Posts tagged with "Human Resources"

Eight Steps to Improving Diversity and Inclusion in Your Company

Do you still consider “diversity” or “inclusion” to be buzzwords? In that case, it’s time to recognize the importance of embracing these values for your business and the consequences of failing to do so. It runs far beyond getting in trouble with the law. Fully 82% of consumers surveyed in a recent Harris Poll indicated that they prefer to buy from companies that mirror what matters to them – and they’re willing to pay more for the privilege.

Furthermore, research suggests that the most diverse teams produce more in terms of profit. They also create a less hostile, more accepting work environment, which is critical in today’s world of labor shortages and supply chain issues. The best staff members want to clock in where they feel appreciated and welcomed, and teams that fail to adapt could see star talent depart for kinder shores.

What can you do if you haven’t yet addressed ways to ensure people from all walks of life, including various ethnic backgrounds, sexual and gender orientations, and ability levels, find your team welcoming and inviting? Here are eight steps to improving diversity and inclusion in your company.

1. Include It in Your Growth Plan

Please schedule a time to complete this important task if you haven’t yet created a corporate growth plan. What is it? This document sets out your goals and targets, listing the specific strategies you plan to use to achieve them. Best of all, it starts by considering the current state of your business, evaluating your strengths and weaknesses and your opportunities for improvement.

For example, some firms prefer to take time and care with each new hire instead of outsourcing particular tasks to remote call centers or partnering with independent contractors who may not keep the team’s mission foremost in their minds. They could be worrying about how to pay their bills or juggle this client with multiple others, resulting in falling short of fully embracing the corporate mission.

Of course, this approach might not work for every business. Some creative enterprises, for example, might do better with independent freelancers who work alternative schedules and need customized environments to do their best. That’s why the growth plan is so vital – you evaluate your business’s unique needs and decide how to best meet your diversity and inclusion goals in conjunction with them.

2. Regularly Solicit Input and Feedback From Staff

Social media abounds with tales of people complaining about their workplaces. With all the bellyaching, it can seem like no one is ever satisfied. However, a shift in perspective could help business owners recognize the obvious: Staff members concerned about their paychecks aren’t likely to raise concerns in the office unless they feel secure enough in their position that giving feedback won’t lead to a pink slip. Many organizations lack such a supportive atmosphere.

How can you coax reluctant employees to give honest and genuine feedback on how you could improve diversity and inclusion in your company? One method is to send out regular and anonymous surveys using an online site such as SurveyMonkey to protect identities. Include open-ended questions with plenty of room to write meaningful comments along with true-or-false and multiple-choice queries.

3. Offer Flextime and Telecommuting Arrangements

Each human being is only one person. You might have felt this crunch as a business owner if you ever had to attend two of your children’s events on the same day out-of-town clients come in for a face-to-face meeting. You can only do so much and be in one place at a time.

Flextime and telecommuting arrangements allow staff members the same flexibility you have to take off for a few hours in the afternoon to attend a recital, returning to work in the evening after the children have gone to bed. However, these programs are inclusive to more than the parents on your roster.

Such arrangements are often invaluable to workers with disabilities. Many need to attend multiple specialist appointments and most doctors don’t offer evening or Saturday hours. Many specialists may only have one or two days of availability per week, and a flexible schedule enables staff members to attend appointments while making up work later or doing it in advance. Telecommuting benefits those who can’t drive but otherwise have no problem handling their workload.

4. Be Transparent About Salaries and Progression

Here’s the pesky thing about U.S. employment law: At-will employment laws often conflict with protective measures on the books. For example, according to the National Labor Relations Act, it’s legal for workers to discuss their wages with each other. However, states with at-will employment laws allow either employer or employee to terminate their relationship at any time for any reason – meaning many still fear that speaking up will cost them their job.

However, you can circumvent controversy by creating a clear salary progression path. There are several methods to do so:

  • Years of service: This method is the simplest. For each subsequent year of employment, workers receive a specified percentage raise.
  • Years of experience: This method evaluates how many total years of experience each staff member brings to their role.
  • Educational attainment: Some companies pay higher compensation packages to those who complete advanced degrees.
  • Merit-based: Workers who perform tasks at certain speeds, amass a required number of clients, or hit other milestones earn a raise.

Many businesses use a mixed approach. For example, many school districts base their salary schedule on a combination of total years of experience and educational attainment levels. Whatever you choose, broadcast your schedule in your employee handbook, discuss it during orientation and ongoing training, and refer to it when performing annual evaluations.

5. Provide a Meaningful Benefits Package

The U.S. lags behind the rest of the world regarding health care coverage and other employee benefits that folks in Europe and much of Asia take for granted. For example, many countries mandate a specified number of paid and parental leave days. Overseas employers have fewer expenses regarding benefits packages because health coverage is paid for through tax revenue instead of corporations.

However, you must follow the rules of the country where you conduct commerce. That means you don’t have to extend a single day of vacation time, sick leave, maternity leave, or paternity leave. While the Affordable Care Act mandates that companies with 50 or more employees offer health coverage to at least 95% of their full-time staff or face a penalty, it gives them considerable leeway in picking plans.

However, please note that adequate benefits packages are among the best ways to retain top talent. A parent of a child with a health condition will jump ship, even with a competitive salary, if they can get better coverage elsewhere.

Furthermore, a lack of adequate downtime in the form of paid leave destroys productivity and encourages behaviors like “quiet quitting.” Multiple studies confirm that people work better when given a break – but they must realistically be able to afford to take one.

6. Create a Supportive Mentorship Program

Mentorship programs can go far in promoting diversity and inclusion. They introduce new staff members to the rest of the team when they may otherwise flounder when trying to fit into your organization. Many people feel more secure talking to a colleague than an HR representative. 

Your mentorship program can be as structured or loose as you like:

  • Highly structured: In this arrangement, you assign each new staff member to an experienced colleague upon completing their intake paperwork.
  • Medium structured: Such arrangements provide new staff members with a list of qualified colleagues to serve as mentors, letting them choose within a specified time, such as the end of their first two weeks.
  • Loosely structured: This arrangement requires the least participation from the employer. New staff members may choose any mentor they like at any time.

7. Conduct Routine Diversity and Inclusion Training

Under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, companies must conduct diversity training that addresses sex bias. Many go beyond this by including all aspects of diversity and inclusion in their training. Why not follow suit?

Such training can help smooth interoffice relationships and prevent a few toxic individuals from creating a hostile work environment. All staff should know the penalties for discriminatory behavior – it deserves a prominent spot in your employee handbook.

8. Hold Team Leaders Accountable

All the diversity training in the world isn’t worth much if your team leaders don’t embrace it. They should enforce the rules equally across the board, immediately taking action to stop discriminatory behavior.

Include the responsibilities of team leaders when it comes to diversity and inclusion in your employee handbook. Implement an anonymous reporting system that any employee can use to share instances of discrimination so you can hold leaders accountable for enforcing the rules.

UFW PAYS FARM WORKERS $600

UFW Foundation to Distribute One-Time $600 Payment to Farm Workers for Pandemic Relief 

Applications are not available at this time; details on how to apply through UFW Foundation will be forthcoming

The United States Department of Agriculture today announced that the UFW Foundation has been selected as a grantee for the Farm and Food Worker Relief (FFWR) Grant Program to provide a one-time $600 payment to agriculture workers affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. The UFW Foundation will have seven subrecipient organizations that will also be providing critical outreach and application support to workers.

The program was designed to provide relief to farm workers, meatpacking workers and front-line grocery workers for expenses incurred due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Details of eligibility criteria to qualify for the $600 one-time payment will be forthcoming. The application period start date is yet to be determined.

Relief payments will be available to eligible frontline workers in farming activities, meatpacking, and grocery store work during the period extending from January 27, 2020 until the emergency period has been declared over. Eligibility requirements include identity and employment verification, and immigration status is not a factor. There is no cost to apply for the Farm and Food Workers Relief (FFWR). Only organizations awarded the grant by the USDA may process Farm and Food Workers Relief (FFWR) applications. Potential applicants are reminded to not provide personal documents or any form of identification to unapproved organizations. The organizations listed on the USDA website are the only entities selected to provide these funds.

The UFW Foundation worked tirelessly to advance legislation that would empower USDA to support farm workers throughout the pandemic. COVID-19 Congress relief packages failed to provide pandemic assistance to millions of undocumented persons, many of whom pay taxes through Individual Taxpayer Identification Numbers and continued laboring during the pandemic, including farm workers. That is why UFW Foundation has been advocating for farm worker pandemic relief—making it known that even though farm workers are essential workers, they haven’t been treated as such. Additionally, unlike other workers, farm workers federally do not qualify for overtime pay, typically receive low wages, and experience poor working conditions. 

Below is the list of the UFW Foundation’s subrecipients for the USDA FFWR Program:

CIERTO

Michigan Advocacy Program (MAP)

Bienestar Oregon

Pineros y Campesinos Unidos del Noroeste (PCUN)

United Farm Workers (UFW)

Farmworker Association of Florida

North Carolina Focus on Increasing Education Leadership and Dignity (NC FIELD)

“The COVID-19 pandemic left our most essential workers to fend for themselves with no federal aid, low pay, dangerous working conditions, and little to no economic safety nets,” said UFW Foundation Executive Director Diana Tellefson Torres. “And yet, farm workers continued risking their lives for all of us to have food on our tables. We applaud the Biden-Harris Administration, Secretary Vilsack and USDA for recognizing the vital role of farm workers in the nation’s food security and economy through this program. Pandemic relief payments will make a significant impact in the day to day lives of farm workers affected by the pandemic. We have a lot of work ahead of us to ensure this much-needed pandemic relief reaches the hands of farm workers across the nation.”

Employee and employer strife HR guide via 360 MAGAZINE

How to Deal with Difficult Employers: A Guide

When you enter the workforce, the odds are that you will often come across people whom you don’t get along with. Sometimes, they will annoy you. Other times, you won’t agree with their opinions. And sometimes, you simply won’t like them.

This is a part of life. However, it does get a lot harder when you don’t get along with a difficult employer. If this is something you’re struggling with, you’ve come to the right place. Keep reading to learn about four ways that you can deal with a difficult employer.

Take legal action

Sometimes, an employer may go too far. Instead of simply being difficult to get along with, they may do things that are illegal, such as harassing you or discriminating against you.

Employers cannot discriminate based on race, so if this is something that your employer is doing, you may have grounds for a lawsuit. Taking legal action can be intimidating, but it’s often the only way of ensuring that your employer stops their harmful behavior. 

If you do decide to take legal action, you should consider getting a lawyer to help you.

Communicate

You’ve probably heard time and time again how important communication in the workplace is. While you may be sick of hearing it, it is true.

If you have an issue with your employer, you should consider communicating this issue to them. Of course, the way you do this is very important since you won’t want them to feel attacked. It may be the case that your employer isn’t even aware of what they are doing. 

You may feel like you have no idea where to start, so following these tips for workplace communication may help you.

Consider finding another job

If you simply don’t get along with your employer, you could always consider getting another job. This doesn’t have to be as drastic as it sounds – you can always ask to stay with the company, but just work in another division or on another team.

Or, if you wanted to, you could try to find another job entirely. It may seem extreme to quit your job just because you have a difficult employer, but if it’s affecting you a lot, it may be worth it. Of course, this is a serious decision, so you should think it through. If you need some tips for an effective job search, click here.

Try to ignore it

Finally, you could always just accept that you have a difficult employer, and do your best to not let it affect you too much by simply doing your best to ignore it. 

After all, you should only have to deal with them at work, so if you can find a way to cope with them for a few hours each day, it shouldn’t have a big impact on you. This is only true if you separate your work life from your personal life, however. It’s important to keep your personal life out of the office and vice versa if you want to live a balanced life.

Vaughn Lowery President of 360 MAGAZINE

VAUGHN LOWERY


Vaughn Lowery, the president of 360 MAGAZINE, has always strived for positive social change. He graduated from Cornell University‘s ILR School. From there, he became active in modeling, acting and publishing.

A decade or more, Vaughn Lowery became notable when he appeared in Kmart’s smash commercial – Joe Boxer. It helped the retailer roughly sell 20 million dollars per week. By becoming an exclusive spokesperson, he appeared with Leeza Gibbons on Extra, Katie Couric on Today Show, and Jay Leno on The Tonight Show.

At the culmination of college, he relocated to New York City; and thus, Vaughn began a career as an actor and model. It was there where celebrity makeup artist Sam Fine set him up with a fashion photographer, Fadil Berisha. Above Joe Boxer, he worked as a successful print model for many companies such as GAP, Old Navy, as well as a runway model for Tommy Hilfiger, Phat Farm, and Karl Kani. He has graced the pages of Elle, Cosmopolitan and Glamour. Additionally, he flipped the Houston Chronicle.

Years back, ABC News Primetime aired a segment chronicling his life, along with the tragic John Ritter story. Vaughn has also filmed a Super Bowl commercial, completed a high-profile Dasani Water billboard ad campaign, appeared on America’s Next Top Model, guest-starred on the comedy, Scrubs, and screened his controversial 35mm festival film, The Young & Evil, at Sundance 2009. Having been represented by major industry players such as NEXT, he was also named Seventeen Magazine’s 17 Hot Guys. His hindmost project The Company We Keep boasts director Roy Campanella II along with comedic co-star Leslie Jones. At present, Vaughn wrote a short, Chasen Life, which won a writing competition. He adapted audiobook Say Uncle into a feature-length film, pitched a reality series and is in the process of architecting an immersive design experience.

Due to his turbulent upbringing in Detroit, Vaughn has kept his personal promise to be a contributing citizen to those in need. He has lent his name and support to: Women At Risk, Human Rights Commission, March of Dimes, Heart of Los Angeles Youth, Awakening Young Minds and schools across the nation where he encourages adolescents to step into their power.

As of late, Lowery has produced 360 MAG, a podcast on Audible, Apple and Spotify as well as an NFT Animal Series on OpenSea.

Futher, 360 MAGAZINE was named Business of the Month by the National Gay & Lesbian Chamber of Commerce [NGLCC]. The NGLCC is the business voice of the LGBT community, the largest advocacy organization dedicated to expanding economic opportunities and advancements for LGBT people, and the exclusive certifying body for LGBT-owned businesses. It possesses deep affiliations with FORTUNE 100 Fastest Growing Companies.

Lastly, hard cover and auditory interpretations of Vaughn’s memoir, Move Like Water × Be Fluid, are available on Amazon, Barnes & Noble and Walmart.


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Vaughn Lowery in classic fedora for 360 MAGAZINE
Vaughn Lowery tests and reviews NÜR San Francisco for 360 MAGAZINE, wearing eyewear by Valentino and shirt by Allsaints.
Vaughn speaks on the NFT-VIP ‘press panel’ on Sun., June 19 at 2:30pm EST Margaritaville Times Square Resort NYC.

In his spare time, he designs e-bike bras and reconfigures their silhouettes.



MIXED MEDIA ARTIST



PORTFOLIO



US Businesses Allowing Remote Working

The rise of cloud computing and teleconferencing represent both the biggest opportunity for growth as well as the most significant organizational challenge to companies around the world, according to new research from Condeco’s new research paper, The Modern Workplace 2019: People, places & technology, involving 750 corporate leaders. The full report can be downloaded here. Among the countries in the survey, remote working is particularly prevalent in Australia (45 per cent) with the US tied for being the country with the second most amount of companies allowing remote work (43 percent) and least widespread is Germany (35 per cent). However, US businesses were least likely to offer flextime (49 percent), while those in Singapore were most likely (66 percent). In addition, 43 percent of US business forecast that they will allow more remote working in the next year while only 9 percent have indicated that they will offer less remote working, a clear indicator that remote working is a major trend in America. 54 percent of US companies have said that they offer remote working to increase employee retention, which showcases employees increasing demands to work from home.

While recognizing digital transformation as crucial to their future success, 60 percent of those who participated express concern over the speed with which new technologies are reshaping their businesses. They are increasingly preoccupied with issues related to cloud computing, the internet of things, and big data.These technology challenges are contributing significantly to the changing nature of the corporate environment, the report finds. Cloud computing in particular has made it possible for increasing numbers of employees to work remotely and flexibly meaning that the central company workspace is rapidly becoming an administrative hub, rather than a traditional central focus where everyone gathers during set hours. The demands of regulation and compliance are also adding to the burden felt by businesses as they face the future. Condeco’s report is based on an in-depth survey of business leaders in six countries, including the United States, backed by qualitative interviews. Respondents overall say the biggest challenges facing their organizations in the next 12 months are digital transformation (37 percent) and the adoption of new technology (35 percent).

Across all countries surveyed, access to talent supply (26 per cent) and regulation and compliance (24 per cent) are considered greater organizational challenges than business uncertainty (22 per cent). Welcome to the flexible working revolution. Almost half of global businesses surveyed (41 percent) say they already offer some degree of remote working, while three-fifths (60 percent) provide flextime opportunities, allowing employees to choose when to start and end their workday. “The research clearly shows that businesses are in the process of transforming their workplaces digitally, which enables them to transform the way that they are used physically,” said Paul Statham, CEO of Condeco.”Today’s technology allows for space to be used more flexibly and for employees to work remotely. This benefits businesses by maximizing office space, reducing costs and by keeping employees engaged and productive.”

The end of meeting-room culture? When employees do go into the office, it is most often for meetings with colleagues and customers. Yet the researchers discovered that finding, booking and using meeting rooms is a consistent point of organizational tension, even as more people are working remotely. Fewer than a quarter of those surveyed (23 percent) say that their employees have access to meeting rooms whenever they need them; however, the US leads the world with 31 percent, compared to just 9 percent in Singapore. Only a third of respondents (31 percent) currently use specialist meeting-room scheduling software to help make efficient use of their available space. Some of those surveyed believed that there was an opportunity to use artificial intelligence to book and use meeting rooms more effectively.

“AI can release individuals from routine, repetitive tasks at work and free them up for more value-adding and enriching activities. That’s why it is likely to play an important role in meeting room booking software,” said Peter Otto, Chief Product Officer at Condeco. Businesses are only just beginning to realize the extent to which the need for co-workers to meet in person is a thing of the past, as new conferencing systems enable teams to maintain real-time collaboration and conversation across vast distances and multiple time zones.“Ultimately new technology will enable businesses to allocate their resources and time more effectively,” said Otto.“There is also a role it can play in gathering data, but companies need to be aware of the ethical and privacy aspects of using it in this way and be prepared to be fully transparent in communicating what they are doing to their employees.”

US leaders prepare for the future While a fifth of business leaders worldwide (22 per cent) said that uncertainty was a concern for them, less than one fifth of American business leaders (16 percent) echoed this. The most-common concern for US respondents is technology adoption (45 percent) and talent supply (30 percent), suggesting that businesses are expecting these to be major issues over the next year. Only 11 percent of US business cited access to capital as their top organizational concern.

Top 8 HR software for small business leaders

Despite tighter budgets and limited IT resources, small businesses still need to centralize workflows and be efficient, just like enterprise companies. This is especially true for HR departments. In this ebook, we’ll take a look at some of the best HR software for small business modern, cloud-based systems with industry-leading functionality at an affordable price point.

This ebook covers:

  • Small business HR pain points
  • Key HR software features
  • 8 top HR solutions for small business

Download it here

How To Operate A Successful Medical Facility

Running a medical facility is incredibly important and noble work, and it can feel fantastic to make a difference to and save people’s lives every single day. On top of this, this will always be an industry that is in demand, which means it can be secure and lucrative work too. Running a successful medical facility is certainly not an easy task. You need to run the facility like a business while also providing the best possible care for your patients, which can be a tricky tightrope to walk. Below are a few points for running a successful medical facility.

1. Create A Strong Brand

Branding is the best way to differentiate yourself from the competition and show people your practice. In addition to the company logo, slogan, color scheme, and other branding factors, this will also involve how you welcome people through the door, how phones are answered and the general atmosphere that you want to create inside.

2. Recruit Carefully

In order to succeed in this industry, you need to provide an excellent level of care, which will mean having highly skilled employees at every level of the organization. In addition to attracting top talent, you will also need to look after your staff and keep them happy and motivated. It can be challenging in this industry because it is highly demanding, stressful and time-consuming work.

3. Purchase The Best Equipment

In addition to staff, being able to provide the best level of care will also involve having the latest and best medical equipment. Medical device engineering firms like DeviceLab provide prototypes of medical equipment which can help you to find the best products for your particular facility and stay ahead of the curve. In addition to medical equipment, utilizing the right software will help you to streamline the operation, reduce the workload of your staff and cut down on errors.

4. Invest In Marketing

As with any type of online business, online marketing is hugely important, along with having a high-quality website and being active on social media channels. It can increase brand awareness and allow you to directly communicate with the world and show why they should choose your facility over the competition. In addition to online marketing, you should also be looking at offline marketing as you will mainly be targeting people in the local area. This will involve traditional marketing such as adverts in the local paper but also by getting involved with the local community, holding local events and anything to get the face of the company out there.

Running a successful medical facility is a unique challenge as it is not like any other type of business. The key to success is providing the best level of care for your patients so that you can develop a good track record and show why people should choose your company over the competition. You can do this with the above tips, and when you start to find success, you will also find that this is incredibly rewarding work too.

Starbucks Anti-bias Training

Today, May 29th, Starbucks will be closing around 8,000 stores to train their employees on anti-bias after an incident in Philadelphia. The training will last for around two to three hours causing a loss in profit up to around $12 million dollars. For more information visit USA Today at: http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/business/2018/05/29/starbucks-closure-racial-bias-training-tuesday/650316002/

Study says bosses need to stop doing THIS in 2018

Researchers Identify the Most Worst Boss Behavior

Leadership coach explains findings

Here is the most damaging boss behavior: A manager who has mood swings.

A recent study from University of Exeter found that leaders who exhibited “Jekyll and Hyde” behavior (switching between friendly and kind to volatile and critical) created the highest level of disengagement among employees.

“You might think that a boss who was sometimes friendly and magnanimous with his staff would earn some brownie points that would help ease hurt feelings when he later lost his temper,” says leadership coach Jack Skeen, who is the co-author (along with Greg Miller and Aaron Hill) of a new professional development book, The Circle Blueprint. “However, it’s just the opposite. Instead, employees begin to view their boss as unpredictable. Since they never know which boss they are going to encounter (the nice guy or the grouchy guy), they are constantly walking on eggshells and afraid to be themselves or voice their ideas.”

However, Skeen assures managers that they don’t have to be ‘one-note’ happy managers all the time, either. “Employees understand that their bosses are human and that they have bad days,” says the Fortune 500 coach, “But you can be disappointed or displeased with your staff without losing control and attacking your employees on a personal level.”

To help leaders grow into their full potential, Skeen has co-created a self-assessment tool to help leaders assess themselves in key areas, including their power, purpose, humility and independence. This assessment is available for free here, to anyone who has purchased The Circle Blueprint. “Until leaders are aware of how they are impacting the people around them, specifically their employees, they are going to continue hitting a professional plateau.”

For more on this topic or to speak with Jack Skeen, please contact me.

 

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