Posts tagged with "health"

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Taking care of your health like a celebrity

Whenever we see a photo of nearly any celebrity, or see someone in a movie or a series, they are usually always at peak physical shape. Granted, most of them have personal trainers and dieticians and some of them even have personal chefs to cater to their nutritional requirements. They do yoga, meditate, and eat right to make sure that they are in top shape for the next role. You can also eat, train, and take care of yourself, your body, and your mind like a true celebrity with these few techniques.

Eating right

The key to having a body and digestive system that functions at an optimal level is proper nutrition and adequate hydration. What we eat greatly impacts how we feel and what we are capable of. The body needs just the right amount of calories and the balance between calories in versus calories out needs to match your goals.

The relationship between macronutrients such as protein, carbohydrates, and fatty acids are also important, but the amount you need might depend on the diet you adhere to. For instance, if you are doing a ketogenic diet like mega stars Megan Fox and Halle Berry have reportedly had great success with, then you need to tone down the number of carbohydrates you ingest and up the fatty acids and protein. There is a huge variety of different ways to split your macronutrients, and it is important that you find a formula that works well for your body and schedule.

For the fatty acids, it is important that they come from healthy sources, so that the fatty acids are unsaturated (preferably polyunsaturated) and not saturated or transfatty acids. Unsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids can be found in nuts, fatty fish such as salmon and herring, and avocado. Saturated fats are generally found in fast food and fried food and should not make up the main part of your diet.

As far as the protein goes it is also important that it comes from solid and healthy sources such as beans and legumes and lean meat such as fish and chicken. The majority of your carbohydrates should come from wholegrain sources of rice, pasta, potatoes and various vegetables. Make sure you drink plenty of water, as water is key to maintaining a healthy body and getting enough sleep. Incorporate lots of different vegetables and fruits into your diet. Basically, if you want to eat like a celebrity, you have to develop clean eating habits.

Calm your mind and body with meditation

Meditation is highly popular within Hollywood – probably because of the high stress working environments and busy schedules. Stars like Katy Perry, Scarlett Johansson, Russell Brand, and Brad Pitt all like to take time out of their busy days to just sit and be. Meditation is a great way to unwind and let your thoughts flow and your body relax. Meditation relaxes, refreshes, and recharges your body and soul, as well as decreasing stress symptoms, allowing for a calmer and more relaxed you.
If you are new to meditation, there are a bunch of great apps out there, such as the Keep app (which also has a great yoga section), Calm, and Buddhify. These apps offer guided meditations of varying lengths, which can be great if you are just starting out. There might also be meditation classes available in your area that you can join.  

Get toned and flexible with yoga

Yoga has been around for centuries, but has recently gained a revival and is now being utilized by literally everyone from Jennifer Aniston, who practices yoga to stay in shape and stay flexible both for movies and personal gain, to pro poker players such as Celina Lin, who uses yoga to relax after high stress tournaments. Pretty much all of the Kardashians do yoga, and so do busy CEOs, who takes 20 minutes out of his schedule every day to stretch. Even stars like famous footballer David Beckham, actor Matthew McConaughey and top model Gisele Bundchen implement yoga into their daily routine to stay healthy, lean, and flexible.

Yoga is for everyone, everywhere, and anytime. It gives you that space of solitude and peace whether you have a whole hour at your disposal or only 5 minutes in a hectic afternoon. 
There are so many different versions of yoga, but they are all highly beneficial for your body and mind. See if there are any classes in your area and try a few different types out to discover what suits you the best. Yoga is great for increasing flexibility and muscle tone, and for calming your mind and body, and just like meditation, there are a lot of really great apps for yoga beginners to help you get started.
 

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Transforming Your Home With Self-Care In Mind

If you’re searching for methods of transforming your home into a self-care sanctuary, you may be surprised to know that you don’t exactly have to spend a fortune to achieve this healing goal. Your home should showcase optimal comfortability level and while you should view your home as the one place in the world you can truly let go and just relax, you will benefit significantly health-wise from making small impactful adjustments to your day-to-day lifestyle as well. From reducing anxiety and stress to an improved ability to find quality sleep on a regular basis, making necessary changes will benefit your life in many ways. Therefore, incorporating self-care routines such as hand and nail care, while making physical changes to your home will be an effort that will continue to pay off. 

The following home adjustments will increase your quality of life and transform your home into the ultimate calming sanctuary.

Relaxation Through Nature

Bringing nature indoors has become an increasingly popular design trend in recent years, and for several notable reasons. While the visual appeal of natural elements, such as pot plants and elegant wall fountains for the indoors will drastically transform your bland space instantly, the health benefits of nature will impact your quality of life through inducing calm and relaxation. This is because simply being around nature will help you feel more at ease, and there is ample scientific evidence to support the fact. Even though you don’t have to transform your home into an indoor jungle, adding a few indoor plants and incorporating the soothing sounds of running water with even a small water wall will be enough to summon an absolutely blissful atmosphere. 

Other methods of bringing nature in, suggest that creating a small and practical kitchen herb garden or creating a display shelf of assorted crystals and gems are also incredibly popular. It is key to avoid going overboard and rather build up a natural aroma in your home as you go, as this will help you actively create an interior design you are comfortable with, rather than making extreme changes that may feel overwhelming.

Focus On Comfort

So many homeowners make the all too common mistake of designing their homes with visual appeal in mind while neglecting elements such as comfort. Even though the visual appeal is important, many would agree that it is far more important to feel comfortable in you home rather than focus on methods of impressing guests with your modern design talent. Therefore, a simple way of transforming your home without spending too much is to simply assess your current home design and consider which elements are cramping the comfort level. Perhaps you could add a few more cosy scatter cushions, or remove overwhelming decor items that take up space and harden the atmosphere. Your home should be decorated for you, and not for your guests. Adding comfort items such as candles, cushions, and area rugs is a great and affordable way of enhancing comfort in your home.

Keep Your Home Clean And Fresh

There’s no denying that countless homeowners around the world truly underestimate the impacts of a clean and fresh home. As many feel that a cluttered and cramped living space impacts their quality of life, a clean home will have the opposite effect. However, if you are not entirely fond of cleaning, it would be wise to consider creating a cleaning schedule that allows you to complete one or two tasks per day as this will help you reduce the overall effort, while you are able to keep your home clean in general. You could designate Mondays for dusting, Tuesdays for laundry, and so on. Alternatively, you could also craft a calming cleaning schedule and change your perspective on the chore by considering cleaning as a detox of your home that will ultimately detox your daily life from dust, clutter, and other smothering negatives that live in our homes.

Repaint With Relaxation In Mind

Painting your home is an extremely affordable way of increasing property value, and instantly sprucing up your property as well. However, if you opt to repaint with relaxation in mind by opting for calming colours such as neutral colours and soothing tones, you will be able to notice an immediate impact on the general atmosphere in your home. Therefore, you should avoid bright and bold colours such as emerald green and shocking pink as these are by no means relaxing colours. Grey palettes and pastels are perfect when considering your comfort.

COVID-19 POLICY ALLIANCE

To prevent hospitals from being overwhelmed, states should focus on preventing the spread of COVID-19 at high-risk sites, such as nursing homes, and in high-risk localities, the COVID-19 Policy Alliance—a group of experts brought together by two professors at the MIT Sloan School of Management—said in a presentation released today.

The Alliance also put online a set of data analytic tools to enable states to identify the highest risk facilities and localities—those with clusters of individuals over 65 or with relevant health issues. 

The Alliance analysis indicates that one of the factors possibly leading to the high fatality rate in Italy was that sick people from areas with concentrations of high-risk individuals overwhelmed hospitals, creating a domino effect that led to skyrocketing death rates. The Alliance has developed tools to identify institutions and counties in every state in the U.S. that have the same characteristics as the points in Italy that put its health care system into a tailspin.   

For example, the data tools not only show where nursing homes are and how many people reside in them, but show which nursing homes have had the most problems previously with infections. For counties, the tools show not only areas with high numbers of elderly, but also those with high numbers of individuals of all ages suffering from diabetes, obesity and other conditions that create COVID-19 risk.

A 15-minute webinar describing the Alliance’s tools and recommendations for U.S. federal, state and local policymakers is here. The webinar expands on a slide deck that lays out the analysis and guidance.

The COVID-19 Policy Alliance was launched on March 11 by Professors Simon Johnson, the Ronald A. Kurtz Professor of Entrepreneurship, and Retsef Levi, the J. Spencer Standish Professor of Operations Management. They pulled together a team of experts from across MIT and elsewhere to analyze the available data on the pandemic. The tools will be updated as more data and analysis are available.

Levi said, “We want to help states make data-based decisions that can save lives. Focusing on the sites and areas that are most likely to lead hospitals to crash is key.”

Johnson said, “Hospitals are a critical line of defense in the ongoing battle against COVID-19. We must focus now on preventing our world-renowned hospital systems from collapsing.”

About the MIT Sloan School of Management
The MIT Sloan School of Management is where smart, independent leaders come together to solve problems, create new organizations, and improve the world. Learn more at mitsloan.mit.edu.

Rice University on COVID-19

Rice U. experts available to discuss COVID-19’s wide-ranging impact

As the COVID-19 pandemic grows and impacts the lives of people across the globe, Rice University experts are available to discuss various topics related to the disease.

Joyce Beebefellow in public finance at Rice’s Baker Institute for Public Policy, can discuss paid leave programs.

“COVID-19 highlights the importance of paid (sick) leave programs to workers,” she said. “The issue is not whether we should have a paid leave program; it is how to design a program that provides nationwide coverage to all American workers instead of waiting until the next pandemic.”

Robert Bruce, dean of Rice’s Glasscock School of Continuing Studies, is an expert in online and distance learning, community education and engagement and innovative models for personal and professional development programs.

“The field of continuing and professional studies is uniquely positioned to help the public during a crisis that requires social distancing,” he said. “Our core mission is to empower people to continue to learn and advance, regardless of location or age or learning style.”

Utpal Dholakia, a professor of marketing at Rice’s Jones Graduate School of Business, is available to discuss consumer behavior and panic-buying during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Everyone is panic-buying, not just all over the country, but basically all over the world,” Dholakia said. “That makes the sense of urgency even more. Are all these suppliers going to be able to keep up with the demand?”

John Diamond, the Edward A. and Hermena Hancock Kelly Fellow in Tax Policy at the Baker Institute and an adjunct assistant professor in Rice’s Department of Economics, can discuss the economic impact on Houston and Texas, particularly unemployment.

Elaine Howard Ecklund, the Herbert S. Autrey Chair in Social Sciences, professor in sociology and director of Rice’s Religion and Public Life Program, studies the intersection of science and religion. She can discuss how these two entities can work together to prevent the spread of COVID-19 and recently authored an editorial about this topic for Time magazine. It is available online HERE.

Christopher Fagundes, an associate professor in the department of psychological sciences, is available to discuss the link between mental and immune health.

“In my field, we have conducted a lot of work to look at what predicts who gets colds and different forms of respiratory illnesses, and who is more susceptible to getting sick,” Fagundes said. “We’ve found that stressloneliness and lack of sleep are three factors that can seriously compromise aspects of the immune system that make people more susceptible to viruses if exposed. Also, stress, loneliness and disrupted sleep promote other aspects of the immune system responsible for the production of proinflammatory cytokines to overrespond. Elevated proinflammatory cytokine production can generate sustained upper respiratory infection symptoms.”

And while this research has centered on different cold and upper respiratory viruses, he said “there is no doubt” that these effects would be the same for COVID-19.

Mark Finley is a fellow in energy and global oil at the Baker Institute.

“The U.S. and global oil market is simultaneously grappling with the biggest decline in demand ever seen (due to COVID-19) and a price war between two of the world’s largest producers, Russia and Saudi Arabia,” he said.

Bill Fulton, director of Rice’s Kinder Institute for Urban Research, an urban planner, an expert on local government and the former mayor of Ventura, California, can speak to both the short-term and long-term changes in city life and the way government works.

What will the effect be on transportation and transit? Retail and office space? Will people walk and bike more? How will they interact in public spaces in the future? How will government function and hold public meetings during the crisis, and will this fundamentally alter the way government interacts with the public in the long run? How will local governments deal with the inevitable revenue loss — and, in the long run, with the fact that they will probably have less sales tax?

Vivian Ho, the James A. Baker III Institute Chair in Health Economics, director for the Center of Health and Biosciences at the Baker Institute and a professor of economics, can discuss insurance coverage as families experience lost income and jobs during the crisis.

“Policymakers should temporarily expand subsidies for middle class workers who buy insurance through the Affordable Care Act marketplace,” Ho said. “Families experiencing lost income due to the pandemic shouldn’t have to worry about losing access to health care in the midst of a pandemic.”

“Hospitals in states that did not expand Medicaid coverage to able-bodied adults under the Affordable Care Act are bearing tougher financial burdens, which may damage their ability to respond to the current health crisis,” she said.

Mark Jones, a professor of political science and fellow at the Baker Institute, is available to discuss how the spread of COVID-19 is impacting elections, including runoffs in Texas.

“COVID-19 has already resulted in the postponement of local elections originally scheduled for May 2, with the elections now to be held in November with current officeholders’ tenure extended until their successors are confirmed in November,” Jones said. “It is increasingly likely that COVID-19 will affect the Democratic and Republican primary runoff elections scheduled for May 26, with a growing possibility that the elections will be conducted entirely via mail ballots or at the minimum will involve the adoption of no-excuse absentee voting whereby any Texan, not just those 65 or older, hospitalized or out of the county, will be able to obtain an absentee ballot and vote by mail.

“The emergency adoption of no-excuse absentee voting would change the composition of the May primary runoff electorate by expanding turnout among many voters who otherwise would have been unlikely to participate, as well as increase pressure on the Texas Legislature to reform the state’s electoral legislation to allow for no-excuse absentee voting when it reconvenes in January of 2021 for the next regular session.”

Danielle King, an assistant professor of psychological sciences and principal investigator of Rice’s WorKing Resilience Lab, is an expert on the topic of resilience to adversity. Her research focuses on understanding the role individuals, groups and organizations play in fostering adaptive sustainability following adversity. She can discuss how individuals can remain resilient and motivated in difficult circumstances.

“Though we are still in the throes of the COVID-19 pandemic, we can begin to enact adaptive practices that foster resilience such as remaining flexible to changing circumstances, practicing acceptance of the present realities, seeking social support in creative ways while practicing social distancing, and finding and engaging with experiences and thoughts that elicit positive emotions during trying times,” King said.

Tom Kolditz, founding director of Rice’s Doerr Institute for New Leaders, is a social psychologist and former brigadier general who has done extensive research on how best to lead people under perceived serious threat. His work is widely taught at military service and police academies globally, and he did extensive work with the banking industry during the 2008 financial crisis. His expertise is in articulating what people need from leaders in volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous times and what leaders must do to gain and maintain people’s trust. His book, “In Extremis Leadership: Leading As If Your Life Depended On It,” teaches people to lead in crisis, when people are anxious or afraid.

“Leadership when people are under threat hinges far less on managerial principles, and far more on trust,” Kolditz said. “Whether in a company or their own family, people who lead in the same way now as they did two months ago will experience a significant decline in their influence.”

Jim Krane, the Wallace S. Wilson Fellow for Energy Studies at the Baker Institute, is an expert on energy geopolitics and Middle East economies and societies. He can comment on the effect on OPEC and its production decisions, relations between Russia and Saudi Arabia, and how low oil prices will affect policy inside producer countries.

Ken Medlock, the James A. Baker III and Susan G. Baker Fellow in Energy and Resource Economics at the Baker Institute, senior director of institute’s Center for Energy Studies and an adjunct professor and lecturer in Rice’s Department of Economics, can discuss COVID-19’s impact on oil prices and the oil industry.

Kirsten Ostherr, the Gladys Louise Fox Professor of English and director of Rice’s Medical Futures Lab, can discuss the representation of outbreaks, contagion and disease in public discourse and the media. She is also an expert on digital health privacy. She is the founding director of the Medical Humanities program at Rice, and her first book, “Cinematic Prophylaxis: Globalization and Contagion in the Discourse of World Health,” is one of several titles made available for open-access download through June 1 by its publisher, Duke University Press.

Peter Rodriguez, dean of the Jones Graduate School of Business and a professor of strategic management, can discuss the economic impact of COVID-19 in Houston, the state of Texas and around the world.

Eduardo Salas, professor and chair of the Department of Psychological Sciences, is available to discuss collaboration, teamwork, team training and team dynamics as it relates to COVID-19.

“We often hear that ‘we are in this together’ and, indeed, we are,” Salas said. “Effective collaboration and teamwork can save lives. And there is a science of teamwork that can provide guidance on how to manage and promote effective collaboration.”

Kyle Shelton, deputy director of the Kinder Institute, can discuss how the economic impact of COVID-19 closures and job losses can amplify housing issues, and why governments at every level are opting for actions such as halting evictions and foreclosures and removing late fees. He can also speak to some of the challenges confronted by public transportation, why active transportation like biking and walking are so important now, and how long-term investments in these systems make cities and regions more adaptive and resilient.

Bob Stein, the Lena Gohlman Fox Professor of Political Science and a fellow in urban politics at the Baker Institute, is an expert in emergency preparedness, especially related to hurricanes and flooding. He can also discuss why and when people comply with government directives regarding how to prepare for and respond to natural disasters, and the political consequences of natural disasters.

“Since God is not on the ballot, who do voters hold accountable before and in the aftermath of natural disasters?” he said.

Laurence Stuart, an adjunct professor in management at Rice Business, can discuss unemployment in Texas, how people qualify for it and what that means for employers and employees.

Located on a 300-acre forested campus in Houston, Rice University is consistently ranked among the nation’s top 20 universities by U.S. News & World Report. Rice has highly respected schools of Architecture, Business, Continuing Studies, Engineering, Humanities, Music, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences and is home to the Baker Institute for Public Policy. With 3,962 undergraduates and 3,027 graduate students, Rice’s undergraduate student-to-faculty ratio is just under 6-to-1. Its residential college system builds close-knit communities and lifelong friendships, just one reason why Rice is ranked No. 1 for lots of race/class interaction and No. 4 for quality of life by the Princeton Review. Rice is also rated as a best value among private universities by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance.

360 magazine, sara sandman, beauty

HAND × NAIL CARE

How to prevent hands from cracking and staying hydrated:

•Moisturize one to two times a day with a cream such as Cerave Cream or Aveeno Eczema Cream.

•Choosing a fragrance-free formula is also a good idea.

•It is generally best to opt for cleansers that only have gentle ingredients.

Neutrogena Hydroboost Gel prevents dryness without clogging pores and absorbs into the skin quickly without leaving any residue and is perfect for year-round use.

•Avoid antibacterial soap, which can be drying. Unless you’re instructed to use antibacterial soap for medical reasons, then just use the regular stuff instead.

•I don’t think you can use too many products as they will all be absorbed into your skin.

•Other products can be added to target specific concerns, like benzoyl peroxide or salicylic acid for acne, or hyaluronic acid for irritation or dryness.

How to prevent nails becoming brittle and weaker and advice for strengthening your nails:

•Wear gloves when hand washing dishes or cleaning.

•Do not use antibacterial soap. 

•Moisturize cuticles with Aquaphor, Vaseline or CND Solar Oil.

DermaNail Conditioner – use twice a day; Helps dry, brittle nails.

•Biotin – a vitamin which accelerates nail growth (My favorite is vitafusion Gummies for Hair, Skin, and Nails because it contains a good amount of Biotin and is also a multivitamin).

•Keep nails short; file nails gently; avoid nail trauma (such as using them to open packages or remove lids from cans).

•For soft nails – use Nailtiques 2 Plus Lacquer or Sally Hansen Advanced Hard as Nails Strengthener.

•Use nail polish remover that does not contain acetone.

*Tips provided by Elizabeth Mullans, MD, Board-Certified Dermatologist practicing in Houston, Texas.

Regaining Control in Uncertain Times: Advice from a Doctor/Cancer Survivor

As a doctor and entrepreneur, I spent most of my life seeking control – obsessively studying, planning, and working to guarantee my success. That’s why I wanted to be an entrepreneur in the first place – I wanted to be my own boss, in charge of my own fate. Despite my success, in 2013, I would lose every semblance of control in my life. In 2013, I was diagnosed with cancer.

My cancer diagnosis came with many emotions: anger, anxiety, uncertainty, depression. I felt alone and hopeless, like everything I had worked so hard for suddenly didn’t matter. I just had to “wait and see” if the chemotherapy worked; how sick I would be; if I could have a family one day; if I would ever have my regular life back.

In many ways, I see similarities between the way my cancer diagnosis impacted my life and how the current Coronavirus pandemic is affecting us all. Life as you know it has suddenly stopped. You don’t know when it will return to normal, and you may feel like you have completely lost control of your life.

Even though the unknowns of cancer treatment terrified me, certain strategies gave me a “sense” of control – and often times, that was enough. I hope that you can employ these strategies in the coming days and weeks to regain control in these uncertain times.

Exercise

Although chemotherapy prevented intense workouts, simply walking regularly released feel-good endorphins in my brain, and it’s something I had control over. Similarly, a self-imposed routine may help you cope with the uncertainty of the Coronavirus pandemic. Even though gyms are closed, consider doing body-weight workouts at home, YouTube fitness tutorials, or walking/running outside.

Breathe

You can also change your breathing patterns voluntarily, resulting in various powerful effects. For example, if you feel a wave of panic approaching, try taking deeper breaths using your diaphragm, which will cause your heart rate to slow and your body to relax.

Journal

Exercise and focused breathing are two techniques that worked for me, but it’s also important to remember what activities made you feel the best. Try journaling how different activities make you feel – more/less anxious, more/less in control, etc. This way, you can continue doing things that make you feel good, even when the Coronavirus is a distant memory.

Sometimes, challenging times are the kickstart you need to pursue a better life. After my cancer diagnosis, I completely transformed my stress-filled, unhealthy lifestyle. I overcame cancer, and I owe it all to positive lifestyle changes. If you are ready to start your journey to better health, check out my book “From Doctor to Patient.”

About Dr. Diva Nagula

Dr. Diva Nagula is a board-certified osteopathic physician with extensive knowledge and training in Integrative and Functional Medicine. He was diagnosed and treated for Stage 4 non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. After several years of treatment, he remains in complete remission.
You can purchase his book here.

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Don’t Put It Off: When to See a Doctor After a Car Accident

You’ve gotten into a car accident but you’re not sure when to see a doctor. You feel fine for the most part. Even if you’re not “hurt” you shouldn’t put it off.

Did you know there are around 6 million car accidents every year in the United States? If you were part of this statistic recently and are not sure when to see a doctor because you feel fine for the most part, we are here to help.

Sometimes even if you do not feel hurt you should get a checkup because you never know.

When to See a Doctor After a Car Accident

auto injury doctor

Ready to go see the Doctor?

Now that you know when to see a doctor after a car accident, you can follow their tips above to ensure that you are ok and know about any treatment you might need sooner rather than later.

Did this article come in handy today? Please bookmark this site to stay on top of all their latest!

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What Does Medicare Plan F Exactly Cover?

Medicare parts and plans are almost always mistaken for one another. There are only four main Medicare parts which are Parts A, B, C, and D. These parts offer hospital coverage, outpatient services, and prescription drug coverage. Part C, on the other hand, is considered to be an alternative solution for the original parts along with other services that aren’t usually covered in Part A and B such as vision and dental care.

Other than the Medicare main parts, there are other available plans to purchase as an added help to your Original Medicare such as Medicare Supplement Insurance Plans. However, they only work alongside your Original Medicare. That’s why enrolling firstly in Original Medicare is one of the most important requirements to be able to qualify for any Medicare plan. Different Medigap policies are sold across all states, including Plan F which is considered to be one of the most extended-coverage plans out there. Read on to discover more information on Plan F so you can determine whether it is a good fit for you.

What Are Medigap Policies? 

Medicare Supplement -also known as Medigap- insurance plans are essentially available to help in covering certain out-of-pocket costs that Original Medicare doesn’t cover. If you are thinking about enrolling in Medigap, especially Plan F, then you must read everything you need to know and understand what exactly this plan has to offer. It’s important to educate yourself regarding the plan you are considering to ensure it is suitable for your needs. While Medigap Plan A is mandatory to be offered by insurance companies that sell supplement insurance plans, there are other plans such as C and F that are sold upon the desire of every consumer.

What Is Medicare Supplement Insurance Plan F?

There are ten different Medigap policies that are available. Plan F is considered to be the most comprehensive plan available in most states. People who seek broader assistance with out-of-pocket costs benefit from the extensive coverage that this plan offers. Plan F offers a great advantage for beneficiaries who often use Part A and B which is that it reduces hospital and medical expenses significantly; most of the time, you won’t need to pay for any additional costs. For these reasons, it’s only logical that premiums might be more expensive. Since this plan, and other Medigap policies, is offered by private insurance companies, it might not be available. Plan availability varies from one state to another, so it’s always a good idea to research the availability of the plan in your region. However, Plan F is highly desirable due to its extensive coverage which pushes most insurance companies to offer it.

What Are Plan F’s Presented Benefits?

Most Medigap plans are standardized across all states. This means that regardless of your location or the insurance company you choose to purchase the plan from, you will be able to get the same benefits that are offered by Plan F in any state. However, Plan F premiums may vary from one insurance company to the other. There is also another high deductible version of Plan F that is different from the original plan.

Here are some of the benefits that you get when you purchase Medigap Plan F:

•Plan F offers additional benefits that reach up to 365 days after the exhaustion of Medicare Part A benefits.

•Plan F offers Medicare Part A deductibles, copayment, and coinsurance. The difference between copay and coinsurance is that the first is a set rate you pay for hospital services you have benefited from. The latter is a percentage of the costs you pay after you have already met your deductibles. Deductibles, on the other hand, are the set amount of charges you pay for medical services before coinsurance is activated.

•It covers the excess charges that come with Part B that specializes in outpatient services and deductibles.

•It covers the cost of the first three pints of blood needed. Yet, the medical procedure must be approved and it only covers three pints of blood annually.

•Trained nursing facility coinsurance.

•It covers 80% and up to the Plan limit of emergency foreign travels.

While a Medicare advantage plan offers different Medicare benefits that aren’t usually covered such as dental and vision care, Medigap policies are considered to be an Original Medicare’s sidekick. Plan F offers coverage for most deductibles, coinsurance, and copayment for Part A; it also covers excess charges for Part B. Investing some time and effort into educating yourself on the differences between Medicare parts, plans, and policies will help in cutting costs and saving money while you are taking care of your health in the long run.

Sara Sandman, 360 MAGAZINE, illustration

Top 5 nutrition tips when working from home

1. Look for nutritious alternatives

If you’re worried about not being able to continue to eat well as particular ingredients are no longer in stock, try exploring other foods that could offer similar health benefits. We have put together a shopping list of alternative food options to ensure you’re not missing out on your essential vitamins and minerals. The key advice here is nutrition should still come first, but you may have to switch up some of your routinely used ingredients.

2. Stick to your routine

Spending more time at home can also impact when you eat. Whether or not you’re working from home, try to create (and stick to) a routine. This will help you avoid snacking on unhealthy foods. Eat your typical set number of meals a day and around the same time each day. If you don’t cook much or have more time on your hands than previously, now is a great time to start.

3. Stay hydrated

Keeping well hydrated is important for overall well-being, particularly cognitive function. If you’re working from home, keep a glass of water by you and drink throughout the day. Drink several cups of fluid each day including water, tea & coffee (though not too much!), fruit teas and sugar-free drinks.

4. Don’t forget your fresh veg

Fresh fruits and vegetables may have taken a back seat for you. Fruit and vegetables provide loads of essential nutrients and there are ways to extend their shelf-life and make them more convenient. For example, soups and sauces can be made straight away and then frozen. You can make a concentrated stock which you can then freeze in ice cube trays and, voila, homemade, low salt stock cubes!

5. Keep your stress at bay

There are many ways to reduce stress. Try to minimize the amount of alcohol you drink, especially during the week, which will also help you stick to a routine. Keep an eye on the number of caffeinated drinks you’re having and try switching to decaf options during the afternoon. This can help you sleep and focus better.

ABOUT HUEL:

Launched in 2015, Huel’s mission is to make nutritionally complete, convenient and affordable food, with minimal impact on animals and the environment.

Offering consumers “complete nutrition” means that each Huel meal serves customers a good balance of protein, carbs, fibre, essential fats and phytonutrients, plus an optimum level of all essential vitamins and minerals required on a daily basis. Formulated by Registered Nutritionist, James Collier, Huel is vegan, lactose-free and soya-free.

Along with Huel powder (including a gluten-free and reduced carb option), Huel offers a number of nutritionally complete products, including the world’s first nutritionally complete granola and an on-the-go bar which makes for the perfect snack. Most recently, Huel launched their first Ready-to-drink meal, acting as an innovative solution for time-poor consumers.

Each Huel packet has a year-long shelf life and produces zero food waste with minimal packaging waste which makes less of an environmental impact on the planet than many other food products.

Visit Huel:

Instagram: @huel @huelusa @huel_de @huelglobal
Twitter: @gethuel @huelusa
Website: huel.com

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COVID-19 × Technological Change

COVID-19 Pandemic Will Force Companies Around the World to Radically Rethink How They Operate and Embrace Technological Investment

ABI Research Analysts share their thoughts on the likely short-and long-term impacts the global pandemic will have on technology and end markets

The Coronovirus outbreak and the worldwide reaction to the pandemic will force companies to radically rethink how they operate and embrace technological investment, states global tech market advisory firm, ABI Research.

In its new white paper, Taking Stock of COVID-19: The Short- and Long-Term Ramifications on Technology and End Markets, ABI Research Analysts look at the current and future ramifications of COVID-19 across technologies and verticals. Analysts also offer recommendations to weather the storm and strategies to help companies rebound and prosper after the pandemic has slowed.

“To effect change, there must be a stimulation of a magnitude that means companies cannot do anything but make bold decisions to survive. COVID-19 is that magnitude,” explains Stuart Carlaw, Chief Research Officer at ABI Research.

Bold decisions and technological investments could lead to outcomes such as:

-A more concerted and widespread move to lights-out manufacturing
-Increased usage of autonomous materials handling and goods vehicles
-A more integrated, diverse, and coordinated supply chain
-Investment in smart cities to support community resilience
-A move to virtual workspaces and practices…
…And so much more

“Before we feel this potential long-term impact, there will be some serious short-term implications. Contractions in consumer spending, disruptions to supply chains, and reduced availability of components will create a rough sea for all boats,” Carlaw says. “In the short-term, there will be a retrenchment in outlooks a reduced investment in modernization, as survival instincts trump the drive to prosperity.”

For a clearer picture of the short- and long-term global impacts of COVID-19, download the whitepaper Taking Stock of COVID-19: The Short- and Long-Term Ramifications on Technology and End Markets.

About ABI Research
ABI Research provides strategic guidance to visionaries, delivering actionable intelligence on the transformative technologies that are dramatically reshaping industries, economies, and workforces across the world. ABI Research’s global team of analysts publish groundbreaking studies often years ahead of other technology advisory firms, empowering our clients to stay ahead of their markets and their competitors.

For more information about ABI Research’s services, contact us at +1.516.624.2500 in the Americas, +44.203.326.0140 in Europe, +65.6592.0290 in Asia-Pacific or visit www.abiresearch.com