Posts tagged with "cancer"

Susan G komen partner proceeds via 360 Magazine

Susan G. Komen Partner Proceeds

Each year, Susan G. Komen®, the world’s leading breast cancer organization, gathers products and services from its partners during Breast Cancer Awareness Month to continue our commitment to help fund research and care services that support people living with breast cancer. Proceeds from these products support individuals living with breast cancer through their diagnosis, treatment, and beyond.


GT + Komen Echelon® GT+ Connect Bike — Susan G. Komen Edition

$899.99

The Echelon GT+ Connect Bike – Susan G. Komen Edition incorporates the historic color of breast cancer awareness. With a padded comfort seat, ergonomic bullhorn handlebars, and 32 resistances levels, the GT+ delivers an impactful workout experience while supporting a great cause. Pair with the Echelon membership for live and on-demand cycling classes led by motivating instructors and compete on the Leaderboard with members from around the world. A portion of every Echelon bike sale will be donated to Susan G. Komen!

Echelon x Komen Metal Water Bottle
$14.99

The Echelon x Komen stylish metal water bottle will keep your drink hot or cold, whether working out or on the go.

Echelon x Komen 2lb. Dumbbells
$19.99
These dumbbells feature an easy-grip neoprene coating, which helps ensure a secure hold during use. The rubber-like coating also helps protect floors and allows the weights to be used both indoors and out.

Echelon x Komen Exercise Mat
$19.99

Enjoy the perfect balance of comfort and a supportive surface while you work out on our moisture resistance exercise mat.

National Tree Company 4ft. Tinsel Pre-Lit Artificial Christmas Tree

$29.99

Featuring hundreds of individually crafted branch tips to create full bodied branches, this tree is designed to look and feel lifelike. Features 70 white lights that remain lit even when a bulb goes out. The lights are strung on the tree before packaging, offering an easier, more convenient set up.   

Natura Bissé Nourishing Natural Balm

$54.00

Made from 100% ingredients of natural origins, this balm deeply moisturizes your skin helping to promote its suppleness, softness, and beauty. Formulated with mango and shea butters, vitamins and antioxidants, it visibly improves the appearance of rough, dry or scaly skin and contributes to provide an incredible feeling of well-being.

Mohawk Flooring SmartCushion

Pricing Varies

Get the softest step possible by adding SmartCushionTM to your carpet purchase. Mohawk’s exclusively engineered carpet cushion enhances the feel and performance of your carpet and adds 20 years to your warranty. Mohawk manufactures both carpet and cushion, so you can be sure you’ll get a perfect match for your new Mohawk carpet while supporting a great cause.

Wacoal Bras with a Cause

Pricing Varies

From October 23, 2022 through October 29, 2022, Wacoal will conduct its 2022 Wacoal Bras with a Cause promotion and will donate a portion of sales to Komen for every regularly-priced Wacoal bra and b.tempt’d bra sold online.

The Kent Bicycles 26″ Women’s Susan G. Komen Floral Cruiser Bike

$248.00

The Kent Bicycles 26″ Floral Cruiser has a sturdy step-thru steel frame for easy on and off. It’s perfect for the boardwalk or a neighborhood adventure and with seven speeds, you won’t get stuck pushing it up hills. Front and rear alloy linear pull-brakes make stopping easy.

GT + Komen Echelon® GT+ Connect Bike — Susan G. Komen Edition
$899.99

The Echelon GT+ Connect Bike – Susan G. Komen Edition incorporates the historic color of breast cancer awareness. With a padded comfort seat, ergonomic bullhorn handlebars, and 32 resistances levels, the GT+ delivers an impactful workout experience while supporting a great cause. Pair with the Echelon membership for live and on-demand cycling classes led by motivating instructors and compete on the Leaderboard with members from around the world. A portion of every Echelon bike sale will be donated to Susan G. Komen!

Stethoscope graphic via Heather Skovlund for use by 360 MAGAZINE

Tyler Robinson Foundation

Founded by the GRAMMY Award-winning music group Imagine Dragons, the Tyler Robinson Foundation (TRF) has been dedicated to assisting and providing support for families affected by pediatric cancer. The nonprofit organization was created with the goal of providing relief of expenses that entail families confronting a pediatric cancer diagnosis.

Throughout the year of 2021 alone, over 500 Emergency Fund expenditures were granted to families in need.

The foundation was initiated after learning about the moving story of Tyler, who was diagnosed with Rhabdomyosarcoma, an incredibly rare form of cancer, at the age of 16-years-old. His inspirational story and bravery shown throughout the duration of his battle with cancer inspired countless of individuals around the world.

Coming together, his family and Imagine Dragons created the TRF, who advocate the message that, “the real battle is not whether you live or die, but how you respond to the challenge.”

The TRF has grown immensely and now supports over 2,000 families to date. Continuing to expand their foundation, the foundation continues to partner with more organizations like the Children’s Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA), where they have founded a TRF.

Beginning with a donation of $10,000 from Imagine Dragons, this specific fund provides support with meals and food insecurity for pediatric cancer families. Imagine Dragons, too, went in attendance of a virtual meet and great with patients from CHLA where they discussed music and meditation.

The foundation has also partaken in events that tie in with their ambassador program Team TRF. Such events include a raffle to win a ZERO-G Flight experience with Imagine Dragons that accumulated nearly $10,000 and the Rise Up Gala one-night-experience that raise of $2.6 million for TRF.

TRF, too, was named a 2021 Top-Rated Nonprofit by GreatNonprofits, a provider known for providing user reviews of charities and nonprofits. TRF received a 2021 Platinum Seal of Transparency with Candid.

Since their founding, TRF has been able to provide aid to over 2,500 families internationally and has raised a mass accumulation of over $12 million. For each dollar that is raised by TRF, over 85% goes back to families that are affected by a pediatric cancer diagnosis. To learn more about TRF, visit TRF.org and follow TRF on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Dr.Liia Ramachandra Talks about cancer inside 360 MAGAZINE

Dr.Liia Ramachandra Breaks Down Cancer-Causing

Forever Chemicals and the Household Substances they are Found In 

By Dr. Liia Ramachandra

If you wear glasses, you probably know how frustrating it can be to battle fog when wearing a mask or face shield. Many people have turned to anti-fogging sprays and cloths to combat the ever-present fog that has plagued people wearing glasses throughout the pandemic. 

Recently, it was discovered that these sprays and cloths may contain high levels of toxic PFAS (Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances), which are considered to be “forever chemicals” in that they do not break down in the environment. 

Forever chemicals are often referred to as the new asbestos. The pattern of research and regulations set forth to control PFAS has many similarities to how the risks of asbestos were revealed decades ago, and the action had to be taken to remove it from the environment altogether. PFAS are found extensively in the environment, so eliminating them completely is nearly impossible. Exposure to the chemicals has been linked to certain cancers, weakened immunity, thyroid disease, and other health effects. Mothers and children are particularly vulnerable to the effects of PFAS, as they can affect reproductive and developmental health. 

The research from a Duke University study looked at four top-rated anti-fogging sprays, and five anti-fog clothes found on Amazon. The research discovered that all nine samples contained fluorotelomer alcohols (FTOHs) and fluorotelomer ethoxylates (FTEOs), two types of PFAS. The levels of PFAS found in the product during the Duke study were considerably high, up to 20.7 milligrams of PFAS per milliliter of solution. Many of the products that contained these high levels of PFAS were billed as safe and non-toxic, even for children. 

Other Exposure to PFAS 

PFAS can be found in other personally used items as well. These items include: 

  • Some grease-resistant paper, fast food containers/wrappers, microwave popcorn bags, pizza boxes, and candy wrappers 
  • Nonstick cookware 
  • Stain-resistant coatings used on carpets, upholstery, and other fabrics 
  • Water-resistant clothing 
  • Cleaning products 
  • Personal care products (shampoo, dental floss) and cosmetics (nail polish, eye makeup) 

Paints, varnishes, and sealants 

The PFAS can seep into the drinking water and food we consume. PFAS chemicals are often added to cosmetics, lotions, cleaners, and nail polish or find their way into products via raw ingredient contamination. The PFAS chemicals are added to products because of their skin-smoothing properties or to add shine. Most people are probably not aware that their products contain these dangerous chemicals. During the Duke research study, they found none of the anti-fog sprays or cloths that they studied listed their ingredients. 

Steering Clear of PFAS 

 Due to the pandemic and the massive uptick in people wearing masks everywhere they go, there was an increase in demand for anti-fog sprays and cloths over the last two years. As noted in the Duke study, many medical professionals and first-responders who spent hours upon hours in masks relied on these products to prevent fog. Now that the results of this study have been published, people may want to be more diligent in selecting proven safe products. 

Reading labels for some chemical-laden products, like anti-fog spray, can sometimes be confusing. To circumvent this issue, one will want to select personal products that note that they do not contain PFAS. With the release of the damning information from the Duke study, companies have gone back to the drawing board, and some have released anti-fog products that are PFAS free

As the dark storm clouds of the pandemic begin to clear and we anticipate sunnier, healthier days ahead, the high demand for anti-fog products may wane. However, those who rely on wearing glasses regularly will always require anti-fog products in some fashion. With the release of the Duke study, companies who provide these products will likely have to address the level of harmful chemicals in their goods and remedy the situation to avoid a business-ending backlash. 

Dr. Liia Ramachandra 

EpiLynx by Dr. Liia was born from my struggle with gluten allergy and realizing that I wasn’t alone. Not being able to find skincare products that could guarantee being gluten-free, my husband and I decided to create our own.  Both of us have over 30 years of pharmaceutical medicine development experience.  We decided to use scientific and medical skills to enhance the lives of all people our products touch.
 

LAMBORGHINI RAISES AWARENESS FOR MOVEMBER

North America Drives Lamborghini’s Largest Global Rally to Raise Awareness and Funding for Movember

  • More than 1,500 mustached Lamborghinis paraded the streets of major cities around the world, with 92 Lamborghini showrooms joining in support
  • Movember rally activities included approximately 600 cars across 22 states in North America, including Los Angeles, New York, Miami, Austin, Vancouver and Mexico City
  • Donations can be submitted through Lamborghini’s dedicated fundraising page by November 30

Today, more than 1,500 Lamborghini super sports cars across the globe participated in drive events with the collectiveSant’Agata Bolognese/New York, November 6, 2021 – Today, more than 1,500 Lamborghini super sports cars across the globe participated in drive events with the collective mission to raise awareness and funding for the world’s leading men’s health charity, Movember. North American rallies were held across 22 major cities, with approximately 600 cars in attendance, each wearing a decal of the charity’s mustache symbol. In New York, 45 cars were organized into the mustache shape to generate attention for the cause in the country’s most populated city.

The money raised from the Movember “Bull Run” will aid in the charity’s mission of bringing awareness to important issues surrounding mental health, suicide prevention, prostate and testicular cancer. Those who wish to donate to Movember can do so through Lamborghini’s dedicated fundraising page HERE through November 30.

“The Movember Bull Run was the largest global rally in the company’s history and we are thrilled North America was able to play a large part in leveraging our brand to elevate the awareness for men’s health,” said Andrea Baldi, Automobili Lamborghini Chief Executive Officer for the Americas Region. “We saw passionate fans and customers of all ages come together in major cities across the Americas to support the cause and actively contribute to the crucial issue of health and support research.” 

Lamborghini from the new track-inspired Lamborghini Huracán STO to various historic models, all supporting the cause with an emblem of a mustache affixed to their hood. Each rally commenced from a local retail-partner showroom and paraded in glorious progression to a final destination.

image from Dina Allende for use by 360 Magazine

AUTOMOTIVE GROUP FIGHTS AGAINST BREAST CANCER

Two Automotive Executives Become Co-Chairs of the 2021 Making Strides Against Breast Cancer® Event in Broward

For the Craig Zinn Automotive Group, joining the fight against breast cancer hits close to home. That’s why two top executives from that organization have stepped up to co-chair this year’s Making Strides Against Breast Cancer Broward presented by Seminole Hard Rock Hotel and Casino – Hollywood, scheduled for October 23, 2021. Fleet manager for Lexus of Pembroke Pines, Michele Alter, is a 21-year breast cancer survivor, and Brittany Zinn, assistant group general manager/CZAG, lost a maternal figure to breast cancer. The two plan to work closely with Trudy Spence, senior development manager at the American Cancer Society® Fort Lauderdale to make this year’s event a success.

The American Cancer Society Making Strides Against Breast Cancer® (MSABC) is a national movement. Fundraising events range from large-scale traditional walks to unique local experiences and celebrations. Making Strides has united communities, companies and individuals across the country in the fight to end breast cancer for more than two decades. The organization has known of Michele and her fight since 2002, when she first started participating in their events. Both Michele Alter and Brittany Zinn believe in MSABC’s commitment to create a future that’s free from breast cancer. “As we look to the road ahead, we are more determined and more inspired than ever before. It will unite Broward County communities to honor cancer survivors and caregivers touched by the disease and raise awareness and funds for a world without breast cancer,” said Trudy Spence. In years past, this event has raised over 700,000 dollars, which went towards funding breast cancer research and programs geared towards both men and women. At this time, the event will move forward in person, but it will keep federal, state, and local health guidelines in mind. As the fall season approaches, event-based decisions may be made to best meet the health and safety needs of everyone involved. Michele and Brittany hope to get as many people signed up to help raise funds. “Between now through October, people can fuel the fight against breast cancer by fundraising. It’s as easy as downloading the American Cancer Society FUNdraising App, which will allow you to register for the October event and ask for donations via email, text and social media,” said Michele Alter who was first diagnosed with breast cancer at the young age of 32.

For many, being diagnosed is a life changing experience, and Michele believes that cancer lit a fire in her soul. Early during her treatment, she decided that she would not only beat cancer, but she would also volunteer and help The American Cancer Society fund a cure. “They were there for me when I needed them the most, so I feel blessed that I am here today ready and able to co-chair this year’s Making Strides/ Broward event.” Michele believes in the programs, because they were the only thing that helped her see the light during those moments of darkness. Brittany comes from an automotive family that happens to also be highly philanthropic. Her father, Craig Zinn, encourages everyone in his company to give back to the community. Despite wearing many hats, Brittany was eager to serve as co-chair for this year’s event to honor the memory of Ingrid, who was like a mother to her. “I’ve seen what breast cancer does to a person. Since I was young, Ingrid kept the true depth of her struggles from me. Had I known, I would have been there for her, much like The American Cancer Society was for Michele,” said Brittany.

According to the American Cancer Society journal, a Cancer Journal for Clinicians, there will be an estimated 1.9 million new cancer cases diagnosed in 2021 and 608,570 cancer deaths in the United States. Given the pandemic, it’s believed that people with active cancer may be more susceptible to COVID-19, because of their impaired immune system. For that, the Broward chapter wants to ensure everyone that even if they cannot attend in person, the success of this event will depend on enthusiastic individuals who commit to raising funds, in addition to generous donors who will support those participants.

WHEN:

Saturday, October 23, 2021, at 8:00 a.m.

WHERE:

Huizenga Plaza, 32 E Las Olas Blvd, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33316

REGISTRATION:

Click HERE to join the walk by signing up as an individual or team. Be sure to download the app to your phone and link the dashboard to Facebook. Fun Fact: Those that connect their fundraiser to FB, raise seven times more money.

image from Dina Allende for use by 360 Magazine

Participants at the 2019 event

Kaelen Felix illustrates Twin Towers for 360 Magazine

How Has 9/11 Changed America?

September 11, 2001 will forever remain etched in the memories of Americans. Almost 3,000 innocent lives were lost during the deadly 9/11 terror attack. No one saw it coming until two planes hijacked by terrorists crashed into New York’s World Trade Center.

Terrorists aboard a third plane hovered around the Pentagon while the fourth crashed in Pennsylvania. And this was the beginning of significant changes in America’s history. Nearly everything changed in a bid to make America safe. Below are several things that changed after the terrorist attack.

Start Of War On Terror

The 9/11 terrorist attack on U.S. soil marked the beginning of America’s war on terror. Before then, American troops were home. But a month after the attack, American troops were deployed to Afghanistan. Their main objective was reining in al-Qaeda militia – an outlawed terror group – behind the terrorist attack in the U.S.

In an address to Congress nine days after the attack, declared a global war on terror.

“Our war on terror begins with al Qaeda, but it does not end there. It will not end until every terrorist group of global reach has been found, stopped, and defeated,” Bush’s resolute stand read.

The U.S. troops sustained a long war in dismantling the Taliban government supporting al-Qaeda. It is the most protracted military campaign in the annals of U.S. history. And it didn’t end here. Military troops from the U.S. in 2003 invaded Iraq intending to dethrone Saddam Hussein. Hussein was the leader at the time and was producing weapons for the Taliban forces.

Twenty years later, about 8,000 US troops are still in Afghanistan, taming the Taliban insurgency.

Health Complications

Residents of lower Manhattan in New York reported increasing cases of Ground Zero respiratory diseases five months after the terror attack. Some of the 9/11 related illnesses came as a result of pulverization. When the World Trade Center collapsed, all materials in the building became fine dust spreading all over Manhattan.

The World Trade Center Health Program certifies that there are more cases of respiratory diseases since the attack in the area. Further, other ailments certified by the program include asthma, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, cancer, depression, rhinosinusitis, and sleep apnea.

Onset Of Deportations

The Department of Homeland Security didn’t exist before September 11, 2001. President Bush formed it in 2002, working closely with the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). Deportations rose exponentially during Barack Obama’s administration, having the highest numbers. Between 2009 and 2010, nearly 400,000 people were deported.

Between 1999 and 2001, there were at least 200,000 annual deportations. But they doubled after the 9/11 terror attack.

Airport Security More Elaborate

In 2001, you would wander around the airport in the U.S. without much fuss. Today, you need a ticket to do this. And proper scrutiny of your passenger I.D. is undertaken before boarding a flight. A thorough body check happens today, and you must remove your shoes and your belt. Back then, none of this happened. Security is now elaborate – nothing is ignored. Not even the vaguest intelligence report.

Anti-Muslim Bias

Between 2015 and 2016, FBI data indicates 91 cases of assault stemming from anti-Muslim bias. In contrast to 2001, after the 9/11 attack, this number grew. Americans perceive Islam as a religion advocating for war. Religious discrimination is still a thing in America. The profiling of Muslims continues amid efforts to change the narrative that they are peace-loving.

The aftermath of the 9/11 terror attack in the U.S. in 2001 has a good and an ugly side. In terms of safety, it is a plus for the people. More elaborate security systems are in place today. But America is still in the war two decades later; this is a sad reminder of the aftereffect of the most significant terror attack in the land.

health via 360 Magazine for use by 360 Magazine

Brain Tumor Infocon

By: Skyler Johnson

The Brain Tumor Infocon was an event that took place this past week, via Zoom because of the pandemic. The event was not for cancer patients themselves but for those that cared for them. They gave four talks on four separate days, each regarding a different topic. I attended the workshop focusing on children and young adults. All different types of people attended, from parents caring for children to friends caring for friends. But they came for the same reason, to try and gain advice towards dealing with cancer patients. And hopefully they left gaining more information then they had entered with. Here’s what I learned from the event:

Brain Cancer Changes Who a Person is

This must be terrifying to go through, but it does make sense. After all, the brain is where a person’s thoughts, feelings, and emotions are stored, and cancer destroys that. When a person has cancer you have to see them change. There’s not much anyone can do about it, there’s no way to prevent it, but it is something that happens nonetheless. 

Don’t Be Afraid to Say “Cancer”

For a person with cancer, it can be incredibly isolating when their caregiver doesn’t use the actual word. For children, it can be hard to understand what’s wrong with them if they don’t know what they’re going through if they don’t have the actual term to define it. It’s the same with emotions. Caregivers shouldn’t be afraid to show emotions just because they don’t want to upset those they’re caring for. It’s another thing that can make people feel very alone. 

The Question Jar

The presenter recommended a question jar for child patients who may be shy about asking questions regarding their cancer. The caregiver, a parent, would leave the jar in a heavily trafficked part of the house, like a kitchen or living room, and the child can put questions in the jar whenever they’d like. The caregiver would answer their questions periodically, not directly after the child put the concern in. You wouldn’t want them to know you’re keeping track. 

Feel Free to Take Time for Yourself

Having to take care of a cancer patient can be a daunting task, and one thing that was heavily encouraged was having caregivers taking time for themselves. They can’t be there for another person if they can’t be there for themselves. Exercise. Watch TV. Walk the dog. Anything that’ll help calm.

Everyone has a Different Definition of Caring

This is the first lesson I learned, and the most important. The presenter asked the group how they defined caring, which is not something I’d thought about previously. Several of the attendees answered, each in different ways. To some people, caring meant what caring means to most people: helping someone else through their day, making sure they’re content. If I answered the question I might’ve used an anecdote. But for one person it meant “loving and hurting,” which is, I can imagine, the most accurate. Caring can be painful. Caring can be suffering. Because you have to watch them fall apart, and get emotional in front of them, and despite all the advice people may give you, while caregiving will always be loving, it will also be hurting.

Town & Country 8th Philanthropy Summit – Marlo Thomas × Phil Donahue

The 8th annual Town & Country Philanthropy Summit continued today with a wonderful conversation between Marlo Thomas and Phil Donahue, moderated by Editor in Chief Stellene Volandes. This is the first time that Phil has interviewed Marlo since they first met on the Donahue show decades ago.

Please see below for highlights from the panel as well as a link to view the interview in its entirety:

Marlo on visiting St. Jude following her father’s death:

“After my father died, it was just a terrible shock to us. It was stunning because he hadn’t been sick, so it was very sudden. He was adored by us. We all loved him, and he was our funny, loving perfect daddy so it was very, very hard. We all decided that you know, we’d go to St. Jude and let them know that we were here if they needed us and so I went to St. Jude, a couple of months later. I drove up and there was a sixteen feet statue of St. Jude right at the entrance, and I started to cry because I’ve been there so many times with my dad. I pulled myself together because I didn’t want to cry in front of the parents, they have enough heartache of their own. I went inside and, in the lobby, there was this party going on. All of these little kids running around with party hats, balloons, confetti, ice cream, and cake. I said to the nurse, ‘Well whose birthday, is it?’ She said, ‘Oh it’s not a birthday party, it’s an off-chemo party.’ Well, I’ll tell you, I just gasped, to see these children celebrating one of their turns for the better. All of these moms and dads and grandparents standing around with tears in their eyes because they felt that if this child made it, maybe their beloved child would too. It was really a stunning moment for me. And then, just as I was standing there, this mom came over with a little girl about four years old, all dressed in pink. She had little pink ribbons jauntily tied around her little bald head and the mother said to her, ‘do you know who’s this lady’s daddy is?’ and the little girl shyly answered, ‘yes’ the mother said ‘who?’ She [little girl] proudly said, ‘St. Jude.’ I just fell in love with her. I fell in love with all of those kids in the off-chemo party. I fell in love with this place. And I realized for the first time, just what all of this hope and love and promise and the future of a second chance for children meant to my father. It really helped me to see myself as a part of it.”

Marlo on what she learned from her father: 

“Well, what I learned from dad, really is that he had a lot of sayings, and one of them was there’s two kinds of people in the world: those who stop on an accident to see if they can help or those who just drive by. He was literally the kind that would stop and help. I remember one time, we were driving by down Sunset Blvd. we saw these boys beating up on another little boy. And my father stopped the car and jumped out. He pulled the boys apart and gave them a big talking to. I was sitting in the car, terrified, I was eight years old. He got back in the car. He brought the little boy that’ve been bullied with him. We were going to drop him off at home and as my dad started the car, he said, ‘I hate a bully.’ And I think to him, cancer in children was a bully. A bully that he wanted to defeat. The thing about my dad too is that he really was a citizen of the world, that we all are citizens of the world…He saw himself as part of the neighborhood as a part of a community wherever he was, he was a part of that community. I think that was a great lesson for my sister, my brother, and I.”

Phil Donahue on his first visit to St. Jude and how that impacted him: 

“My first visit to St. Jude, I picked up a little bald-headed kid. I said, ‘What do you want to be when you grow up, big guy?’ This still makes me cry. The kid said, ‘I just don’t want to be sick anymore.’ Well, my god, I grabbed this kid. You know, for a very brief moment, I kind of felt how parents feel when they take a child to St. Jude. How scary it must be and how I didn’t want that child to see my eyes get moist. So, it’s a real learning experience at St. Jude. It changed me forever. I do wish everybody could visit the hospital. It’s a life-changing experience and when you see the parents arrive with a child. You see the real fear on their faces, terror sometimes. Then you see them leaving and they’re better. It’s like a godsent – the change they feel, and that their children feel.”

Marlo on being awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom and her version of the American Dream: 

“One of the things that happened in my life that was really big a great deal, because of my work with St. Jude, is that I received the Medal of Freedom from President Obama. My husband and I went, and my brother came, and the head of St. Jude came. The interesting thing about it, is when you are growing up, especially as an actress, you dream of getting an Emmy or an Oscar or a Tony, but I don’t think anybody grows up dreaming about the Medal of Freedom. It just comes as a shock when you’re told you will be receiving this at the White House. And I remember I was stunned. Remember we discussed that I wasn’t going to cry? So, I’m not going to cry, but I did because at the moment President Obama was clasping the medal around my neck, I thought of my grandparents. My grandparents were immigrants who came to this country from Lebanon to find a better way of life, to raise their family and their children. And I saw them in my mind’s eye, I could see my grandparents with all their belongings and cloth bags. And here, their granddaughter just two generations later were in the White House receiving the Medal of Freedom from the President of the United States. I mean, that is the American Dream. I’m so proud of the fact that my grandparents made a life in this country.”

Marlo on how celebrity involvement has helped the foundation: 

“That’s a very interesting thing because just as in our generation, we brought in Jennifer Aniston and Robin Williams and all of those wonderful people. My dad did that, that’s how he built the hospital. He used to say this hospital was built with laughter George Burns and the Bob Hope and all of the funny guys—Jerry Lewis and Frank Sinatra, Nat King Cole, Ella Fitzgerald, all of the men and women that were on the night club circuit with my dad helped build St. Jude. In fact, Frank Sinatra did so many benefits that we actually have a whole wing that’s called the Frank Sinatra wing. Their generosity really built the hospital.”

Watch the full summit here.

The T&C Summit continues tomorrow with Stacy-Marie Ishmael speaking to Taraji P. Henson and Jamie Raskin, and Stellene Volandes in conversation with Andreas Dracopoulos. If you are interested in attending register directly here.

Prostate cancer illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Battle Against Prostate Cancer

New Insights into Hormone’s Action Could Help in Battle Against Prostate Cancer

Discovery Sheds Light on How Cancer Cells Use Androgen

Researchers at UVA Cancer Center have unveiled important new insights into how hormones known as androgens act on our cells – and the discovery could boost efforts to develop better treatments for prostate, ovarian and breast cancers.

The findings shed light on how androgens interact with their receptors inside cells to affect gene activity. This process is important in both healthy cells and certain cancers. Hormone therapy for prostate cancer, for example, aims to reduce the amount of androgen in the body, or to stop it from fueling the cancer cells. However, the approach does not work for some men, and for others it eventually fails. So, scientists are eager to better understand how our cells – and cancer – interact with androgen.

“Our study reveals a new mechanism for how androgen regulates communication within prostate cancer cells,” said Bryce M. Paschal, PhD, of the UVA School of Medicine’s Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics. “Anti-androgen therapies continue to be the cornerstone for prostate cancer therapy. The better we understand how androgens work, the better clinicians will be positioned to understand why it fails, and how even better therapies can be designed.”

Androgen and Cancer

In a new paper in the scientific journal Nature Communications, Paschal and his colleagues describe how a complex signaling system regulates androgen receptor activity. The system, they found, uses a “writer” and a “reader” to modify cellular proteins – sort of like how a computer reads and writes information.

Scientists have appreciated the importance of these modified proteins but understanding just how they influence the androgen receptors has been difficult. One key to the regulation process, found by Paschal and his SOM team, is an enzyme, Parp7, produced by the PARP7 gene. Parp7 is part of a family of enzymes involved in important cellular functions including DNA repair.

Certain cancer drugs already target certain Parp enzymes; these drugs are used to treat prostate, ovarian and breast cancers in patients who have mutations in DNA-repair genes. And while androgens are usually discussed in the context of prostate cancer, androgens may be important in ovarian and breast cancer as well.

Paschal’s new findings offer fresh insights into these Parp drugs and could lead to improved treatments that help patients get the best outcomes. Further, Paschal and his team found lower levels of Parp7 in prostate cancer that has spread to other parts of the body than in the initial tumors. That may suggest that a reduction in Parp7 is associated with the progression of the disease, the researchers say.

With their new androgen insights, Paschal and his colleagues have provided scientists with important new directions to explore in the battle against prostate and other cancers.

“Our next steps will be to use pre-clinical models to determine the role this pathway plays in prostate cancer progression, and whether inhibition of the pathways slows disease,” Paschal said. “We are very excited by what we have learned thus far. Our study emphasizes there is still so much to be learned, and that basic science plays a critical role in defining the molecular context for enzyme and drug action. “

About the Research

The research team consisted of Chun-Song Yang, Kasey Jividen, Teddy Kamata, Natalia Dworak, Luke Oostdyk, Bartlomiej Remlein, Yasin Pourfarjam, In-Kwon Kim, Kang-Ping Du, Tarek Abbas, Nicholas E. Sherman, David Wotton and Paschal.

The work was supported by the National Institutes of Health’s National Cancer Institute, grant CA214872.

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"90s Kids" by Jax artwork by Ted Sullivan via Atlantic Records of Warner Music Group for use by 360 Magazine

JAX – 90s Kids

JAX does it for the “90s Kids”

Multi-talented singer-songwriter premieres nostalgia anthem, available now via Atlantic Records

STREAM “90S KIDS” HERE

Singer-songwriter Jax has premiered her highly anticipated new single “90s Kids” – available now via Atlantic Records. The nostalgia-fueled anthem became an instant fan-favorite after being previewed on TikTok late last year, packed with all the quintessential decade references from Tamagotchi to Britney Spears.

“I’m obviously a 90s kid, and grew up with all these amazing trends that I’m still obsessed with today” said Jax. “One night at 3am I was just thinking of all the times I’d watched ‘Saved By The Bell,’ played Super Smash Bros, danced to Britney Spears and I just put it all in a voice memo. Next thing I knew by sunrise I had this anthem to rep all my fellow 90s babies.”

“90s Kids” follows the release of “Ring Pop,” Jaxs major label-debut which yielded a massive viral response and high-profile appearances on The Ellen DeGeneres Show, Access Hollywood & more. Initially teased on TikTok, “Ring Pop” instantly captivated fans with its honest lyrics that perfectly encapsulate the emotions being felt by so many in today’s predicament. Her warm delivery coasting over dreamy guitar and snappy percussion as she croons to her boyfriend, “Don’t need no diamonds, you’re my rock, and I’m okay with a ring pop.

Raised in New Jersey by way of New York, Jax got her start by performing a wide variety of genres and in bands growing up. At the age of 18, she developed cancer above her vocal cords, which returned following a couple months of remission right as she relocated to Los Angeles in pursuit of her music. Left unable to sing herself, Jax turned to songwriting for others and found industry success behind-the-scenes.

As her ability to perform returned, Jax needed to pivot yet again when the COVID-19 pandemic struck. This time she turned to TikTok, posting a hilarious response to the pop gem “Stacy’s Mom” from “Stacy’s Mom’s Perspective” which exploded with nearly 9 million views in just a few months and “Update from Avril Lavigne & Sk8er Boi 18 years later” which became her most successful parody to date with over 14.5 million views. She continued to go viral a dozen or more times over, eventually amassing over 1.6 million followers on the platform, 200 million total views and 28 million “likes.” With a massive online audience under her belt, Jax began sharing her own original music in late 2020 to an overwhelmingly positive response – ultimately leading to her singing with Atlantic Records for her forthcoming debut full-length.