Posts tagged with "American cancer society"

American Cancer Society charity digital pop up for MCM illustration by Maria Soloman for 360 MAGAZINE

MCM x ACS

By Armon Hayes

On Wednesday, October 14 MCM and style architect Misa Hylton will go LIVE promptly at 10:55am from Soho for an exclusive virtual shopping event. An RSVP only experience for their partnership with the American Cancer Society; together they fight relentlessly for a world free of Cancer. This year, I was welcomed to support the first-ever virtual shopping event, hosted by iconic stylist and MCM’s Global Creative Partner, Misa Hylton. With intense purpose, she inspires us by remixing her vision with functionality. Provided with live updates leading up to the event via text, coupled with the means to interact and shop look-book in a touchless society.

How it works: 

Request desired favorites with SKU and await an invoice by email to complete transaction. 20% of proceeds from sales of this event will be donated to support the ACS. The 30-minute live event will feature MCM’s Fall 2020 pink assortment. At 11am the full assortment preview will begin, followed by a Q&A from Hylton. Qualifying orders will additionally receive a gift. Misa will style six looks on-model and show different ways you can wear these must-have pieces. With the goal being to shop to one’s content, if you ever needed a reason to shop until you drop, this event would be it. No trick, but certainly a treat for a cause we all know and are too familiar with. For those survivors and current fighters, their families and community warriors stand proudly with them through the fight despite at times feeling hopeless. This month in particular creates a driving force within me. Currently, I am approaching the five year anniversary of Liam Maurice Fields; my cousin who transitioned during his fight with leukemia. Only a child and here for a short time, it’s often the smallest things that are the most impactful. 

MCM and the American Cancer Society are providing an opportunity to join the fight against cancer. Funds raised through the 2020 campaign will assist cancer patients in a variety of ways, including:

Education: The American Cancer Society educates the public, providers, community members and employers regarding cancer screening guidelines.

Advocacy: The American Cancer Society Cancer Action NetworkSM, the American Cancer Society’s nonprofit, nonpartisan advocacy affiliate, advocates on behalf of cancer patients at local, state and federal levels (including access to no-cost COVID-19 testing for insured and uninsured individuals).

Research: The American Cancer Society has dedicated over $4.9 billion dollars toward cancer research since 1946.

Service: The American Cancer Society provides cancer information and support through its 24/7 helpline at 1-800-227-2345 and online at cancer.org.

MCM is proud to participate this year with innovative concepts in these times. Last October, MCM’s pink product campaign raised over $20,000. The American Cancer Society’s mission is to save lives, celebrate lives, and lead the fight for a world without cancer. The coronavirus pandemic has brought challenges for cancer patients worldwide, but cancer hasn’t stopped and neither has the American Cancer Society. Together, both organizations are committed to moving us closer to a world without cancer and appreciate the support from supporters, clients and friends. 

About The Host: 

Misa Hylton’s global influence can’t be overstated; she reaches +3.1 billion people worldwide through her relationships and collaborations with networks and publications, celebrities and brands. She has the admiration and ear of today’s biggest household names in music, entertainment and popular culture. She continues to revolutionize fashion at various levels – collaborating with luxury fashion house MCM as Global Creative Partner, styling private celebrity clients, featuring as a commentary subject in two documentaries on music epochs, leading a new generation of creatives at her Misa Hylton Fashion Academy and instructing professional studies courses at the Fashion Institute of Technology. Misa continues to transcend categories by constantly redefining modern style.

Breast Cancer Illustration by Kaelen Felix for 360 Magazine

Breast Cancer Awareness Month

October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month and there are many ways to support the cause this month. This annual campaign is held to both spread awareness and raise money for the cause. 

The website for the National Breast Cancer Foundation provides many resources to help with this cause. Although things are challenging for everyone this year, this important organization has been fighting for women since 1993 and continues to thrive thanks to its supporters. 

New this year on the foundation’s website anyone is able to designate a donation to one of four specific causes. Donations are being accepted to screening, education, support and the general fund. 

The screening fund allows the National Mammography and Patient Navigation programs to provide free cancer screenings and mammograms to those in need; this helps remove barriers in the cancer care system. By donating to education, more women will be given resources and education to detect breast cancer early and lower their risk. To help women that have been diagnosed, donating to the support services will help them gain resources and support they need to heal. This money goes to funding HOPE Kits, Metastatic Retreats and Support Groups.

If you are unsure which program you would like to donate to, giving to the general fund allows the National Breast Cancer Foundation to designate your donation to the area they believe needs it most. You can even donate in honor or memory of someone in your life that has been impacted by breast cancer. 

The National Breast Cancer Foundation is sharing stories of hope through October. They are sharing stories of hope of survivors and those impacted by breast cancer. Stories and photos can be submitted here. This is a great way to spread hope and positive messages to those struggling with breast cancer and their loved ones. 

Available for download from the foundation is the Breast Problems That Aren’t Breast Cancer ebook. This free resource will help women recognize common problems versus breast problems that need to be looked at by a professional. 

Breast cancer screenings are important for women to get regularly so they can detect problems from the start. The United States Preventive Services recommends women ages 50 to 74 get screened every two years, while women 40 to 49 should talk to their doctor about getting screened sooner if they are at higher risk. Self-examinations are recommended for all women to check that there is no concern. 

The American Cancer Society has been hosting Making Strides Against Breast Cancer for over twenty years. This walk helps fundraise for research and support for breast cancer patients. Even though the ongoing coronavirus pandemic has canceled many events, the walk will still be taking place virtually. Donations are still being accepted and people everywhere will be coming together virtually to support the cause. 

Ways to volunteer with the National Breast Cancer Foundation are being moved virtually as well. This is a great way to give back in October instead of donating. People everywhere are helping to pack HOPE Kits for women in treatment and write encouragement cards to put in the kits. There are many ways to help in the month of October to spread awareness about breast cancer and give hope to those in need.

The non-profit organization, Susan G. Komen for the cure, also supports women with breast cancer and their families. On their website, women can find information, resources and assistance to help them with their journey. Founded in 1982 by Nancy Brinker, is the largest breast cancer organization in America.

Jane Velez-Mitchell illustration by Mina Tocalini

Meat Causes Cancer

The American Cancer Society’s (ACS) new guidelines for cancer reduction were revealed recently and it’s no surprise that they recommend avoiding or reducing meat intake. The ACS is advising the public to consume far less processed and read meats while shifting to more plant-based whole foods. In the guidelines they do advise consuming nutrient-rich, high in fiber foods like vegetables, whole grains, beans, fruits, and peas. “Eat the rainbow” as we’ve all heard for years. 

These new guidelines follow in line with the World Health Organization (WHO) stance released in 2015 where they famously classified red meats as a Group 2A carcinogen that was “probably carcinogenic to humans”. They referenced studies that lined consistent consumption of red meat to colorectal cancer.   

New Day New Chef: Support and Feed Edition focuses on the organization’s work supplying food to children’s charities, homeless and domestic abuse shelters, food banks, family and senior centers by supporting vegan restaurants in Los Angeles, New York, and Philadelphia. Filmed largely with robotic cameras during the COVID-19 outbreak, the show follows Maggie Baird, (actress, screenwriter, vegan, and mother of musicians Billie Eilish and Finneas, who are also vegan) on her journey to create Support and Feed. Two episodes are now available to stream on Prime Video, with more released weekly. 

Animal Rights Activist & Host of “New Day New Chef: Support and Feed” Jane Velez-Mitchell is the founder and editor of JaneUnChained.com, a multi-platform social media news channel producing thousands of widely shared videos on animal rights and veganism. Jane is the winner of four Genesis Awards from the Humane Society of the United States. For six years she hosted her own show on HLN (CNN Headline News) where she did a weekly animal segment. Velez-Mitchell also reported for the TV show Celebrity Justice, and was a news anchor/reporter at KCAL-TV in LA and WCBS-TV in NY. Jane is active in the LGBTQ community in Los Angeles. Two episodes are now available to stream on Prime Video, with more released weekly. 

Follow New Day New Chef Support and Feed: Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

NYC, Vaughn Lowery, 360 MAGAZINE

Clive Davis x Tisch Gala

Clive Davis will be honored at the NYU Tisch School of the Arts 2020 Gala.

“As both a music industry luminary and an essential member of the Tisch community, Clive Davis’s impact is immeasurable,” said Allyson Green, Dean, NYU Tisch School of the Arts. “Clive has continually reinvented the idea of the creative producer during his lifelong commitment to championing music artists. At Tisch, Clive’s dedication and generosity are reflected in his significant contributions to the Clive Davis Institute of Recorded Music, where his legacy and influence will reverberate with future generations of music makers. We’re excited to honor Clive and his fundamental role in developing an institute unlike any other in the world.”

In 2002, Davis announced a $5 million gift to the school for the creation of a new Department of Recorded Music, the first of its kind to offer a four-year, degree-granting undergraduate program that recognizes the creative producer as an artist and musical recording itself as a creative medium. In 2011, Davis made an additional gift of $5 million to NYU Tisch to expand the department, creating the Clive Davis Institute of Recorded Music, home to stellar working professionals and a generous scholarship fund to support young talent from around the world.

Born in Brooklyn, New York, Davis was a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of New York University, where he received his B.A. magna cum laude. He later graduated with honors from Harvard Law School. As the record industry’s most innovative and influential executive, Davis has had a profound effect on the world of music.

Davis is directly responsible for the signing of many landmark artists, among them Janis Joplin’s Big Brother and The Holding Company; Blood, Sweat & Tears; Chicago; Santana; Boz Scaggs; Loggins & Messina; Laura Nyro; Billy Joel; Bruce Springsteen; Aerosmith; and Earth, Wind and Fire. In addition, he attracted to the label Neil Diamond; Pink Floyd; Herbie Hancock; and The Isley Brothers. He played a key role in the careers of Simon & Garfunkel, Sly & The Family Stone, Bob Dylan, Barbra Streisand and Andy Williams. Thereafter, under Davis’s leadership at Arista Records, Whitney Houston, Barry Manilow, Patti Smith, Kenny G, Sarah McLachlan, Monica and Dido all launched their careers. The label also attracted such important artists as Aretha Franklin, The Grateful Dead, The Kinks, Lou Reed, the Eurythmics, Dionne Warwick, Daryl Hall & John Oates and Carly Simon. Davis had Arista finance LaFace Records, and thereafter LaFace built an outstanding roster of hit-making artists including TLC, Toni Braxton, Usher, OutKast and Pink. At Bad Boy Records, financed by Arista, he helped grow the artist roster to include Notorious B.I.G., Faith Evans, Mase, 112 and Sean “Puffy” Combs. Davis also created J Records, which emerged as a dominant music force with chart-topping albums by Alicia Keys, Maroon 5, Annie Lennox, Luther Vandross, Rod Stewart and Jennifer Hudson. Since 2008, Davis has served as Chief Creative Officer of Sony Music Entertainment. Currently, Davis is also working as an executive producer on an eight-part television series produced by Brian Grazer and Ron Howard for Disney on the life of Aretha Franklin.

A five-time Grammy Award-winner, Davis has received numerous awards and recognitions over the course of his career. He was inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame and he received the Grammy Trustees Lifetime Achievement Award from the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences (NARAS), which also named the prestigious state of the art theater inside the Grammy Museum the “Clive Davis Theater.” He is also the recipient of many humanitarian honors from organizations such as the T.J. Martell Foundation, the Anti-Defamation League and the American Cancer Society. Davis received the Humanitarian Award from the American Foundation for AIDS Research (amfAR) for his efforts in the battle against AIDS.

Davis is also the best-selling author of Clive: Inside The Record Business and his autobiography, The Soundtrack of My Life. His life was documented by the Ridley Scott firm in the award-winning documentary film, Clive Davis: The Soundtrack of Our Lives.

Since its founding in 1965, NYU Tisch School of the Arts has established itself as one of the leading arts schools in the country. It draws on the vast artistic and cultural resources of New York City and New York University to create an extraordinary training ground for artists, scholars and innovators. Today, students learn their craft in a spirited, risk-taking environment that combines the professional training of a conservatory with the liberal arts education of a premier global university with campuses in New York, Abu Dhabi, Shanghai and 11 academic centers around the world.

Thousands of NYU Tisch alumni have gone on to enjoy fulfilling careers in the arts, including renowned artists such as Pulitzer Prize winners Annie Baker (also a MacArthur Fellow), Tony Kushner, Doug Wright and Chang Lee; Academy Award winners Mahershala Ali, Kevin Willmott, Martin Scorsese, Oliver Stone, Spike Lee, Marcia Gay Harden, Mark Bridges and Keiko Ibi; Tony Award winners Ali Stroker, Nina Arianda, Beowulf Boritt, Steve Kazee, George C. Wolfe, Michael Mayer, Idina Menzel, Stephen Spinella, Frank Wood and Paul Tazewell; Emmy Award winners Alec Baldwin, Sterling K. Brown, Billy Crystal, Vince Gilligan, Donald Glover (also a Grammy Award winner as Childish Gambino), Camryn Manheim and Debra Messing; Golden Globe winners Rachel Brosnahan, Rachel Bloom and Gina Rodriguez; acclaimed filmmakers Amy Heckerling and Colin Trevorrow; Grammy Award winners Lady Gaga (also an Academy Award winner) and Amber Gray; Grammy Award nominees Maggie Rogers and Elle Varner; entrepreneur Dennis Crowley; MacArthur Fellowship recipients Kyle Abraham, Branden Jacobs-Jenkins (also a Pulitzer Prize finalist), Camille Utterback and Mimi Lien; visual artist Leo Villareal; actors Danai Gurira and Corey Stoll; and photographer Tyler Mitchell

Facing Addiction

By James W. Hood

I had a horrible feeling that October Friday. I’d been in that situation many times before, but this time felt different.

That Wednesday, Austin left voicemails that sounded confused — from a friend’s phone, because Austin had lost his.

On Thursday, Austin sent texts from that same phone. Something wasn’t right. I called the friend to say I was concerned and to have Austin call me. Several hours later, the friend called to say he went to Austin’s apartment, but no one was home.

A few hours later I received a blocked call but couldn’t answer in time. Three minutes later a call came with a New Orleans area code. It was the coroner saying my beautiful boy was found slumped over his kitchen table, dead from an opioid overdose.

Austin’s journey was over. Mine was just beginning.

Like every child, Austin was a wonderful person — just a kid trying to grow up in a world that throws endless challenges at us. But at age 14, Austin started drinking. We were concerned and sought help. By 15, we found pipes and marijuana in his room. We sought more help. By 16, Austin was using opioids.

The next three years were a blur of therapists, interventions, wilderness programs, therapeutic boarding schools, and ER visits. At 19, Austin was doing great. He went to college with new-found determination and optimism. Until those 48 hours that I’ll never be able to understand or reconstruct.

Until the phone call came that would bring any parent to his or her knees. Until he lost his battle and I lost my son.

Someone said losing a child is the greatest pain we will ever face.

They were right.

Looking back, I wondered why it was so difficult to help Austin. Why did he have to go to 18 different people or places for help? Why was there no roadmap? Why did I feel we were lurking in shadows the entire time? Wasn’t there anyone who’d figured out what needs to be done?
I came to understand our family’s journey was far from unique. But even in Westport, CT, society wants to pretend addiction is not the horrific problem it is.

Addiction is devastating our country and stealing our youth. With 21 million people currently suffering and 23 million more in long-term recovery, addiction to alcohol and other drugs impacts one in three households. Addiction affects as many people as diabetes; one-and-a-half times as many as all cancers combined.

Someone, usually a young adult, dies from alcohol or other drugs every four minutes — like a jumbo jet falling from the sky every day with no survivors. Addiction and accidental overdose are now the leading killer of people under 50 years of age, and addiction costs our country $1 trillion a year.

Where is the outrage?

Our country has done little to combat the scourge of addiction, and so it continues to get worse, striking an ever-younger audience every year. Why? Because the stigma, shame, and hopelessness surrounding addiction have kept this issue in the shadows.

As a result — astonishingly — there has never been a well-funded equivalent of the American Cancer Society or American Heart Association to battle the addiction crisis.

This is why I left my career and, with others whose lives have also been forever changed by this crisis, created Facing Addiction (now Facing Addiction with NCADD).

We’ve crafted a comprehensive strategy to turn the tide against addiction in America.

To do that, we’re building a national movement — as exists with every other major health issue — to bring a unified voice and sustainable source of funding to this effort.
On October 4, 2015, Facing Addiction made history on the National Mall, when tens of thousands gathered to end the silence surrounding addiction. This was the first time major musicians, politicians, actors, and advocates all joined to create a united voice, supporting Facing Addiction’s pledge to help solve the most urgent health crisis of our time. It was the AIDS-quilt moment for addiction in America.

Since then, Facing Addiction with NCADD has become the leading voice in the effort to end addiction in our country, and has accomplished many important things. Still, because of the stigma, shame, and misunderstanding surrounding addiction, many ask if we can truly reverse this problem.
The answer is, unconditionally, yes.

First, we must educate people that addiction is an illness, not a moral failing. It happens to good people who no more want to become addicted than others want to get cancer, heart disease, or diabetes.

Addiction is not inherently fatal. It is treatable, and recovery is real. But people must understand the risks. One in every seven Americans will experience a substance use disorder.

Second, we must make accurate information readily accessible, in a trusted place, so people who need help know where to turn. Facing Addiction with NCADD, with Transforming Youth Recovery, created the Addiction Resource Hub that lists some 40,000 assets, to help people with prevention, intervention, treatment, recovery, and advocacy. This is the most comprehensive addiction resource ever assembled, and is already helping countless people.

Third, we must remove impediments that have been holding back progress for decades. Prevention programs that don’t work. Pediatricians untrained in addiction. Shady, under-regulated addiction treatment centers. And our wrong-minded response to addiction as a crime, instead of an illness.
America has faced other health crises throughout history and, each time, found ways to dramatically lessen their impact.

Thirty-five years ago, people thought HIV/AIDS, another highly stigmatized illness, was insurmountable. But since the AIDS quilt moment in 1983, great strides have been made to reduce its devastation — with $3 billion raised toward that end.

But we must act…now. More than 50 years ago, Martin Luther King, Jr. spoke of “the fierce urgency of now” when discussing a very different crisis in America. We must focus today’s “fierce urgency of now” on the addiction crisis in America, before we lose an entire generation of our youth.

JAMES W. HOOD
Co-CEO of Facing Addiction with NCADD

Jim has had a distinguished career, with an emphasis on helping companies identify and implement strategies for significant growth. He has more than three decades of experience in general management, business strategy, marketing, finance, consulting, private investing and as an entrepreneur.

Since the death of his son, Austin, from drug-related causes in October 2012, Jim has devoted all his time helping to forge a national organization, Facing Addiction, to serve as “the American Cancer Society of the addiction space.”

Facing Addiction launched with a history-making event on the National Mall on October 4, 2015. In January 2018 Facing Addiction merged with NCADD. The resulting organization, Facing Addiction with NCADD, is now recognized as the leading voice in the effort to end addiction in our country. Jim serves as Co-CEO of Facing Addiction with NCADD.

During his years in advertising, Jim managed some of Young & Rubicam’s largest accounts, headed the agency’s strategy review board, served as Director of Global Business Development, and was CEO of the joint venture between Y&R and Dentsu, the largest advertising agency in the world.

During his years on Wall Street, Jim was Chief Marketing Officer of Lehman Brothers and CS First Boston (now Credit Suisse).

Jim also had a successful strategic consulting practice for more than a decade, working with clients in the financial services, telecom, defense, technology and restaurant industries. While a consultant, Jim co-founded and became CEO of HipCricket, a groundbreaking mobile marketing firm that went public in 2006. He was also a director of Einstein Noah Restaurant Group and served as a member of their executive committee when the company went public.

Jim is an investor in several private equity and hedge funds and invests in and advises early stage companies. He also serves as a mentor at the Yale Entrepreneurial Institute.

Jim holds a BA in Psychology and Economics from Cornell University and an MBA from Harvard University. He has served on many community boards in his hometown of Westport, CT.

Chicago’s Fashion Week

Chicago’s Fashion Week events will take place October 20, 21, 22, 24, 27, and 29 and will benefit the American Cancer Society of Illinois in a celebration of fashion, beauty, and wellness. FashionBar LLC would like to highlight their Fashion Finale event on October 29 which will showcase an Avant Garde competition. Fashion Finale is the show to close out Chicago’s Fashion Week. Four designers: Rodnell Jones II, V.J.G. Clothing, Mario Puga, and La Moda Munze, will be challenged to create a custom garment inspired by Chicago’s cityscape. The contestants will be judged based on quality, creativity, and execution. Leroy Dawkins, a model, stylist, and a judge for Russia’s Next Top Model, will be flying in from London for the competition. The four panel judges for the competition will be: • BeBe Jones – Chicago Style Maven, NIKE Chicago Influencer, Fashion Geek at MAGIC Las Vegas (PROJECT).

Kaori Semaj – Winner of the 2016 CFW Avant Garde Competition, CEO & Founder of The Haus of Chrjor, Inc.

Steven Alvarez – Director of Runway Execution & Development Brand Manager at Ralph Lauren

Maryann Rasnussen – American Cancer Society Representative, with 25+ years within the fashion industry.

• Lyndsey Davis – President of the Fashion Law Society at the John Marshall Law School that focuses on intellectual property, copy writing etc.

Fashion Finale’s hair and makeup will be provided by Salon Fusion’s team (Chantal Manduca, Giuseppe Stanfa, Dmitriy, and their creative team) and Steven Papageorge Salon. Musical entertainment for the Fashion Finale will be produced by Kevin Ross (Twoguard Media) and DJ NRG.

As the CEO of FashionBar, Tony D. Long, states: “The importance of this year’s fashion week initiative is to bring awareness to wellness, as wellness is the foundation of fashion and beauty.”

To learn more about FashionBar and Chicago Fashion Week, visit their website HERE