality, “insofar as I do not continuously develop solutions to the problem that I once found.” Thus Schaufler always tries out new color combinations, tools such as spatulas or razor blades, sometimes he dilutes the colors, sometimes he works with more white space, sometimes he fills the canvas almost completely. Nevertheless, all of his works have a high recognition value, a signature that seems to lie in the energetic mark-making of the color. For Schaufler, the act of painting often requires the use of the body. The strong movement in front of the canvas, which can range from mere gestures to physical aggression, sometimes creates brute, but also sensual and poetic forms of expression.

Schaufler’s pictures are juxtaposed with four large-format sculptures by Anna Fasshauer from this year, which has a similarly high level of abstraction. In their material experiments, Fasshauer works with raw aluminum, such as is used in drywall and trade fair construction. To shape her pipe sculptures, she uses machines that are normally used for the industrial bending of metal. The wound, knotted and tangled sculptures appear as if they were sketches thrown onto paper, that then grow into three dimensions – like something that was created provisionally with a light hand. Therefore the weight, the dimensions, and the machinability of the work could not be in greater contrast.

With other sculptures, Fasshauer uses her body to model by literally hugging them, as in the case of the pink cuboid seen in the exhibition. The coloring comes before the molding. The mostly monochrome lacquer color of Fasshauer’s sculptures blurs the industrial character of the material from which they are made, sometimes it is in the greatest possible contrast to it, such as in the work “Tactical Reserve,” in which metallic hardness and pastel softness meet, and with its handle makes one think of a man-sized travel bag. Similar to Schaufler, Fasshauer plays with the association potential of form, which is just figurative enough that it stimulates the imagination to relate to real things. She succeeds in creating playful and humorous objects from the originally cool, technical material.

The title of the exhibition is a borrowed phrase from the Austrian poet Friederike Mayröcker. She lets this phrase appear in her breathless stream of consciousness whenever poetry threatens to become too clear, because it aims to create a certain feeling without going through the mind and thus threatens to become kitsch. The works in the exhibition also have a dual nature: they are based on a high degree of reflection, at the same time they reach the senses and feelings without detour. Similar to Mayröcker’s poetry, Schaufler and Fasshauer operate outside of defined narratives that lie outside of art itself. Their art is about art and at the same time tells us something about life.

INSTAGRAM

Opening Hours:
Wednesdays–Saturdays
12 am–6 pm
and by appointment

About Matthias Schaufler

Matthias Schaufler born in 1964 in Laichingen, Germany lives and works in Berlin. Schaufler studied Fine Art at Hochschule für Bildende Künste Hamburg (class of Erhard Walther and Mike Hentz) and at Städelschule Frankfurt (class Martin Kippenberger).

About Anna Fasshauer

Anna Fasshauer born in 1975 in Cologne, Germany lives and works in Berlin. Fasshauer studied Fine Art at the De Montfort University Leicester and received a Master of Fine Arts at the Chelsea School of Art and Design, London.

Fahren Feingold

Fahren Feingold Exhibit – No End To Love

The Untitled Space presents FAHREN FEINGOLD “NO END TO LOVE” An Artsy Online Exhibit Exclusive

EXHIBITION ON VIEW April 14 – April 30th

*While the exhibition is live all artworks are an additional 19% off list price. Contact The Untitled Space for more info.*

VIEW NOW

The Untitled Space is pleased to present “NO END TO LOVE” a limited time Artsy online exclusive exhibit of works on paper by artist Fahren Feingold, launching on April 14th, and on view through April 30, 2020. While the exhibition is live all artworks are an additional 19% off list price. New works will be added daily!

Watercolor artist Fahren Feingold imparts an ethereal quality to her unique works depicting the female form. Her watercolors featuring bold feminine nudes reference imagery from early 20th century French erotica, vintage American magazines from the 70s and 80s, and today’s Internet girls. The Los Angeles native moved to New York at the age of seventeen to study at the Parsons School of Design. After earning her BFA between Parsons and Glasgow School of Art, she worked as a fashion designer for top brands including Ralph Lauren, Nicole Miller, and J.Crew, among others. In 2016, her dreamy watercolors caught the eye of the legendary Nick Knight, who commissioned her to illustrate Paris Fashion Week for SHOW Studio. Since then, her work has been featured in numerous international exhibitions including “Moving Kate,” curated by Nick Knight for the SHOW Studio in London and The Mass in Tokyo; “The Vulgar” at The Barbican in London, curated by Judith Clark and Adam Phillips; “Red Hot Wicked” at Studio C Gallery in Los Angeles; as well as The Untitled Space group shows “UPRISE / ANGRY WOMEN” and “SECRET GARDEN” curated by Indira Cesarine and “LIFEFORCE” curated by Kelsey and Remy Bennett.

Celebrated as “a trailblazing artist on a meteoric rise” by Vogue, her watercolors have steadily gained recognition from collectors and critics alike for their sensitive, dreamlike colors, graceful brush strokes, and rendition of the female nude. Through her erotic depictions, Feingold gives new voices to women of the past and present while exploring larger notions of women in contemporary society. She had a solo show curated by Indira Cesarine at The Untitled Space in September of 2017, as well as a solo show presented by the gallery in collaboration with brand Fleur du Mal in 2018 titled “The Peep Show”. Her work was featured at SPRING/BREAK Art Show in both the “EDEN” (2019) and “(Hotel) XX” (2018) exhibitions presented by The Untitled Space, and was recently featured at Sotheby’s New York for the annual “Take Home A Nude” benefit exhibit and auction in October 2019.

PREVIOUS EXHIBITIONS NOW ON VIEW ONLINE

INDIRA CESARINE “THE LABYRINTH”

Indira Cesarine created an immersive installation featuring photography, sculpture, video art, and mixed media works. The gallery was transformed into a maze through which viewers could experience her contemporary female gaze on Surrealism, a theme the artist has been exploring through a variety of mediums over the past several decades. “THE LABYRINTH” is a surreal odyssey that reveals through its passages a kaleidoscopic universe of subconscious realities bound by the contrasts of hyperrealism and ethereal symbolism. “THE LABYRINTH” explores the juxtaposition of contrasting opposites, dimension, distortion, and the power of light to engage and reflect on our own stream of consciousness while provoking the tangibility of perceived realities. The result is a journey through our fantasies and expectations, rendered through the lens of dreams and desires. “THE LABYRINTH” exhibition and installation feature Cesarine’s most recent body of work, as well as select works from her “Goddess”, “Les Fleurs du Mal”, “Pandora’s Box” and “ONLY YOU” series. Experience the works online in our viewing room!

JESSICA LICHTENSTEIN “DO THEY MAKE A SOUND?”

For SPRING/BREAK Art Show 2020, Lichtenstein’s immersive installation ponders the question, “If a tree falls in the forest, do they make a sound?” The exhibition presented a forest scene, with trees falling and leaves, in the form of female figures, scattering. The viewer became fully engaged in her conceptual landscape which featured snippets of news carved into the trees like love notes. The floor became a reflection of the scene with paper leaves in the shape of girls echoing statements as well as the voices, the “sounds” of these women. To create her environment the artist built the landscape with layers upon layers of images, a bombardment of colors and characters. The viewer was able to explore and discover unique details throughout the scene that played with notions of perception, including hidden moments and words that with closer view reveal themselves.

NICHOLE WASHINGTON “REBELLIOUS BLACK GIRL”

Nichole Washington is a visual artist known for her mixed media artworks exploring feminine strength, spirituality and identity. In 2016 she graduated from School of Visual Arts where she earned a master’s degree in digital photography. Her work has been exhibited in galleries and institutions across the United States including the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History. In 2017 she was one of ten recipients of the Enfoco Photography Fellowship. Washington’s work is featured in the inaugural issue of “MFON: Women Photographers of the African Diaspora” and has been featured in several benefit auctions including The Heliotrope Foundation, Groundswell and Art4Equality. Her work has been exhibited in a number of group shows at The Untitled Space including BODY BEAUTIFUL, IRL: Investigating Reality, ONE YEAR OF RESISTANCE, and SHE INSPIRES.

In her latest exhibition, Nichole Washington pushes the boundaries of her identity by creating portraits that are bold, non-conforming and liberated. She uses manipulated photographs and bold paint strokes to figuratively and literally break out of “the box” of normative behavior. Through this process she creates super-heroine characters that exist in an imagined space meant for healing and transformation.

OPEN CALL FOR ARTISTS

Submission Deadline April 26, 2020

Applications are now open for our first Online Solo Show Open Call!

The Untitled Space invites artists to apply for an Online Solo Exhibition presented by the gallery which will run from May 14 – August 14th. The exhibition will include an online viewing room of the exhibition on our website, online exclusive of the exhibition on Artsy, as well as special coverage of the exhibition on a variety of media outlets including The Untitled Magazine among others. The exhibition will additionally include a hardcover printed exhibit catalogue which will be cross-published online, as well as coverage in our social media channels.

The Untitled Space is looking for an artist with an exceptional body of work for this unique opportunity. Artists who submit may also be considered for future opportunities with The Untitled Space such as international art fairs, group shows, and future solo shows at the gallery.

The exhibit opportunity is open to submissions until April 26, 2020

APPLY NOW

ABOUT THE UNTITLED SPACE

The Untitled Space is an art gallery located in Tribeca, New York in a landmark building on Lispenard Street. Founded in 2015 by Indira Cesarine, the gallery features an ongoing curation of exhibits of emerging and established contemporary artists exploring conceptual framework and boundary-pushing ideology through mediums of painting, sculpture, printmaking, photography, video and performance art. The gallery is committed to exploring new ideas vis-à-vis traditional and new mediums and highlights a program of women in art as well as special events aligned with our creative vision.

“HOOKED ON A FEELING” by Fahren Feingold

“Dysmorphic Dystopia”

“STAY GOLD”

Vaughn Lowery, 360 MAGAZINE, design, decor, interior design

How to Successfully Complete a Home Design Project

If you are guilty of starting home design projects but never seeing them to completion, then you need to change your attitude and how you approach design projects. A kitchen or bathroom remodel won’t complete itself, after all. 

Most people will admit to having various unfinished design projects in their home, but once it becomes a pattern and you never finish anything you start, it’s time to reconsider your thinking and take it on with a different angle. 

Home design projects require commitment, dedication, and a whole lot of effort. If you come home from work exhausted, there is no question about why you don’t feel up to finishing that project. 

If you want to change this, and often feel guilty about leaving projects uncompleted, then take on this advice.

  • Plan Before You Start

It can be tempting just to get stuck right in on a project and see where the flow takes you, but this approach will not see you through to the end. 

Before you even pick up your tool kit, thoroughly plan what you are going to do. It’s crucial that you know where to start and where to pick up next time after you finish. It can be incredibly demotivating to try to pick up on the project a week or two later, only to be unsure of where you had left off the last time.

Planning will also give you a better overview of the project and whether you can feasibly complete it by yourself.

  • Set Goals

Motivation is vital for projects that will take some time. Set goals for yourself to achieve. Aim to have all of the kitchen cabinets installed within two weeks or have the bathroom plumbing installed and working by the end of the next. 

Goals like this can help you to envision the end result and give you the boost of motivation you need to keep going. 

  • Ask for Advice

Even if you have decided to take on a design project by yourself, there is no harm in asking family members, friends, or even expert designers for their advice on the project. To get the work done faster, you can also get help from experts for replacement windows.

If you are struggling with installation but have the design down, here’s a great resource: www.gkandb.com.

  • One at a Time

If a project isn’t going your way, it can be incredibly tempting to abandon it and start another, but these will simply leave many unfinished projects. 

Make sure you finish a project to the best of your ability before you start working on something else. Having multiple ongoing projects at home can make it a more stressful environment, and you certainly won’t have the energy to work on them all. Before you start replacing the tiles in the bathroom, make sure you are happy with the kitchen first. 

If you have a one project at a time rule, you will feel more encouraged to finish one design project so that you can get on with another. 

Paradigm Gallery Presents “Obsolescence”

Paradigm Gallery + Studio (746 S 4th St) is pleased to present Obsolescence, a solo exhibition by Sweden-based artist Ulla-Stina Wikander, open October 25 – November 23, 2019. The artist’s first solo exhibition in the United States, Obsolescence, features new works from Wikander’s well-known series of household objects covered in colorful, vintage embroideries. Obsolescence will have a public opening reception on October 25 from 5:30 – 10:00pm.

Wikander began collecting vintage embroideries 15 years ago in antique stores and flea markets, initially attracted to the intricate designs of needlework textiles. Although Wikander was traditionally trained as a painter and sculptor, the unknown histories of the women who made the embroideries interested her and she began experimenting with her new collection. Wikander’s earliest experimentation with textile began with covering a broken vacuum cleaner she had laying around in her home. Through a meticulous process of deconstruction and reassembly, she transformed the anachronistic tool into something visually absorbing and entirely new, giving the vacuum a new reason to exist. Although not all of the objects Wikander covers are broken, they’re all out-dated. Through Wikander’s process, these retro items are transformed and recycled into fully contemporary sculptures.

On her practice Wikander says, “It is rather new for me to be a part of the textile community because I have always regarded myself as a painter and sculptor. While I do not embroider myself, I am always very meticulous when I choose my patterns.  Embroidery is very hard to find nowadays, so I often travel to small towns in Sweden to find them. I have a big collection with hundreds of embroideries, organized into boxes by motif. I do not know if it is accepted among textile artists, to cut embroideries into pieces, but I think my work is a bit different. I always have a bad feeling that I am destroying a beautiful embroidery that someone else has made, but the recycling of something forgotten also feels current and good”.

The latest artworks included in Wikander’s Obsolescence exhibition are suffused with humor and critical explorations of feminism, domesticity, and upcycling. Her intricate textile constructions are shaped by the forms that lie underneath – including irons, blow dryers, shoes, bags, lamps, books, and phones. Freshly adorned in coverings of flowers, animals, and pastoral scenes, the items transcend their former functionality and are simultaneously revelatory and recognizable. Wikander’s vibrant re-appropriations are evocative formal studies that defy categorization and illicit equal parts dissonance and delight.
About Ulla-Stina Wikander
Ulla-Stina Wikander was born 1957 in Kungälv. She is currently living in Stockholm/Kullavik, Sweden and has been working as an artist since 1986. Wikander has shown extensively around the world in solo and group exhibitions including shows in the United States, Sweden and the UK.
About Paradigm 
Paradigm Gallery + Studio® exhibits contemporary artwork from around the world with a focus on Philadelphia-based artists. Established February 2010, the gallery began as a project between co-founders and curators, Jason Chen and Sara McCorriston, as a space in which to create artwork, to exhibit the work of their peers, and to invite the members of the community to create and collect in a welcoming gallery setting. To this day the gallery still aims to welcome all collectors, from first time to lifelong, and continues to support accessible work that welcomes a wide audience.

SUMMER ReFRESH!

SUMMER ReFRESH!

Works from the collection

On view through September 21, 2019

Gilles Clement Gallery presents a gathering of their latest collection of cutting- edge Contemporary, Pop, Op and Street Art. An array of artwork delights and inspires the viewer with iconic imagery, vivid colors, and culturally significant themes. Rotating throughout the season, the exhibition will showcase an eclectic mix from the gallery’s stable of artists, and a range of mediums and techniques including photography, painting, mixed media, collage and neon. Fresh additions to the gallery are the vibrant abstract works of Philadelphia-based modernist painter Michael Gallagher; Spanish artist Lino Lago’s clever oil paintings that juxtapose classical and contemporary art; and the exploded pop sculptures of French artist Francois Bel. Other featured artists include: Curtis Cutshaw (oil enamel on birch), David Datuna (mixed media), Robert Mars (vintage collage and neon), Clement Kamena (acrylic on canvas), MARCK (video sculpture) and TRAN$PARENT (money art).

SUMMER ReFRESH: works from the collection will be on view through September 21, 2019 at the Gilles Clement Gallery, 45 East Putnam Avenue, Greenwich CT 06830.

WEBSITE: http://www.gclementgallery.com/upcoming-exhibitions

Images:

Michael Gallagher, Pink and Green Acrylic on canvas on panel, 36” x 48”

Francois Bel, Warhology Turquoise Caps Mixed media, acrylic glass, 17”x 5.5”x 4” (feature photo)

Lino Lago, Fake Abstract Blue Oil on canvas, 43.3” x 39.4”