Posts tagged with "Vegetables"

health, Vaughn Lowery, 360 MAGAZINE

Plant-Based Diet Benefits

Plant-based eating provides a number of health benefits (and it’s good for the environment too). It’s important to ensure that with a plant-based diet, you can get the recommended amounts of all nutrients. Taking the time to plan will also make plant-based eating achievable.

James Collier, head of nutrition at Huel, the world’s best-selling complete nutrition brand, has put together some easy tips to make sure that anyone on a plant-based diet gets the protein and vitamins they need:

Eat a variety of foods, especially different colored foods as these contain different levels of nutrients. For example, the phytonutrient lycopene, which is an antioxidant that protects against cell damage and gives tomatoes its red color. Other carotenoids also act as antioxidants and give fruit and vegetables their orange and yellow colors; for example, carrots.

Vitamin B12 plays a vital role in helping the body produce red blood cells and is perceived as tricky to get enough of with a plant-based diet. The good news is it need not be. As a start, try incorporating plant-based milks that are that are fortified with B12, as well as calcium and vitamin D. Cereals, meat alternatives, and some soy products are often fortified with B12 too. Taking a B12 supplement also rids any concerns.

Ensure adequate omega-3 consumption. If oily fish is not part of your eating plan, then foods such as walnuts, soy products, and flaxseed are ways to obtain a good intake of omega-3s. Flaxseed is one of Huel’s six main ingredients and is rich in the omega-3 essential fatty acid ALA. Omega-3 fats are generally low in a Western diet and adequate omega-3 consumption is crucial to support cardiovascular health.

Keep your intake of iron up. Iron is not just found in meat food sources. Dark leafy greens, nuts and dried fruits are great sources of iron. Iron is crucial for oxygen transport, cognitive function, and the immune system. Iron from plant sources can be harder to absorb, but again, there’s no need to worry: iron absorption can also be increased by the presence of vitamin C which is found in lots of fruits and vegetables such as oranges and peppers. It’s where the idea of having orange juice with breakfast comes from – to increase the absorption of iron that is in breakfast cereals.

There are many protein-rich foods available to a plant-based diet, for example beans, lentils, soy products, hummus, nuts, and seeds. There are misconceptions about plant-based proteins in that people claim that they are inferior to meat, eggs and dairy proteins, which isn’t the case. Although the amino acid profile of a single plant-based protein source may be inferior to an animal protein, this is easy to get around simply by combining more than one source of plant protein in a meal. For example, beans and rice both contain good amounts of protein.

More information on Huel can be found at Huel.com

Raising Children to Eat Greens

Getting children to eat their greens? Both parents need to set an example

A positive example set by both the mother and the father promotes the consumption of vegetables, fruit and berries among 3–5-year-old children, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. The study explored the association of the home food environment and parental influence with the consumption of vegetables among kindergarten-aged children. The findings were published in Food Quality and Preference.

Children eat inadequate amounts of vegetables, fruit and berries across Europe and elsewhere, too. As the health and nutrition benefits of these foods are well-known, increasing their consumption among children is a challenge many countries are struggling with. Dietary habits also track from childhood to adulthood, and the period of early childhood is critical for adapting to a diet rich in greens.

The researchers studied the consumption of vegetables, fruit and berries, and the family’s home food environment, through a survey taken by parents. The study looked at 114 kindergarten-aged children and their parents (100) in Finland. Raw and cooked vegetables and fruit and berries were analysed separately.

The researchers found that to a certain degree, the consumption of vegetables is affected by different factors than the consumption of fruit and berries. Maternal example was associated with the consumption of raw and cooked vegetables as well as with the consumption of fruit and berries. Paternal example, on the other hand, was the strongest for cooked vegetables.

“This shows that teaching children to eat their greens is not something mothers should be doing alone. A positive example set by both parents is important, as is their encouragement of the child,” Researcher and Nutritionist Kaisa Kähkönen from the University of Eastern Finland says.

The study also showed that dinner is the most important meal at home when it comes to teaching children to eat vegetables. The families participating in the study often ate dinner together, highlighting the role of parental influence on the development of children’s dietary choices and preferences.

Dinner constitutes a daily opportunity to serve vegetables in a variety of different forms: as the main course, as a side dish, and as salad.

“Variation can be created by serving raw vegetables, such as the ever-popular cucumber and tomato, accompanied by cooked ones. In fact, many root vegetables, cabbages and squashes are best served cooked,”
Kähkönen says.

When it comes to eating fruit, evening snacks were the most important meal.

The study shows that many families still eat less vegetables, fruit and berries on average than would be beneficial in view of health promotion. Cooked vegetables and berries were the least eaten food items among the study population.

The Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition at the University of Eastern Finland studies how food education in early childhood can support good nutrition among children and promote the establishment of healthy dietary habits.

The newly published study was carried out in collaboration between researchers from the Universities of Eastern Finland, Jyväskylä and Turku. The study was funded by the Jenny and Antti Wihuri Fund.

How eating habits have an impact on our oral health

Will An Apple A Day – Along With Checkups – Help Keep Tooth Decay Away?

Eating may be a necessity, but when it comes to your teeth and gums, all that munching also can lead to quite a battle raging in your mouth.

Some of those foods – especially the sugary and starchy ones – act like invading forces, feeding the bacteria that cause tooth decay and gum disease, even as the saliva in your mouth fights back as best it can, trying to ward off the detrimental effects of the acids and enzymes.

“Tooth decay can be a problem for people of all ages – children, teenagers and adults  –  and yet it’s completely avoidable,” says Dr. Seth Newman (www.asktheorthos.com), an orthodontist and co-author with Dr. Steve Giannoutsos of Giving It To You Straight: Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Orthodontics But Were Afraid To Ask.

Newman and Giannoutsos say that there are plenty of ways that what’s in your diet affects not just your weight, but also your teeth and gums.

“Most people know that sugar and processed snacks can lead to tooth decay, even if they don’t always avoid those foods,” Giannoutsos says. “But there are other foods that also can be troublesome, and many people may not realize that.”

He and Newman provide a few tips for making sure your diet isn’t harmful to your oral health:

Watch out for bread – and chips. Chomp down on a candy bar and you might think to yourself that you better brush soon, lest the sugar go to work on your teeth before you can head it off. But the same thought might not occur to you when you’re eating breadsticks. Yet, foods that are high in carbohydrates and starches – such as bread, chips, pasta and crackers – contribute to the plaque acid that attacks tooth enamel.

Braces come with extra concerns. Beyond the usual dental care, there are additional dietary worries to consider when you have braces. People wearing braces should avoid foods that are too hard, sticky or chewy, Newman says, such as gum, nuts, corn chips, hard taco shells, hard candy and popcorn, just to name a few.

Develop good food-choice habits. When you’re grocery shopping, always check the nutrition labels. “Selecting snacks that are low in sugar can help combat tooth decay,” Giannoutsos says. “If poor nutrition continues, your oral health will decline, potentially resulting in gum disease and tooth loss.” Fruits and vegetables that are rich in fiber are a good choice for improving your oral health. Examples are apples, carrots and celery. In addition, milk, cheese and other dairy products are excellent options because of the calcium, phosphate and vitamin D they contain. Finally, drink fluoridated water as much as possible. If your tap water doesn’t include fluoride, check with your dentist for a fluoride supplement.

Ultimately, more is at stake than your teeth and gums. Left untreated, Giannoutsos and Newman say, oral-health problems can have a detrimental effect on your overall health, contributing to such conditions as heart disease and diabetes. That’s an additional reason why regular checkups – along with brushing and flossing – are so critical.

“It’s hard to resist your inner sweet tooth, so I wouldn’t say that you should never indulge in treats,” Newman says. “But when you do, brushing your teeth as quickly as possible afterwards will help decrease the risk of decay.”

About Seth Newman, DDS

Dr. Seth Newman (www.asktheorthos.com) is an orthodontist and co-author, with Dr. Steve Giannoutsos, of Giving It To You Straight: Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Orthodontics But Were Afraid To Ask. He owns orthodontic practices in the New York City area. Dr. Newman completed his dental training at Stony Brook School of Dental Medicine, where he was a member of the National Dental Honor Society. He was a clinical instructor of the Invisalign system at the NYU School of Dentistry.

About  Dr. Efstathios “Steve” Giannoutsos 
Dr. Efstathios Giannoutsos, or “Dr. G.” as he is commonly called, was born in Astoria, Queens, just outside of New York City. He graduated from St. John’s University in Jamaica, Queens, with high honors and a BS in Biology.  He is also the co-author with  Dr. Seth Newman of Giving It To You Straight: Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Orthodontics But Were Afraid to Ask(www.asktheorthos.com)He completed his dental training at NYU, where he graduated with a Doctor of Dental Surgery (DDS) degree. He was also accepted into NYU’s highly competitive orthodontic residency program. During that time, he also discovered a passion for treating children and adults with facial deformities. Coinciding his passion, his research thesis to attain specialty certification involved children with cleft deformities.

Greens Restaurant

Greens Restaurant celebrates its 40th year of nourishing the Bay Area community and visitors from around the world. Through the march of generations and amidst an ever-changing San Francisco dining scene, Greens Restaurant has remained steadfast in its original mission of celebrating vegetables with an intentional practice of being of service, an important value system set forth by its founders, the San Francisco Zen Center. Focusing on six important values of Generosity, Patience, Virtue, Energy, Focus, and Connection, Greens Restaurant has partnered with six acclaimed Bay Area chefs to serve guests in a special dinner series that will take place once a month starting this July.

The Greens 40th Anniversary Acclaimed Chef Dinner Series features an unprecedented lineup of renowned chefs, including: Alice Waters (Chez Panisse), Reem Assil (Reem’s California), Tanya Holland (Brown Sugar Kitchen), Suzette Gresham (Acquerello), Pam Mazzola (Prospect), and Kim Alter (Nightbird). These six Bay Area chefs will each design a vegetarian four-course prix fixe meal inspired by historic menus archived from the last four decades of Greens. Each menu will be offered at $85 per person with optional wine or beverage pairings. Tickets can be purchased via greensrestaurant.com. Details of the menus, the underlying core values and themes, and the connection between Greens and the guest chefs will be announced in advance of each monthly dinner.

Along with the milestone 40th Anniversary, Greens’ dinner series celebrates the meaningful ecosystem of interconnectedness — uniting a vital community network of diners, chefs, farmers, and artisanal purveyors from the Bay and regional lands. The kinship of land, food, and people has been the very foundation of Greens since 1979 and will be honorably showcased at each forthcoming 40th anniversary guest chef dinner.

With gratitude, Greens invites you to join the celebration of its heritage and ongoing mission.

Tuesday, July 9, 2019 — Reem Assil — Reem’s California

In 2010, the dream of Reem’s was born at the doorstep of a street corner bakery in Beirut, Lebanon. The scent of za’atar, yeasted bread, and sweet orange blossom syrup right out of the oven and the sounds of laughter and chatter in Arabic all around Reem Assil conjured up memories of her childhood and yearning to create home and community in the United States. Witnessing the life inside those bakery doors despite the political turbulence outside of them is when she realized her people are masters of bread and hospitality: the lifeline of their history and what has kept them resilient over many generations despite colonization, war, drought, and famine in the Arab world. In the fall of 2016, Reem Assil won the national OpenTable contest to fund their dream restaurant, and six months later, they opened their first brick & mortar location in the heart of Fruitvale in one of the most diverse communities in Oakland. Since then, Reem has garnered an array of top accolades, including being named a James Beard semifinalist in the Best Chef: West in 2018 and 2019, Thrillist’s “2018 Chef of the Year,” San Francisco Magazine’s “2018 Chef of the Year,” San Francisco Chronicle’s “2017 Rising Star Chef,” and most recently, Star Chefs “Rising Star Chef 2019.” Reem’s California was also named one of Food & Wine’s “2018 Top 10 Restaurants of the Year.”

Monday, August 5, 2019 — Alice Waters — Chez Panisse

Alice Waters is a chef, author, food activist, and the founder and owner of Chez Panisse Restaurant in Berkeley, California. She has been a champion of local sustainable agriculture for over four decades. In 1995, she founded the Edible Schoolyard Project, which advocates for a free school lunch for all children and a sustainable food curriculum in every public school. She has been Vice President of Slow Food International since 2002. Her honors include election as a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2007; the Harvard Medical School’s Global Environmental Citizen Award, which she shared with Kofi Annan in 2008; and her induction into the French Legion of Honor in 2010. In 2015, she was awarded the National Humanities Medal by President Obama, proving that eating is a political act, and that the table is a powerful means to social justice and positive change. Alice is the author of 16 books including her critically acclaimed memoir, Coming to My Senses: The Making of a Counterculture Cook, The New York Times bestsellers The Art of Simple Food I & II, and The Edible Schoolyard: A Universal Idea.

Wednesday, September 11, 2019 — Suzette Gresham — Acquerello

Acquerello’s co-owner and Executive Chef, Suzette Gresham, has led an incredibly accomplished career, receiving countless awards and accolades. Her achievements, however, have never deterred her from the ultimate goal as a chef — to make her guests happy. Gresham’s enthusiasm in the kitchen and tenacious personality led to the opening of Acquerello with business partner Giancarlo Paterlini in July 1989. Since that time, Acquerello has held a spot every year on the San Francisco Chronicle’s Top 100 Bay Area Restaurant List. The restaurant received its first Michelin star in 2007, and was awarded a second star in 2014. Today, Gresham is known as a pioneer in the culinary industry and has become one of the most influential chefs in the world of Italian fine dining. Her understated yet elegant approach to traditional Italian dishes showcases her culinary philosophy; that simplicity and preserving the integrity of food speaks volumes.

October 7, 2019 — Kim Alter — Nightbird

Kim Alter is the driving force behind Nightbird and Linden Room, which she opened August 2016 in the bustling Hayes Valley neighborhood as one of the most highly anticipated restaurants of the year. Nightbird, named for Alter’s love of owls, embraces community and diversity, and consistently delivers a hospitable, whimsical experience. Alter showcases the Bay Area’s bounty of produce with layered, flavorful dishes reflecting her commitment to technique, whole animal cooking, and unyielding support of the region’s farmers. Alter earned a Food & Wine Magazine nomination for People’s Best Chef in 2012 and 2013. In 2018, Alter was a James Beard Award semifinalist for “Best Chef: West.” Alter formerly worked with the Daniel Patterson Group for three years at the helm of kitchens such as Haven and Plum in Oakland, California. Prior to that, she worked in some of the Bay Area’s most notable restaurants such as Manresa (three-star Michelin), Aqua (two-star Michelin), and Acquerello (two-star Michelin). Alter won the title of “Best New Chef” from Oakland Magazine while at Haven, which was also named “Best New Restaurant” under her direction and awarded three stars from San Francisco Magazine.

Monday, November 4, 2019 — Tanya Holland — Brown Sugar Kitchen

Known for her inventive take on modern soul food, as well as comfort classics, Executive Chef Tanya Holland is the owner of Brown Sugar Kitchen. Chef Holland is the author of the Brown Sugar Kitchen Cookbook and New Soul Cooking; was the host and soul food expert on the television series Melting Pot; and competed on the fifteenth season of Top Chef. Holland appeared as a special guest on countless national television shows including the Today Show, Vh1’s Soul Cities, Sarah Moulton’s Cooking Live, Ready, Set, Cook! The Wayne Brady Show, and has been featured in articles in The New York Times, O The Oprah Magazine, The Wall Street Journal, Travel & Leisure, and Sunset just to name a few. Holland shares her love of modern Southern fare by bringing home her passion for soul food and the amazing experiences shared through the act of enjoying a meal with family and friends.

Wednesday, December 11, 2019 — Pam Mazzola — Prospect

Hailing from Denver where she cooked in many of the city’s top kitchens, Pam Mazzola first joined Chef Nancy Oakes at San Francisco’s L’Avenue in 1988. Their meeting launched a friendship and culinary partnership that has endured for over twenty years. Mazzola was part of the opening staff of Boulevard and is a co-author with Oakes on the James Beard Award-nominated Boulevard Cookbook. Prospect is a collaboration of Chef Nancy Oakes, Pam Mazzola, and Kathy King from Boulevard Restaurant. As chef/partner in Prospect, Mazzola works closely with the team, guiding the overall direction of the restaurant with a focus on menu development. Located at the base of the Infinity Towers in downtown San Francisco, Prospect features exceptional contemporary American cuisine with local, sustainable, and organic ingredients while hosting diners in a warm and modern urban environment with high service standards.

About Greens Restaurant

Greens Restaurant pioneered vegetarian cooking and paved the way for establishing it as a cuisine in America. In 1979, the San Francisco Zen Center opened Greens to provide an opportunity for Zen students to work together and extend their practice to the workplace. For many years, the entire staff at Greens were Zen students. Founding Chef of Greens, Deborah Madison, was a student at Zen Center for 18 years where she held a host of kitchen positions. In 1981, Annie Somerville joined the restaurant and trained with Madison. Somerville became Executive Chef in 1985, and has since continued to work closely with local growers, cheesemakers, and purveyors, to serve and celebrate seasons and their bounty. San Francisco Zen Center’s Green Gulch Farm provides the restaurant with organic produce year-round from its farm and garden. Green Gulch Farm has been a model of sustainable organic farming and gardening.

Occupying a former Army warehouse in Fort Mason, the restaurant is adorned with floor to ceiling windows and quintessential views of the Golden Gate Bridge, Marin headlands and The Marina. The space was constructed by carpenters from the Zen Center, including lead designer Paul Discoe, an ordained Zen Buddhist priest, using reclaimed wood and recycled material. Central to the familiar dining room are works by local Bay Area artists: a curving three-ton, tour de force of woodcarving, redwood installation by J.B. Blunk, original landscapes hanging on the walls by painter Willard Dixon, and specially made service areas and entryway by designer Jason Lees.

Tips To Get Wedding Ready

By Beachbody Super Trainer and creator of Ultimate Portion Fix, Autumn Calabrese

When deciding on a nutrition program to follow to slim down for your wedding there are a few key things to keep in mind. The first being how much time you have till the big day and how much time you have till your final dress fitting. Once you’ve had that final dress fitting its ideal to maintain your weight so that your dress fits on the big day!

Following the Foundational Fix plan of Ultimate Portion Fix is a great way to get wedding ready.

  • Start by eliminating highly processed foods from your diet, this includes, sodas, sugary coffee drinks, cakes, candy, and any other foods you might be consuming that contain excessive amounts of sugar (anything over 8 grams per serving is high). If it has a laundry list of ingredients you can’t pronounce its go to go.
  • Stick to whole foods, things like, fruit, vegetables, lean proteins (chicken, fish, turkey, tofu, tempeh, occasional red meat) and healthy carbohydrates like brown rice, quinoa, beans, potatoes, lentils and oats.
  • Watch your portion sizes. You can overeat on healthy food as well.  You don’t need as much as we tend consume to fuel your body. Ultimate Portion Fix shows you exactly how to portion out the foods that you love with its color coded, portion control containers.  
  • Balance your macronutrients. Again this is something Ultimate Portion Fix does for you.  No counting calories, carbs, protein or anything else. Fill your containers and enjoy your food knowing that you’re getting a perfectly portioned, balanced meal every time.
  • Make water your new best friend. Water is so important to the function of your body so stay hydrated, it also helps flush toxins out of your system. Make drinking half your body weight in oz of water a day your number 1 priority.
  • Practice self care. Planning a wedding can be stressful, that stress can start to take a toll on your waistline if you’re not careful. So find ways to relax like taking an epsom salt bath, getting in a good sweat session, journaling, and most importantly getting enough sleep at night.

In addition to implementing Ultimate Portion Fix and these 6 tips, load your diet with foods that support a healthy weight.  

  • Apples not only provide a healthy, natural sweetness to your diet they are loaded with fiber to help you feel fuller for a longer period of time.
  • Avocados have a monounsaturated fat called oleic acid which provides a slow burning energy source for the body.  Its been shown to fire up the metabolism and healthy fats help you feel satiated.
  • Beans are a great source of healthy carbohydrates.The are loaded with fiber and it takes our bodies a long time to digest. This again means you will feel full longer.
  • Eggs are a great source of protein. I know they’ve gotten a bad wrap in the past but they are low in calories and high in protein. Increasing protein in ones diet has been shown as a effective form of weight loss.
  • Chia Seeds try adding these little guys to a salad or smoothie. Chia seeds have been shown to help with endurance, energy and decreasing hunger. They are also high in omega – 3 fatty acids ( a good fat that we need) and protein.  

Looking your best on your special day is a big deal and can stress a lot of people out. Take the stress away, follow a program that isn’t a diet, doesn’t leave you starving or feeling deprived, has been proven to work long term for hundreds of thousands of people.  If you want a program that is effective and will have you feeling like your best self on your big day check out Ultimate Portion Fix.

About Autumn Calabrese

Celebrity trainer, best-selling author, and working mom Autumn Calabrese has created  breakthrough fitness programs 80 Day Obsession®, 21 Day Fix®, 21 Day Fix EXTREME®, The Master’s Hammer and Chisel® and Country Heat®. She’s revolutionized the Beachbody fitness model with her simple approach to healthy eating.

Together with her chef brother, Bobby Calabrese, she authored the portion-control cookbook, FIXATETM and hosts the cooking show by the same name that streams on Beachbody® On Demand. FIXATE features simple, delicious recipes, all perfectly portion-controlled and easy to make. Her goal as a health and fitness expert is to motivate and inspire people to make the lasting changes that will serve them and their families for the rest of their lives.

HueApproved Scanner

The Easy & Fun Way to Choose Healthy Products: NEW HueApproved Scanner

If you have ever found yourself looking at labels at the grocery store or online and trying to decide on the best product for you, our HueApproved Scanner will make it easy for you! 
Check out how it works here: 
Our philosophy is simple:
Food as Fuel to Color Your World.

We are a third party, unbiased, wanting to help you make the best lifestyle choices!

We love simple. Easy home cooked meals. Lots of colorful fruits and vegetables. Nutritious products with clean labels. But cutting a pathway through the clutter can be hard work and we need your help.

Nutrients are important. Using the nutrition label or recipe analysis, we check protein, fiber, sodium, sugar, and saturated fat.

Ingredients are important. We look for recipes developed by our HueChefs made with whole minimally processed ingredients and we look for packaged foods with fewer additives.

Behaviors are important. Making time to cook at home is best but we know you need other more convenient options.

And finally the pattern is important. At the end of a day, it’s the sum total of individual choices that determines the pattern. The more variety you bring into your day, the better.

So we envisioned a pattern for a good food day based on nutrients, ingredients, and behaviors. Then we developed a tool to assess how well a product or a recipe compares to that pattern on a scale of 1 to 7.

We sum the scores to get a final value between 1 and 7. The higher the number, the more we approveand we need your help to test it out for us!

To test our tool, please go to:

https://hueapproved.com/scanner/

Please let us know what you think and share with your friends!!!

FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA FOR LIVE EVENTS AND PROMOTIONS:

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HueTrition™ is a nationally-recognized family wellness program that utilizes cutting-edge technologies to promote a balanced, and active lifestyle that includes a daily variety of colorful fruits and vegetables from an early age while encouraging sensible choices for the planet.

Another New Platform!

HueLive Promo video– 

https://youtu.be/Y25pjd2ycT0

How To Make Healthy Fun & Simple: Personal Chef & Nutrition Expert Online

Ever wondered what it would be like to have your own personal chef and nutrition expert a your place? Check out our new HueTrition Live online space where you can contact experts, attend health & wellness support groups, see healthy culinary events with our Chefs, take online classes & reach your goals all in one! To book your private online session, please visit:

https://huetrition.com/shop/

What can we do to help you achieve your health & wellness goals in 2019? What sort of content would you like to start seeing from us? 

Please comment below any suggestions, or if you have any questions or would like to ask about HueTrition Live, please e-mail us at info@huetrition.com.       

To sign up for any of our Live Events or to have a conversation with our experts, please visit:

https://huetrition.com/shop/

You can get our nee HueTrition ebook How to Make Healthy Fun & Easy, a roadmap to a colorful plant-based diet with link below:

https://huetrition.com/resources/

To Read Full HueApproved Hue Launch Story, please visit:

https://huetrition.com/blog/2019/04/19/introducing-the-hueapproved-scanner/

USDA MyPlate Campaign

USDA Announces Launch of the Start Simple with MyPlate Campaign

In a continuing effort to help Americans make healthy food choices, and in honor of National Nutrition Month, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Secretary Sonny Perdue today announced a new campaign to help simplify the nutrition information that surrounds us each day.

USDA recommends people visit here to get started with tips on the MyPlate food groups, or to use a variety of simple resources to put these tips into action. Online resources include the MyPlate Plan and widget, a tip sheet, the MyPlate Action Guide, a one-week menu template, as well as a toolkit for nutrition professionals.

USDA also invites Americans to join the #MyPlateChallenge by sharing healthy eating tips or ideas related to the five MyPlate food groups. People can post a MyPlate-inspired healthy eating tip with a photo or video and share it on social media. Once they post their healthy eating tip, people can challenge a family member, friend, or co-worker to share their own tip.

Join USDA as we celebrate the different ways people strive to eat healthy and Start Simple with MyPlate! View more information about the challenge here.

About USDA’s Food and Nutrition Service

USDA’s Food and Nutrition Service aims to increase food security and reduce hunger by providing children and low-income people access to food, a healthful diet and nutrition education in a way that supports American agriculture and inspires public confidence. In addition to co-developing the Dietary Guidelines for Americans and providing nutrition education through MyPlate, the agency administers a network of nutrition assistance programs that comprise America’s nutrition safety net. For more information, visit our website.

2020 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee

Members of the 2020 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee Announced

Scientific Experts Will Review Scientific Evidence on Key Nutrition Topics To Inform Development of New Guidelines

To ensure America’s dietary guidance reflects the latest science, U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue and U.S. Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Alex Azar today announced the appointment of 20 nationally recognized scientists to serve on the 2020 Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee. The independent advisory committee will review scientific evidence on topics and questions identified by the departments and will provide a report on their findings to the secretaries. Their review, along with public and agency comments, will help inform USDA and HHS’ development of the 2020-2025 Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGAs).

“USDA is committed to ensuring everything we do is data-driven and based in scientific facts, which is why this expert committee’s work in objectively evaluating the science is of the utmost importance to the departments and to this process,” said Secretary Perdue. “The committee will evaluate existing research and develop a report objectively, with an open mind.”

“The scientists we selected to serve on the committee are national leaders in the areas of nutrition and health,” said HHS Secretary Alex Azar. “HHS, USDA, and all Americans will benefit from the collective experience and expertise of the committee, which will conduct a rigorous examination of the scientific evidence on several diet-related health outcomes, including the prevention of cancer, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, which are three of the leading causes of death in the United States.”

The list of members appointed to the expert committee can be found here.

The committee’s work will kick off at a public meeting to be announced in the coming weeks. The committee will review scientific evidence on specific nutrition and health related topics and scientific questions that, for the first time, reflect both public comments and federal agency input. Throughout their deliberations, the public and other stakeholders will be encouraged to provide comments and feedback.

“In our continuing commitment to transparency and customer service, we invite the American public to engage in this process,” said Secretary Perdue. “We want to hear from everyone and all viewpoints. I encourage everyone with an interest to attend public meetings and to send comments through the Federal Register once the committee begins their work.”

The next edition of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans will continue to focus on dietary patterns of what Americans eat and drink as a whole, on average and over time, to help prevent disease and keep people healthy. Additionally, the review process will take a life-stage approach and will, for the first time, include pregnant women and children from birth to 24 months as mandated by the 2014 Farm Bill.

The Dietary Guidelines for Americans are updated every five years and serve as the cornerstone of federal nutrition programs and policies, providing food-based recommendations to help prevent diet-related chronic diseases and promote overall health.

USDA’s Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) works to reduce food insecurity and promote nutritious diets among the American people. The agency administers 15 nutrition assistance programs that leverage America’s agricultural abundance to ensure children and low-income individuals and families have nutritious food to eat. FNS also co-develops the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, which provides science-based nutrition recommendations and serves as the cornerstone of federal nutrition policy. For information and links, go to DietaryGuidelines.gov.

The HHS Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (ODPHP) provides leadership for disease prevention and health promotion initiatives on behalf of the HHS Secretary and as part of the HHS Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health. ODPHP co-develops the Dietary Guidelines for Americans with USDA and leads the development of Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans. ODPHP also leads the Healthy People initiative, which sets evidence-based, 10-year national goals and objectives for improving the health of all Americans.

The Northwoods of Wisconsin: An Outdoorsman’s Paradise

By Jake Porter & Vaughn Lowery

There is no better place in the United States to experience as many snow and cold-weather activities in one day as there is in the Northwoods region of Wisconsin. The two larger towns, Cable and Hayward, which are located in the far north of the state, act as home bases for tourists to Wisconsin. Hayward is a small, quaint town in Sawyer County, Wisconsin. It is characterized by its gently rolling hills, while Cable is just 15 minutes away. Aside from being known for it emphasis on outdoor activities, Cable is also renowned for being the starting point of the American Birkebeiner cross-country skiing race. There are also nationally renowned restaurants within a short 30 minute drive. Both locations offer an opportunity to escape from the stress of congested metropolitan cities and relax in the welcoming environment that both towns offer.

Traveling from the west coast, the north of Wisconsin is a dramatic change of pace from the bustling vibes of the many developed metropolitan cities. It is also the top destination for most snow-related adventure spots. The food and travel businesses in the area, the top two largest economies in the northern Wisconsin, are thriving and are welcoming to new small-businesses. With a well-developed and diverse school system in the surrounding communities, both towns are extremely capable of hosting both tourists and accommodating people intending to move to the region.

With their proximity to the great woods of the Chequamegan National Forest and the sparkling waters of Lake Owen and Namakagon, the recreational activities are abundant. Activities range from cross-country skiing, snowmobiling, snowshoeing, ice fishing, and winter fat biking. Cable is an epicenter for skiers, offering wonderfully groomed trails traversing the relatively flat landscape. At the start of the Birkebeiner trail in Cable, there is a newly built rest area and event center which offers a wide range of amenities including a source of heat in the wintertime. Snowmobiling is a crucial activity for the adventure-seeking traveler. It is also a staple for most of the locals in the area. In addition, ice fishing is a classic wintertime sport and can be done on most frozen lakes in the area. Fat Bike riding and snowshoeing can be done by most any able-bodied traveler. Bikes and snowshoes can be picked up at Howl Adventure Center, while snowmobiles can be rented from Hayward Power Sports.

As for the less adventurous travelers, downtown Hayward, which was named one of five Hallmark-worthy small towns in Wisconsin, is easy to explore. The downtown includes small boutiques and coffee/pastry shops which line the beautiful, quiet streets. Meet the artists at local art shops such as Art Beat and Nordic Northwoods, who specialize in fun, artsy gifts and souvenirs. Hayward Mercantile is a delightful place as well, filled with Wisconsin-made goods, while Ronnings, just a few doors down provides everything from moccasins to sweatshirts. Just 10 minutes away, Glassy Ladies Art Studio provides a fun environment to get your creative juices flowing while you learn glass fusing, bead making, metal-smithing, and how to work with stained glass.

After a long day in the snow, there is nothing better than a hot meal at lunch or at the end of the day. Lucky for you, there are countless, award winning, restaurants within close proximity. Tamarack Farms Winery is not only the number one winery in the area, but also provides small sandwiches and artisan pizza. The Old Southern Smokehouse, a creation of the award winning BBQ chef Dave Anderson, is the epitemy of a BBQ experience. Their menu consists of quality meats, fresh produce, and award winning sauces. The Landing, situated on the Chippewa Flowage is an amazing place known for its nationally renowned fish fry and its liquor bar. The owners, Chris and Elsie Lee are extraordinary people and are extremely hospitable. Located in Cable, The Brick House Cafe is a quaint place featured on Food Network’s Diners, Drive-in, and Dives with Guy Fieri. Serving sandwiches and fresh salads, they are known for their locally sourced meats and vegetables. It even occupies one of the oldest buildings in Cable, dating back to the 1800s!

Finally, The Rookery exhibits casual gourmet dining at its finest. The Rookery’s ever-changing menu features fresh fish specials and their famous bison steak. Here you will find some of the best vegetarian, vegan, and gluten-free options you’ll find anywhere in the northern Wisconsin communities. And what’s Wisconsin without cheese? Most of the restaurants and dives nestled in the towns serve a wide range of cheeses and fried cheese curds which are almost like a staple in the state. With all of these amazing options for food in the area, your taste buds are in for a real treat!

Not only is there a multitude of thrilling activities interspersed amongst the trails, forest, and lakes surrounding the area, there are also countless establishments in which to shop and also create art. Both communities are extremely sustainable, and are excitedly welcoming tourists and thrill-seekers alike. The spirit of the towns are quite endearing. The eager traveler definitely has a chance to fully experience what the area has to offer in a 5 day to a week span. Can you imagine visiting a region for the first time and immediately feeling at home and being welcomed by the locals? Can you imagine having access to incredible activities and nationally recognized eateries? Then the sister towns of Cable and Hayward should be at the top of your list of future travels. They are communities that are welcoming and make you feel at home, no matter your background, ethnicity, or culture.

Hayward Wisconsin, Wisconsin,  360 magazine

Restaurants and Eateries:

http://tamarackfarmswinery.com/

https://www.oldsouthernbbq.com/

http://www.thelcolanding.com/

https://thebrickhousecafe.net/

https://www.rookerypub.com/

Shopping and Art:

http://www.artbeatofhayward.com/

https://nordicnorthwoods.com/

http://haywardmercantileco.com/

https://ronningsofhaywardinc.business.site/

https://www.travelwisconsin.com/arts-and-culture/glassy-ladies-art-emporium-281937

Adventure Sports Rentals:

http://www.howlinbayfield.com/bike.html

https://www.haywardpowersports.com/

6 Choices to Make Your Mental & Physical Goals a Success in 2019

According to U.S. News, approximately 80% of resolutions fail by the second week in February. Why? Because dramatic and immediate changes are not sustainable long-term.

So this year, make 2019 not a year of resolutions or diets but one of incremental changes to instill habits that create real long-lasting results. Here are 6 tips:

Do What You Enjoy:

Commit to trying new things or even old things to remind yourself of what you enjoy. This is especially true for keeping active and fulfilling your body’s desire for movement and exercise. This can be taking frequent walks through nature, biking, dancing, hiking, or yoga. Start taking ballroom dancing lessons that you promised yourself you would try years ago. Take a barre method class where you can let your inner ballerina shine. Better yet, put that music on full blast while you are preparing dinner and dance like no one’s watching. It is not about perfection, it is about finding what you love to do and what brings a smile to your face, then it becomes fun and not something you want to do.

Add Things, Don’t Remove Them:

If your goal is to improve your nutrition to lose weight and improve your energy levels, try adding foods into your diet like vegetables. Find fun ways to prepare them to fit your taste buds. Often times if you start with a deprivation statement like, “I am going to stop eating all carbs,” then the only thing you will think about is carbs. When you introduce something new and start noticing the benefits of that change, then you are often inspired to move on to add the next change. Think addition not deprivation!

Stop Eating by 6pm:

If you want to encourage the body to burn fat for energy, stop eating by 6 or 7pm. This allows the body to put most of its energy into rejuvenating and restoring the body for the next day. It also gives the body all time it needs to use up all the sugar storage in the liver so then it can start burning the fat cells for needed energy.

Take 5 Minutes to Stop & Breathe:

If one of your goals is to start being more mindful or to simply start incorporating some relaxation techniques to help you react to stressful events with more ease then perhaps going from not meditating to promising to meditate every day for 45 minutes a day may be a bit overwhelming.

Try this simple strategy, wake up in the morning take a deep breath, record in a journal or on your phone one thing you are grateful for, appreciate or just makes you happy. Read it out loud and then follow with 5 slow breaths and really feel that joy. This way you are starting the habit and getting your body used to what relaxation and being in a state of gratitude feels like. During the day when things get hectic, pull out that book or play that recording and take 5 deep breaths. Fast, easy and often times very effective for decreasing the effects of those stress reactions.

Go to Bed 15 Minutes Earlier:

Work on getting a good night’s rest. A healthy amount of sleep helps you to be more alert, make better decisions, maintain a healthier weight and helps you to look and feel younger. Go to bed 15 minutes earlier each week for a month so you total an hour more of sleep. Remove all electronic devices in the bedroom that gives off artificial light and creating a bedtime routine that signals the body that it is time for bed.

Spend Your Time with Like-Minded People:

Make an effort to spend more quality time reconnecting with family or friends.  Individuals who have social connections suffer less symptoms of depression and may live longer healthier, lives. Also, establishing a support group can help to stay on track with our goals. This may look like once every two weeks to a month spending some time with your girlfriends or skyping or face timing them to catch up.

Making these gradual changes can help you to create habits that will help to feel more energized, feel less stressed, think more clearly and make better choices for you. With each choice comes the opportunity to be the person you have always envisioned.

Eudene Harry MD is the medical director for Oasis Wellness and Rejuvenation Center, a wellness practice devoted to integrative holistic care. She is a veteran physician with over 20 years of experience. Dr. Harry earned her medical degree and performed her residency at Thomas Jefferson University.

Dr. Harry is the author of three books designed to empower the individual to get started on their path to optimal health. She has published extensively on the topics of reducing stress, healthy lifestyle choices, and regaining youthfulness. Her most recent book, Be Iconic: Healthy and Sexy at Any Ageis now available on Amazon.