Posts tagged with "nyc"

Vaughn Lowery, 360 MAGAZINE

Understanding The Responsibilities Of A Personal Injury Lawyer

Personal injury lawyers are civil litigators that represent clients who face injuries or economic harm due to the actions of another party. A personal injury claim can mainly help a victim avail some benefits against the negligent party; to secure the compensation of the damages that may have been caused due to the incident. Now for a victim, it is obvious to file a personal injury claim as their right. Yet, to take the claim further and avail the compensations, personal injury lawyers play an important role for the victims. 

But when it comes to hiring a personal injury lawyer, the victim needs to understand the actual responsibilities that they’ll be offering in terms of the claim and its entire process. This is simply because their legal duties are pretty specific in terms of representing their clients. So, if you’re someone who’s planning to pursue a personal injury claim or know someone who would; it’s better to understand what appropriate representations you should be expecting from your lawyer.

Their Responsibilities

Explaining The Process

Going through the process of personal injury compensation is probably new to many, in comparison to the specific type of injury compensation. Other than that, the state to state differences in the personal injury law also make it uncommon for everyone to be aware of completely. That is why, when you hire a personal injury lawyer; their utmost responsibility is to explain to you the details about the process of filing a claim. Along with that, the personal injury lawyer also informs you about what you should be expecting to happen in the coming weeks or months; so that you can be completely prepared for it.

Giving Personal Advice

Other than explaining to you of your rights and the entire process, the personal injury lawyer will also provide you their advice according to their professional experience. This advice will mainly be based on what you should and shouldn’t do following your injury and case details. This professional advice would be another responsibility of your injury lawyer; that would benefit you to take the claim further. As an example, your injury lawyer can advise you on what medical treatment you can take to back up your medical records while ensuring the damages you’re claiming for.

Deeply Investigating

Another important responsibility of a personal injury lawyer is to deeply investigate your case and understand all the major and minor details. This would help them understand what compensation you deserve (according to them). This way, with the help of proper assessment of the medical details and injuries you’re facing, your injury lawyer would more strongly be able to handle the argument and negotiate for your settlement amount suitably. Although, when it comes to having a personal injury lawyer that would handle your case strongly and help you get better claims, it’s always recommended to go for professional help, especially in the larger cities of Los Angeles, like Pasadena. The professionals at https://usa-law.org/ believe that having a strong understanding of personal injury cases and having more experience in it; makes it far easier to achieve a better claim. Besides, the more experienced and professional personal injury lawyers you hire, the least stressful the whole process of claiming can be for you, right?

Negotiating For A Settlement

Now we mentioned how a professional personal injury lawyer would make it easier for you to go through the entire claiming process, right? But that isn’t all, as a professional personal injury lawyer also goes through the responsibility of negotiating a settlement with the at-fault party; from your side. With the help of the expert knowledge they have, the personal injury lawyers ensure that you rightly avail what you deserve; while professionally and suitably dealing with the insurance companies as well as other attorneys. As a result, personal injury lawyers tend to look at the situation a lot more than just the immediate effects that might take place, and handle it accordingly.

Representing You

Normally, personal injury cases are settled outside the court easily. Although, in cases where the settlement isn’t possible without having third-party interference; taking the case to a trial becomes important. At times like this, (which are also quite rare); it is the responsibility of your injury lawyer to represent you in the court and fight for the compensation you deserve. Yet, since such cases don’t go to the court often; it’s also important to ensure that your injury lawyer is suitable for representing you (in case if the case goes to court)!

When you hire an attorney, you don’t only increase the chances of success of your injury claim, but also secure a better compensation in comparison to what you would have received without an attorney. Yet, since not many are aware of how a personal injury lawyer serves us; it’s better to be aware of their responsibilities and look for an attorney that professionally fulfills them all.

Vaughn Lowery, 360 MAGAZINE, coronavirus, COVID-19

In COVID Fashion

With the recent outbreak of the Coronavirus pandemic, the shortfall of supplies and equipment for healthcare workers was inevitable. In this time of uncertainty, New Yorkers as well members of a global society are dependent upon community outreach and government. Leaders like Michael Costillo, Christian Soriano and GAP have taken action by lending their resources to impact the scarcity in surgical mask industry.

As of late, stylist/designer Armon Hayes created a protective mask for 360 Magazine’s Vaughn Lowery. Not your typical medical face mask, it was derived from Gucci fabric from a vintage belt bag with velcro stone wash denim straps. Designed out of necessity, fashionable protection is sweeping the market. The idea of a protective mask is becoming a part of our normalcy, inducing creativity during these turbulent times.

360 MAGAZINE, illustration

Mariah Carey – “Hero” Petition

DOCTOR FROM HOMETOWN OF SUPERSTAR MARIAH CAREY WANTS SONG “HERO” DEDICATED TO LONG ISLAND’S TENS-OF-THOUSANDS COVID-19 HEALTHCARE WORKERS

A doctor from Huntington, Long Island, the birthplace and childhood home of Mariah Carey, wants her to perform her “Hero” dedicated to the Long Island healthcare workers fighting the COVID-19 pandemic.  Dr. David Buchin, Director of Bariatric Surgery at Northwell Health-Huntington Hospital, is launching a petition for the Grammy-Award winning artist to help boost morale and awareness for healthcare heroes. Huntington is among the hardest hit New York City suburbs, with thousands of cases of COVID-19.

Mariah Carey, a 1987 graduate of Harborfields High School, had to put her big 50th birthday (March 27) celebrations on hold due to the coronavirus pandemic. In 2001, in the wake of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, “Hero” became an anthem for the police, firefighters, and emergency personnel responding and helping America recover. Now, as America faces another crisis and acts of hospital heroism are spreading on social media, healthcare workers are worthy of the badge “hero.”

Petition: Mariah Carey: Perform Your Hit-Song “Hero” & Dedicate to Healthcare Heroes!

LOOTE MUSIC, 360 MAGAZINE

LOOTE MUSIC

Emotions turn on a dime. In the span of just one Loote song, you might get up and dance, sit back down and let out a tear, or return to your feet and fall in love again. In a similar manner, the New York duo—Jackson Foote and Emma Lov—fashion self-described “cry jams” out of alternative, electronic, and pop elements. Bathed in the glow of neon production and artful instrumentation, the pair put on a different kind of party…

“We make music you can jam out to while you cry,” says Jackson. “It’s funny, but it’s true.”

“The songs are a vibe,” Emma elaborates. “I feel like we’re always in the middle. So many people are worried about losing themselves, finding themselves, and not knowing who they are when they come out on the other side. It’s a struggle I dealt with for a long time too. We’ve figured out how to talk about this in our music, because we found the right midpoint between these emotions. We exist in our own crevice of what you’d call pop.”

They occupy this space quite comfortably as well.

Since first united by a professor at SUNY Purchase College, these two kindred spirits have quietly positioned themselves for pop ubiquity. The group’s 2018 debut EP, single., gathered nearly 150 million cumulative streams in under a year. As they averaged over 8 million monthly listeners on Spotify, “High Without Your Love” and “Your Side of the Bed” both leapt past the 40 million-mark, while superstar Joe Jonas lent his inimitable pipes to “Longer Than I Thought.” In between supporting Eric Nam on tour and performing at the Hot 100 Festival, they attracted critical acclaim from the likes of Billboard, Idolator, Baeble, Substream, and many more. Jackson co-produced and co-wrote Zara Larsson’s “Ruin My Life” which recently was certified gold. Additionally, they collaborated with David Guetta and Brooks on the 2019 smash “Better When You’re Gone.”

JESSIE J LIVE AT HOME

TUNE IN: JESSIE J LIVE AT HOME MARCH 27 AT 12P PT / 3P ET
WATCH HERE ON INSTAGRAM LIVE
#letsgetlivestayingside
 
SUPPORTING WHO & UNICEF
 
WHEN: MARCH 27TH (JESSIE J’S BIRTHDAY)
TIME: 12PM LOS ANGELES
3PM NEW YORK
7PM LONDON
3am – CHINA (March 28)
WHERE: INSTAGRAM @JESSIEJ – https://www.instagram.com/jessiej/
SUPPORTING:
WHO – https://www.facebook.com/donate/1564752357011737/10111653413088551/
UNICEF –  https://www.unicef.org.uk/donate/coronavirus/

William Anthony Allen – Harlem’s Renaissance

by Abigail Baldwin × Vaughn Lowery

Earlier this month, 360 had the opportunity to sit down with the award-winning community activist William Anthony Allen. After many years of serving Harlem as a community leader and on the District Council, Allen is exploring the possibility of running for City Council serving the 9th District.

Harlem has long been a beacon of Black culture, community, and heritage since the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s. Growing up in the 70s and 80s, the Harlem that William Anthony Allen knew was one of unity, familiarity, and freedom. According to Allen, “Crack cocaine came and killed all that. It stopped people from going to the community. It created mistrust. It changed how people participated politically and how they saw themselves. A great number of the working class and middle class of Harlem began to look at other options.” Allen describes his childhood in Harlem as poor but centered in the community, “people were so loving like they were aunts and uncles, but they really were not a blood relationship. The way they treated you, felt like family.” He watched as crack cocaine and the crisis to follow attacked the infrastructure of Harlem and divided the community, giving way to gentrification. “Black people don’t own the businesses in their own neighborhood anymore and young people say that can’t afford to come back to Harlem,” he says. Allen has completed housing and community development efforts in New York, as well as health care and social services proposals on a local, state and federal level. His efforts have always been lead by a desire to uplift the community and uphold the “great legacy” of Harlem, “particularly for African Americans.”

But what are his plans? How does Allen intend to use his experience in the community to serve them at a City Council level? He told 360 he would begin by “sitting down with parent leaders, senior citizen leaders, youth leaders, and really talk about mapping it out in terms of how do they see the future of this community, what do they want from it, and make that the blueprint.” He calls for the people of Harlem to define their own community and make their own decisions, with himself as a representative of their interests. “I’m going to be fighting very hard to address the housing inequities and disparities, helping to lower the cost of housing,” he told 360, “making sure that folks that really want to make a contribution to the life of this city can afford to be here.”

Allen lamented that a particular program that had been around for nearly fifty years, the Addicts Rehabilitation Center (ARC), has closed, “without those services, gentrification moves us all out.” Allen is fighting to get these programs reestablished, but he specifies that black and brown people should be running these programs for the community, “I want to make sure that the people that are running the program are culturally correct.”

In his youth, William Anthony Allen attended Fordham University in the Bronx where he was the first non-white person to serve as Vice President of the Student Council. Later, he transferred to CUNY where he was the Editor-in-Chief of the school newspaper. Now, he is the founding member of a local charter elementary school. He recognizes that education is of the utmost importance. In City Council, Allen plans to create a network through Historically Black Colleges. “We need to make learning and knowledge sexy,” he says, so everyone, regardless of there circumstance can step up and participate in the betterment of their community.” Of his current efforts, he says, “I’m organizing a network of black influencers to address crisis issues that affect black people across the country.” These crisis issues include police relations, employment discrimination, gentrification, and inadequate schools.

For himself, Allen’s goal is, in his own words, “to be known as the guy who brings everybody together to have dialogue and then create action.” He says to not only the Black community but to the youth of Harlem and the LGBTQ+ community, “Tell me how I can support you to have a strong voice.”

“Harlem represents a great legacy, particularly for African Americans. And our entry, not only here into the city but what we have done for the nation,” says Allen, “We need to leverage that.”

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LensCrafters, Luxottica, 360 MAGAZINE, coronavirus, COVID-19, breaking news, pandemic, outbreak

@Lenscrafters @Luxottica Seems to Ignore @NYSOA State × Federal Guidelines

My beloved @LensCrafters @Luxottica how can you have the audacity to allow employees and customers come to your retail space during a pandemic? According to the @NYSOA, you should be vigilant and close your stores over the next 2 weeks so we can avoid what happened in #ITALY #coronavirus #NYC

According to S&P Global Luxottica suspends production × logistics as Italy’s virus toll grows.

Indira Cesarine x The Labyrinth

THE LABYRINTH
An Installation and Exhibition by Indira Cesarine

ARTIST RECEPTION + PERFORMANCE
Featuring Katherine Crockett
Thursday, March 12, 6pm-9pm

EXHIBITION ON VIEW
March 12 – April 11, 2020
THE UNTITLED SPACE
45 Lispenard Street, NYC 10013

The Untitled Space is pleased to present THE LABYRINTH an installation and exhibition of works by artist Indira Cesarine featuring photography, video, painting, and sculpture, as well as a series of performances inspired by the artwork. The exhibition will open with an artist reception on March 12th, 2020 featuring a special performance by renowned modern dancer Katherine Crockett, and will be on view through April 11th.

For “THE LABYRINTH” Cesarine has created an immersive installation, transforming the gallery into a maze through which viewers can experience her contemporary female gaze on Surrealism, a theme the artist has been exploring through a variety of mediums over the past several decades. “THE LABYRINTH” is a surreal odyssey that reveals through its passages a kaleidoscopic universe of subconscious realities bound by the contrasts of hyperrealism and ethereal symbolism. Cesarine leads the viewer through this maze of discoveries, presenting works that are deeply personal and equally created in response to the influence of Surrealists including Jean Cocteau, Man Ray, and Dora Maar. “THE LABYRINTH” explores the juxtaposition of contrasting opposites, dimension, distortion, and the power of light to engage and reflect on our own stream of subconscious while provoking the tangibility of perceived realities. The result is a journey through our fantasies and expectations, rendered through the lens of dreams and desires.

The juxtaposition of Cesarine’s macro and kaleidoscopic florals created for “THE LABYRINTH” play in sharp contrast to the visual yin yang of her surreal portraits of women that explore female sensuality and identity. Through the lens of fantasy and illusion, she toys with imagery of the subconscious mind, depicting the human form with power and subjectivity. Hands and faces intertwine in a reverie that is part real, part illusion. Sculptural hands project from the walls of the installation as though coming alive, part human, part sculpture, in a manner that is both seductive and haunting. Video art, including a 2020 remix of her film “The Spell” which was featured at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, adds to the visual poetry and experience of the maze. Her use of symbolism and dramatic chiaroscuro conveys emotionally charged imagery that presents both an escape into fantasy and a journey through our unattainable desires. As one walks through “THE LABYRINTH,” there is a sense of being lost in time as kaleidoscopic images come alive off the walls. Mirrors positioned throughout the installation emphasize our own reflections while exploring the surreal landscape of the artworks on display.

“THE LABYRINTH” exhibition and installation features Cesarine’s most recent body of work, as well as select works from her “Goddess”, “Les Fleurs du Mal”, “Pandora’s Box” and “ONLY YOU” series. Cesarine’s “Goddess” series, featuring dancer Katherine Crockett, presents emotive images of the female form juxtaposed with detailed florals, creating surreal portraits that according to the artist, emphasize the graceful strength of Mother Earth as a goddess and the power of nature. “Les Fleurs du Mal” welded steel sculpture series reflects on the emotional impact and symbolism of flowers. The depiction of flowers, whether as a still life, as part of a photographic composition, or in the form of a 3 dimensional sculpture has been an ongoing theme in Cesarine’s artwork dating back to her early photography series shot on medium format film in the 1990s. Also featured in the “THE LABYRINTH” are a selection of photography and video art from her “ONLY YOU” series, which focuses on the eyes as an emotional portal. Works from her “ONLY YOU” series were previously exhibited at Cannes Film Festival, Art Basel Miami, SCOPE Basel, Switzerland, CICA Museum (South Korea), Red Bull Studios (London), and Norwood Arts Club, NY.

ARTIST STATEMENT

“Empowering feminist themes are often a point of departure for my multi-sensory series. My work questions the place of humanity in context with contemporary civilization and is often influenced by autobiographical content and women’s history at large. I connect with thematic subject matter that engages a narrative of social discourse and art activism. As a multi-disciplinarian artist, I often work across several mediums such as photography, video, sculpture, painting and printmaking to convey a rich and diverse narrative. Through my exhibitions and artwork, I challenge the status quo, as well as tackle stereotypes and double standards. I draw from historical narratives in an effort to create empowering artwork that can have an impact on the viewer, be a catalyst for change or provide insight into history, which may have been overlooked. As an artist, I find it is more effective to communicate my ideas through visual and sensory explorations that can uniquely address the world we live in today.

I have been exploring themes of Surrealism in my work since my very first forays into photography back in the late 80’s. Experimental darkroom techniques such as solarization and double exposures have played an important part of my visual narrative, which also often employs nuances of fractured light. While studying for my degree in Art History at Columbia University in Paris I became very interested in the history of Surrealism, and wrote a 30 page paper, “Surréalisme, Sexualité, et La Femme,” on the male gaze and misogyny of many of the original Surrealists. Presenting an empowering female perspective on images of women has always been an important part of my work. Explorations of female identity, sexuality, dreams, and desires have been returning themes in my artwork since I first started creating. In the early 2000s, I expanded from the still frame and works on canvas and paper to moving images, with experimental filmmaking and video art. As my artwork has evolved, I have become inspired to create 3 dimensional works in glass and steel that further propel my visual language. My sculptures explore themes of female identity, symbolism and experience, employing a technical emphasis on light and reflection, often combining figurative sculpture with neon or video display to further engage a multifaceted experience.

In several of my recent works featured in “THE LABYRINTH” I explore surreal techniques of “light painting” that were invented by Man Ray in1937, which I have juxtaposed with dramatic chiaroscurist portraits of women in order to evoke an ethereal universe of light and energy. I also find myself returning to the visual language of flowers – as a representation of women’s sexuality, as well as emotional expression of love, forgiveness, sorrow, and hope. Throughout history, flowers have been ripe with symbolism, with each blossom or arrangement having different meanings. The language of flowers dates back many centuries, and they were often used to send secret messages to lovers. For me the flower can be alluring, mysterious, sensual and full of emotions that are difficult to express with words. There is also something intrinsically female about flower blossoms and their visual reference to a women’s body that resonates with me as an artist. It has been inspiring to bring together multiple aspects of my creative process into one exhibition, with “THE LABYRINTH” featuring many varied artistic mediums that become unified through the installation of the maze. I conceived of the maze concept for an exhibition and installation a few years ago after my father passed away. This exhibition is inspired by the maze of life, the power of human connection, emotion and experience – combined with the surreal nature of the unknown.”

ARTIST BIOGRAPHY

Indira Cesarine is a multidisciplinary artist who works with photography, video, painting, printmaking, and sculpture. A graduate of Columbia University with a triple major in Art History, French and Women’s Studies, she additionally studied at Parson’s School of Design, International Center of Photography, School of Visual Arts, Art Students League and the New York Academy of Art. Cesarine had her first solo show at the age of sixteen at Paul Mellon Arts Center. Her work as an artist has been featured internationally at many art galleries, museums, and art fairs, including The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Hudson Valley MOCA, Mattatuck Museum, Albany Institute of History and Art, CICA Museum, San Luis Obispo Museum of Art, French Embassy Cultural Center, Art Basel Miami, SCOPE Art Basel, SCOPE Miami, SPRING/BREAK Art Show, Getty Images Gallery, Cannes Film Festival and the International Festival Photo Mode to name a few.

In 2014, her public art sculpture “The Egg of Light” was exhibited at Rockefeller Center as part of the Fabergé Big Egg Hunt supporting The Elephant Family. Her work has been auctioned at Sotheby’s New York for the annual Take Home A Nude art benefits in 2017-2019, at ARTWALK NY benefiting the Coalition for the Homeless in 2018 and 2019, as well as at Tabula Rasa, the 26th Annual Watermill Center Benefit and Auction, July 2019. Her work is additionally on view at Norwood Art Club’s “Ingenuity” exhibition until August 2020. Her artwork and exhibitions have been featured internationally in many publications including American Vogue, Vogue Italia, Forbes, Newsweek, W Magazine, Harper’s Bazaar, Dazed and Confused, New York Magazine, i-D Magazine, and The Huffington Post among many others. Cesarine currently lives and works in Tribeca, NY.

“THE LABYRINTH” Opening Performance: Katherine Crockett March 12, 2020

Katherine Crockett is a celebrated modern dancer and choreographer who performs internationally. She was the principal dancer for Martha Graham Dance Company and toured internationally with the company for 21 years. Crockett starred as The Queen in the Off-Broadway immersive theater hit, “Queen of the Night,” for which she created and choreographed her role. She played Cate Blanchett’s dancer double in “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” starring Blanchett and Brad Pitt, directed by David Fincher, and starred alongside Mikhail Baryshnikov as Helen in Richard Move’s “Achilles Heels-The Show”. Crockett has additionally performed at the Cannes Film Festival, the VH1/Vogue Fashion Awards, and on the runways of Prada, Alexander McQueen and numerous other global luxury houses. She has collaborated with artist Indira Cesarine on a variety of art series, and recently performed at Cesarine’s “EDEN” exhibition at the UN Plaza.

Website Here

THE UNTITLED SPACE
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Indira Cesarine, The Labyrinth, The Untitled Space, Vaughn Lowery, 360 Magazine, Indira Cesarine, The Untitled Space, The Labyrinth, Vaughn Lowery, 360 Magazine,

New York City,Michelle Lewin. Emily Ratajkowski,Zumba,strong,nyc,fitness,gym,personal trainer,health,workout,Vaughn Lowery,360 MAGAZINE,master trainer,

Emily Ratajkowski × STRONG

Model, actress and entrepreneur Emily Ratajkowski attended a STRONG by Zumba high-intensity workout event at New York City hot-spot Terminal 5 today (Wednesday, March 4).  The non-dance, high-intensity full body work-out class was taught by STRONG by Zumba Master Trainer and fitness phenomenon Michelle Lewin for over 125 people. 

#SBZStrongerTogether, the two social media powerhouse personalities have nearly 40MM Instagram followers combined. Emily is wearing STRONG by Zumba’s latest apparel collection. 

*Photo credit: Janice Yim for STRONG by Zumba