Posts tagged with "painting"

Malka Nedivi - Transcending Matter via 360 MAGAZINE

Malka Nedivi – Transcending Matter 

“Nedivi’s most singular gift is for transforming the literal and metaphorical artifacts of ruin into objects and experiences of folkloric, fantastical, and hypnotically eccentric beauty.” – Shayna Nys Dambrot, Huff Post, Dec 2017

Malka Nedivi’s current solo exhibition Transcending Matter is on view from Sunday November 13 to Sunday, December 11, 2022 at Matter Studio Gallery, 5080 W. Pico Blvd., Los Angeles. An opening reception will be held on Nov. 13 from 4-8 pm.  The gallery will host an artist talk on Dec 4, 2-5pm where the artist will present a performance excerpt from her upcoming one-woman show “A Story About Shoes” at 3pm. A closing reception is scheduled for Sunday, December 11 from 2-5 pm. 

Malka Nedivi’s Transcending Matter is the visually articulated story of reclaiming lost family history and healing for herself and her ancestors. It is an artist’s response to immense life challenges of generational trauma, coupled with immigration’s loss of grounding, and complicated familial relationships.

Nedivi began creating large sculptures and collage paintings following the death of her mother in 2002. These works explore the emotional connection she had with her parents – both survivors of the Holocaust.  Born in the newly established State of Israel after her parents immigrated from Poland, Nedivi was raised in a family without ancestral mooring-where none of their history was discussed and remains largely unknown. Artmaking became her method for filling the gaps created by their lack of familial past. 

“Everything that I use is old. I am giving the materials new life.” is how she describes the mixed media ingredients of her work.   In repurposing discarded materials, she reclaims and restores diminished significance.  Her resulting collaged figures combine Figurative Expressionism with the directness and accessibility of folk art.  Nedivi’s process consists of layering and molding fabric, paper, and other mixed media in a way that is reminiscent of how her mother collected materials, perpetually patching and mending holes in worn garments.   She sees her art as her way of mending the holes in her own life.  

Malka Nedivi is a multi-disciplinary artist living and working in Los Angeles. She was born in Rehovot, Israel, in 1952, an only child to parents who survived the Holocaust and emigrated from Poland. Studying Theater and Literature at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, she directed plays and taught theater. In 1980, she moved to Los Angeles, CA, with her husband and son to study film at UCLA. She worked as an Assistant Film Editor from 1987-1992. 

Malka has an extensive exhibition history including solo shows at BOA Art Gallery and the National Council of Jewish Women in Los Angeles. Malka’s work has been reviewed in publications such as the Huff Post, Beverly Press, Diversions LA, Filling the Negative Space, and Trebuchet Magazine

Still Life with Earthenware Vessel and Blue Ewer by Mark Gertler via 360 MAGAZINE

Unseen work by Mark Gertler

UNSEEN WORK BY MODERN BRITISH ARTIST MARK GERTLER EMERGES FROM PRIVATE COLLECTION AFTER 100 YEARS

Chorley’s auctioneers are thrilled to offer a publicly unseen, never before exhibited work by the great British artist Mark Gertler (1891-1939). The work, titled Still Life with Earthenware Vessel and Blue Ewer has been in the private collection of esteemed art connoisseur, Lt Colonel Murray “Victor” Burrow Hill, DSO, MC (1887-1986) for over 100 years. It is believed Victor may have acquired the work directly from the artist in the same year it was painted, which was during Gertler’s stay with fellow artists in France in 1922. It will be offered in a sale titled Fine Paintings, including the Victor Hill Collection of Modern British Art at Chorley’s auctioneers on December 5, 2022

Commenting on the work, Chorley’s Director Thomas Jenner-Fust says: “We are delighted to be able to offer this previously unseen work by Mark Gertler, a unique and talented artist. The earthenware pitcher, blue enamel jug and stark white tablecloth, though atypical in Gertler’s work, beautifully captures the character of rustic French interiors of the period. The landscape glimpsed through a framed window and the softly painted diagonal strokes are typical of Gertler’s landscapes between 1919 and 1920.” 

Gertler was born in Spitalfields, London, the youngest child of impoverished Polish Jewish immigrants. He took night classes in art at Regent Street Polytechnic, before winning a national art competition that would inspire him to apply for a scholarship from the Jewish Education Aid Society. On attaining it he was able to study at the esteemed Slade School of Art. Although highly accomplished and having several patrons, he spent much of his life juggling his finances and in mental despair. He suffered from depressive episodes triggered by his unrequited love for the English painter Dora Carrington (1893-1932), who he met at the Slade. He also had an unpredictable, slightly arrogant personality, which was often his downfall – after a visit to Virginia Woolfe in 1916, she exclaimed “Good God what an egoist”. Despite this, he was passionate about his craft and admired by many, including leading literary figures and was the subject of many characters in books, such as Gombauld in Aldous Huxley’s Crome Yellow and Loerke in D.H. Lawrence’s Women in Love. His modernist works were well-received, and he was considered a genius by some. His latter works however were more experimental – spatially flatter and with a greater emphasis on textures and surface patterns, causing interest to wane. Struggling to stay true to his artistic aspirations he committed suicide in 1939. The oil on canvas is estimated to fetch £6,000-£8,000 although, due to its emergence after so many years and never having been seen by the public, interest could push it higher. 

In the same private collection is a study for the large-scale work Why Weren’t You Out Yesterday by the great British artist Sir Alfred Munnings (1878-1959). The smaller scale preparatory painting shows us first-hand, how the artist worked and gives us clues to the creative processes he went through to produce the finished masterpiece. Why Weren’t You Out Yesterday is considered one of Munnings’ most humorous paintings. It features his wife Violet, a family friend and four of his own horses. Painted in 1935 it was inspired by another portrait Munnings had seen, which showed some members of a prominent New Jersey family (a Mrs. Cutting and her daughters), which had amused him. He said: “So taken was I with the arrangement that I repeated almost the same design on another canvas for my own amusement.”

Why Weren’t You Out Yesterday by Alfred Munnings via 360 MAGAZINE
Why Weren’t You Out Yesterday by Sir Alfred Munnings (1878-1959). Estimate £40,000-£60,000

The work offers us the ‘inside track’ on how Munnings experimented in order to decide which elements worked well. Chorley’s Director Thomas Jenner-Fust relays: “In this study it is likely that Munnings would have painted the central hunter first, as the one to the right is a worked-up version, with reconsidered elements such as the angle of the head and twitch of the left ear, communicating the horse’s state of alert, both of which feature in the final painting. Spontaneity, immediacy, understanding and above all, enjoyment are apparent in this study. It also captures Munnings returning, as he did throughout his life, to two of his greatest passions; horses and hunting.” The work, which was exhibited at the Royal Academy of Art in 1939 carries an estimate of £40,000-£60,000.

Also in Victor’s collection is a work by the Irish painter Roderic O’Conor (1860-1940). Born in Milltown in Ireland and brought up in Dublin, he studied at Ampleforth College and the Metropolitan School of Art in Dublin, before venturing to Antwerp in 1883 to study at the Academie Royale. Like many artists at the time, he went on to Paris to study and after falling in love with France, he went on to spend much of his life there. He painted in Brittany amongst other regions, often with the Impressionist painters Vincent Van Gogh and Paul Gaugin, who had a direct impact on his work. 

Le Loing at Sundown by Roderic O’Conor via 360 MAGAZINE
Le Loing at Sundown by Roderic O’Conor (1860-1940). Estimate £40,000-£60,000

The painting in the sale dates from circa 1902 and is in oil on canvas. Titled Le Loing at Sundown it references Montigny-sur-Loing, a small town outside of Paris. Highly popular with artists in the 19th century, they flocked to take advantage of painting the lush forest of Fontainebleau and the winding river, as well as to enjoy the camaraderie of fellow artists. O’Conor’s affection for the region meant that he returned several times in the mid-1890s, where he had good friends, many of whom were also artists. 

O’Conor created a series of landscapes of serene views along the tree-lined river Loing and the present work is a fine example. Discussing the painting Thomas Jenner-Fust said: “To render the failing light he has deployed a palette of bright colours, including pink, purple and two different yellows, exaggerating the local colours of the scene itself. The derivation of this technique, still highly radical in 1902, reverts back to the artist’s precocious discovery of Vincent van Gogh (the expressionist gestures) and Paul Gauguin (the exotic palette) a decade earlier.” Described by the Irish Times as ‘The great forgotten Irish painter’2.  O’Conor’s works are in many public collections around the globe, the painting carries an estimate of £40,000-£60,000.

Roses in a Vase by Sir Matthew Smith via 360 MAGAZINE
Roses in a Vase by Sir Matthew Smith, CBE (1879-1959). Estimate £15,000-£20,000

Another exciting addition to Victor Hill’s collection was Roses in a Blue Vase by British painter Sir Matthew Smith, CBE (1879-1959). Yorkshire-born Smith studied at the Manchester School of Art and then the esteemed Slade School of Art. He also trained under Henri Matisse in Paris, where he gained an interest in Fauvism. Following his short-lived marriage to fellow artist Gwen Salmond (1877–1958), he was infamously in a relationship with the artist Vera Cunningham (1897-1955), who modelled for his nude works between 1923 and 1926. Invalided out of the army, Smith spent time in Aix-en-Provence, France. His work at the time was unnaturalistic in form and reflected the Fauves, with the use of vibrant, bold colours. His first solo exhibition is recorded as being at Tooth’s Gallery in London in 1926.

Discussing the work, Thomas tells us it was produced in 1927 in Smith’s studio in London and Victor Hill acquired the work for his collection by 1929. He says: “1927 saw the prolific production of a host of flower paintings by Smith, with ever increasing complexity of arrangements and compositions. Smith enjoyed collecting old vases and jugs for his still lifes, finding them in junk shops and second-hand shops in London, an activity he called ‘ferreting’. They played an important role in the flower pieces, providing interesting curvilinear shapes and strong colour.” Roses in a Blue Jug is a superb example from the middle of this period when things were going very well for Smith, as his work was selling, beginning to be reviewed in the art press and the prestigious Bond Street gallery Arthur Tooth & Sons became his dealer in 1928.” In oil on canvas, the painting is estimated to fetch £15,000-£20,000.

Tatev Oganyan by Jonathan Stinson via 360 Magazine

Changing the Game in Cannabis

Q&A With Tatev Oganyan of the Oganyan Agency: Changing the Game in Cannabis

The 360 Magazine had the honor of interviewing a woman who is changing the game in the cannabis space as well as luxury consumer goods as one of the top attorneys in California. She is a force to be reckoned with due to her many accolades and talents. Mrs. Oganyan speaks on gender equality, balancing her professional and personal life, her favorite hobbies including her successful “Happy High Hour” events in Orange County, the future of the cannabis industry, and which A-list celebrities are investing in cannabis companies. Read the informative interview below and keep up with Tatev on INSTAGRAM and her website TheOganyanAgency.com

As a powerful female attorney in the cannabis space, do you find being a woman has made it harder for your success? We read all the time about actresses not being paid the same as their male co-stars. Would you say the cannabis industry is similar or not at all? 

I think being a woman has its challenges in most industries including acting and cannabis, especially as you move up the corporate ladder. I have seen my fair share of gender inequality, which could be detrimental to cannabis companies. Without a doubt, there are a lot more hurdles for women to overcome but we are stronger because of it in an industry that requires thick skin. You must know your worth and advocate for yourself, negotiate your pay and work hard to get what you want because it will not be handed to you.

How do you balance your professional life and your personal life? 360 read that you work with your husband, what are your tips on leaving work stress at the office? 

My husband is of counsel at The Oganyan Agency for corporate and commercial real estate matters so it’s not uncommon to talk business while we brush our teeth.

We just got back from our honeymoon in Croatia, which we had to postpone for eight months due to work deadlines. We powered through and our clients were very grateful. Here are some tips that work for us

  • Get organized and coordinate scheduling for work and personal time on a regular basis.
  • Respect professional boundaries and personal space at home and in the office, which is important for privacy and comfort.
  • Find ways to instill passion in each project and have fun. Your clients will appreciate it.
  • Make time for nature to unplug and stay active.
  • Be present.

Our readers would love to know some of your favorite hobbies. 

My creative outlet is drawing, painting, and curating unique experiences through experiential marketing. This week, we hosted a Happy High Hour, which was an exclusive taste testing event for industry insiders and influencers to meet Trendi, an indoor premium California flower brand that launched this summer.

Where do you see the Cannabis Industry within the next year? 

Without federal legalization, sound regulation, and tax breaks, the market will continue to be volatile as the illicit market thrives. Large operators will continue to buyout challenged operators. Mergers and acquisitions will accelerate as larger companies expand their footprint to boost revenue. The stigma will reduce as education and research improves and more states legalize cannabis. A lot more Americans will be open to using cannabis regularly for medicinal and recreational purposes.

Do you believe cannabis will be legalized on a federal level? If so, when do you see that happening? 

I believe cannabis will be legalized but no time soon, unfortunately. I am optimistic about the prospects of full federal legalization in the long run because I believe it has broad popular support from the American people.

Just look at how long progress takes at the federal level with the SAFE Banking Act which was first introduced in 2013. It would be a huge boom to the legitimacy of the cannabis industry if cannabis companies could bank like every other legitimate business.

It’s 2022 and despite the Act’s continued bipartisan support, we see it held up for one reason or another by both Democrats and Republicans. Overall, we believe the momentum is there for the bill to eventually pass, but it is not a priority for this legislative season.

Tell us who inspires you and did they help influence you to pursue your career in the cannabis space? 

My cannabis backstory happened largely by chance. I applied for a job on Indeed fall of 2016 and the industry was not disclosed to me until the final interview. I requested time to consider the offer since I was unsure if cannabis was legal at the time. My husband (then boyfriend) helped me research California laws on cannabis and encouraged me to pursue a legal career in cannabis. He also believed in my entrepreneurial spirit since law school and motivated me to start my own business in 2020. Today, we tag team our largest projects together.

What are 3 tips or professional advice you have for our readers who are looking to open a dispensary and have never been in the cannabis industry before? 

  • Only the cream of the crop makes it. Don’t expect to get rich overnight. The heavy tax burdens (up to 40%), ever-changing regulations, and competing illicit markets make it challenging to operate a profitable dispensary.
  • Know your market. Integrate yourself into the cannabis culture for long-term industry success.
  • The industry is not for the faint-hearted. Learn to eat bad news for breakfast because you must be relentless to survive when navigating unseen waters.

Since 360 is a lifestyle magazine and also focuses on celebrities, do you see a shift in celebrities being open publicly about using cannabis recreationally? 

We are seeing more celebrities openly discuss cannabis or CBD consumption especially celebrities who want to get into the cannabis industry. Fans expect authentic ventures and collabs. Cannabis consumers are very quick to reject cash grabs.

In order to succeed, celebrities must connect with the culture and lifestyle by openly sharing their story and relationship with weed. Otherwise, their involvement will seem merely opportunistic.

Do you think celebrities will start investing in cannabis companies? 

Cannabis is an emerging industry and a hot commodity with strong ties to Hollywood, hip-hop, and reggae cultures. In recent years, more celebrities are investing in cannabis-connected businesses. Many like Mike Tyson, Bella Thorne and Seth Rogen are already creating their own cannabis brands. Brands that exemplify celebrity personas capitalize on an existing fan base, which can help drive retail sales. It’s exciting to see how celebrity-backed products attract new cannabis-curious consumers and audiences.

Lastly, if you could give advice and inspiration to your younger self starting off in law school, what would you say? 

I would tell my younger self to enjoy the ride as much as the destination. Most importantly, don’t forget to have fun because the work will always be there. Trust your instincts and stop doubting yourself. Use your fear as fuel to learn. Being scared and uncomfortable is a sign of personal growth.

ROBOT DIGIT LEARNS PAINTING via 360 magazine

ROBOT DIGIT LEARNS PAINTING

Robots have been given the gift of human creativity. 

Artist Agnieszka Pilat is currently out West at the headquarters of Agility Robotics, where she has made a new friend with the humanoid robot DIGIT, and started a series of paintings with him that will be included in her upcoming show, ROBOTa. 

“This is the era of the new, intelligent machine,” says Agnieszka. “The works created by DIGIT are full of mistakes. This innocence in mark-making gives them a sense of spontaneity, like children playing with crayons.”  

Watch DIGIT paint here

Agnieszka is no stranger to painting with robots. She has worked closely with Boston Dynamics‘ SPOTselling one piece created by the robot canine for $40,000 during a fundraiser to benefit Ukrainian refugees. The pieces with DIGIT and SPOT will be featured in Agnieszka‘s upcoming fall show at the gallery Modernism in San Francisco. 

Agnieszka’s Talking Points: 

  • This is the era of the new, intelligent machine. This is not a printer – an enhancement of a human hand, or a camera lens – an amplified human eye. The new machine is close to man’s nature – interested in the sublime, the essence of what it means to be human. It’s slow and curious and playful. Unlike clean, perfect classical machine esthetics, new machine esthetics are fraud with errors and imperfections.
  • If a human is the ideal – then robots strive to imitate their human creators. We are the parents to the machine – and intelligent machines like proper children believe in their naivete, that they can someday surpass their creators.
  • The new machine is close to man’s nature – interested in the sublime, the essence of what it means to be human. It’s slow and curious and playful. Unlike clean, perfect classical machine esthetics, new machine esthetics are fraud with errors and imperfections.

Agnieszka Pilat Bio: 

Polish born artist, Agnieszka Pilat studied painting and illustration at the Academy of Art University in San Francisco, CA. She is an award-winning artist and her works can be found in public and private collections in the United States, Poland, and Canada. Pilat currently lives and maintains a full time studio in San Francisco and is represented by numerous galleries throughout the United States and has exhibited at the Carnegie Museum of Art.

Picture of ArtPop Street Gallery via ArtPop Street Gallery for use by 360 Magazine

ARTPOP STREET GALLERY IS BACK

ArtPop Street Gallery is back with more fashion, hosting their second annual Upcycled Fashion Show and ninth fundraiser event to support local artists and small businesses. The fashion show will feature 12 Charlotte regional artists from a variety of media backgrounds including textile, multimedia, digital, and painting. 

The show will be from 6 to 8 p.m., on Saturday, Sept. 10, at Griffith Hall, Lenny Boy Brewing Company, 3000 South Tryon Street, Charlotte, NC, 28217. Show Emcee is Ohavia Phillips—Charlotte media personality and host of the “Oh Show”.

Fashion designers include Jennifer Gilomen, Margaret Fleeman, Anise Augustin, Edelweiss Vogel, Michelle “Bunny” Gregory, Itala Flores, Angela Kollmer, Kathy Phillips, Hasan Dirton, Isiah Miller, Melissa Crosson, and Kendall Kendrick. The clothes will be made from recycled ArtPop billboard vinyl material featuring artists Holly Keogh, Mikel Frank, Cat Babbie, Caroline Rust, Bree Stallings, Jesse Carkin, Laura Brosi, Cristina Montesinos, Greg Barnes, Deborah Triplett, Elaine Stephenson, and Barbara Mellin.

This fashion show is sponsored by Crescent Communities, Neiman Marcus, Little Architecture, LendAHand Alliance Cohort, and LendingTree Foundation. All proceeds from the event helps support sustainable and local Charlotte artists’ small businesses.  ArtPop Street Gallery diverts 13,000+ square feet of vinyl from landfills every year by upcycling the billboard vinyl into fashion, framed art, tote bags and more.  

Tickets: $85 — Includes fashion show, silent auction with a chance to win a trip to Antigua, hors d’oeuvres, desserts, and two drink tickets for Lenny Boy beer, wine, or kombucha and can be purchased HERE

About ArtPop Street Gallery

ArtPop turns interstate highways and other common areas into outdoor art galleries throughout the Charlotte region and across the country too.  The nonprofit organization’s mission is to connect local artists with billboard advertising and other media companies who showcase their art. This promotes artists and offers the community thought-provoking and inspirational creations that everyone can enjoy – for free!  We showcase and support artists of the 13 county greater Charlotte Region.  

For more information, https://www.artpopstreetgallery.com.

Dresden via Victoria, Saxony Tourism by 360 Magazine

Saxony Celebrates Bellotto at 300

The Artist who Portrayed Dresden and Pirna as they truly were: Historic, Magnificent, Panoramic

Bernardo Bellotto, the nephew of Canaletto, and often referred to as Canaletto the Younger or just Canaletto, turned 300 this year. This anniversary is an enormous cause in the Elbe city of Dresden and the neighboring town of Pirna as Bellotto painted extraordinary landscapes that depicted the baroque cities, as well as Fortress Koenigstein as they really were in the mid1700s.

To celebrate the artist and his impact of having created a lasting memory of the city, the Dresden State Art Collections has mounted the exhibition Enchantingly Real: Bernardo Bellotto at the Court of Saxony in its Gem&Alte Meister (Old Masters Gallery in the Zwinger Palace). The exhibition runs through August 28.

In Pirna, the exhibit at the StadtMuseum Pirna, visitors can experience Canaletto’s own large-format etchings of his views of Pirna and the camera obscura that he used to help create his paintings. Here too the citizens honor the artist who memorialized their city.

Bellotto became famous as the court painter for the elector of Saxony, Frederick Augustus II. He arrived in Dresden in 1747 and got right to work. Augustus was famous for his lavish spending on arts and culture and court life and he spared no expense. Bellotto’s famous works are breathtaking depictions of the city and its environs. The paintings measure over eight feet in width and are luxurious in their details. They are practically historical monuments as they depict details of the day-to-day life and times, architecture, and landscapes of Dresden and Pirna in the 1700s.

On display in Dresden is the painting you see above: “Dresden from the right bank of the Elbe below the Augustus Bridge,” better known as the famous Canaletto view, which the artist painted in 1748 and which has shaped the world’s view of Dresden to this day. Also, in the exhibit are the so-called Capricci – paintings in which different architectural set pieces are combined to form atmospheric compositions. Bellotto created these imaginative compositions both during his early days in Italy and during his second phase in Dresden, when he taught perspective as an associate member of the Art Academy.

The artist is who, like his uncle and teacher Antonio Canal, also called himself Canaletto ߝ ranks as one of the most important 18th century painters of city views &vedute. The Dresden retrospective is the culmination of a years-long conservation project and results from a cooperation with the Royal Castle in Warsaw. It features the Gem & Ide-galerie is own collection of Bellotto is paintings, which is itself the largest in the world.

The painter also made his mark on the charming town of Pirna, only 20 minutes south of Dresden, on the Elbe. Between 1753 and 1755, the painter captured the tranquil town on the Elbe in eleven views and at least 25 replicas. The most famous painting, the panorama picture “The Market Square in Pirna” (1753), is now with his other paintings and the Pirnauer Verduten (Pirna landscapes) at the Dresden State Art Collections. In the so-called “Canalettohaus” on the market square, they are showcasing enormous replicas of the painter’s Pirna works. Saxony Tourism has also put together a beautiful film on Canaletto’s life in Pirna that will be part of the special Sightgeist video this November – stay tuned!

A special time for Saxons will be this summer in both cities. Dresden and its citizens will celebrate Canaletto especially from August 19 to 21 when the Dresden City Festival takes place and so many festival goers will be lining the banks of the Elbe enjoying Canaletto is views in person. In Pirna, the town is already in full celebration mode with exhibitions, town festivals, tours and music. The city festival from June 17 to June 19 will be a special time as is the ongoing Pirna Sculpture Summer showcasing at least 16 sculptors from Germany. It is said, that the Seven Years’ War ended Canaletto’s creative period in Saxony in 1763.

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UKRAINIAN artist, painter, professor via 360 MAGAZINE

Yana Bystrova

Yana Bystrova is a third-generation Ukrainian artist, born to create undeniably conceptual, enticing pieces of art. Having her body of work showcased in galleries around the world, Yana has continuously stunned audiences with her meticulous creations full of color, concept and mixed media.

Listen to Yana’s full conversation with the 360 team on the 360 MAG Podcast HERE.

No stranger to pouring her countries rich history into her designs, we now see Yana’s paintings amongst the traveling exhibition Painting in Excess: Kyiv’s Art Revival, 1985 – 1993,” originally set to be showcased in her homeland of Ukraine.

Engulfed in the world of artistry since before she can remember, Yana often questions whether she had a choice on becoming an artist. Her professional ability has been evident from a young age; with Yana’s mother often telling a story about a painting she created in her adolescence. The piece, showcased at a children’s museum, was suddenly stolen from their home. Yana created the painting at the mere age of three years old.

Having doubted her position as an artist, Yana, too, experimented with differing professions before returning to her craft. She dabbled in design and programming, in which she gained mass success with. Nonetheless, she knew that the corporate environment did not suit her appropriately and went back to her original passion for creating art.

Amidst the ongoing war in Ukraine, Yana has been deeply affected by the destruction to her country. A daunting task, Yana spoke about the devastation she felt from hearing about the Russian invasion when stating, “It is horrible, I was in shock and very disoriented in the beginning [of the war].”

Yana’s thoughts pour into her work, evoking a new era of her works. She finds that her most recent paintings are a version of the distilled reality of the situation at hand. Each hue used in her art represents something deeper than the color wheel could ever encompass, it exemplifies the weight of Ukraine on Yana’s heart.

She often considers the conflict endured by everyone affected by the war; those who have fled and those who are still in the country. The situation at hand in Ukraine has had an everlasting affect on her personal and professional wellbeing.

“[It is] one thing is to be a tourist; another thing is to be a refugee.”

Her latest participation in the new exhibition “Painting in Excess: Kyiv’s Art Revival, 1985 – 1993” was organized a few years back, postponed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Held at the Coral Gables Museum through October of 2022, the showing was originally conceived by the Zimmerli Art Museum at Rutgers. The project embraces a life of its own, taking a new shape and meaning modernly with the tragedy occuring in Ukraine.

Yana utilizes delicate use of color to personify her artistry, creating new narratives. In the way that verbal communication only accounts for a small portion of human interaction, Yana attributes color to bridging these gaps and expressing what cannot be stated in words. Often investigating new mediums for her artistry, Yana carefully crafts art that is theoretical and impactful.

Amongst her upcoming exhibitions, Yana has a New York residency opening on June 3. Entitled “Yana Bystrova: Approaching a Chaotic Reality,” the showing will be held at Gallery Arte Azulejo. A gallery walk will be sported on June 16 as well.

Additional resource on Yana.

Article by: McKinley Franklin x Vaughn Lowery

Yana Bystrova Ukranian artist image via Yana Bystrova for use by 360 MAGAZINE

IAM NYC Opening

IAM is the inverted experience of the self as reflected through the eyes of established and upcoming local and international artists. The museum’s mission is to showcase the various facades of New York City through an inverted perspective, forcing audiences to re-envision the city’s topologies and structures in a new and creative light.

The inverted museum welcomes its guests in the heart of Soho, one of New York City’s best-known neighborhoods for fine art and culture. The museum’s lobby acts as an orientation point, a place where individuals can gain more insight into various art installations and their historical relevance to the city. The IAM Inverted Art Museum encourages individuals to tap into the complex spectrum of human emotion while they traverse through an array of vibrant exhibition rooms. As they are guided through these thematic rooms, time halts, and guests become fully immersed in the singular moment of time as the visual storytelling of each exhibition unravels in front of them.

The uniqueness of IAM comes from the museum’s ability to capture a visual record of history, igniting feelings of nostalgia, happiness and curiosity in its audiences. Each room acts as a different urban landscape unfolding the various personalities of New York City. From the gritty to the luxurious, the uptown bound trains to the empty apartments in Billionaires Row, the unexpected nature of the inverted rooms can be described as physical surrealism, showing off the unanticipated and often illogical juxtapositions of the city’s identity. 

IAM recognizes that each unique piece of art acts as an entryway to the artist’s cultural, political, and socio-economic circumstances. Culture and art are created by ordinary people, and their collective experiences shape the perception of the world around them. Similarly, New York City’s art scene is multifaceted, a melting pot of artistic expression that transcends any physical bounds dictated by borders or bodies of water. The museum wishes to highlight each artist’s unique perception of the world through an inverted lens, encouraging its viewers to pause and digest each and every little detail that surrounds them. IAM hopes to be a place of inspiration for artists and visitors alike, allowing artists to create work as their full unique selves while promoting tolerance, respect, and equality.

Our exhibition rooms

  • IAM Statue of Liberty
  • Oversized Kids Bedroom
  • Authentic New York’s Antique Shop
  • Plasma Room inspired by Nikola Tesla
  • Diorama inspired by Stan Lee
  • LEGO® Bathroom

Exhibition rooms of New York Artists’ work

Staying true to its mission of visual storytelling, the IAM Inverted Art Museum is also prioritizing work installations by Ukrainian artists in the hopes of aiding those who are affected by the unjust war. A percentage of ticket purchases go towards rebuilding schools and helping kids in Ukraine. IAM works directly with a number of charities to ensure that all donations are going towards rebuilding Ukraine and aiding families in need. The museum will also hold an auction for a large-scale Ukrainian flag built out of lego blocks and 100% of the profits made from the auction will go towards war relief efforts in Ukraine.

The IAM Inverted Art Museum is also proud to be supporting Ukrainian artists seeking to come to the United States Under the O-1B visa, otherwise known as the Artists Visa. Selected artists will receive assistance with navigating through the O-1B petition process. Please note that we do not cover the cost of application fees or lawyers, rather we help applicants fill out their petitions as an alternative route to hiring a lawyer. Our team members have first-hand experience with applying for the O-1B visa and can help applicants with the completion of their own Visa application.

Although artists from all around the world are welcome to apply to this initiative on our website HERE, we are currently prioritizing Ukrainian artists.

art illustration by Gabrielle Marchan for use by 360 magazine

New Forum Auctions Paintings

Forum Auctions is delighted to offer several exemplary works in its upcoming sale of Editions and Works on Paper 15002021 on Thursday 17th March 2022. A work by the ever-popular English artist Damien Hirst (b. 1965) titled Virtues comprises the complete set of eight laminated giclée prints, dating from 2021, notably with matching edition numbers.

Virtues features eight cherry blossom prints, each named after one of the eight Virtues of Bushidō according to Nitobe Inazō‘: Honor, Mercy, Politeness, Control, Justice, Courage, Honesty and Loyalty.

With a nod to pointillism, action painting, and impressionism, the Cherry Blossoms symbolize the natural joy of spring. In colors and on aluminum composite panels, each is signed in pencil and with matched edition numbers from the respective editions of each work. Published by HENI Editions, the set carries an estimate of £80,000-£120,000.

Another top highlight is a work by one of the most influential British artists of the 20th century, David Hockney (b. 1937). Hockney is known for experimenting across mediums: from drawing, printmaking, and photography, to painting and digital experimentation. His subjects range from landscapes to portraits and still lifes. His highly popular works encapsulate much of what is around him, from friends and acquaintances to animals. The work in the sale, titled Waiter, Alexandria, portrays a figure in bright colors captured in colored pencil and graphite on wove paper. It dates from 1963 and has an estimate of £50,000-£70,000.

Another visually impressive and important highlight is a large-scale work by the British artist and novelist Harland Miller (b. 1964), who is famed for painting canvases that depict Penguin book covers, a theme that enables him to delve into the interactions between images, text, meaning, and a subject that he experiments with in his mixed-media and sculptural works.

Miller captures his audience’s attention, not just by his visual motifs, but also by his smart use of interwoven language, such as his cleverly devised book titles that appear in his works, often making a statement on classical, or contemporary literature, or topical subjects. This is demonstrated by the work in the upcoming sale. Titled Save the Penguin, the work bears the slogan ‘There’s plenty More Plastic Bags in the Sea’, a cynical take on ‘Plenty More Fish in the Sea,’ and the environmental effect of modern plastic use. This unique pigment print extensively hand-colored in graduating blue and white acrylic with graphite additions is signed and dated 2020. It has an estimate of £30,000-£50,000.

Over at Dreweatts is an equally impressive sale that includes the discovery of a new work by one of the most important British artists of the 20th century, the esteemed British sculptor Henry Moore (1898-1986). After two years of working with the Henry Moore Foundation and the family of the owner, former Publisher and Editor of The Architectural Review Hubert de Cronin Hastings (1902-1986), the sculpture, titled Mother and Child which has now been authenticated.

Commenting on the discovery, Dreweatts’ specialist Francesca Whitham, said: “It has been such a fascinating journey working with this rare Henry Moore sculpture. I was elated, after many months of delays due to covid restrictions, to finally receive the letter from the foundation authenticating the piece as a genuine Moore. Dreweatts are honored to bring this sculpture to the market for the very first time, presenting an opportunity to purchase a unique and rare sculpture by one of the most important British artists of the 20th century.”

The foundation was able to link the work to a sketch of the sculpture by Moore already held in its’ records, titled Eighteen Ideas for Sculpture, which he produced in 1939.

The sculptural group is believed to have been gifted to Hubert de Cronin Hastings directly by Henry Moore, as they met through The Architectural Review, via Moore’s friend Jim Richards, Assistant Editor of the magazine at the time, who had befriended Moore after writing an article on his work for the magazine in 1934. The sculpture was passed down by Hubert to his son, John Hastings in the 1970s, remaining on his mantlepiece amongst an eclectic mixture of objects until he passed away in 2019.

The work is also considered an extremely rare piece as it is cast in lead, which was a material the sculptor only used for a short period in the 1930s, during a time in his career when he was experimenting with other materials such as string and wire for his series of stringed sculptures. Mother and Child is believed to be a preliminary design for one of these stringed sculptures, which explains the unusual markings on the front of the sculpture, which add to its’ joyful and playful nature.

Mother and Child is a stunning figural group in trademark Moore semi-abstract style. Formed in lead, the work has been dated to 1939-1940 and will be offered in Dreweatts Modern & Contemporary Art sale on Wednesday, March 16, 2022, with an estimate of £30,000-£50,000. However, due to the popularity of works by the artist and the rarity of this type of work from the artist’s oeuvre, it may achieve much more. 

Commenting on the quality of the sales, Stephan Ludwig, CEO across both the Dreweatts and Forum auctions business, said: “These two auctions of Modern & Contemporary artworks taking place on 16th and 17th March underscore one of the many rationales for the merger of Dreweatts and Forum Auctions. With a combined £1,500,000 anticipated sales total, spanning fine art, sculpture, and prints, we are pleased to be delivering on our objective to grow across all sectors of the art market.”

Let your decor tell your story 

No matter if you are an indie, grunge, or cottage core person, posters are a simple way to add that aesthetic to your surroundings. Posters alone can do so much more than that. In this article, we will explain how. 

Whether you are just now starting to find your own style or if you’ve connected with a certain type of aesthetic for quite some time, it can sometimes be a challenge to let that vibe permeate through your entire life. A simple way to enhance your aesthetic in your home is by acquiring art prints and posters. You can purchase posters online or in home furnishing and decor stores.

How do I find good posters?

Start by allowing yourself to get inspired 

There are plenty of places to get inspired and find the style of prints and posters you’re looking for. For example, apps such as Pinterest act as visual discovery engines to help you find more of what you like. Of course, magazines such as 360 MAGAZINE are also great sources of inspiration when browsing through different sections. 

Next: choose how personal you want to get 

Choosing which prints and posters to purchase is very similar to the process of deciding to get a tattoo.  You can go two ways: choose something just for fun or choose something with personal meaning for you. In terms of posters, a personal print can be something related to a place you’ve been, a memory or an inside joke you have, etc. 

Personal touches helps elevate your prints from simply looking chic. It isn’t a must, of course. You can also choose to make it personable by presenting your prints in some sort of combination with personal photos or art. 

How do I present my posters?

Simply choosing prints with personal-related themes isn’t the only way to personalize your decor. You can also make them more unique in presentation. 

Experiment with the frames

For example, an effective way to make your prints stand out is by choosing the right frames. This can be done in several ways for different aesthetics. You can personalize your frames by decorating them and/or making them yourselves, or you can diversify the types and thicknesses of the frames to create storytelling in the prints. 

An observer’s eye will naturally be drawn to the boldest frames and motifs first, so keep that in mind if you want to present a story arc of some sort. 

Experiment with format

You can also create a storytelling arc by experimenting with formatting of posters and prints. For example, you can do this by using both vertical and horizontal pictures, or by experimenting with the amount and use of “white space”, that is the amount of unused space between the actual motif and the frame.  

By using these simple means, you can find innovative ways to tell your story or open for conversations. If nothing else, prints and posters can be a good ice breaker as well as a good free weekend project to be completed alone, or with friends.