Posts tagged with "lgbtq"

LGBTQ Illustration for 360 Magazine by Gabriella Archuleta

OUT CELEBRATES ANNUAL OUT100 ISSUE

Pride Media’s Out magazine is thrilled to release the 2020 Out100 presented by Lexus. The list remains the largest annual portfolio recognizing members of the LGBTQ+ for their ground-breaking, ripple-inducing, and culture-shifting impact nationwide. 

The coveted and anticipated Out100 issue features four covers including trailblazing actor Wilson Cruz, activist and BLM organizer Janaya Khan,  actor and director Joe Mantello, and artist and icon Janelle Monáe.

This year’s honorees make up one of the most diverse lists in Out magazine’s history, spanning several generations and a multitude of intersections. From 18-year-old rap sensation Kidd Kenn and 99-year old trans WWII U.S. Navy fighter pilot Robina Asti to MSNBC journalist Rachel Maddow, who in a year of political tension was a voice of reason for the LGBTQ+ community. 

From fashion legend André Leon Talley, headlining musician Lizzo, comedian Wanda Sykes, actors Jeremy Pope and Cheyenne Jackson to modeling industry heavyweight Ivan Bart, the creators of Queer Eye, and Joe Biden and Kamala Harris’s very queer team Jamal Brown, Reggie Greer, and Karine Jean-Pierre, inclusivity and progress are the driving force behind this year’s list. 

Each honoree represents not just the past but also the future. Leading into 2021, the LGBTQ+ community as a whole will undoubtedly reap the benefits of their accomplishments. This year might have brought an onslaught of challenges, but it also welcomed new opportunities to reflect on what matters to the LGBTQ+ community and what lies ahead in the fight for equality and justice.

Now more than ever, it’s vital to recognize the powerful voices leading the charge and sounding off the new vanguard of queer leaders. In a year of Pride celebrated at home instead of in the streets, community support from company partners like Lexus, Citi, Gilead, McDonald’s USA, Truly Hard Seltzer, and Stoli® Group USA, LLC has never been more important or helpful in amplifying these powerful Out100 voices moving the LGBTQ+ community forward. 

 “Community building has been the bedrock of the LGBTQ+ rights movement, and part of that is understanding the fact that we are not and have never been monolithic. All of us have a story and role to play in this fight. All of our experiences and lived realities are different, special, and integral in building a better world — together,” said Editor in Chief of Out, David Artavia.

“The Out100 list is a representation of this journey. For 26 years, it has stood the test of time and continues to empower the next generation of LGBTQ+ thought leaders, artists, and professionals to create a more inclusive future for all of us,” continued Artavia. 

This year, Out’s nationally recognized and respected Out100 issue extends beyond the brand’s print and online properties with two exciting virtual events. On Friday, November 20, the co-founder of Black Lives Matter Canada, Janaya Khan, will moderate a dynamic “How Do We Come Back From This?” symposium on what moving out of the last four years looks like for culture, politics, the movement, and ourselves, including Emmy-winning creator of Transparent Joey Soloway, trans activist Ashlee Marie Preston, and PR strategist Kelly Bush Novak.

On Saturday, November 21, the Out100 culminates in the first-ever 2020 Out100 Virtual Honoree Induction Ceremony, live at 5 p.m. Pacific (8 p.m. Eastern) at Out.com/Out100Live, and available on all Revry live channels and on-demand at 6 p.m. Pacific (9 p.m. Eastern) at watch.revry.tv.

Bisexual adults less likely to enjoy health benefits of education

Education has long been linked to health — the more schooling people have, the healthier they are likely to be. But a new study from Rice University sociologists found that the health benefits of a good education are less evident among well-educated bisexual adults.

“Education and health: The joint role of gender and sexual identity” examines health among straight, bisexual, gay and lesbian adults with various educational backgrounds. Authors Zhe Zhang, a postdoctoral research fellow at Rice, Bridget Gorman, a professor of sociology at Rice, and Alexa Solazzo, a postdoctoral research fellow at the Harvard University T.H. Chan School of Public Health, were particularly interested in bisexual adults, since they may experience distinctive health vulnerabilities.

The researchers found that while having at least a bachelor’s degree was linked to better health among bisexual adults, they received less benefit than heterosexual and gay or lesbian adults with similar education. This effect was especially true for bisexual women.

“The health benefits of education are well established — so much so that anything we do to promote and improve public education should really be viewed as health policy,” Gorman said. “It’s that impactful on health and well-being. That our analysis showed less health benefit associated with education among bisexual adults compared to heterosexual, gay and lesbian adults is concerning.”

While the researchers could not pinpoint the exact cause, they theorized the problem might be social stigma and additional anxiety among women due to gender discrimination, Zhang said.

“Discrimination of any kind can take a heavy toll on health,” Zhang said. “While we cannot say with certainty that is what is happening in this study, it’s a very real possibility.”

The authors based their study on data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, which included a sample of more than 1.2 million adults living in 44 U.S. states and territories from 2011-2017. They hope the study will raise awareness of the issue and help health professionals provide better care.

The research was partially supported by a grant from the National Cancer Institute. The article is available online at https://bit.ly/3iJdNY0 and it will be published in the December 2020 edition of the journal SSM-Population Health.

This news release can be found online at news.rice.edu.

Follow Rice News and Media Relations on Twitter @RiceUNews.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg illustration by Kaelen Felix for 360 MAGAZINE.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg

By Cassandra Yany

Ruth Bader Ginsburg died Friday after her long battle with cancer. The 87-year-old Supreme Court justice was a trailblazer who continuously worked to end gender discrimination and preserve our civil liberties. 

The Supreme Court announced Friday that Ginsburg passed away at her Washington D.C. home due to complications from metastatic pancreatic cancer. She had previously overcome lung, liver and colon cancer. In July, she revealed that the cancer had returned, but that she would continue to serve on the Supreme Court.

Ginsburg’s revolutionary career started when she graduated at the top of her class from Cornell University, earning a Bachelor’s degree in government. Two years later, she attended Harvard Law School with her husband, Martin Ginsburg. There, she was one of only nine women in her class of over 500 students, according to NPR.

During their time at Harvard, Martin was diagnosed with testicular cancer, so Ruth would take notes for the two of them and help him with his work, all while trying to juggle being a new mom. When Martin landed a job at a firm in New York, the family packed up and Ruth finished her education at Columbia University. 

Once Ginsburg finished school, she began to experience the discrimination that came with being a female lawyer. According to TIME, she was unable to secure a position at a premier law firm or one of the Supreme Court clerkships, regardless of the fact that she had been the first students to serve on both the Harvard and Columbia Law reviews, and graduated at the top of her class. These jobs were instead easily given to males who had ranked lower than her in school. This led her to work a lower court clerkship and teach at the Rutgers Law Newark campus.

At Rutgers, she co-founded the Women’s Rights Law Reporter. While she was there, she learned that she wasn’t earning the same wage as one of her male counterparts. The dean attributed this pay disparity to the fact that the male professor had a family to support, while Ginsburg’s husband already had a good-paying job. This type of discrimination caused her to hide her second pregnancy.

After her son was born, Ginsburg began teaching at Columbia, becoming the university’s first tenured female professor. There, she also co-authored the first case book on discrimination law. She later went on to co-found the Women’s Rights Project of the American Civil Liberties Union in 1972.

During her work as a lawyer, Ginsburg established that equal protection under the law, as stated in the 14th Amendment, should extend to gender. She won five out of the six cases that she argued before the Supreme Court on gender discrimination. She often chose to find this prejudice in cases where males were the plaintiffs being discriminated against, as seen in the 2018 film On the Basis of Sex. 

In 1980, Jimmy Carter appointed Ginsburg as a judge in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia. She became the second woman on the Supreme Court, and the first Jewish justice since 1969 when she was appointed by Bill Clinton in 1993. During her time, she eliminated almost 200 laws that discriminated against women. 

Ginsburg also fought for the rights of immigrants, the mentally ill, and members of the LGBTQ+ community. She approved gay marriage in the case of Obergefell v. Hodges, stating that if you can’t deny a 70-year-old couple the right to marriage due to their inability to procreate, you can’t deny a gay couple of that right either.

Ginsburg supported women’s reproductive rights, fighting for the coverage of contraceptives despite anyone’s religious beliefs. At the time of Roe v. Wade, she litigated a case where a pregnant Air Force captain was told she would have to have an abortion in order to return to her job. She noted the hypocrisy present in this case— that the U.S. government was encouraging abortion – and found that it served as a clear example of why women should have the right to make their own life decisions.

Ginsburg’s passing gives Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and President Trump the ability to appoint a new justice, despite her dying wish to not be replaced until after a new president is elected. This opportunity could make the Supreme Court more right-leaning and jeopardize cases like Roe v. Wade that are at the forefront of equal rights movements. 

This comes four years after McConnell’s 11-month Republican blockade of President Obama’s nominee for the court, where he argued “that a president shouldn’t be able to seat a new justice in the final year of their term.” Obama noted this in a statement released early Saturday, where he said “A basic principle of law— and of everyday fairness— is that we apply rules with consistency, and not based on what’s convenient or advantageous in the moment.”

After the news broke Friday night of Ginsburg’s death, hundreds of people gathered outside the Supreme Court to pay tribute and create a memorial on the building’s steps. Many signs have since been left outside of the court honoring her legacy.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced Saturday morning that there will be a statue built in Ginsburg’s hometown of Brooklyn to “serve as a physical reminder of her many contributions to the America we know today…”

Trump issued a proclamation Saturday ordering flags to be flown at half-staff until sunset on the day of interment “As a mark of respect for Ruth Bader Ginsburg…”

RBG will be dearly missed by Americans on both sides of the aisle. We have lost a longtime champion of equal rights, but her legacy will never be forgotten.

Parson James Releases Single with Visual – ‘High Tide, Low Tide’

Multi-platinum selling artist Parson James has returned today with his brand new single ‘High Tide, Low Tide,’ also marking the first release since signing to his new record label 12Tone Music.

WATCH | LISTEN
‘HIGH TIDE, LOW TIDE’

“‘High Tide, Low Tide’ actually came about during the throes of quarantine. It’s clearly been an exceptionally odd year for everyone and personally it’s forced me to look inward and face things about myself in a way that I had never done before.” Parson James confesses. “As always, a hunter for silver linings, I am thankful for what I’ve learned during this time. The opening line of the song is “my empathy is killing me” & what I mean by that is that my empathy is always getting the best of me. I’m always trying to help others before ever helping myself and more often than not this does not work in my favor.” Read Parson James’ full interview and learn more about the inspiration behind the song in V Magazine HERE.

Listen to ‘High Tide, Low Tide’ HERE

Watch the visual for ‘High Tide, Low Tide’ HERE

With his cathedral-size vocal range, confessional lyricism, sharp sense of soul, and pop ambition, South Carolina-born and Los Angeles-based platinum-certified singer and songwriter Parson James transmutes trials and tribulations into inspiration.

Now, with a new label deal and single out titled “High Tide, Low Tide,” Parson James is ready to wear his heart on his sleeve yet again, as he embarks on this next chapter. His rhythmically soulful way of storytelling permeates throughout his new music, setting the stage for Parson James to return with a style that is finally his own.

“It’s a focus on me, now. I’m at this point in my life, where I’m back at a place of total belief in myself,” he says. “I’m stoked to be able to have creative control, clarity and freedom to continue telling my story.”

Parson’s personal journey could be worthy of a novel or screenplay in and of itself. As an openly gay, bi-racial son of the South, who experienced a rocky childhood marked by racism, religion-based homophobia, addiction, and domestic abuse, James has frequently found himself drawn to trying to make sense of his past and how it has shaped his identity. Born to an African American father and Caucasian teen mom in poverty, the music of Otis Redding, Bill Withers, Johnny Cash, and Elvis Presley became something of a refuge throughout his childhood.

Following a whirlwind few years starting in 2015 when Parson James catapulted to the top of the charts and gained instant global fame having penned and sang on Kygo’s major hit “Stole The Show,” he simultaneously inked a major label deal, began releasing his own critically acclaimed solo music, landing on the cover of magazine’s and touring all over the world. “Stole The Show” went on to earn RIAA multi-platinum certification in North America and multi-platinum in 15 other countries, clocking more than a billion combined global streams.

Also, a staunch and outspoken advocate, he capitalized on the opportunity to give back within the LGBTQ+ community and became a board member for the LOVELOUD Foundation, and has been a regular contributor to organizations such as GLAAD, The Trevor Project and AmFAR.

Now, Parson James is back, with more experience, a new perspective and the best music he’s written to date.

INSTAGRAM | TWITTER | FACEBOOK

Chaz Cardigan

Chaz Cardigan – Middle of the Road

Watch “Middle Of The Road” Video HERE

Chaz Cardigan’s trip down memory lane unfolds like a futuristic fairy tale in the official video for his new single, “Middle of the Road.” View HERE. It’s the second in a surrealistic quadrilogy of videos produced by Haoyan of America (Crumb, Cautious Clay) that are based on a 3D model of Chaz. Created using photogrammetry in a virtual environment, the 3D figure was brought to life in the first video, “Everything’s Wrong,” and now continues on his journey in “Middle of the Road.”

The new video underscores the song’s theme of how choices made in the past set one’s future in motion. Chaz has made some bold choices in his life – including the decision to move from his hometown of Elizabethtown, KY to Nashville when he was only 17. He explains, “‘Middle of the Road’ came from ruminating on what my life would’ve been like if I’d stayed in my hometown. I realized I would’ve been miserable, stuck in a cycle of debt and probably addicted to something, pretending to be someone I’m not for the rest of my life.”

“The dance worthy, infectious, and fun track [‘Middle of the Road’] is the perfect anthem to blast, windows down, as we ride out the rest of the summer,” said Play Too Much. Q Review observed, “Chaz keeps delivering thoughtful music of strong perspective, sincere reflection and authentic honesty wrapped in sonic kick ass and punch.” RIFF Magazinecalls the track an “instant earworm” showcasing Chaz’s “artistic diversity and maturity.”

In its premiere of “Everything’s Wrong,” Flaunt said, “‘[the song] speaks volumes to the current state of the world. The message: a bad day is never the end of the story.” Billboard noted, “‘Everything’s Wrong’ is Cardigan’s musical declaration that things are messy, and he’s perfectly happy with that.” The track appeared on numerous playlists, including Spotify’s New Music Friday and Ones To Watch #NowWatching Weekly.

With the arrival of his acclaimed EP Vulnerabilia in early 2020, Chaz proved his talent for turning his deepest insecurities into wildly cathartic pop songs. Featuring the smash single “Not OK!” – a top 20 hit at Alternative radio – Vulnerabilia found Chaz opening up about his panic disorder while also building a high-energy but beautifully nuanced sound. His follow-up single, “S.O.S.,” was recently named as one of “The 25 Best Songs By LGBTQ Artists In 2020 (So Far)” by Billboard.

A classically trained pianist who taught himself to play guitar, bass, and drums, he got his start gigging in punk bands at the age of 11, covered classic songs in Louisville bars during his high-school years, and later produced in a Nashville hip-hop collective. After releasing his debut album, IChaz put out a series of singles that all ended up on Spotify’s New Music Friday playlist – a triumph that soon earned him the distinction of becoming the first artist jointly signed to Capitol Records and Loud Robot, which is the record label from J.J. Abrams’ production company, Bad Robot.

Octavia Spencer illustration done by Mina Tocalini of 360 MAGAZINE.

Octavia Spencer × Ruderman Family Foundation

Academy Award-winning actress Octavia Spencer today joined the Ruderman Family Foundation in calling on the entertainment industry to increase the casting of people with disabilities, including in on-screen roles that portray characters with disabilities.

“Casting able-bodied actors in roles for characters with disabilities is offensive, unjust, and deprives an entire community of people from opportunities,” Octavia Spencer says in a new public service announcement with the Ruderman Family Foundation

Appearing in a newly released public service announcement, Spencer recounts Hollywood’s long history of inauthentic representation and exclusion of marginalized populations — from men playing women until 1660; to white actors playing Black, Asian, and Native American characters; to LGBTQ stories getting left out of film and television until the last two decades.

“All of these communities of people had to endure not only their stories being told inauthentically, but also seeing themselves portrayed inauthentically,” says Spencer in a message filmed for the Ruderman Family Foundation. “But nothing can replace lived experience and authentic representation. That’s why it’s imperative that we cast the appropriate actor for the appropriate role, and that means people with disabilities as well. Casting able-bodied actors in roles for characters with disabilities is offensive, unjust, and deprives an entire community of people from opportunities.”

She continues, “I am joining with the Ruderman Family Foundation to call on the entertainment industry to increase casting of people with disabilities. There is no reason that we should continue to repeat the same mistakes of the past. Together, we should and can do better.”

Spencer’s call amplifies the Foundation’s series of initiatives to foster greater inclusion in the entertainment industry.

Last December, the organization circulated an open letter calling on studio, production, and network executives to pledge to create more opportunities for people with disabilities, and to make more inclusive casting decisions. Among those who signed the pledge were Oscar winners George Clooney and Joaquin Phoenix, Oscar nominees Ed Norton, Bryan Cranston and Mark Ruffalo, Golden Globe winner Glenn Close, Oscar-winning director Peter Farrelly, accomplished actress Eva Longoria, and acclaimed filmmaker Bobby Farrelly.

A separate Foundation-initiated pledge to commit to auditioning more actors with disabilities was signed by CBS, while the BBC pledged to implement more authentic and distinctive representation of people with disabilities on screen. The Foundation also released a white paper showing that half of U.S. households want accurate portrayals of characters with disabilities, and despite that only 22% of characters with disabilities are authentically portrayed on television.

“As an Oscar-winning actor, Octavia Spencer embodies Hollywood’s vast potential to serve as a powerful catalyst for positive social change if studio, production, and network executives commit to more inclusive and authentic representation,” said Jay Ruderman, President of the Ruderman Family Foundation. “We are gratified that Ms. Spencer has joined our call and we look forward to have other actors and actresses, filmmakers, producers and studios continue to create unprecedented momentum that brings about greater casting of people with disabilities.”

To view Octavia Spencer’s video message in full, please see here.

Follow Octavia Spencer: Instagram | Twitter

Follow Ruderman Family Foundation: Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

Camera illustration by Allison Christensen

The Untitled Space’s Online Exhibitions

The Untitled Space is pleased to present “Lola Jiblazee: True World Story,” an online solo exhibition premiering on Tuesday July 21st. Lola Jiblazee is a New York based artist from Tbilisi, Georgia who primarily works with acrylic paint and digital forms. Influenced in her formative years by strong female role models during Georgia’s Civil War, Lola developed a passion to echo the empowerment of women. Lola Jiblazee’s latest series “True World Story” explores hope, love, and courage during the COVID-19 pandemic. Isolated during the lockdown, Lola turned to social media and asked her followers to share their positive quarantine stories. Those stories inspired her latest series, with each painting including the personal story of her subjects.

Jiblazee grew up in the Republic of Georgia in the nineties during their Civil War. She had been under curfew and isolated, went without water and electricity, and was separated from loved ones for months. She struggled to overcome the PTSD that ensued but the experiences also made her stronger. Through her artwork, she attempts to convey how others can find joy in simple things which can help overcome tough times and remind people how beautiful life can be.

In addition, the Untitled Space continues to present “Tom Smith: STRIP” the first in a series of online summer solo exhibitions. In celebration of LGTBQ Pride Month, “Tom Smith: STRIP” premiered his fantasy installations on Tuesday June 30th, 2020

Indira Cesarine Studio and The Untitled Space showcase “The Labyrinth,” an installation and exhibition of works featuring photography, video, painting, and sculpture, as well as a series of performances inspired by the artwork. The exhibition opened with an artist reception on March 12th, 2020 featuring a special performance by renowned modern dancer Katherine Crockett. Due to the pandemic, the exhibition closed on March 13th, and the updated exhibition dates are June 24 – August 28, 2020 by appointment according to CDC guidelines.

There is also select artwork from Sarupa Sidaarth, Anna Sampson, and Chistina Massey on virtual display at The Untitled Space. Be sure to explore their digital galleries and look forward to socially distant viewings in person.

Katy Perry Smile illustrated by Mina Tocalini for 360 MAGAZINE.

Katy Perry – Smile

Katy Perry unveiled “Smile,” the title track of her new album, which will be released by Capitol Records on August 14. The infectious, life-affirming song is brimming with gratitude and suggests that setbacks often turn out to be blessings in disguise.“I wrote this song when I was coming through one of the darkest periods of my life,” says Katy. “When I listen to it now, it’s a great reminder that I made it through. It’s three minutes of energizing hopefulness.”  

Earlier today, Katy revealed the album cover along with exclusive Smile-themed merchandise bundles. Fans who pre-order HERE the album will instantly receive “Smile” plus “Daisies,” the Gold-certified “Never Really Over” and “Harleys In Hawaii.” Since its release in May, “Daisies” has amassed more than 125 million combined global streams. It is now top 10 at Hot AC radio. Last week, Katy shared an acoustic version of the song. 

While in quarantine, she’s won acclaim for the wide variety of performances she has given of “Daisies” – including the “American Idol” season finale, the launch of the 2020 “Good Morning America” Concert Series and the “Can’t Cancel Pride: Helping LGBTQ+ People in Need” livestream. Katy also co-headlined the recent Democracy Summer 2020 livestream. The event kicked off a campaign to register 200,000 new voters this summer, led by a coalition that includes Rock the Vote, Voto Latino Foundation, When We All Vote, March For Our Lives and others. 

Since Katy Perry’s Capitol Records debut in 2008 with One of the Boys, she has racked up a cumulative 40 billion streams alongside worldwide sales of over 45 million adjusted albums and 135 million tracks with her albums One of the Boys, Teenage Dream, PRISM and Witness, and her latest singles – Gold-certified “Never Really Over,” “Never Worn White,” “Small Talk” and “Harleys In Hawaii.” 

Views of her 2013 video “Roar” recently surpassed three billion – making Katy the first female artist to reach this milestone. Katy was also the first female artist to have four videos surpass a billion views each. Her videos for “Firework” and “Last Friday Night” have over one billion views, while “Dark Horse” has surpassed the 2.7 billion mark. Katy’s 2015 Super Bowl performance is the highest-rated in the event’s history. 

She is one of only five artists in history to have topped 100 million certified units with their digital singles – and the first-ever Capitol Records recording artist to join the elite RIAA 100 Million Certified Songs club. Aside from being one of the best-selling musical artists of all time, Katy is an active advocate of many philanthropic causes. 

In 2013, Katy was appointed a UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador as a result of her commitment to improving the lives of children worldwide. From traveling to Vietnam and Madagascar to highlight the needs of some of the world’s most vulnerable children, to empowering girls and supporting adolescents living with HIV/AIDS, as well as raising awareness for UNICEF’s emergency relief efforts, Katy has used her powerful voice to advocate for children and support UNICEF’s mission to ensure every child’s right to health, education, equality, and protection. She was awarded with the Audrey Hepburn Humanitarian Award in 2016. 

Follow Katy Perry: Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | YouTube

Jane Velez-Mitchell illustration by Mina Tocalini

Meat Causes Cancer

The American Cancer Society’s (ACS) new guidelines for cancer reduction were revealed recently and it’s no surprise that they recommend avoiding or reducing meat intake. The ACS is advising the public to consume far less processed and read meats while shifting to more plant-based whole foods. In the guidelines they do advise consuming nutrient-rich, high in fiber foods like vegetables, whole grains, beans, fruits, and peas. “Eat the rainbow” as we’ve all heard for years. 

These new guidelines follow in line with the World Health Organization (WHO) stance released in 2015 where they famously classified red meats as a Group 2A carcinogen that was “probably carcinogenic to humans”. They referenced studies that lined consistent consumption of red meat to colorectal cancer.   

New Day New Chef: Support and Feed Edition focuses on the organization’s work supplying food to children’s charities, homeless and domestic abuse shelters, food banks, family and senior centers by supporting vegan restaurants in Los Angeles, New York, and Philadelphia. Filmed largely with robotic cameras during the COVID-19 outbreak, the show follows Maggie Baird, (actress, screenwriter, vegan, and mother of musicians Billie Eilish and Finneas, who are also vegan) on her journey to create Support and Feed. Two episodes are now available to stream on Prime Video, with more released weekly. 

Animal Rights Activist & Host of “New Day New Chef: Support and Feed” Jane Velez-Mitchell is the founder and editor of JaneUnChained.com, a multi-platform social media news channel producing thousands of widely shared videos on animal rights and veganism. Jane is the winner of four Genesis Awards from the Humane Society of the United States. For six years she hosted her own show on HLN (CNN Headline News) where she did a weekly animal segment. Velez-Mitchell also reported for the TV show Celebrity Justice, and was a news anchor/reporter at KCAL-TV in LA and WCBS-TV in NY. Jane is active in the LGBTQ community in Los Angeles. Two episodes are now available to stream on Prime Video, with more released weekly. 

Follow New Day New Chef Support and Feed: Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

Tom Smith, 360 Magazine

Tom Smith × The Untitled Space

The Untitled Space is pleased to present “Tom Smith: STRIP” as the first in a series of online summer exhibitions. In celebration of LGTBQ Pride Month, “Tom Smith: STRIP” premieres today, June 30th, and will be on view through September 30th, 2020. In addition to viewing Smith’s fascinating works, your visit helps support LGBTQ+ organizations. In particular, 20% of proceeds from sales of this exhibition will be donated to the Marsha P. Johnson Institute which organizes and funds programs supporting the black transgender community.

New York-based artist Tom Smith is firmly rooted in a generation of queer artists bridging our digital world with the tradition of painting. Smith spent the past 3 months quarantining in his studio where he created a series of 36 “strip paintings.” These meticulously hand-crafted pieces are made through a process of painting two works on paper in opposing colors. The paintings are then sliced into tiny strips and alternately glued to a panel. The end result? Each painting appears to be in motion or vibrating.

When asked about the suggestive imagery in the paintings, Smith comments, “In 2008 I made 36 fast drawings to unearth subconscious images. I immediately saw an unlimited supply of pictures connected to my sexuality without censorship. At the time I was openly gay but not yet comfortable showing pictures so apparently queer. At the beginning of the lockdown in New York I found the drawings and realized this was the perfect time to finish them as paintings because I had the time as well as privacy. Now that they’re finished I realize these things don’t just represent my own sexual impulses but that others see and interpret differently depending on their own imaginations.”

About Tom Smith:

Based in New York City, Tom Smith received a BFA from MICA, Baltimore, MD in 2006 and a MFA from the School of Visual Arts, NY in 2008. His work has been exhibited in Australia, Brazil, China, France, Ireland and Taiwan and he has participated as artist in residence at Largo das Artes in Rio de Janeiro as well as the Atlantic Center for the Arts in New Smyrna, Florida. Smith is also the co-creator of DragOn, a drag and costume ball that has raised over $100,000 for HIV/AIDS related organizations in NYC. His work has been featured in publications around the world such as The New York Times, The Creators Project (VICE), Elle and Marie Claire (Taiwan) and The Sydney Morning Herald.

Detail of “Duct” by Artist Tom Smith, The Untitled Space Gallery, New York
Detail of “Quake” by Artist Tom Smith, The Untitled Space Gallery, New York