Posts tagged with "painting"

Outsider Project illustration by Heather Skovlund (original artwork: Henry Darger)for 360 Magazine

Outsider Project × Henry Darger

OUTSIDER PROJECT CELEBRATES WORLD-RENOWNED CHICAGO ARTIST HENRY DARGER’S BIRTHDAY

French musician Philippe Cohen Solal found material ripe for musical expression in Chicago-born author and artist Henry Darger’s drawings, paintings, writings, life story and lyrics. The award-winning Cohen Solal drew from Darger’s oeuvre to compose OUTSIDER, an album and transmedia project honoring the renowned outsider artist. In celebration of Darger’s birthday on Monday, April 12, Intuit partners with Cohen Solal and Musee Art Moderne de Paris (MAM) on the launch of OUTSIDER, in which Cohen Solal will present an excerpt from the project live from MAM on the website at noon central time.

In the baroque pop album OUTSIDER, musicians Philippe Cohen Solal, Mike Lindsay, Adam Glover and Hannah Peel turn Darger’s paintings and writings into melodies. The album is available now on streaming platforms and the website an immersive bilingual website featuring music videos and a short film. Releasing in English on Wednesday, April 14, the accompanying bilingual podcast retraces Darger’s story through the testimonies of the people who knew him and studied and exhibited his work. Hear stories from the artist’s former landlord, Kiyoko Lerner, and learn more about the Henry Darger Room Collection, which Cohen Solal used as inspiration, from Intuit President and CEO Debra Kerr.

“It’s exciting to see Darger’s influence in new mediums. Philippe has long been inspired by both seeing the artworks in person and his visit to the Henry Darger Room at Intuit. As Darger is Intuit’s most closely associated artist and many people’s entry to the genre of outsider art, I’m always interested to see new creativity catalyzed by his story and body of work,” says Kerr. “In this case, Philippe and his colleagues have treated Henry’s legacy with the utmost respect, honor and care. Darger’s story is shrouded in mystery, and I am happy when new interpretations stay true to what we know and can uncover with rigorous scholarship. I send my warm congratulations.”

Although Darger and his mysterious artwork have been of interest to the art world for several decades now, the outsider artist lived life in obscurity as a hospital janitor. Lerner’s husband, Nathan, discovered Darger’s work shortly before the artist’s death in 1972, and the couple shared it with outsider art enthusiasts and scholars who became fascinated by him over time.

As the pandemic keeps people removed from one another, an exploration of the notably isolated Darger is especially relevant. Cohen Solal’s interest in and repurposing of Darger’s work into new artforms speak to the universality and timeless emotional rawness of the late creator’s life and work. Celebrate Darger’s legacy at this commemorative program that is sure to delight and inspire fans around the world.

For more news from Intuit, visit our press room.

ABOUT INTUIT

Founded in 1991, Intuit is a premier museum of outsider and self-taught art, defined as work created by artists who faced marginalization, overcame personal odds to make their artwork, and who did not, or sometimes could not, follow a traditional path of art making, often using materials at hand to realize their artistic vision. By presenting a diversity of artistic voices, Intuit builds a bridge from art to audiences. The museum’s mission to celebrate the power of outsider artis grounded in the ethos that powerful art can be found in unexpected places and made by unexpected creators.

Intuit is open 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday and Saturday and reserves admission by appointment for guests who are in an increased risk group. More information on the website.

Intuit is generously supported by the following organizations: Alphawood Foundation Chicago; anonymous foundations; Art Dealers Association of America Foundation; Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs & Special Events; Crown Family Philanthropies; Gaylord and Dorothy Donnelley Foundation; Field Foundation; Illinois Arts Council Agency; Illinois Humanities; MacArthur Fund for Culture, Equity, and the Arts at Prince; National Endowment for the Arts; Polk Bros Foundation; Prince Charitable Trust; and Terra Foundation for American Art.

Album cover with original artwork: Henry Darger, Spangled Blengins. Edible. Boy King Islands. One is a young Tuskerhorian the other a human headed Dortherean
Album cover with original artwork: Henry Darger, Spangled Blengins. Edible. Boy King Islands. One is a young Tuskerhorian the other a human headed Dortherean
Heather Ann illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Heather Ann

Dreaming the Impossible and Accomplishing the Unbelievable

Her name is Heather, and she is a statistic. Since the age of sixteen, she has been a statistic due to becoming pregnant with her firstborn son, Zachary. Heather had always believed that she would only be known as that: a teenage mom. She worked hard and graduated high school a semester early to entirely focus on being a full-time mother. Heather then put off college and any thought of childhood dreams because she felt they were unattainable. She worked minimum wage jobs to try and raise her son the best that she could.

Heather’s daughter, Tyanna, came along when she was 21 years old.  In that time, Heather found herself in an unhealthy relationship. She fought hard to pull herself and her children out of the situation; she eventually did. However, she found herself turning to alcohol to cope with the pain she had endured through the years. Alcohol became Heather’s best friend for over a year, and she was faced with losing her children and eventually becoming pregnant with her youngest son, Jaxson. He was her saving grace. An angel sent from above to remind Heather that she was worthy of love and that she was stronger than she had ever known. It took her a few months to get back on her feet for herself and children, but she did it with her head held high.

Fast forward to 2011 where Heather was working as a cashier at Walmart, barely making ends meet for her family. She met her now-husband, Joshua. In 2013, they became a big, blended family with six children. Heather gained three more beautiful children: Emmanuel, Lyric, and Benjamyn. Their children now range in age from ten years old to 22 years old! Also, Heather is a proud grandma to two beautiful grandchildren – Lydia and Jaxton, a.k.a. her Sweetpea and Monkey.

It hasn’t been an easy road, but it has been full of love and memories. Heather’s husband has been the sole provider for their family, sometimes working over sixty hours a week. It was decided that Heather stay at home with the children for many reasons. The most important reason was due to the emotional abandonment that Emmanuel, Lyric, and Ben went through due to their biological mother. Although they have learned coping techniques, it has been a stressful and emotional journey. It was always best for the children if Heather was available at all times for them.

In addition to the chaotic life they live with a large family, Heather’s oldest daughter was diagnosed with Chiari Malformation and Ehlers Danlos Syndrome in 2016, which led to an emergency brain surgery to better Tyanna’s quality of life. This is a lifelong disease with no cure, so there have been quite a few struggles for her to find her new normal. She will never lead a “normal” life; however, she is doing her best to make life fun, and that is all Heather can hope for. Heather also has these health conditions, but they are nowhere as severe as Tyanna’s are. Heather also suffers from a dead talus bone in her ankle, along with two collapsed joints surrounding that ankle. This has contributed to continuing on as a stay-at-home parent as well. Heather’s family is big and unique, but they are full of love, and that’s the best thing she could ask for.

Heather has spent years being unable to provide for her family financially. As a parent to six children, this has always weighed heavily on her. She has watched her husband work from four in the morning to close to midnight in the same shift. He is hardworking and very dedicated to providing for his family. In 2018, Heather decided to start exploring the idea of college. She knew that she wanted to be in something art related. Art has been a coping mechanism throughout life; sketching, painting, and inks are her mediums of choice. She believed that the career she landed with should be something that she loved and would be proud to do. This led Heather to enroll at Independence University to obtain her associate degree in graphic design. This career choice allows Heather to share her art with the world and also contribute to her family.  She has worked hard to keep an impressive grade point average while learning as much as she can about graphic design.

Heather will officially graduate in January 2022 with a bachelor’s degree in graphic design. She decided after a year into her associate degree that she wanted to pursue her bachelor’s degree. Obtaining this degree would open opportunities for Heather to work within public relations, publishing, and digital media businesses.

Heather had been asked by quite a few people why she wanted to pursue her bachelor’s degree so soon after graduating with an associate degree. Many assumed that she wanted to stay focused on her education; that is true. However, that was not the decision-maker for Heather. This decision comes from a life-changing situation that her family encountered at the beginning of 2020. You see, Heather’s father was taken away from her when she was three years old. She found him again when she was sixteen and had not been away from him since then. Her father, Mike, was diagnosed with Lou Gehrig’s disease, also known as ALS, in March of 2020. This disease has continually cursed her family throughout the years. It has taken her great-grandmother, paternal grandmother, an aunt, an uncle, a distant cousin, and now her father. Heather always doubted that she would be able to attend college and succeed, but Mike was always the voice telling her that she could and that he was so proud of her. Mike was an amazing person and had always been Heather’s biggest cheerleader in life. She has many reasons to continue creating art; however, her passion comes from wanting to pursue more for her family, especially her father. She would love the opportunity to make him proud continually, even though he has been watching her from heaven since November of 2020.

In February of 2021, Heather took a big breath and reached out to Vaughn Lowery, President of 360 Magazine, in hopes of obtaining an internship through the magazine. 360 Magazine stands out from other magazines on many levels. 360 is an edgy fashion, lifestyle, and culture magazine. The founding members have over 30 years of collective experience both as notable talent and uber professionals within fashion, music, art, design, and entertainment. They are an LGBTQIA-friendly publication. Quality art content is the constant goal – No magazine like it is available today, constantly celebrating racial and sexual ambiguous talent and artists. Interning with 360 Magazine was definitely an opportunity she was ready to take on!

The morning Heather interviewed with Vaughn, she was battling the flu that was running its course through her household – she nailed the interview and started the next day! Heather continues to learn every day during her internship and through her classes. She has become increasingly more confident in her illustrations with Vaughn’s guidance. In addition to her internship with the magazine, Heather is also the Communications Director for her school’s AIGA Student group. She was recently nominated and is looking forward to learning her new role within the group!

While Heather stays really busy with art-related things, she really does enjoy doing other things! Her family has five dogs (Beethoven, Duchess, Ruby, Lucky & Alaska) and six cats (Pepper, Chewy, Tom, Jerry, Ebony & Dolly) that fill their home with fur and love. Heather and Josh try to hop on the ps4 a few times a week and play some Warzone. They have always been gamers! They enjoy having game nights, outdoor experiences, and hiking. Her husband is in the process of finishing their home gym – which they are pretty excited about it! Oh, can’t forget reading! Heather has a ton of books that she has bought over the years or have been given to her. She loves being able to curl up and spend an entire day just reading. Music. Music is her saving grace as well! Heather has such a unique playlist(s) – pop, country, r&b, hip-hop, rap… the list could go on!

Heather has a new mantra that she tries to tell herself daily: Keep going until YOU’RE proud. Heather has always doubted herself…but she needs to remember – like many others – that she needs to keep pushing and straighten her crown!

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Container House by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

How to Find a Reliable Home Contractor

Most homeowners go through a hard time finding a reliable contractor even though there are hundreds of contractor companies. If you are looking for a contractor, you certainly don’t want one that is going to take longer than the agreed period, to finish your project. 

On the contrary, you want a contractor that can do an awesome job within your stipulated budget and time. You may want a contractor for the construction of your home or for its renovation. Whatever your need, the following tips will help you pick a reliable home contractor.

Ask For References

The best thing about the internet is that you can get online references on various services. However, personal referrals are way more credible than online reviews and you should prioritize them over online referrals. Besides Google, other websites where homeowners can get reviews of contractors include Home Advisor, AngieList, and Yelp.

You can get personal referrals from sources like your friends and family, and the workers at your local hardware shops. You can also approach a homeowner who recently built their home to give you details about their contractor.  

The best scenario is by combining online reviews and personal reviews. Remember to have an open mind when seeking referrals and be sure to do background checks on as many contractors as possible.

Be Specific About Your Project

It is not advisable to hire a contractor for home projects that are not clearly identified. For instance, hiring a contractor who specializes in roof to renovate your home interior is a bad idea. The unqualified contractor is likely to turn out unreliable as you may end up having to look for another contractor who is fit for the job. 

Treat your home as you would treat your body and go for specialized services from a qualified contractor. You wouldn’t see an ophthalmologist when you have a broken arm, would you? Your home is made up of various areas that a general contractor may not know how to fix as well as a specialized contractor.

Get Proposals from Various Contractors

Once you reach out to your potential contractor, be ready to conduct interviews and ask lots of questions. Request t each of the contractors you are interviewing to write a proposal with their estimated prices for the entire project. The estimates should also include the prices of the materials to be used and any the costs. 

Ensure every contractor makes their bid and then take your time to compare the bids. To widen your scope, experts recommend you reach out to as many as ten contractors. Hiring a contractor for your home project is a crucial part of your home project to answer important questions like shower waste and what to do with it, so take your time.

Go For the Busy One

When you are looking for a contractor you may find it easy to choose the available one since you want to start on your home project as soon as possible. However, going for the contractor who has lots of time on their hands may not be a good idea. Such a contractor is likely to be less experienced and may not be reliable, thus their low demands.

A reliable contractor is likely to be engaged in other projects already since they are on high demand. Therefore, you may have to wait for you to get on their schedule. Considering you want a well done job, you definitely can wait a few weeks or months for a perfect job. 

Finally, be sure to pick the contractor with whom you have a good rapport as this will go a long way in ensuring you two communicate better. You may pick a contractor who is experienced but if you cannot communicate effectively with them, you may end up disappointed.

Paolo Canevari, ThANKS (2009) e J.M.B. (2007), installation view at Cardi Gallery London for use by 360 Magazine

PAOLO CANEVARI SELF-PORTRAIT

PAOLO CANEVARI
SELF-PORTRAIT / AUTORITRATTO

22nd February – 17th April, 2021

While the London venue is currently under lockdown in keeping with current government regulations, we recommend you the video tours of Paolo Canevari’s exhibition.

Cardi Gallery London

22 Grafton Street | London W1S 4EX

Italian contemporary artist Paolo Canevari is best known for transforming everyday materials and icons into large-scale sculptures that confront his audience with stark, political and philosophical commentary. Throughout his career, Canevari has worked in a variety of media, most notably tyres and inner tubes, painting, drawing, performance, animation and film.

The provocative nature of his works, his connections to contemporary scene, and his active role within the art scene in New York–where he lived and worked for many years–has kept Canevari in the spotlight of both American and Italian media.

Cardi Gallery is proud to present the first major solo show of Canevari’s work in the UK, an extensive survey exploring thirty years of the artist’s practice, the culmination of a decades-long collaboration with the gallery. A museum-scale exhibition occupying four floors at Cardi London in Mayfair, ‘Self-portrait / Autoritratto’ brings together over 30 works including sculptures, drawings and installation that range from the artist’s notorious 1990s rubber sculptures through to his most recent ongoing series ‘Monuments of the Memory: Landscape’ and ‘Constellations’. Many of the exhibits are shown here for the first time.

‘Self-portrait / Autoritratto’ aims to illustrate Canevari’s worldview through the artist’s deeply introspective creative process. It brings to the fore not only a reflection on the self but also, in the artist’s words “…a political reading of making art, intended to measure what Pasolini had defined “the injustice of the world”.

“Art is a democratic, progressive force, so it should ideally serve society, not the powers that be. In my work, the use of icons, symbols, and forms from various cultures is a way of drawing attention to their true meaning, tied to dogmas or other forms of power; they’re a way to open up a dialogue with the viewer and stimulate a reaction.
[…] The “political” character of my work is just one of many possible interpretations of what I do.”

“What I wish to express is a radical, subversive attitude towards art and the idea of art as it has been conceived and conveyed by globalised consumeristic society, therefore raising the level of moral and ethical perception of the world.”

The ambiguity of Canevari’s artworks, suspended in their brutalist aesthetic between irony and disquiet, is a successful result of both conceptual and formal transformation of industrial materials. Oil and its applications (synthetic rubber, exhaust motor oil, etc) are at the heart of his vocabulary; in his hands they become ambiguous symbols of the systemic violence that permeates today’s declining world where the threat of war–whether in the name of spiritual or monetary values–is constant, and humankind’s memory is tragically too short.

“To me, an artwork is profoundly important when it does not recoil into a one-way structure­–whether ideological or technical–but when it opens up to different perspectives for the viewer, therefore broadening their thought.”
-Paolo Canevari

“Cardi Gallery believes that art and culture are key for a healthy society and a ray of hope in these tragic times. I am absolutely delighted to bring to London these incredible works by Paolo Canevari, opening an exciting exhibition season for the gallery.”
-Nicolo Cardi

The exhibition is accompanied by a catalogue with an essay by the eminent American curator Robert Storr; an interview with Iranian artist Shirin Neshat and a homage to Canevari by the acclaimed Italian novelist, Andrea Camilleri. A series of artist talks, and exhibition tours will be held in conjunction with the show.

Open: Monday – Friday 10am – 6pm & Saturday 11am – 5pm

Artwork by Paul Gervais-8437-2

Paul Gervais – Faces and Forms

Leaning In to Reveal the Personal and the Imagined

On View through May 30 at the Boca Raton Museum of Art

 

The Museum premiere of these new paintings by Paul Gervais features portraits with a tenderness that urges the viewer to lean in closely, to really study them. All of the subjects in the portraits are personal, from the life he has shared for 46 years with his husband Gil, of whom there are several paintings. The exhibition is curated by Kathleen Goncharov, the Senior Curator of the Boca Raton Museum of Art. She chose to accompany the 14 portraits with a series of 13 paintings by Gervais of imagined objects. The exhibition is on view through May 30, and features an exclusive online conversation with Paul Gervais as part of the Museum’s Collectors Forum Series for Members. This virtual visit to the artist’s studio will also be made available free to the public later on, as part of the #BocaMuseumatHome series sponsored by Art Bridges Foundation and PNC.

“Whether real or imagined, all the paintings in this exhibition are a reflection of Gervais’s life and perceptions,” says Irvin Lippman, the Executive Director of the Boca Raton Museum of Art. “The intimate scale of these works forces the viewer to move in closer in order to see each painting’s fine details, and in the case of the portraits – to more closely read each subject’s personality,” adds Lippman.

Always Seeking the True Likeness

The artist was driven to explore portraiture for the first time by two events in early 2020 that left an indelible mark on Paul Gervais: after he saw the exhibition Lucian Freud: Self-Portraits at London’s Royal Academy of Arts; and after reading The Lives of Lucian Freud by William Feaver. “All of a sudden one day at home I came down to breakfast and there was my husband Gil, and it all clicked: in a flash I took his photo and rushed to my studio to paint my very first portrait,” says Gervais. The intimate, smaller scale of these paintings was inspired by Freud’s smaller works, especially Freud’s petite portrait of Queen Elizabeth. “To me, when I observe Lucian Freud’s body of work, his portraits come across as a kind of autobiography. When viewing them I feel as though I could fill in the blanks of his life, and the history of art in that place in time.”

Also an acclaimed author, his first novel was a finalist for the prestigious PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction in 1991. Presciently, the title of Gervais’s first book was Extraordinary People, foreshadowing his focus today on painting people who are extraordinary because they stand out in his life. “When I’m painting a portrait, I’m thinking about that person all the time. A true likeness is what I am looking for most of all,” says Gervais, who always paints his subjects from a photograph. “I prefer to catch them while they are in a reflective moment,” he says. “I don’t usually want them looking at the camera. I prefer they never pose nor aim to please, to show a more intimate look at the person.”

 

“The Abstracts are also a Portrayal of Something that is Me”

Although the forms referred to in the title of the exhibition are imaginary, they reflect Gervais’s sensibility and experience, and are closely linked to his portraits. Gervais refers to these forms and figures as “all-time, from throughout all cultures of human history.” These abstractions have personal relevance for Gervais, such as Sculpture and a Pool – an homage to David Hockney, who Gervais met when he was a student at the San Francisco Art Institute in the 1970s, when Hockney was a guest lecturer. Hockney became friends with Paul and Gil. He pictured the couple in one of his Composite Polaroid works during that period, and they have remained friends ever since.

 

“The abstracts are also very much a portrayal of something that is me,” says Gervais. Some are imagined interiors, such as the hybrid style of Enfilade, a cross between a minimalist home and a contemporary art gallery. In some of these interiors, Gervais includes depictions of paintings behind the forms as nods to iconic abstract expressionist works. In some of his other abstracts, Gervais projects tones inspired by 18th-century neo-classical colors. Others show forms with oxidized copper hues that give heed to the Statue of Liberty, with a horizon line of pale blue sky.

 

More About the Artist

The work of Paul Gervais is in the collections of several institutions, including: the Museum of the Legion of Honor in San Francisco; the Bank of America Collection; the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; and the Hall Collection in New York. In 1980, he earned his MFA from the San Francisco Art Institute. Gervais also earned a B.A. in English Literature at Saint Michael’s College in Vermont in 1969. At San Francisco State University, Gervais studied poetry with Robert Creeley and Phillip Lamantia.

His work has been exhibited in solo and group exhibitions throughout the U.S. and Europe, including: The Achenbach Foundation for Graphic Arts/The Museum of the Legion of Honor; Sunne Savage Gallery (Boston); Leah Levy Gallery (San Francisco); Fritz Gallery (Palm Beach); Bagni di Lucca Art Festival (Italy); and Gavlak Gallery (Palm Beach).

In addition to his literary success with the PEN/Faulkner Award Finalist nomination, other short fiction and articles by Gervais have been published in anthologies and periodicals including The Los Angeles Times. “My lifelong devotion to art, both visual art and writing, are my two passions. I believe that both art and writing come from the same place in the artist. They are just different disciplines,” says Paul Gervais.

Gervais met Gil Cohen in 1974, and the artist credits their shared life of more than four decades as being instrumental in his art. They now live in London and Palm Beach County. In 1982, the couple became internationally famous for the garden at their celebrated home in Lucca, Italy where they lived for 34 years before moving to London in 2016. The 60-acre estate, Villa Massei, was built in 1500 by the Counts Sinibaldi. Hundreds of garden lovers and botanical clubs visited their garden. It captured the attention of Prince Charles, who invited Paul and Gil to his Highgrove Royal Gardens. Many notables visited the garden and stayed at the villa, including: David Hockney; the Queen of Norway; Princess Maria Pia of Bourbon-Parma (the daughter of Italy’s last king); Hubert de Givenchy; James Lord; Edmund White; Kathleen Turner; and Michelle Phillips, among others. His book, A Garden in Lucca, is a personal memoir recalling the author’s journey of self-discovery after caring for the extensive garden.

Regarding this new pairing of his portraits alongside the paintings of imagined forms, Gervais states: “I am thrilled the Museum is showing them together, because they are linked. Faces and Forms takes a closer look at figuration in art. The abstract forms are positioned like actors on a stage, interacting with light and shadow and with each other. This show could be seen as people in my portraits contemplating the mysteries of abstraction, their faces surrounded by their inner artistic conundrums. Also, could this pairing be seen as an affirmation that all painting is simply portraiture, whatever the subject. This brings to mind a quote by Jamie Wyeth: Everything I paint is a portrait, whatever the subject.”

 

About the Boca Raton Museum of Art

Kicking off its eighth decade in 2021, the Boca Raton Museum of Art encompasses a creative campus that includes the Museum in Mizner Park and the Art School. As one of South Florida’s cultural landmarks, the Museum has provided cultural and artistic service to the community, and to many visitors from around the world, since it was founded by artists in 1950. Visit their website to enjoy the Museum’s current online content, including video tours and digital gallery guides. Support for #BocaMuseumatHome and #KeepKidsSmartwithArt virtual programming is provided by Art Bridges Foundation and PNC. Museum hours, admission prices and more visitor information available at the museum’s website.

Artwrk by Paul Gervais-8439-2

Denise Solenghi (Lara Facco P&C) Denise Solenghi (Lara Facco P&C) for 360 Magazine

Cut A Rug A Round Square

Curated by: Jessica Stockholder

The American artist curates an exhibition of works from the collection of “la Caixa” Foundation and CRT Foundation for Modern and Contemporary Art and turns them into a large environmental installation.

Many times has the “end” of painting been declared and just as many times its “rebirth” has been attested: with the desire to investigate the limits and contemporary potentialities of painting, from February 11 OGR–Officine Grandi Riparazioni–presents Cut a rug a round square, a new site-specific commission developed for the former industrial spaces of OGR Turin by the American artist Jessica Stockholder.

Chosen for her peculiar perspective, Jessica Stockholder has played over the last twenty years a crucial role in the ongoing debate on painting and its limits, expanding the concept in a relentless dialogue amid various media, between form and space, by forcing the limits of painting towards the sculptural and installation dimension.

In her work, the artist combines apparently disparate and ordinary objects to create complex installations that hoard and stratify materials and colors: plastic bags and containers, extension cords, lumber, carpets, and furniture: in her hands, these often-neglected objects recover aesthetic and formal qualities in a practice reminiscent of abstract expressionism, color field painting, and minimalism.

For the project set up inside Binario 1 of OGR Cult, the area of OGR dedicated to art and culture, the artist Jessica Stockholder converted into an exceptional curator and created a unique installation with works from two important collections: the Collection of Contemporary Art “la Caixa” of Barcelona, and that of the CRT Foundation for Modern and Contemporary Art, whose works are on permanent loan to the Turin museums Gam – Gallery of Modern Art and Castello di Rivoli, Museum of Contemporary Art.

To plan her route across the rich heritage at her disposal, the artist developed a concept that is both rigorous and poetic: “I am exploring how the generally rectilinear geometry inherent in the contour, or edge, of paintings, generates meaning both inside and outside the paintings. – states Jessica Stockholder – In relation to both their exposure and internal mechanisms, paintings make use of geometry and its resonance with the scale and form of the human body. (…) Casting a glance through the collections, I was struck by the many works in which the circle and square intersect. Often these works literally feature circles and squares themselves. I began to think of the representation of the human body as a kind of circle within the square, as in Leonardo da Vinci’s Vitruvian Man. The paintings are themselves usually characterized by rectilinear geometries. What happens inside pushes against the edges. The edges are both literal and abstract and are defined by the end of the material support, but the rectangle, identified as a mapping, is understood by virtue of abstraction.

Combining works of disparate production and origin, the artist investigates the ways of painting and its categorical definitions across genre boundaries, studying its literal and metaphorical edges.

Works range from Directions by Vito Acconci, a photograph documenting the exhausting performance of a man with his arms and legs spread to evoke the Vitruvian Man, to Combustion by Aurelio Amendola, whose shots portray Alberto Burri in the act of melting plastic with a flashlight to create a circle in a square. From Bonded EternmaleMonica Bonvicini‘s installation of two chairs covered in studded black leather exhibited on a circular red carpet, to A REMOVAL OF THE CORNER OF A RUG IN USE by Lawrence Weiner where written words protrude from the surface of the wall like paint does on his canvas. From 9 to 5 by Edward Ruscha, who painted the time cycle of a working day trapped inside a claustrophobic rectangle to Undercurrent (Red) by Mona Hatoum where the floor surface acts as a pictorial plane for a large carpet of electric cables. And again, among others, the works of Marlene Dumas, Richard Tuttle, Tracey Emin, Diego Perrone, and Jessica Stockholder herself, are exhibited in a display specially designed by the artist who succeeded in transforming the entire exhibition into a work of art in itself, a large environmental installation that evokes, in an experiential form, the clash between the circle and the square as an image of the productive clash between rationality and imagination, order and superabundance, body and idea.

Cut a rug a round square is an opportunity for the public to admire, in complete safety and free of charge, in the spaces of OGR, a treasure preserved by the city’s museums and enriched over the years by the CRT Foundation, with a newfangled interpretation from the point of view of an artist across the works of yet another international collection. The exhibition focuses on the theme of painting, dear to both collections, which have a rich heritage of pictorial works, by taking the cue from one of the most discussed and loved media – even by the more general audience. Cut a rug a round square reshapes the boundaries of this discipline and weaves a discourse that takes from the forms and phantasmagorias of painting, keys to reading the contemporary world,  and invites visitors to lose themselves in a world of shapes and colors.

Jessica Stockholder (1959, Seattle, WA. Lives and works in Chicago, Illinois) has exhibited widely in museums and galleries internationally. Her work is in the permanent collections of numerous museums including the Whitney Museum of Art, New York; The Art Institute of Chicago; MoCA Los Angeles; MoMA San Francisco; the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; The British Museum, London; and the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam. Recent solo exhibitions include Stuff Matters at the Central Museum, Utrecht and Relational Aesthetics at The Contemporary Austin, Austin in 2019.

From February 11
Free admission
Thursday and Friday, 3PM – 8PM, last admission 7.30PM
OGR Cult, OGR – Officine Grandi Riparazioni

DIYhome-01 by Imagine It Media for 360 Magazine

3 Step Process For Repairing Polished Concrete or Epoxy Floors

Although polished concrete is a highly durable flooring option, it can succumb to damage after a long time. The damage usually occurs and can be caused by; using harsh soaps to clean it, stains caused by other liquids seeping through the concrete, exposure to high foot traffic, and exposure to high impact. 

We interviewed an epoxy flooring contractor near marlboro NJ can also wear and tear if the contractor laid the foundation improperly. Improperly laying the polished concrete can cause air pockets and bubbles inside the concrete. These bubbles later worsen and crack. 

Luckily, there are ways to fix the small imperfections that occur over time. Read on to find out how to repair polished concrete floors.

Repairing Dulling 

A polished concrete floor can become dull when exposed to high traffic, usually by foot. This can occur in places like restaurants, school’s common areas, or grocery stores. Typically, this happens when the floor features a burnished tropical treatment or a sealer to give it a shiny look. These features usually wear out fast over time. 

If you went for a mechanically polished concrete floor where physical buffing is done to produce a shiny appearance, your floor’s shine might last for a while compared to when you use chemicals to get the same effect.  Nevertheless, the polished concrete floor is bound to become dull after some time, no matter how well it is polished.

A mere rebuffing process can make your polished concrete shiny again to fix the dulling. The floors will look as good as new once a professional rebuffing is done. 

Fixing Cracks

Besides dulling, cracking is another common problem for polished concrete floors. And just like dulling, you cannot entirely avoid cracking. Cracking usually occurs when the chemicals used in making the concrete floor shrink. Also, adding more water to the concrete puts the concrete at more risk of cracking. 

However, unlike dulling, cracking is not easy to fix, especially when the cracks appear in small areas. Replicating a good finish can be challenging in such areas, and pouring more concrete into the cracks will not do the trick. When your concrete develops small cracks, the advisable thing to do is to consult a professional contractor first to assess the extent of the damage and have them give their advice on the best way to fix the cracks. 

Typically, an epoxy repair mortar is used to repair concrete cracks. The other alternative is by using control joints. Control joints are more of a preventive measure than a repair method since they are fixed on the concrete floor when the concrete is being laid. The control joints help provide stable and durable flooring and limit the threat of cracking. 

Fixing Crazing

Cracks are known as crazing when they become interconnected, forming a hexagonal shape. The cracks result in a sloppy and unsightly appearance. 

Crazing occurs when the finishing of the concrete floor is poorly done or when the concrete dries too fast. Fortunately, concrete contractors can fix the crazing when it occurs during the construction. They do this using a method known as moist curing. Moist curing is a popular repair product that features a spray-on with chemicals that fix the crazing. Alternatively, the contractor can use other stiffer and drier mixing solutions.

Other more straightforward methods that do not involve chemicals include using a broom to brush over the concrete floor in the final stages. This method is useful in masking cracks and other surface blemishes of a minor scale. Prompt repair of crazing is necessary to avoid severe damage when the crazing is left for longer. 

Finally, since it is almost impossible to prevent the concrete floor from dulling and cracking, the best thing to do is to ensure you involve professional contractors when installing the polished concrete floor. This will enable you to at least enjoy your beautifully shiny concrete floor before you have to think of repairing it. But make sure you involve professional flooring contractors to get quality results.

Graffiti and art article illustrated by Gabrielle Archuleta for 360 magazine

Imagination in Motion Youth Art Contest Winners

WonderWorks Myrtle Beach announces its youth art contest winners. ART-OLINA: Youth Art Gallery of the Carolinas, located inside WonderWorks Myrtle Beach, will display the winning pieces for a year. The winners also each receive four complimentary tickets to WonderWorks to visit the art gallery and see their work on display. The winners of this year’s art contest are:

Dawson, 12th Grade, Socastee High School, Art Title: COVID19 Self Portrait

Rori, 8th Grade, Loris Middle School, Art Title: The Dream

Erin, 7th Grade, Bob Jones Academy, Art Title: Free to Dream

Corbin, 8th Grade, Black Water Middle School, Art Title: Right and Left State of Mind

Addysyn, 6th Grade, Bryson Middle School, Art Title: Mind on Me

Anna, 5th Grade, Waccamaw Elementary School, Art Title: Light through the Dark

Kaylee, 6th Grade, St. James Intermediate School, Art Title: Thinking About Art in Space

Weston, 3rd Grade, Aynor Elementary School, Art Title: In the Wild

Adayln, 1st Grade, Carolina Forest Elementary School, Art Title: Thinking

“We received a lot of great artwork from the youth in our community,” explains Robert Stinnett, general manager at WonderWorks Myrtle Beach. “We are happy to be able to have some of it on display for the next year. This is a great way to honor our young artists and to inspire others.”

Submissions for the art contest were accepted through December 18, 2020, with the winning submissions going on display January 22, 2021. The theme for this year’s contest was “Time to Think,” which encouraged young artists to think and express their thoughts through art. All of the artwork focused on being unique in concept, design, and execution. All winning artwork will help expand the illusion art gallery in a special section created to highlight local area youth art.

Encouraging youth to engage in art comes with many benefits. According to the National Endowment for the Arts, youth that engage in arts do better in school, are more optimistic, less likely to try drugs, and have higher school attachment. Additionally, youth who engage in art tend to have a higher quality of life, reduced stress and make them feel more involved in the community.

“Art is one of the things that we focus on here at WonderWorks Myrtle Beach,” added Stinnett. “We are happy to offer the area’s young artists a chance to have their artwork on display. Combine that with all the other family fun we offer, and it’s a winning combination.”

WonderWorks Myrtle Beach programs include the WonderWorks WonderKids event,  ART-OLINA Young Artist’s Gallery of the Carolinas, online science worksheets, sensory days, group rates, birthday parties and a homeschool program.

WonderWorks Myrtle Beach offers a variety of STEM- related activities, including virtual learning labs, science fair partnerships, on-site exhibits, activities and more. To learn more about the program, visit the site here. To learn more about the most recent career highlight, visit the site.

WonderWorks Myrtle Beach has COVID-19 safety measures in place. They include reduced hours, enhanced cleaning, spatial distancing protocols, employee health screenings and employee personal protective equipment (PPE).

About WonderWorks

WonderWorks, a science-focused indoor amusement park, combines education and entertainment. With over 100 hands-on exhibits, there is something unique and challenging for all ages. Feel the power of 84-mph hurricane-force winds in the Hurricane Shack. Make huge, life-sized bubbles in the Bubble Lab. Get the NASA treatment in our Astronaut Training Gyro and experience zero gravity. Nail it by lying on the death-defying Bed of Nails. Conquer your fear of heights on our indoor Glow-In-The-Dark Ropes Course. WonderWorks is open 365 days a year and hosts birthday parties and special events.

Katie Commodore x The Untitled Space

The Untitled Space is pleased to present “Katie Commodore: Between Friends and Lovers” solo exhibition opening on November 21st, and on view through December 12, 2020.  Curated by Indira Cesarine, “Katie Commodore: Between Friends and Lovers” debuts a series of large scale erotically charged figurative tapestries, created with detailed adornments and unique embroideries, along with a number of her signature portraits in gouache, miniature watercolor paintings on ivory, as well as works on paper including intaglio etchings, metallic foil cutouts, and photogravure prints. Katie Commodore is an interdisciplinary artist who concentrates on creating intimate portraits of her friends. In 2000 Commodore received her BFA in illustration from Maryland Institute College of Art. In 2004 she obtained her MFA in printmaking from Rhode Island School of Design where she is currently an adjunct professor.

“Katie Commodore: Between Friends and Lovers”

A Solo Exhibition
Presented by The Untitled Space

THE UNTITLED SPACE
45 Lispenard Street, NYC 10013

*RSVP*
Due to COVID, there will be limited capacity inside the gallery, and guests are required to wear masks. RSVP Required via Registration Link. All RSVPs will be confirmed. Thank you in advance.
RSVP REGISTRATION LINK 

EXHIBITION ON VIEW
November 21– December 12, 2020

“Everyone is my friend and they are allowing me to be a witness to their love, which in turn is then celebrated by everyone that sees it.” Over the past few years, Katie Commodore’s artwork has concentrated on depicting real people’s sexuality, although not necessarily their sexual preferences, but rather sexuality in the broader sense. Her intimate portraits address what is it that makes them feel sexy, how they express that physically, and how it evolves over the years for them as individuals. “We change our clothes every season; our physical appearance through body modification, losing weight, gaining weight, tattoos, etc; we change our kinks and sexual preferences partner to partner, year to year.  Our sexuality, and how we feel about it, is in constant flux; the same way that we redecorate our homes, change the wallpaper and curtains, change the sheets.” States the artist on her portraits. Commodore likens this subtle change in how her friends express themselves to the way society also expresses its collective self through decorative patterns. “In a roundabout way, it can be looked at as a meter of a population’s ‘sexuality’ – the public expression of the private. Bright colors, vibrant patterns, clean lines, and minimal decoration all provide a window into the personalities that chose or created them. Historians and anthropologists often use the decorative remnants (pots, jewelry, frescos, etc.) of past cultures to gain valuable insight into the lives of the people that created them, the same sort of cultural portrait can be drawn from our design choices today.”

Throughout the years, she has focused on various mediums including drawing, painting, printmaking, textiles, and scrimshaw. She has often emphasized materials that are not considered “fine art” but were rather thought of as women’s “hobbies” and in so doing highlights their traditional merit. A majority of her artwork is portraits of her friends during their most erotic moments, acting as a celebration of personal power, beauty, and sexuality.  It is a subtle, but often rich moment that shows the kink, sexual fulfillment, and the sexual interests of those closest to her. “Any activity that helps someone express their sexuality is beautiful, to be supported, and worthy of being immortalized in art.” She states of her sexually charged portraits which depict real people in the moment, captured through private photo sessions with the artist which are used as references for her paintings or prints.

Commodore was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis in 2007, which forced her to adjust her artistic practice. Her diagnosis motivated her to explore ways of maintaining the vibrant patterns and detail that she’s known for while not having to rely completely on her super fine motor skills. “Right before I was diagnosed with MS my artwork got much more detailed and pattern-based, and I think that was an unconscious reaction to the fact that I was losing my super-fine motor skills. Since then, I’ve adapted my studio practice to accommodate what I can and cannot do. I don’t draw with a pencil or pen as much anymore, paint brushes are more forgiving when it comes to small hand tremors. I do much more planning and sketching in the computer. Embroidery has been a real change that allows me to maintain the compulsive marking and patterns while there’s no need for perfect hand-eye coordination.”

Her latest series of large-scale figurative tapestries are ripe with intricate details. In a continuation of her signature style she presents bold figures against dramatically complex patterns, pushing the visuals into the realm of surreal erotic fantasies. The sheer scale of the works heightens the drama in a cinematic manner with the life-sized figures taking center stage. “Tandem to creating miniatures and paintings with vivid patterns, I’ve always been interested in creating life-sized portraiture. In grad school I did a series of life-sized relief prints and over the years I’ve done several life-sized drawings that I then spent months filling in with patterns. There was always something about portraying my models in a completely relatable scale that took the image from something precious to something actually more personal, the viewer can feel their gaze and the energy in their pose, feel their weight and almost come away feeling like they know the model in real life. Several years ago, I wanted to have custom tapestries made to reference the historical value of tapestries while giving tribute to the fact that often women were the actual makers of the tapestries which were usually designed by men. My digitally woven textiles start out as drawings in my computer. Like my works on paper, the patterns are historical wallpaper and fabric designs that range from the medieval to contemporary examples. I embroider on them, adding appliques (chine collé, if you will), bejeweling and beading away for hours, turning them into monoprints. I’m creating something new that combines the immediate gratification of print on demand fabricated works with the meditative, time consuming craft of embroidery and fiber arts. I juxtapose mass-produced elements with the uniqueness of each piece, elevating each patch and plastic bead to something more substantial.” She also introduces a number of text works in fiber that complement the series with their adventurously powerful statements.

Katie Commodore has exhibited throughout the United States and Europe, including England, Italy, Germany, and Greece. She has had solo exhibitions at Baby Grand, NYC, and SHAG, Brooklyn. Her work has been previously featured in a number of group shows presented by The Untitled Space including “(Hotel) XX” at Spring/Break Art Show, “IRL: Investigating Reality” and “Secret Garden”. Other notable exhibitions include “FEMME” presented by Spoke Art and Juxtapoz Magazine, SCOPE Art Fair, “StitchFetish 6” at The Hive Gallery, and “Facing the Walls” at The VETs Gallery. Residencies include ChaNorth, Pine Plains, New York; Red Light Design, Amsterdam, Holland; and One Night Residency, London, England. She is currently the Administrative Director of Crux, LCA, a cooperative of Black XR Creatives and Producers that focuses on Black storytelling and creating a foothold in the burgeoning vocabulary of new media of VR and creating Black wealth. Commodore has been featured in a number of publications including The New York Times and Dazed Digital, among others. She currently lives and works in Providence, Rhode Island.

Art4Equality x Life, Liberty & The Pursuit of Happiness

The Untitled Space is pleased to present a group exhibition and public art series “Art4Equality x Life, Liberty & The Pursuit of Happiness” presented in collaboration with SaveArtSpace and Art4Equality. The two-part exhibition features an empowering public art series of 10 billboards each by different artists launching on September 21, 2020 in a variety of locations throughout New York City, to coincide with a gallery exhibition opening on September 26, 2020 at The Untitled Space featuring the work of over 50 contemporary artists. Revolving around the theme of “Art4Equality x Life, Liberty & The Pursuit of Happiness” the public art series and group exhibition is curated by Indira Cesarine, founder of The Untitled Space and Art4Equality.

The gallery will feature the unique artworks displayed on the billboards (presented by SaveArtSpace) along with an exhibition of many additional works in a variety of mediums including painting, drawing, photography, video, and sculpture inspired by the words “Equality,” “Life,” “Liberty,” and “The Pursuit of Happiness,” which will be on view at the gallery through October 17, 2020. The Untitled Space is honored to collaborate with non-profit SaveArtSpace and support the programming of Art4Equality, an initiative that supports the creation of empowering equality themed exhibitions and public art.

Curatorial Statement:

“’What do these words mean to you: “Equality,” “Life,” “Liberty,” “The Pursuit of Happiness”? We live in an unprecedented time, our liberties robbed by a global pandemic, which laid painfully bare the inequities that have plagued the most vulnerable in our society for far too long. Political polarization in the United States is reaching critical mass with a divisive political system at war. Realities of social inequality and racial injustice are challenging our ability to have confidence in a promising future. With the 2020 elections approaching, I felt that it was a crucial time to create an opportunity for artists to respond, with the artwork presented in a public platform where it can reach an audience of millions of people every day and promote an inclusive dialogue.

The billboard transformed into an art display is an innovative, and ultimately accessible way to present contemporary art, transforming spaces normally dedicated to advertising into public art that has power and impact. We received such an overwhelming response to the exhibit opportunity, which was presented via an open call, that I expanded the project to include a gallery group exhibition featuring over 50 artists who created artworks inspired by the theme – most of which were created during quarantine. The public art series and exhibition “Art4Equality x Life, Liberty, & The Pursuit of Happiness” seeks to empower, enlighten, and shed a ray of hope in a city that has been under a dark cloud, in a country that is in tatters not only by an invisible virus, but also by political and civil unrest. As we navigate through this difficult time, “Art4Equality x Life, Liberty, & The Pursuit of Happiness” celebrates art as activism, giving voices to a diverse array of contemporary artists from all backgrounds, ages, and genders. I’m honored to guest curate the public art series for SaveArtSpace and hope viewers will be inspired and motivated by the public art billboards and exhibition artwork.” – Artist & Curator Indira Cesarine

EXHIBITING ARTISTS:

Alexandra Rubinstein, Alison Stinley, Alysia Davis, Ann Lewis, Anne Barlinckhoff, Annika Connor, April Fitzpatrick, Ashley Chew, Buket Savci, Cabell Molina, Coco Dolle, D’nae Harrison, Dan Alvarado, Daniel Aros-Aguilar, Danielle Siegelbaum, Daryl Daniels, David Siever, Dessie Jackson, Devynity Wray, Diana Zipeto, Dolly Faibyshev, Donna Bassin, Egypt H., Fahren Feingold, Faustine Badrichani, Geoffrey Stein, Hana Zhang, Indira Cesarine, Jamia Weir, Jared Freschman, Jodie Herrera, Joel Tretin, Jose Baez, Karen Bystedt, Katya Zvereva, Kim McCarty, Leah Schrager, Linda Friedman Schmidt, Lola Jiblazee, Lynn Bianchi, Meg Lionel Murphy, Michele Pred, Osaze Stigler, Panteha Abareshi, Paolo Morales, Q’shaundra James, Rachel Van Der Nacht, Rebecca Bird, Robin Tewes, Robyn Gibson, Rosemary Meza-DesPlas, Sarupa Sidaarth, Travis Rueckert, Tslil Tsemet, Valerie Carmet, and Vaughan Larsen.

PUBLIC ART BILLBOARDS (in collaboration with SaveArtSpace):

Anne Barlinckhoff – Pulaski Bridge 11th St & 53rd Ave, Queens Ashley Chew – Flushing Ave & Waverly Ave, Brooklyn Donna Bassin – McGuinness Blvd & Calyer St, Brooklyn Fahren Feingold + Indira Cesarine – W 46th St & 12th Ave, Manhattan Jodie Herrera – Hamilton Pl & 12th St, Brooklyn Kim McCarty – Flushing Ave & Spencer St, Brooklyn Meg Lionel Murphy – Myrtle Ave & Cornelia St, Queens Panteha Abareshi – Park Ave & Emerson Pl, Brooklyn Sarupa Sidaarth – McGuinness Blvd & Calyer St, Brooklyn Travis Rueckert – 11th Ave & W 45th St, Manhattan

ABOUT SAVEARTSPACE

Founded in 2015, in Brooklyn, NY, SaveArtSpace is a non-profit organization that works to create an urban gallery experience, launching exhibitions that address intersectional themes and foster a progressive message of social change. By placing culture over commercialism, SaveArtSpace aims to empower artists from all walks of life and inspire a new generation of young creatives and activists. Since 2015, SaveArtSpace has installed the artwork of 180 artists on 212 advertising spaces in 10+ major US cities, coast-to-coast. Beyond transforming advertisement space into public art, we work with a variety of community groups including: schools, senior residencies, shelters, youth groups, special needs programs, art collectives, galleries, and museums. Together, we aim to foster community and cultural enrichment through the arts. While supporting underprivileged and emerging artists by providing them the opportunity to display work in the public space.

For more information click HERE.

ABOUT ART4EQUALITY

Art4Equality is an initiative supporting equality themed art exhibitions and special projects including films and public art by female identifying artists and allies. The mission of Art4Equality is to create empowering artwork and exhibitions that can impact social change, raise awareness and inspire our community. Art4Equality additionally facilitates opportunities by providing mentorship to artists, as well as special programming such as panel discussions, performances, and educational art events. Art4Equality empowers by creating a platform for progress. By supporting the work of underrepresented and marginalized artists, Art4Equality demonstrates the value, quality, and diversity of their contributions to the community, encourages an inclusive dialogue, and promotes equality for all.

For more information click HERE.

ABOUT THE UNTITLED SPACE

The Untitled Space is an art gallery located in Tribeca, New York in a landmark building on Lispenard Street. Founded in 2015 by artist Indira Cesarine, the gallery features an ongoing curation of exhibits of emerging and established contemporary artists exploring conceptual framework and boundary-pushing ideology through mediums of painting, sculpture, printmaking, photography, video and performance art. The gallery is committing to exploring new ideas vis-à-vis traditional and new mediums and highlights a program of women in art. Indira Cesarine’s curatorial for The Untitled Space includes solo shows for artists Sarah Maple, Rebecca Leveille, Alison Jackson, Fahren Feingold, Jessica Lichtenstein, Tom Smith, Loren Erdrich, Kat Toronto aka Miss Meatface, Nichole Washington, and Jeanette Hayes among many others. Notable group shows include “IRL: Investigating Reality,” “BODY BEAUTIFUL,” “EDEN” and “(HOTEL) XX” at SPRING/BREAK Art Show, “SHE INSPIRES,” and internationally-celebrated group shows “UPRISE/ANGRY WOMEN,” and “ONE YEAR OF RESISTANCE” responding to the political climate in America, as well as numerous other critically-acclaimed exhibitions. Recent press on Indira Cesarine & The Untitled Space includes Vogue (US), Vogue Italia, CNN, Forbes, Newsweek, W Magazine, Harper’s Bazaar, Teen Vogue, New York Magazine, i-D Magazine, Dazed and Confused, and The New York Times among many others.

For more information click HERE.

 

“Entertainment Unit” by artist Sarupa Sidaarth, Artwork featured in “Art4Equality x Life, Liberty, The Pursuit of Happiness” Exhibition and Public Art Series Presented by The Untitled Space in collaboration with SaveArtSpace and Art4Equality

 

“Our Land” by artist Meg Lionel Murphy, Artwork featured in “Art4Equality x Life, Liberty, The Pursuit of Happiness” Exhibition and Public Art Series Presented by The Untitled Space in collaboration with SaveArtSpace and Art4Equality

 

“Behind The Flag” by artist April Fitzpatrick, Artwork featured in “Art4Equality x Life, Liberty, The Pursuit of Happiness” Exhibition and Public Art Series Presented by The Untitled Space in collaboration with SaveArtSpace and Art4Equality

EXHIBITION CONTACTS:

The Untitled Space: info@untitled-space.com

Exhibition Website: HERE

SaveArtSpace Billboards: HERE