Posts tagged with "health"

Donovan Mitchell, BODYARMOR x adidas

Donovan Mitchell is fresh off a five-year, $195 million extension with the Utah Jazz, and now he’s dropping some fresh, new kicks.

The star guard teamed up with BODYARMOR for a collaboration with adidas to create a limited edition version of his D.O.N. Issue #2 sneaker called the adidas D.O.N. Issue #2 x BODYARMOR.

The shoe features a brand new colorway inspired by Mitchell’s favorite BODYARMOR flavor, Tropical Punch.

D.O.N., which stands for “Determination Over Negativity,” is representative of Mitchell’s mindset both on and off the court.

The new shoe features the BOUNCE midsole, which enhances comfort and stability. It is also a higher heel counter, which provides even more containment and support. A webbed lacing system and the soft, breathable mesh upper provide even more lateral support.

The D.O.N. Issue #2 x BODYARMOR will not be available for purchase. Rather, it is available to fans and consumers nationwide through giveaways on BODYARMOR social platforms beginning Tuesday.

There will be just 100 pairs, so those who can get their hands on the shoes will be the envy of sneaker collectors everywhere.

Mitchell was first announced a partner and investor with BODYARMOR Sports Drink in Jan. 2018. He was another premier name added to a list of athlete partners that includes James Harden, Trae Young, Megan Rapinoe, Skylar Diggins-Smith, Kemba Walker, Dustin Johnson, Naomi Osaka, Mike Trout and more.

Mitchell took the league by storm in the 2017-2018 season. He was drafted by the Denver Nuggets with the 13th overall pick in the 2017 draft and was traded to the Utah Jazz the same night.

He won the 2018 Slam Dunk Contest and was named an All-Star during the 2019-2020 season. Through the first three seasons of his career, he is averaging 22.7 points per game, 4.1 rebounds per game and 4 assists per game.

BODYARMOR is now the No. 2 sports drink sold nationwide.

For more information about BODYARMOR, you can click right here. You can also follow them on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.

You can also follow Donovan Mitchell on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.

Gym Illustration by Rita Azar for 360 Magazine

The Beach Body

Kupah James has the raw and positive energy it takes to be motivational. Although he grew up in Boston, he now resides in LA as a Celebrity Group Fitness Instructor. With over 15 years of experience, Kupah is also a Private Party Dj (Global). With best friend and business partner, JENI Lin they created the very popular #BodyWeightBootKAMP – a 45min total body circuit for all fitness levels.

If you don’t find him amongst small groups of people motivating and coaching you can catch sneaking in afternoon naps and binging streaming services…before/after napping (LOL). His long term goal is to travel the world bringing #BodyWeightBootKAMP to each and every shore!

Health During the Holidays

With the 2020 holidays approaching, here are some activities you can #MakeMoves with first thing in the morning to get your mind right for the ensuing “craze that is the holidays.” Let’s agree, we are searching for a quick “win,” nothing super complicated and “thinking” should not be in the cards. Load up your “GoTo” workout, the one where you kill it and always feel your best every time.

If you’re feeling a more chill holiday workout, something meditative like a yoga practice, a long walk, a light jog or meditating can be helpful. One of these exercises can calm your nerves and allow you a moment of calmness. You can take this peaceful time to celebrate making it to another festive season. 

If you’re looking for help with the holiday feast, we all know we don’t want to ruin our appetites. By making sure we get a “healthier” breakfast in the morning, hopefully, we can avoid extra guilt come dessert time. Drink lots of water and if your a coffee person grab one to help suppress your hunger until “DINNAH,” lol. If you really want to balance out the equation, ease up on the carbs 24-48 hours before it’s time to dig in. Bon appétit!

Keeping a Daily Routine

With so many people working from home, parks and other creative spaces, how does one maintain a good routine if your living space becomes your workspace as well?

A couple of ways to maintain a good routine are using your smartphones/devices, friends/roommates/spouses, or an accountability coach. All devices come with apps, timers and reminders to help keep you on task. For me, I’m always on the go so I use food reminders to help me with my routine. Sometimes I’m so busy interacting with clients I forget to eat, so I created a reminder just to chug a protein shake every couple of hours. ICONIC makes a perfect pre-made protein shake, so it’s even easier, no excuses.

Do you have people around you that you can lean on for “check-ins” and support? Asking a friend, relative or spouse could be a great way to “stay the course” and build on an existing relationship. 

Accountability Coaches do just that, hold you accountable with calls, texts, meets and quality time invested into the things you SAY you want to do but allow distractions to get in the way. Sometimes a person you’re close to might not be the best for this job, rather finding an objective, trained professional to work with your motivations might be best. 

A Critical Muscle to Tone

It is critical to develop a strong healthy back simply because your back is essentially the most important part of your skeleton next to your skull. It bears the weight of your upper body while stabilizing your balance and “kindly” houses your Central Nervous System (CNS). Your CNS allows signals from the brain to travel throughout your body. If that isn’t reason enough it’s also a major component to posture, and everyday activities like walking, running, sitting and lifting. 

Some of the primary benefits of a back workout are the strengthening of the shoulder and increasing stability. Many shoulder injuries can be treated simply by strengthening your back. Another benefit to back workouts is the positive effect on your posture and balance. Not to mention, a well developed back will aid in your quest for that Super Hero Body that many of us dreamed of as little boys. 

The best exercises depend on someone’s personal goals. With that said, some essential exercises would be – in no particular order – Back Loaded Squat, Deadlifts both (Sumo and Romanian are common), Back Rows, Rear Flys, Single Arm Row, Pull-Ups and Chin-Ups and Lat Pull Down. These are all great exercises, just to name a few. 

A common mistake of back exercises is having a “poor” form. I could never express how important form is to the overall development of any muscle group and the back is no exception. Especially in the Back Squat, Deadlift and Pull Up. Those are three that I often see performed incorrectly and I can’t help myself but to speak up and try to help the best way I can. An injury is nothing to shake a stick at, so when performing these exercises, and others, please “respect the rep” and choose form over everything.

Something to consider which I believe gets overlooked is a post-workout routine. A good stretch of the muscle group you just worked on can be vital in your recovery. A protein shake that feeds the muscles with proper nutrition and the tools it needs to maximize your workout can also be necessary. My personal favorite post-workout shake is by ICONIC, it comes in a variety of flavors, a powder or pre-made, and is grass-fed. 

How often a person should add back exercises to their routine depends on the individual goals, injuries, limitations, etc. However, once someone wants to add back exercises, they can add them immediately. If someone is “newer” to fitness it might not be a bad idea to try some workouts using strictly bodyweight before adding a load, just to perfect form and technique. A great source of BodyWeight workouts can be found on my YouTube Channel, and are streaming for FREE. As far are frequency, 2x or 3x a week seems pretty reasonable unless there are specific goals in which case it would be situational. For the common fitness person, this number would be adequate. 

New Scientific Study by Rice University Biochemists

Michael Stern and James McNew (Photo by Jeff Fitlow/Rice University)

Study: Early, late stages of degenerative diseases are distinct
Two-phase theory applies to diseases like Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, muscle atrophy

Rice University biochemists Michael Stern and James McNew have studied how neurodegeneration kills cells. They’ve conducted countless experiments over more than a decade, and they’ve summarized all they’ve learned in a simple diagram they hope may change how doctors perceive and treat degenerative diseases as varied as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and muscle atrophy.

In a study published this month in Molecular Psychiatry, McNew and Stern propose that degeneration, at the cellular level, occurs in two distinct phases that are marked by very different activities of protein signaling pathways that regulate basic cell functions.

“We would like clinicians and other researchers to understand that the two phases of degeneration represent distinct entities, with distinct alterations in signaling pathways that have distinct effects on disease pathology,” said Stern, a professor of biosciences at Rice. “In other words, we think that patients need to be treated differently depending on which phase they are in.”

Stern and McNew’s diagram shows how the activity of key cell-signaling proteins either increases or decreases at the onset of degeneration, ultimately bringing about oxidative stress. Oxidative stress then brings about the second phase of the condition, during which degeneration occurs, where the signaling proteins implicated in the first phase behave in a completely different way.

Because cells behave quite differently in the two phases, the research suggests patients in different phases of a disease may respond differently to the same treatment.

“The two phases of degeneration haven’t been previously recognized, so it hasn’t been understood, clinically, that you have two different populations of patients,” McNew said. “Today, they’re treated like one population, and we think this has confounded clinical trials and explains why some trials on Alzheimer’s have given variable and irreproducible effects. It would be like trying to treat all meningitis patients with antibiotics without realizing that there are two types of meningitis, one bacterial and one viral.”

Stern and McNew, professors of biochemistry and cell biology in Rice’s Department of BioSciences, became interested in the cellular processes of neurodegenerative disorders when they began studying hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) in the late 2000s. A rare disorder, HSP is marked by numbness and weakness in the legs and feet due to the progressive deterioration of neurons that connect the spine and lower leg.

These are some of the longest cells in the body, and starting with clues about structural defects that could cause them to degenerate, McNew and Stern used experiments on fruit flies to systematically piece together the biochemical domino effect that caused the neurons to progressively lose more and more function and eventually die. It had been thought that nerve damage could lead to muscle atrophy, but their studies found that muscle cells attached to the neurons started degenerating from the same type of biochemical cascade before the nerve cells died.

A key player in the cascade was a protein called TOR, a master regulator of cell growth and an essential protein for all higher-order life from yeast to humans. TOR acts like a knob, dialing growth up or down to suit the conditions a cell is experiencing. In some conditions, high growth is warranted and beneficial, and in other situations, growth needs to be dialed back so energy and resources can be conserved for daily chores, like the recycling or repair that take place during a process known as autophagy.

Some cancers highjack TOR to promote aggressive cell growth, and increased TOR activity has also been implicated in neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases and in diseases marked by muscle atrophy. After compiling evidence about how TOR and several other signaling proteins behaved in neurodegeneration, McNew and Stern won a grant from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke in 2018 for experiments to investigate signaling pathway changes that occur in the early stages of degeneration.

“At the time, we thought there might be a late phase during which degeneration actually occurs, but we didn’t propose any experiments to test that,” Stern said. “In the new paper, we’re explicit about the existence of a late phase. We propose mechanistically why degeneration occurs only during this phase, and cite abundant research in support.”

Stern said the two-phase process described in the study “is the basic engine that drives most or even all forms of degeneration forward. However, in addition, there are also inputs whose role is to specify how fast the engine turns over.”

To understand neurodegeneration, it’s critical to understand how those inputs work, he said. For example, insulin resistance plays a well-known role in driving Alzheimer’s disease, and in the study, McNew and Stern describe how it does that by accelerating progression through the early phase.

“Similarly, our data suggests that decreases in synaptic transmission, as occurs in our HSP insect model, likewise triggers degeneration by accelerating progression through the early phase,” McNew said. “Our NIH grant was funded so that we could learn the mechanism by which that occurs.”

Now that they clearly understand that two phases of degeneration exist, Stern said he and McNew would like to carry out more experiments to see how the effects of specific genes on degeneration are altered when they are activated in the early and late phases.

“What we would like to do in the last two years of the grant is to obtain data to test some of the predictions we have made, which will help determine if the ideas we have presented are likely to be correct,” Stern said.

The research was supported by the National Institutes of Health (R01-NS102676).

HEALTH (cerebral palsy) article illustration by Rita azar for 360 magazine

Improving Mobility for Kids with Cerebral Palsy: 5 Steps You Can Take

It takes a village to improve mobility in a kid diagnosed with severe cerebral palsy, but without a proper battle plan, some efforts may be all for naught while others may simply not yield the best results. In this post we have rounded up a five-step guide for getting you started. But first let’s see how cerebral palsy affects mobility in children.

How Cerebral Palsy Affects Mobility 

Mobility limitations experienced by children with cerebral palsy vary from patient to patient as there are no two diagnoses alike. And the diagnosis can be mild, moderate or severe. But all cerebral palsy patients have something in common: Their mobility has been affected and not for the better.

The level of impairment depends on the type of cerebral palsy and the severity of the diagnosis. There are four types of CP and just as many ways the condition manifests itself:

·         Spastic cerebral palsy is the most common type of CP, with 80% of CP patients being diagnosed with it. Patients with spastic CP have an issue with muscle spasticity and muscle stiffness and tightness, which means that they may experience uncontrolled movements, difficulty in walking, and coordination and posture issues. In severe cases, children with spastic CP cannot walk at all.

·         Dyskinetic cerebral palsy is the second most common type of CP, but just 5 to 6% of children with a CP diagnosis are affected by it. Patients diagnosed with dyskinetic CP may experience involuntary movements (including twisting), repeat movements, posture and coordination issues, varying muscle tone from too weak to excessively tight.

·         Ataxic cerebral palsy is the rarest form of CP. Patients affected by it have problems with coordination and may experience gait issues such as spreading their legs when walking, bad posture, and poor balance.  

·         Mixed cerebral palsy – the symptoms are a blend of the mobility limitations mentioned above.

5 Steps to Improve Mobility in Your Kid

Depending on the type of CP your child has been diagnosed with, you can take all or just some of the following steps. However, regardless of the severity of the condition, always consult with a professional before trying a new step with your kid. Early intervention is the key here for the best outcome, but uninformed decisions may negatively affect our kid’s prospects.

Step 1: Assessing Your Child’s Mobility

Each CP patient needs a personalized treatment plan for a successful recovery. But for that you will need to properly assess the young patient’s mobility issues. Things like type of CP, location of impairment, the extent of brain damage, severity of symptoms are all factors that need to be taken into consideration.

The following areas will need to be evaluated during the initial assessment:

·         Muscle tone

·         Reflexes

·         Coordination

·         Posture

·         Muscle control

·         Balance

·         Fine and gross motor functions

·         Ability to perform simple tasks like feeding oneself, getting dressed, using the bathroom, etc.

·         Diet, as some CP subtypes may be made worse by nutrient deficiencies even before the child was born.

Medical professionals may use state-of-the-art medical devices to assess all these aspects and issue a customized treatment plan. This plan will include methods to address mobility limitations in both legs and arms to ensure that the patient’s walking and mobility issues affecting the upper body are fully addressed.

A doctor may need to run several tests before he or she can come with a comprehensive assessment of a child’s mobility issues.

Step 2: Set Goals for Therapy

The lack of  goals for improving or restoring mobility may lead to wasted resources, frustration, and less-than-ideal outcomes. Your child’s diagnosis is unique so there are various ways of achieving the ultimate goal of a customized care plan, namely achieving the highest degree of independent living and quality of life the diagnosis permits.

Some of the goals you should keep in mind when tailoring a treatment plan with your child’s healthcare provider include improving/ restoring mobility, control the pain, boost current levels of independence, prevent CP-related complications such as post-impairment syndrome that usually appears later in life, optimize muscle tone, encourage self-care, and manage secondary symptoms such as seizures.

Step 3: Create a Personalized Care Plan

After determining your child’s mobility limitations and therapy’s goals, it is time to create a personalized medical care plan. Don’t expect your child’s primary care provider to come with a standard protocol as there isn’t one for cerebral palsy.

The plan should cover all bases when it comes to mobility issues and goals for therapy and must include both conventional and complementary therapies, along with alternative treatment options.

When drafting a plan include:

·         Therapy options (physical therapy, occupational therapy, massage therapy)

·         Medication (in some cases it might not be required)

·         Corrective surgery (if absolutely necessary)

·         Mobility aids, including walkers and eating aids

·         Home modifications (families affected by cerebral palsy often need to make modifications in their home to accommodate the child’s needs)

·         Strength training (this type of training has been proven very affective at improving mobility in CP patients)

·         Any other complementary and alternative treatment options that your kid’s doctor says they may work.

As the child grows, you will need to adjust the plan and consult with the kid’s educators and instructors on new ways to improve mobility depending on the educational settings’ limitations.

Step 4: Build a Dream Team of Experts

This step is easier said than done as you’ll likely find the best people to work with your child during your journey towards recovery. Make sure that you have the right primary care physician on board as he or she will be able to refer you to the right specialists for your kid’s needs.

You might have to need to work on several medical conditions stemming from the primary diagnosis at once. So, your medical team might need to include:

·         Physical therapist

·         Occupational therapist

·         Massage therapist

·         Developmental pediatrician

·         Neurologist

·         Orthopedic surgeon

·         Rehabilitation medicine specialist

·         Nutritionist

·         Orthotist

·         Counselor

·         Trainer

Step 5: Keep a Record

By keeping track of your child’s medical history, therapy sessions, medications, and other interventions, you’ll be able to tell what works and what doesn’t work to improve your little angel’s mobility.

What’s more, in some states, primary care physicians may be able to legally destroy some or all medical records after several years. You’ll also need a copy of medical records and detailed log of all interventions to share with new experts on the team, health insurers, lawyers, and authorities.

Body positivity — a balancing act

By Janna Breslin

Body positivity is a phrase we hear more and more often, lately. It’s a push to alert people—especially impressionable children and teens—that there are many harmful media representations out there, especially for women.

Just as people once wrung their hands over Barbie’s unnatural shape, the Kardashians and other airbrushed social media influencers make certain “desirable” body shapes seem naturally attainable. We’re all guilty of it to a certain extent. Who doesn’t use strategic selfie angles to mask our “imperfections?”

The body positivity movement is aimed at normalizing all body types, rather than focusing on and celebrating only super-ripped Abercrombie and surgically-enhanced Victoria’s Secret models. Realistically, no matter how much we diet and exercise, the majority of humans can’t achieve those standards. That doesn’t mean we shouldn’t wear the clothes we enjoy or avoid photos with friends.

But acceptance is a balancing act. We should all recognize that our bodies are constantly changing, and to hold ourselves to impossible ideals is detrimental to our mental health. On the other hand, body positivity isn’t a substitute for physical wellness. Luckily, physical health also comes in a number of different packages.

The push to normalize all body types

Your body image is how you feel about the way you look and feel, when you look in the mirror or at photos of yourself. Healthy body image is not merely not hating the way your body looks, but actively accepting it without trying to change yourself to fit arbitrary standards. For example, if you tell yourself, “I’ll look better once I lose fifteen pounds,” that’s not a healthy body image—even if you actually need to lose that weight to be healthy. In fact, it can actually promote unhealthy behaviors.

Body positivity initially started as a plus-size movement, and has grown more inclusive over time. The movement includes people of any shape, size, gender, race and physical ability (or disability). The point is to challenge the way society presents the physical “ideal” in pop culture, media, and more. That ranges from putting plus (or even average)-size models in ads to workout videos hosted by plus-size yogis.

How acceptance can help you stay healthy

For some people, the idea that you can be healthy and physically active, even if you’re plus-sized, is nothing short of revolutionary. Of course, there’s plenty of blowback—detractors accuse body positivity advocates of “glorifying obesity.” Since the movement is diverse, you may come across conflicting options from different sources. The key is that weight stigma hurts your mental health—and when you’re struggling emotionally, it’s that much harder to get fit and enjoy life.

Judith Matz, a clinical social worker cautions people not to put off activities until they reach a certain weight or fitness goal. The key to body acceptance (and staying or getting fit) is to continue to practice healthy behaviors regardless of your current size. When you consistently get the message that you’re not worthy of taking a barre class while you’re thirty pounds overweight, or you can’t wear a crop top until you’re perfectly toned, you’re more likely to give up.

That’s how body positivity can help: it reminds us that we all have the right to exist in and enjoy our bodies just as they are, right now. That includes engaging in healthy exercise and enjoying balanced nutrition.

Body positivity is no substitute for physical wellness

With that said, body positivity isn’t a substitute for physical health. That doesn’t mean that you can’t be a physically fit person at a higher weight. As long as you and your doctor are happy with your fitness and body size, healthy bodies really do come in all shapes and sizes.

The key is to balance the mental health benefits of body acceptance with physical fitness. You don’t have to be the “perfect” BMI (and in fact, research suggests that is an outdated metric) with ripped abs and biceps to be healthy or to love your body. However, if you struggle to get off the couch and get any physical activity at all, chances are you could stand to get back into fighting shape. You wouldn’t be alone, either. During the COVID-19 pandemic, more people are struggling now than ever—which feeds right back into negative body image.

The goal for everyone should be to accept ourselves as we are—works in progress—and prioritize our physical fitness over whether we fit into arbitrary aesthetic standards. When we do that, we make healthier decisions.

Janna Breslin is a well-known fitness model, certified personal trainer, health coach, and
nutrition expert. With Evan DeMarco, she co-founded Complete Human, the new
multi-media platform that takes a deep dive into the areas of mind, body, soul, and planet while
exploring what makes us who we are and what will make us better. Their flagship podcast can be found on all major streaming podcast players including Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and Google Play, and their namesake streaming video channel is online at YouTube.

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Elegance Brands releases Gorilla Hemp CBD Energy drink

Elegance Brands releases Gorilla Hemp CBD Energy drink

Elegance Brandsa global beverage company with a focus on innovation—is launching their flagship brand in select markets in the U.S. this November with their Gorilla Hemp CBD energy drink.

Gorilla Hemp is a carbonated beverage that contains 20mg of Hemp CBD isolate, 160mg of green coffee caffeine, and a multitude of natural plant extracts. This trailblazing energy drink is the world’s first to combine ingredients that boost physical stamina and mental clarity with the potential wellness benefits of CBD, which include anxiety and stress-reduction. Harnessing the best ingredients nature has to offer, Gorilla Hemp provides maximum energy alongside mental clarity.  

Gorilla Hemp is non-alcoholic and non-intoxicating. According to manufacturers, each batch is tested by third-party laboratories to ensure it is void of any THC presence. On Gorilla Hemp’s website, they promise they are “committed to transparency.” They post the Certificate of Analysis (COA) for each batch on their website at www.gorillahemp.com/lab-results.

Gorilla Hemp’s ingredient list is committed to your best self. Its natural guarana extract reduces fatigue and helps maintain focus. Its ginseng, which is a potent antioxidant, improves brain function and reduces inflammation. Its ginkgo biloba—another herbal extract—helps optimize cognitive function and overall well-being. And, its green coffee caffeine provides you with the energy to get through your day. The addition of high-quality hemp CBD isolate gives balance to the blend, and helps speed recovery with its anti-inflammatory qualities.

Elegance Brands will continue to roll out innovative products within the CBD/energy drink world later this year, including a sugar-free extension of Gorilla Hemp.

The best way for you to find this drink is through Gorilla Hemp’s store locator. Cans can be purchased individually, in 4-packs, and in 12-packs.

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Criteria to Ensure Preparedness of Federal Programs

The Strategic Stockpile Failed; Experts Propose New Approach to Emergency Preparedness

A new analysis of the United States government’s response to COVID-19 highlights myriad problems with an approach that relied, in large part, on international supply chains and the Strategic National Stockpile (SNS). A panel of academic and military experts is instead calling for a more dynamic, flexible approach to emergency preparedness at the national level.

“When COVID-19 hit, the U.S. was unable to provide adequate testing supplies and equipment, unable to provide adequate personal protective equipment (PPE), and didn’t have a functioning plan,” says Rob Handfield, first author of the study and Bank of America University Distinguished Professor of Operations and Supply Chain Management at North Carolina State University.

“The SNS hadn’t replenished some of its supplies since the H1N1 pandemic in 2009-10. Many of its supplies were expired. And there was no clear leadership. Federal authorities punted problems to the states, leaving states to fight each other for limited resources. And the result was chaos.

“We need to be talking about this now, because the nation needs to be better prepared next time. And there is always a next time.”

To that end, Handfield and collaborators from NC State, Arizona State University, the Naval Postgraduate School and the Air Force’s Contracting Career Field Management Team came together to outline the components that are necessary to ensure that there is an adequate federal response to future health crises. They determined that an effective federal program needs to address five criteria:

1). More Flexibility: In order to respond to unanticipated threats, any government system needs to have sufficient market intelligence to insure that it has lots of options, relationships and suppliers across the private sector for securing basic needs. 

“You can’t stockpile supplies for every possible contingency,” Handfield says.

2). Inventory Visibility: The government would need to know what supplies it has, where those supplies are, and when those supplies expire. Ideally, it would also know which supplies are available in what amounts in the private sector, as well as how quickly it could purchase those supplies.

“The same is true on the demand side,” Handfield says. “What do people need? Where? When?”

3). Responsiveness: The governmental institution overseeing emergency preparation needs to have leadership that can review information as it becomes available and work with experts to secure and distribute supplies efficiently. This would be an ongoing process, rather than a system that is put in place only in the event of crises.

4). Global Independence: The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the fact that the U.S. has outsourced manufacturing of critical biomedical materiel, because it was cheaper. Authorities need to consider investing in domestic manufacturing of PPE, testing supplies and equipment, pharmaceutical chemicals, syringes, and other biomedical supplies.

“The past year has really driven home the consequences of being dependent on other nations to meet basic needs during a pandemic,” Handfield says. “Relying largely on the least expensive suppliers for a given product has consequences.”

5). Equitable: The government needs to ensure that supplies get to where they are most needed in order to reduce the infighting and hoarding that we’ve seen in the COVID-19 pandemic.

“A first step here is to settle on a way of determining how to prioritize needs and how we would define an equitable allocation and distribution of supplies,” Handfield says.

The last ingredient is bureaucratic: Coordinating all five of these components should be done by a permanent team that is focused solely on national preparation and ensuring that the relevant federal agencies are all on the same page.

“This is a fundamental shift away from the static approach of the SNS,” Handfield says. “We need to begin exploring each of these components in more detail – and defining what a governing structure would look like. We don’t know how long we’ll have until we face another crisis.”

The paper, “A Commons for a Supply Chain in the Post-COVID-19 Era: The Case for a Reformed Strategic National Stockpile,” is published open access in The Milbank Quarterly. The paper was co-authored by Blanton Godfrey, the Joseph D. Moore Distinguished Professor in NC State’s Wilson College of Textiles; Major Daniel Finkenstadt of the Naval Postgraduate School; Eugene Schneller of Arizona State; and Peter Guinto of the Air Force’s Contracting Career Field Management Team.

Billie Eilish releases new single "Therefore I Am" as announced by 360 MAGAZINE illustration by Maria Soloman.

Billie Eilish – Therefore I Am

Five-time GRAMMY Award-winning Darkroom/Interscope Records artist Billie Eilish has released her new single titled ‘Therefore I Am.’ The track comes with an official music video also directed by the 18-year-old, and was shot in a deserted Glendale Galleria shopping mall, a familiar stomping-ground for Billie during her early teen years.

Watch the official music video for ‘Therefore I Am’ HERE.

‘Therefore I Am’ follows a busy few months of writing, recording and campaigning, since returning to the public arena earlier this year with a powerful live performance for the Democratic National Committee of her song ‘my future’ [watch HERE]. Last month, Billie Eilish also performed her first ever groundbreaking global live stream. WHERE DO WE GO? THE LIVESTREAM incorporated state-of-the-art XR technology, bringing music fans from all over the world together for a fully immersive virtual experience. Using multiple cameras, angles and 3D environments, viewers were able step inside Billie’s world, as she performed a fully live set for what was truly an unprecedented virtual experience. The pre-show featured exclusive content, giveaways, trivia and voting PSA’s from special guests.

The official music video for ‘Therefore I Am’ made its broadcast premiere on MTV Live, MTVU and on the Viacom Times Square billboard.

On Sunday, November 22, Billie Eilish will take the stage for a worldwide premiere performance of ‘Therefore I Am’ at the American Music Awards, where she is nominated for two awards; Favorite Artist – Alternative Rock and Favorite Social Artist. The show will broadcast live at 8PM EST/ PST on ABC.

On December 10, Billie Eilish will be performing live on iHeartRadio’s Jingle Ball 2020. The show will be carried live on over 90+ iHeartRadio CHR stations and as a live video stream on The CW app and CWTV.com on Thursday, December 10, beginning at 6PM PT / 9PM ET.

“Billie Eilish: The World’s A Little Blurry,” the highly anticipated documentary feature film directed by award-winning filmmaker R.J. Cutler (“Belushi,” “The September Issue,” “The War Room”) will premiere in theaters and on Apple TV+ in February 2021.

Billie Eilish released her groundbreaking debut album “WHEN WE ALL FALL ASLEEP, WHERE DO WE GO?” in 2019 and won Best New Artist, Album of the Year, Record of the Year, Song of the Year, and Best Pop Vocal Album at this year’s 62nd Grammy® Awards in January, followed by her rousing performance of The Beatles’ ‘Yesterday’ at the 92nd Oscars®. This year also saw 18-year-old Eilish release her internationally hailed official James Bond theme song “No Time To Die,” for the forthcoming MGM/Eon Productions James Bond Motion Picture.

‘Therefore I Am’ is out everywhere now.

Annual Fundraiser for Teen Cancer America

“TEA WITH VICTORIA SUMMER” FEATURING SHERYL CROW, ALFIE BOE AND LESLEY NICOL TO BENEFIT TEEN CANCER AMERICA 

Virtual British Tea, Presented by Lawrence Charles of Charles& Co. and First Citizens Bank, Goes Global on Saturday, Dec. 12

Actress Victoria Summer will host her third annual British Tea for Teen Cancer America on Saturday, December 12, in a virtual online setting that will feature Grammy winner Sheryl Crow, Tony Award winner Alfie Boe and actress Lesley Nicol, known for her portrayal of the manor chef Mrs. Patmore on the Emmy-winning series Downton Abbey.

“Tea with Victoria Summer,” beginning in the U.S. at 3 p.m. ET, will give guests exclusive insight to the timeless British tradition of afternoon tea. The live-streamed global event will raise critical funds for TCA, the national non-profit co-founded by Roger Daltrey and Pete Townshend of The Who, providing facilities and support for adolescents and young adults with cancer.

The interactive tea party will include a master class in making vegan scones from scratch with Italian Michelin star chef Fabrizio Vaccaro. There will also be primer on proper tea etiquette with William Hanson, Fellow of the Royal Society of the Arts and regarded as Great Britain’s most trusted authority on etiquette and civility.

This special event is presented by Lawrence Charles, founder of organic luxury tea brand Charles & Company, and TCA corporate partner First Citizens Bank. Ticket information is available at the fundraiser’s Eventbrite page.

Attendees will learn how to make a tea cocktail with Charles, a preeminent tea purveyor and international expert in the tradition of British tea. Charles is known for his collaborations with the James Beard Foundation, British Polo Day, the Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation and the British Royal family.  

The work of TCA will be highlighted in a conversation between Victoria Summer and a young cancer survivor who will share personal experiences and sing a duet with the hostess.

Summer, a global ambassador for TCA, began her career on stage before transitioning to film acting where she has achieved international stardom. She played Julie Andrews in Disney’s Saving Mr. Banks, was featured in director Michael Bay’s blockbuster, Transformers: Age of Extinction, and starred opposite Chris Klein in the World War One drama, Game of Aces. Summer recently shot a supporting role in the period TV drama, Glow & Darkness, and starts shooting indie biopic Vindication Swim in the UK in January. The actress and producer also created the show Next Generation Role Model which shines the spotlight on leaders of the future. 

TCA’s mission is to improve the experience, outcomes and survival of teens and young adults with cancer by providing programs and specialized facilities designed especially for them in hospitals throughout the U.S.

For information about corporate sponsorship opportunities connected to “Tea with Victoria Summer,” please contact Michelle Aland at  Michelle@TeenCancerAmerica.org.

About Teen Cancer America

Teen Cancer America seeks to bridge the gap between pediatric and adult oncology care by helping the health providers and health systems develop specialized programs and facilities for this age group. TCA brings together physicians and allied healthcare professionals in both pediatric and adult oncology. Age-targeted care for this population is necessary for medical and appropriate psychosocial development. Outcomes associated with some cancers that target this age group have not improved in over 30 years. Teens and young adults with cancer are long overdue for an upgrade and TCA can hopefully light the fire in America’s health systems. For more information, email Michelle Aland (michelle@teencanceramerica.org) or visit www.teencanceramerica.org.

Therapies Developed to Reduce Lung Fibrosis

A new treatment option for lung fibrosis is being developed by Purdue University scientists. Lung fibrosis has been a concern for COVID-19 patients.

People with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) have a life expectancy of fewer than five years. Fibrotic diseases cause organ failure that leads to about 45% of all deaths in the United States. Existing therapies do little to slow progression.

Now, Philip S. Low, Purdue’s Ralph C. Corley Distinguished Professor of Chemistry and Presidential Scholar for Drug Discovery, has led a team to develop two targeted therapies for people with IPF. The two different therapeutic approaches are published in Science Translational Medicine and EMBO Molecular Medicine.

“This is a horrible disease that claimed the lives of my next-door neighbor and a good friend’s wife,” Low said. “We developed two targeted therapies that allow us to use powerful drugs with high toxicities because we specifically deliver them to diseased cells without harming healthy ones.”

The first of the Purdue team’s novel targeted molecules is designed to slow fibrosis and extend life. The second IPF therapy suppresses fibrosis-inducing cytokine production.

The two therapies will be moving into human clinical trials within the next several months. The developments come as a number of people with COVID-19 or who have recovered from COVID-19 experience lung fibrosis or other related conditions.

The therapy technologies are licensed through the Purdue Research Foundation Office of Technology Commercialization and optioned to MorphImmune, a startup co-founded by Low. For more information on licensing a Purdue innovation, contact the Office of Technology Commercialization at otcip@prf.org.

About Purdue Research Foundation

The Purdue Research Foundation is a private, nonprofit foundation created to advance the mission of Purdue University. Established in 1930, the foundation accepts gifts; administers trusts; funds scholarships and grants; acquires property; protects Purdue’s intellectual property; and promotes entrepreneurial activities on behalf of Purdue. The foundation manages the Purdue Foundry, Purdue Office of Technology Commercialization, Purdue Research Park, Purdue Technology Centers and University Development Office. In 2020, the IPWatchdog Institute ranked Purdue third nationally in startup creation and in the top 20 for patents. The foundation received the 2019 Innovation and Economic Prosperity Universities Award for Place from the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities. For more information on licensing a Purdue innovation, contact the Purdue Office of Technology Commercialization at otcip@prf.org. For more information about involvement and investment opportunities in startups based on a Purdue innovation, contact the Purdue Foundry at foundry@prf.org.

About Purdue University

Purdue University is a top public research institution developing practical solutions to today’s toughest challenges. Ranked the No. 5 Most Innovative University in the United States by U.S. News & World Report, Purdue delivers world-changing research and out-of-this-world discovery. Committed to hands-on and online, real-world learning, Purdue offers a transformative education to all. Committed to affordability and accessibility, Purdue has frozen tuition and most fees at 2012-13 levels, enabling more students than ever to graduate debt-free. See how Purdue never stops in the persistent pursuit of the next giant leap at purdue.edu.

Writer: Chris Adam, cladam@prf.org
Source: Philip Low, plow@purdue.edu

Suraj U. Hettiarachchi, Yen-Hsing Li, Jyoti Roy, Fenghua Zhang, Estela Puchulu-Campanella, Spencer D. Lindeman, Madduri Srinivasarao, Konstantin Tsoyi, Xiaoliang Liang, Ehab A. Ayaub, Cheryl Nickerson-Nutter, Ivan O. Rosas and Philip S. Low