Posts tagged with "Vegetables"

Popcorn illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Entertainment at Home: How to Spend Lockdown with Benefits?

The lockdown has ended up becoming a blessing in disguise. It is the perfect opportunity for you to be able to pick up a new skill. However, that is just the tip of the iceberg. If you are able to use the lockdown wisely, then you can surely benefit from it a lot. Use this to your advantage and spend a little more time with yourself. Who knows? By the end of this lockdown, you might evolve into an even better version of who you are now. Read on to find out all the various ways to spend your time productively during the lockdown.

Spending Time Productively in Lockdown

Learn to Cook

This is the time when you find yourself in close proximity to the kitchen the whole day. Ordering in might be a risky bet considering that it might provoke the spread of COVID. So, instead of ordering food from a delivery app, cook it yourself. Start with the simpler things at first like making tea, boiling eggs, etc. As you learn more every day, you can eventually take up cooking initiatives that you never imagined before.

Try New Things

This lockdown, try something that you normally wouldn’t. Spend your time picking up a new skill. There is an endless world out there. Take online gambling for instance. You can get 100 free spins no deposit in UK if you visit online casinos. In this pandemic, as people spend more time at homes, the popularity of online casinos has skyrocketed. More and more people are exploring the world of online gambling because it is thrilling and fun. So, go ahead and explore.

Read More Books

This is the ideal time to read a book. If you are not an avid reader, you might be depriving yourself of one of the most beautiful experiences in life. We all receive books as gifts on our birthdays. On most occasions, those books end up getting dragged to one corner of our shelf and keep collecting dust. Now is the time to get those books out and experience the beautiful stories they tell.

Bond with Family

We live in an age of preoccupations. Everyone is preoccupied with something or the other. Children are busy studying; parents are busy working. We are hardly able to make time for each other. However, the lockdown has changed it, even though temporarily. In the lockdown, a unique phenomenon has taken place. Every member of the family is under one roof. Children are getting to attend online classes and parents are getting to work from home. So, start spending more time with each other. Begin with the simpler things like eating at the dinner table together or watching a movie.

Exercise

You don’t necessarily have to go to a gym to work on your fitness. A free hand workout is the best form of fitness routine. The best thing about it is that it can simply be done at home. So, this lockdown, use the opportunity to work, on your fitness, from home. Go to the terrace, do some stretching. Do some crunches and push-ups. Use the extra time you get at home to improve your health because it will not only help you physically, but also mentally.

Meditate

A lot of people turn out to be rather skeptical when it comes to meditation. However, experts certify meditation to be a genuinely helpful habit. It can result in profound improvement of your mental health and stability. Even more so, in the stressful situation of the global pandemic, you need to calm yourself down. So, practice meditating. It can do wonders.

Watch TV

In the age of Netflix and Amazon Prime, we have gained access to a seemingly endless plethora of interesting shows on TV or computers. Some of the shows have thousands of episodes, each having a running time of at least an hour. Normally, you don’t get the scope to fully watch your favorite shows in the middle of work. Also, by the time you return home, you get too tired. Nevertheless, this is your chance. Switch on the television and watch something with your family.

Do Chores

Use the free time in your hand to perform household chores. Usually, we see the mothers and daughters of the house taking up this crucial responsibility, but why should the men be left out? Pick up the mop and duster. Go ahead and clean your place up. Get into all those remote corners of the room that you have never even looked at before. Reorganize the furniture. Give your humble abode a refreshing new look.

Make a Garden

Gardening can be an extraordinarily soothing way of passing the time. Plants take time to grow and flourish, but when they do, they teach you so much about how delicate life is. Gardening has proven to have hugely positive effects on mental health. An added benefit of doing this is not having to shop for fruits and vegetables outside. After all, you are locked down. You can’t visit the marketplace for buying your cooking ingredients. So, rather grow them at home.

Plan for Future

Since you have more time in your hand, you can concentrate on drafting a course of action for your future. Our lives revolve around various aspects. We have a family to take care of. We have careers to build. We have our own dreams to fulfil. This is the perfect chance of working them all out through meticulous planning.

Try Art

Have you ever explored the artistic side of your personality before? This is the ideal occasion for that. Pick up a paint brush and go ahead. It is also a highly beneficial mental exercise because it helps you work on your precision and focus. There are so many things to take inspiration from. Maybe, try your hand at some glass painting too while you’re at it.

Detox

Enough of indulging in vices, let this lockdown be a detox phase. Rid your body of all the toxins. No smoking and no drinking because, after all, you can’t even if you want to. All the stores are closed. So, might as well use this as a way of benefiting yourself. Use this lockdown to quit your bad habits.

Conclusion

So, we told you about many different ways of using your time productively in the lockdown. However, we saved the best for last. Here it is. As we said earlier, this lockdown offers you the chance to spend some time with yourself. That is very important. So, use this time to write a letter to your future self. When you spend time with yourself, there are thoughts and ideas that you stumble upon which you would normally never even comprehend. Before you end up forgetting them, write them down as a letter for reminding yourself in the future. Make yourself promises. Make your memories immortal. Get a pen and a piece of paper. Then, write your heart out. You will cherish it when the time comes.

Mighty Sesame Sauce illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Mighty Sesame Harissa Tahini

NEW MIGHTY SESAME HARISSA TAHINI PUTS A SPICY SPIN ON A CONSUMER FAVORITE

Mighty Sesame Co. Adds a Bold New Variation to its Popular Squeeze & Serve Line

Mighty Sesame Co., the maker of all-natural, squeeze-and-serve tahini, is upping the tahini game with the first-ever harissa flavored tahini on the market.

Tahini continues to trend globally as consumers and chefs discover new ways to use the creamy, nutrient-rich condiment. With the rollout of Mighty Sesame Harissa Tahini, it’s easier than ever to add extra zip to everything from dressings and dips to meat and veggies.

The sesame experts make their tahini from the finest Ethiopian sesame seeds and serve it up in shake-and-squeeze bottles—the first tahini packaging of its kind in the U.S.—for maximum convenience. The new variety contains a blend of 100% natural harissa spices for a distinctively aromatic, roasted-chile pepper flavor profile with a kick.

Mighty Sesame’s Chef Gregg is available to whip up a great Mom’s Day brunch recipe.  See him in action on this YouTube video.

Like all Mighty Sesame tahinis, the Harissa variety is ready to use with just a shake and a squeeze, no stirring required. It is packed with protein and contains 260mg of calcium per serving. Organic, vegan, gluten- and dairy-free, kosher, and halal, it’s a 100% guilt-free option for everyone.

The original Mighty Sesame Organic Squeezable Tahini, introduced in 2018 and was anointed The Best Tahini You Can Buy, by Epicurious Magazine.

Mighty Sesame Harissa Tahini comes in 10.9 oz / Master Pack of 8 bottles with an MSRP $4.99 per 10.9 oz. bottle. Mighty Sesame is distributed by Kayco, headquartered in Bayonne, NJ.

About Kayco Beyond

Kayco is one of the largest manufacturers and suppliers of specialty and kosher foods. Kayco Beyond Division sources and distributes new products to the general market beyond kosher to meet the demands of consumers looking for optional products that are healthful, convenient, or for restricted diets and lifestyles. These brands include Dorot Gardens, Absolutely Gluten Free, Beetology, Mighty Sesame, Tuscanini Foods, and new Wonder Melon.

vegetables by Nicole salazar for 360 magazine

Michelle Obama Encourages Picky Eaters

When I was a small child, I never ate the vegetables I encountered on my dinner plate, preferring instead to kick, scream, whine, and then feed the offending dish to the dog. How different things might’ve been if former First Lady Michelle Obama was the one gently encouraging me to eat my peas, using Muppet-adjacent puppets and her soothing presence! Unfortunately, I had to learn the hard way, but for the children of America who are now currently throwing handfuls of broccoli at their parents in protest, Obama’s new show, Waffles + Mochi, premiering on March 16 on Netflix, is here to save the day.

There’s little information about what this show will entail, beyond the above tweet, which features Michelle Obama cradling a small, winsome mochi in her hand, flanked on either side by an overzealous bee with glasses and some sort of Yeti-thing, whom I presume is Waffles, as it is wearing a scarf and a frozen waffle as an accessory. The show will be produced by Higher Ground, the Obamas’ production company. My assumption is that Waffles + Mochi is a reworked version of Listen to Your Vegetables & Eat Your Parents, which was reported in 2019 as the title of a half-hour children’s show that would take young children and their families around the globe on an adventure that tells us the story of our food.”

Again, we know very little about the show, because all we’re working with here is the former name and then the image of Michelle Obama flanked by Muppet-adjacent puppets, but what I’m hoping is that this culinary adventure will be a spiritual cousin to the earliest seasons of Sesame Street, which were quirky and weird and just as enjoyable to watch now, as an adult, as they were when I was a small child. Children’s television is at its best when it resonates with both children and adults who are lightly stoned.

Please read on in this article in Jezebel. 

10 Supersmart Superfoods Your Kids Will Love

Having trouble getting your kids to eat healthy? When you package these superfood hits into a child’s menu you can be sure it’s a surefire way of giving them the nutrients they need and show them great nutrition is just around the corner!

Basil

This superfood packs in vitamins A, C and K, iron, potassium and calcium kids can grow their own basil at home. toss it on pasta sauces or pizza! It’s rich in plant chemicals, chlorophyll and other happy mood plant compounds.

Cocoa

Add cocoa powder and honey to kefir for a healthy quick breakfast for kids who won’t sit still to eat a meal. Or a cup of hot cocoa (at least 70 percent pure cocoa) promotes oral health and helps to protect delicate skin from sun damage over time. You can also sprinkle cocoa powder on fruit, snacks and desserts for a healthy punch of flavor. Plant chemicals and antioxidants increase concentration and decrease inflammation!

Black Beans

Adults aren’t the only ones who suffer from high cholesterol, they just get checked more often than kids. Black beans help kids keep cholesterol levels down and provide plenty of calcium and protein to boot. Make a tasty black bean dip with some fresh veggies for a fun snack.

 Cinnamon

This superfood is great sprinkled on breakfast foods. it regulates blood sugar, which will keep energy from crashing after breakfast in the middle of a school day, tastes great and is so easy to use. Its natural sweetness is a plus and goes with so many foods and beverages!

Avocado

Avocados are full of good fat. Kids need a daily diet of 30% monosaturated fat and a little avocado a day provides more than enough. Use it like ordinary mayo for a great mix-in to creamy dips and sauces or sliced fresh for an afternoon snack. Guacamole is a no brainer for kids!

Tomato

Here’s a switch, a tomato a day can keep cancer away. That’s right, the plant version of vitamin A can best fight off all kinds of stressors and the potassium they contain helps to boost energy and stabilize hydration. In-season tomatoes are amazing with basil and olive oil or lightly sautee for a very tasty sauce for pasta, fish or veggies!

Fruit

A sweet spot you don’t want to ignore, kids have a natural liking for fruit and its energy-boosting plus. Encouraging eating fruit curbs drinking sugary beverages and snacks. Go for seasonal fun and plan a harvesting trip to a local orchard or bring your kiddies to the local green grocers to pick out what they want. A variety of colors provides kids with essential vitamins and minerals they need to grow and fiber to keep their bodies healthy. Introduce your kids to a daily fruit plate at a young age and they will probably continue the habit into adulthood.

Sweet Potatoes

These orange tubers are high in Vitamin A which helps kids develop healthy vision and eyes. And they’re delicious roasted, mashed or baked. For an amazing marshmallow flavor, use vanilla extract and honey for a not to be missed sweet treat.

Flaxseed

Flaxseed is bursting with Omega-3 fatty acids that little guys need to grow their brains to their full potential. Buy it ground and sprinkle it over their cereal or add 1/4 cup to their favorite baked-good recipe. They’ll get better nutrition without even knowing it.

Oatmeal

Kids who start their day with oatmeal concentrate better in school all day. oatmeal breaks down slowly to give continual bursts of energy over a long period of time. Add honey, nuts or chocolate chips to make it more kid-friendly, for a great way to use oatmeal be sure to check out the recipe section for a granola recipe the whole family will love.

About Nicolette M. Pace MS, RDN, CDE, CBC,CDN, CFCS ,FAND

Nicolette founded NutriSource Inc. ( www.nutrisource.org )  in 2002 to provide high quality education, counseling and nutrition services for a diverse community population. Prior to founding NutriSource Inc, she served as Director of Clinical Nutrition at the NYHQ/Silvercrest Center where she provided both administrative and direct care for sub-acute and chronically ill patients. Nicolette was a key member of performance improvement projects and as Chair of the Nutrition Committee; significant positive changes were made in the standard of care. 

 Nicolette has been featured in CBS, ABC, NBC, Fox News, the New York Times, Seventeen, Fitness, Men’s Journal, More, Dr. Oz, Everyday Health, AOL, IVillage, Health, Shape and other magazines. She is also a contributing writer for Minerva Place, as well as an adjunct professor of Nutrition at CUNY and Touro Colleges. She believes in emphasizing a holistic approach toward food, nutrition and preventative healthcare.

Nicolette Pace Demo Reel watch HERE.

 
Susan Bowerman on how to beat diet boredom for 360 Magazine

Beating Diet Boredom

How to Beat Diet Boredom in the “New Normal”

By Susan Bowerman, MS, RD, CSSD, CSOWM, FAND, Sr. Director, Worldwide Nutrition Education and Training, Herbalife Nutrition

If you’re bored with your diet, you probably won’t stick with it.  Here are some tips to help you beat diet boredom.

Many of us are still spending more time at home during these uncertain times which can lead to boredom – tired of our same routines, limits on autonomy and for some, bored with our diet. While being bored with your diet could be good news it might also be bad news. 

The good news is this: if you’re bored with your diet, it probably means that you’ve been sticking pretty solidly to your meal plan – at least for the moment – and it’s likely you’re seeing some results. When you eat the same foods day in and day out, you do tend to eat less overall.  But the bad news is that the reason you’re eating less is because you’re simply bored with your diet – and that can spell trouble.  When your diet gets boring, you’re more easily tempted – and you’re more likely to stray off your plan.

Why You Get Bored on A Diet

I think there are a couple of reasons people get into ruts with dieting – and they’re legitimate reasons.  For one thing, if you stick to a plan and you’re getting results, you might be worried that if you eat anything else your progress will slow down.  And, if you eat the same thing every day – as boring as it may be – it just makes it easier; you don’t have to do much planning since you know exactly what you’re going to eat at every meal and snack.

But here’s something to keep in mind.  When you say you’re ‘bored on your diet’ it suggests that at some time you’ll be ‘off your diet’…(and, therefore, ‘not bored’).  I’ve said this before, but it’s worth repeating – weight loss is simply practice for weight maintenance.  In general, the foods and meals you eat while you’re losing are pretty much the same as the ones you’ll be eating when you shift into maintenance mode.  If you’re bored with your diet now, it’s a safe bet that you won’t be able to keep eating this way indefinitely.  And before you know it, you’ll be slipping back into old habits and watching your weight creep back up.

Routine is good – but sometimes you can take things too far.  Just because your diet plan suggests grilled chicken and steamed spinach for dinner doesn’t mean you have to eat exactly those foods every single night.  There are plenty of things you can do that can keep things interesting and help keep you on your plan.

How to Avoid Diet Boredom

Try new fruits and vegetables.  Bite for bite, fruits and vegetables are have fewer calories than protein foods or grains – and they’re loaded with nutrients.  Learning to love a variety of fruits and vegetables helps to keep things interesting, and you’ll be offering your body a whole host of nutrients, too.  If you just can’t face a plate of spinach one more day, try spicy mustard greens, kale or Swiss chard instead.  Just because your meal plan calls for strawberries doesn’t mean you can’t swap in something more exotic like kiwi for a change.

Move meals and meal items around. In general, meal plans are designed to distribute your foods over several meals and snacks throughout the day – partly to help you control hunger, but also to help you maintain your physical and mental energy.  But, that doesn’t mean that you can’t move things around a little bit.  Maybe your plan calls for a mid-morning protein snack, but you don’t feel the need to eat it – by all means, move that snack to later in the day if it works better for you.  If you prefer your larger meal midday, rather than the larger dinner meal that your plan calls for, go ahead and swap.  The time of day that you eat your calories makes little difference as long as you don’t exceed your daily totals.  And, there’s no reason you can’t eat ‘breakfast food’ for dinner and have leftovers in the morning.

Add more seasonings to your food.  It seems to me that some people don’t even try to make their food interesting when they’re dieting.  It’s almost as if they’re trying to punish themselves – and that it would be ‘bad’ to actually enjoy a tasty plate of food. Eating should bring pleasure, not punishment and you can add loads of flavor to foods with seasonings like herbs, spices, citrus juice and zest, garlic, onion or a splash of wine or vinegar.  And don’t forget condiments like mustard, salsa, steak sauce or soy sauce.  Fresh steamed spinach tastes just fine but it’s a whole lot better with a little red onion and a sprinkle of balsamic vinegar.

Give your favorite recipes a makeover.  Diet boredom can also set in when you aren’t eating your usual favorite meals because they’re not very diet-friendly.  But with so many tips and tricks for revamping recipes, you might be able to satisfy your craving for your favorite foods without breaking your diet.  Once you’ve mastered a recipe, share and swap with your friends; it’s amazing how quickly you can build a healthy recipe collection that way.

Find restaurant meals that work with your meal plan.  Dieting can be really boring if you’re convinced you can never enjoy a meal out.  But there’s no reason to avoid restaurants (including curbside pickup) altogether when you’re in dieting mode – the trick is finding items that work with your diet, not against it. Asian and Mediterranean fare, for example, tend to offer diet-friendly vegetables and lean proteins, so that might be a good place to start.  And take advantage of online nutrition information which can be a big help in pre-planning what you’ll order.

Banana illustration by Mina Tocalini

3 Quarantine Nutrition Hacks

Are your clothes fitting more tightly on you than what you are comfortable with these days? If you indulged in “The Quarantine Diet” of added sugar, refined carbohydrates and more sugar, you are not alone. There isn’t a person on the planet who hasn’t been affected by the COVID-19 pandemic in some way. There are memes about Zoom meetings in pajamas. We’ve seen the jokes about annoyed pets who are ready for their owners to get back into the office. The most popular subject…drum roll, please… has been COVID weight gain, or “The Quarantine 15.” With some of us gaining upwards of 10 to 15 pounds at this point, these particular memes aren’t quite so funny anymore.

While some things are more difficult to control, like job loss, financial dips or getting sick, take advantage of the variables you do have control over. One of the easiest things you can master right now is your nutritional health. Making healthier food choices is more important than ever as we are collectively less active these days. Many places in the U.S. still have closed gyms and workout facilities, and home workouts aren’t for everyone. That leaves a lot of us with a perfect storm of weight gain, too little movement and too much snacking at home.

Life has disrupted us in a major way, and yet, there are still things we can do to reverse some of the damage. At 360 Magazine, we have rounded up 3 strategies from Los Angeles Nutrition Coach Natasha Maxwell to help get you back on track if the quarantine weight gain has claimed you as a victim. Nobody knows when COVID-19 lockdowns will end. If this is going to be the “new normal,” you will have to reincorporate the healthy habits from your old life into this new one. If you are totally new to nutritional habit building (the food choices practiced consistently in your daily life), these tips are still a great help. Stick with us through the end for a bonus summer recipe!

How to Reclaim Your Body during Quarantine:

  1. Drink More Water!: This one is often overlooked as a weight management tool although it is as equally as important as the food choices we make. According to Natasha, “As a nutrition coach, I cannot express the number of times I encounter new clients who scoff at the amount of water I suggest. That number should be at least half of your body weight; in the summer I recommend upwards of 100 ounces. Yes, that’s right, 100 ounces minimum. The lack of sufficient water is harmful to your body and can affect it in a number of ways including salty food cravings, waste buildup and digestion problems. That waste buildup can mimic true weight gain, also known as “water weight”. Bloating from dehydration is no fun either and is likely the reason that it’s sometimes hard to button your pants.” As Natasha stated: Drink your water, please!
  2. Be mindful of your sugar intake this summer!: What comes to mind when you envision summertime treats? Maybe it’s popsicles, banana pudding or key lime pie. These are all fine in moderation, but too much sugar can lead to weight gain and excess puffiness. For those looking to lose weight from our extended stay indoors, we will have to keep track of our sugar intake, even when lounging happily by the pool. Some ways around overindulging in sweets include substituting fruits for other sweets, avoiding sodas and packaged fruit juice and being more mindful of limiting foods with labels listing corn syrup, glucose, sucrose, etc.
  3.  Seek out new and healthier recipes!: The likelihood of entertaining guests during summer or being invited to someone else’s party or backyard BBQ is relatively high. Either way, food will be high on the list of priorities. Think produce, lean meats and fewer refined snacks when debating over a menu. Natasha especially urges the consumption of produce. Fresh vegetables and fruit are higher in water content, and an ample water supply can come in handy when you’re feeling a little dehydrated from the heat! Sliced cucumbers and carrots with a homemade dip are a win. Seafood and lean poultry options on the grill with veggies are also a great combo. For plant-based options, think stuffed pepper recipes, veggie hummus wraps and rainbow-colored salads with incredible ingredients and flavor. Who said healthy recipes can’t be tasty, too?

This pandemic is stressful and has affected us in a multitude of ways. Emotional eating is understandable, given our current circumstances. We don’t have to be rigid around everything we eat, but being more aware of what we are indulging in and how often is the key to weight maintenance and weight loss. Make a plan for your nutritional habits and find the balance that works best for you. We wish you luck!

As promised, here’s that bonus recipe you’ve been waiting on. It’s Summer Ceviche!

Let us know what you think with a comment down below!

health, Vaughn Lowery, 360 MAGAZINE

Plant-Based Diet Benefits

Plant-based eating provides a number of health benefits (and it’s good for the environment too). It’s important to ensure that with a plant-based diet, you can get the recommended amounts of all nutrients. Taking the time to plan will also make plant-based eating achievable.

James Collier, head of nutrition at Huel, the world’s best-selling complete nutrition brand, has put together some easy tips to make sure that anyone on a plant-based diet gets the protein and vitamins they need:

Eat a variety of foods, especially different colored foods as these contain different levels of nutrients. For example, the phytonutrient lycopene, which is an antioxidant that protects against cell damage and gives tomatoes its red color. Other carotenoids also act as antioxidants and give fruit and vegetables their orange and yellow colors; for example, carrots.

Vitamin B12 plays a vital role in helping the body produce red blood cells and is perceived as tricky to get enough of with a plant-based diet. The good news is it need not be. As a start, try incorporating plant-based milks that are that are fortified with B12, as well as calcium and vitamin D. Cereals, meat alternatives, and some soy products are often fortified with B12 too. Taking a B12 supplement also rids any concerns.

Ensure adequate omega-3 consumption. If oily fish is not part of your eating plan, then foods such as walnuts, soy products, and flaxseed are ways to obtain a good intake of omega-3s. Flaxseed is one of Huel’s six main ingredients and is rich in the omega-3 essential fatty acid ALA. Omega-3 fats are generally low in a Western diet and adequate omega-3 consumption is crucial to support cardiovascular health.

Keep your intake of iron up. Iron is not just found in meat food sources. Dark leafy greens, nuts and dried fruits are great sources of iron. Iron is crucial for oxygen transport, cognitive function, and the immune system. Iron from plant sources can be harder to absorb, but again, there’s no need to worry: iron absorption can also be increased by the presence of vitamin C which is found in lots of fruits and vegetables such as oranges and peppers. It’s where the idea of having orange juice with breakfast comes from – to increase the absorption of iron that is in breakfast cereals.

There are many protein-rich foods available to a plant-based diet, for example beans, lentils, soy products, hummus, nuts, and seeds. There are misconceptions about plant-based proteins in that people claim that they are inferior to meat, eggs and dairy proteins, which isn’t the case. Although the amino acid profile of a single plant-based protein source may be inferior to an animal protein, this is easy to get around simply by combining more than one source of plant protein in a meal. For example, beans and rice both contain good amounts of protein.

More information on Huel can be found at Huel.com

Raising Children to Eat Greens

Getting children to eat their greens? Both parents need to set an example

A positive example set by both the mother and the father promotes the consumption of vegetables, fruit and berries among 3–5-year-old children, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. The study explored the association of the home food environment and parental influence with the consumption of vegetables among kindergarten-aged children. The findings were published in Food Quality and Preference.

Children eat inadequate amounts of vegetables, fruit and berries across Europe and elsewhere, too. As the health and nutrition benefits of these foods are well-known, increasing their consumption among children is a challenge many countries are struggling with. Dietary habits also track from childhood to adulthood, and the period of early childhood is critical for adapting to a diet rich in greens.

The researchers studied the consumption of vegetables, fruit and berries, and the family’s home food environment, through a survey taken by parents. The study looked at 114 kindergarten-aged children and their parents (100) in Finland. Raw and cooked vegetables and fruit and berries were analysed separately.

The researchers found that to a certain degree, the consumption of vegetables is affected by different factors than the consumption of fruit and berries. Maternal example was associated with the consumption of raw and cooked vegetables as well as with the consumption of fruit and berries. Paternal example, on the other hand, was the strongest for cooked vegetables.

“This shows that teaching children to eat their greens is not something mothers should be doing alone. A positive example set by both parents is important, as is their encouragement of the child,” Researcher and Nutritionist Kaisa Kähkönen from the University of Eastern Finland says.

The study also showed that dinner is the most important meal at home when it comes to teaching children to eat vegetables. The families participating in the study often ate dinner together, highlighting the role of parental influence on the development of children’s dietary choices and preferences.

Dinner constitutes a daily opportunity to serve vegetables in a variety of different forms: as the main course, as a side dish, and as salad.

“Variation can be created by serving raw vegetables, such as the ever-popular cucumber and tomato, accompanied by cooked ones. In fact, many root vegetables, cabbages and squashes are best served cooked,”
Kähkönen says.

When it comes to eating fruit, evening snacks were the most important meal.

The study shows that many families still eat less vegetables, fruit and berries on average than would be beneficial in view of health promotion. Cooked vegetables and berries were the least eaten food items among the study population.

The Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition at the University of Eastern Finland studies how food education in early childhood can support good nutrition among children and promote the establishment of healthy dietary habits.

The newly published study was carried out in collaboration between researchers from the Universities of Eastern Finland, Jyväskylä and Turku. The study was funded by the Jenny and Antti Wihuri Fund.

How eating habits have an impact on our oral health

Will An Apple A Day – Along With Checkups – Help Keep Tooth Decay Away?

Eating may be a necessity, but when it comes to your teeth and gums, all that munching also can lead to quite a battle raging in your mouth.

Some of those foods – especially the sugary and starchy ones – act like invading forces, feeding the bacteria that cause tooth decay and gum disease, even as the saliva in your mouth fights back as best it can, trying to ward off the detrimental effects of the acids and enzymes.

“Tooth decay can be a problem for people of all ages – children, teenagers and adults  –  and yet it’s completely avoidable,” says Dr. Seth Newman (www.asktheorthos.com), an orthodontist and co-author with Dr. Steve Giannoutsos of Giving It To You Straight: Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Orthodontics But Were Afraid To Ask.

Newman and Giannoutsos say that there are plenty of ways that what’s in your diet affects not just your weight, but also your teeth and gums.

“Most people know that sugar and processed snacks can lead to tooth decay, even if they don’t always avoid those foods,” Giannoutsos says. “But there are other foods that also can be troublesome, and many people may not realize that.”

He and Newman provide a few tips for making sure your diet isn’t harmful to your oral health:

Watch out for bread – and chips. Chomp down on a candy bar and you might think to yourself that you better brush soon, lest the sugar go to work on your teeth before you can head it off. But the same thought might not occur to you when you’re eating breadsticks. Yet, foods that are high in carbohydrates and starches – such as bread, chips, pasta and crackers – contribute to the plaque acid that attacks tooth enamel.

Braces come with extra concerns. Beyond the usual dental care, there are additional dietary worries to consider when you have braces. People wearing braces should avoid foods that are too hard, sticky or chewy, Newman says, such as gum, nuts, corn chips, hard taco shells, hard candy and popcorn, just to name a few.

Develop good food-choice habits. When you’re grocery shopping, always check the nutrition labels. “Selecting snacks that are low in sugar can help combat tooth decay,” Giannoutsos says. “If poor nutrition continues, your oral health will decline, potentially resulting in gum disease and tooth loss.” Fruits and vegetables that are rich in fiber are a good choice for improving your oral health. Examples are apples, carrots and celery. In addition, milk, cheese and other dairy products are excellent options because of the calcium, phosphate and vitamin D they contain. Finally, drink fluoridated water as much as possible. If your tap water doesn’t include fluoride, check with your dentist for a fluoride supplement.

Ultimately, more is at stake than your teeth and gums. Left untreated, Giannoutsos and Newman say, oral-health problems can have a detrimental effect on your overall health, contributing to such conditions as heart disease and diabetes. That’s an additional reason why regular checkups – along with brushing and flossing – are so critical.

“It’s hard to resist your inner sweet tooth, so I wouldn’t say that you should never indulge in treats,” Newman says. “But when you do, brushing your teeth as quickly as possible afterwards will help decrease the risk of decay.”

About Seth Newman, DDS

Dr. Seth Newman (www.asktheorthos.com) is an orthodontist and co-author, with Dr. Steve Giannoutsos, of Giving It To You Straight: Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Orthodontics But Were Afraid To Ask. He owns orthodontic practices in the New York City area. Dr. Newman completed his dental training at Stony Brook School of Dental Medicine, where he was a member of the National Dental Honor Society. He was a clinical instructor of the Invisalign system at the NYU School of Dentistry.

About  Dr. Efstathios “Steve” Giannoutsos 
Dr. Efstathios Giannoutsos, or “Dr. G.” as he is commonly called, was born in Astoria, Queens, just outside of New York City. He graduated from St. John’s University in Jamaica, Queens, with high honors and a BS in Biology.  He is also the co-author with  Dr. Seth Newman of Giving It To You Straight: Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Orthodontics But Were Afraid to Ask(www.asktheorthos.com)He completed his dental training at NYU, where he graduated with a Doctor of Dental Surgery (DDS) degree. He was also accepted into NYU’s highly competitive orthodontic residency program. During that time, he also discovered a passion for treating children and adults with facial deformities. Coinciding his passion, his research thesis to attain specialty certification involved children with cleft deformities.

Greens Restaurant

Greens Restaurant celebrates its 40th year of nourishing the Bay Area community and visitors from around the world. Through the march of generations and amidst an ever-changing San Francisco dining scene, Greens Restaurant has remained steadfast in its original mission of celebrating vegetables with an intentional practice of being of service, an important value system set forth by its founders, the San Francisco Zen Center. Focusing on six important values of Generosity, Patience, Virtue, Energy, Focus, and Connection, Greens Restaurant has partnered with six acclaimed Bay Area chefs to serve guests in a special dinner series that will take place once a month starting this July.

The Greens 40th Anniversary Acclaimed Chef Dinner Series features an unprecedented lineup of renowned chefs, including: Alice Waters (Chez Panisse), Reem Assil (Reem’s California), Tanya Holland (Brown Sugar Kitchen), Suzette Gresham (Acquerello), Pam Mazzola (Prospect), and Kim Alter (Nightbird). These six Bay Area chefs will each design a vegetarian four-course prix fixe meal inspired by historic menus archived from the last four decades of Greens. Each menu will be offered at $85 per person with optional wine or beverage pairings. Tickets can be purchased via greensrestaurant.com. Details of the menus, the underlying core values and themes, and the connection between Greens and the guest chefs will be announced in advance of each monthly dinner.

Along with the milestone 40th Anniversary, Greens’ dinner series celebrates the meaningful ecosystem of interconnectedness — uniting a vital community network of diners, chefs, farmers, and artisanal purveyors from the Bay and regional lands. The kinship of land, food, and people has been the very foundation of Greens since 1979 and will be honorably showcased at each forthcoming 40th anniversary guest chef dinner.

With gratitude, Greens invites you to join the celebration of its heritage and ongoing mission.

Tuesday, July 9, 2019 — Reem Assil — Reem’s California

In 2010, the dream of Reem’s was born at the doorstep of a street corner bakery in Beirut, Lebanon. The scent of za’atar, yeasted bread, and sweet orange blossom syrup right out of the oven and the sounds of laughter and chatter in Arabic all around Reem Assil conjured up memories of her childhood and yearning to create home and community in the United States. Witnessing the life inside those bakery doors despite the political turbulence outside of them is when she realized her people are masters of bread and hospitality: the lifeline of their history and what has kept them resilient over many generations despite colonization, war, drought, and famine in the Arab world. In the fall of 2016, Reem Assil won the national OpenTable contest to fund their dream restaurant, and six months later, they opened their first brick & mortar location in the heart of Fruitvale in one of the most diverse communities in Oakland. Since then, Reem has garnered an array of top accolades, including being named a James Beard semifinalist in the Best Chef: West in 2018 and 2019, Thrillist’s “2018 Chef of the Year,” San Francisco Magazine’s “2018 Chef of the Year,” San Francisco Chronicle’s “2017 Rising Star Chef,” and most recently, Star Chefs “Rising Star Chef 2019.” Reem’s California was also named one of Food & Wine’s “2018 Top 10 Restaurants of the Year.”

Monday, August 5, 2019 — Alice Waters — Chez Panisse

Alice Waters is a chef, author, food activist, and the founder and owner of Chez Panisse Restaurant in Berkeley, California. She has been a champion of local sustainable agriculture for over four decades. In 1995, she founded the Edible Schoolyard Project, which advocates for a free school lunch for all children and a sustainable food curriculum in every public school. She has been Vice President of Slow Food International since 2002. Her honors include election as a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2007; the Harvard Medical School’s Global Environmental Citizen Award, which she shared with Kofi Annan in 2008; and her induction into the French Legion of Honor in 2010. In 2015, she was awarded the National Humanities Medal by President Obama, proving that eating is a political act, and that the table is a powerful means to social justice and positive change. Alice is the author of 16 books including her critically acclaimed memoir, Coming to My Senses: The Making of a Counterculture Cook, The New York Times bestsellers The Art of Simple Food I & II, and The Edible Schoolyard: A Universal Idea.

Wednesday, September 11, 2019 — Suzette Gresham — Acquerello

Acquerello’s co-owner and Executive Chef, Suzette Gresham, has led an incredibly accomplished career, receiving countless awards and accolades. Her achievements, however, have never deterred her from the ultimate goal as a chef — to make her guests happy. Gresham’s enthusiasm in the kitchen and tenacious personality led to the opening of Acquerello with business partner Giancarlo Paterlini in July 1989. Since that time, Acquerello has held a spot every year on the San Francisco Chronicle’s Top 100 Bay Area Restaurant List. The restaurant received its first Michelin star in 2007, and was awarded a second star in 2014. Today, Gresham is known as a pioneer in the culinary industry and has become one of the most influential chefs in the world of Italian fine dining. Her understated yet elegant approach to traditional Italian dishes showcases her culinary philosophy; that simplicity and preserving the integrity of food speaks volumes.

October 7, 2019 — Kim Alter — Nightbird

Kim Alter is the driving force behind Nightbird and Linden Room, which she opened August 2016 in the bustling Hayes Valley neighborhood as one of the most highly anticipated restaurants of the year. Nightbird, named for Alter’s love of owls, embraces community and diversity, and consistently delivers a hospitable, whimsical experience. Alter showcases the Bay Area’s bounty of produce with layered, flavorful dishes reflecting her commitment to technique, whole animal cooking, and unyielding support of the region’s farmers. Alter earned a Food & Wine Magazine nomination for People’s Best Chef in 2012 and 2013. In 2018, Alter was a James Beard Award semifinalist for “Best Chef: West.” Alter formerly worked with the Daniel Patterson Group for three years at the helm of kitchens such as Haven and Plum in Oakland, California. Prior to that, she worked in some of the Bay Area’s most notable restaurants such as Manresa (three-star Michelin), Aqua (two-star Michelin), and Acquerello (two-star Michelin). Alter won the title of “Best New Chef” from Oakland Magazine while at Haven, which was also named “Best New Restaurant” under her direction and awarded three stars from San Francisco Magazine.

Monday, November 4, 2019 — Tanya Holland — Brown Sugar Kitchen

Known for her inventive take on modern soul food, as well as comfort classics, Executive Chef Tanya Holland is the owner of Brown Sugar Kitchen. Chef Holland is the author of the Brown Sugar Kitchen Cookbook and New Soul Cooking; was the host and soul food expert on the television series Melting Pot; and competed on the fifteenth season of Top Chef. Holland appeared as a special guest on countless national television shows including the Today Show, Vh1’s Soul Cities, Sarah Moulton’s Cooking Live, Ready, Set, Cook! The Wayne Brady Show, and has been featured in articles in The New York Times, O The Oprah Magazine, The Wall Street Journal, Travel & Leisure, and Sunset just to name a few. Holland shares her love of modern Southern fare by bringing home her passion for soul food and the amazing experiences shared through the act of enjoying a meal with family and friends.

Wednesday, December 11, 2019 — Pam Mazzola — Prospect

Hailing from Denver where she cooked in many of the city’s top kitchens, Pam Mazzola first joined Chef Nancy Oakes at San Francisco’s L’Avenue in 1988. Their meeting launched a friendship and culinary partnership that has endured for over twenty years. Mazzola was part of the opening staff of Boulevard and is a co-author with Oakes on the James Beard Award-nominated Boulevard Cookbook. Prospect is a collaboration of Chef Nancy Oakes, Pam Mazzola, and Kathy King from Boulevard Restaurant. As chef/partner in Prospect, Mazzola works closely with the team, guiding the overall direction of the restaurant with a focus on menu development. Located at the base of the Infinity Towers in downtown San Francisco, Prospect features exceptional contemporary American cuisine with local, sustainable, and organic ingredients while hosting diners in a warm and modern urban environment with high service standards.

About Greens Restaurant

Greens Restaurant pioneered vegetarian cooking and paved the way for establishing it as a cuisine in America. In 1979, the San Francisco Zen Center opened Greens to provide an opportunity for Zen students to work together and extend their practice to the workplace. For many years, the entire staff at Greens were Zen students. Founding Chef of Greens, Deborah Madison, was a student at Zen Center for 18 years where she held a host of kitchen positions. In 1981, Annie Somerville joined the restaurant and trained with Madison. Somerville became Executive Chef in 1985, and has since continued to work closely with local growers, cheesemakers, and purveyors, to serve and celebrate seasons and their bounty. San Francisco Zen Center’s Green Gulch Farm provides the restaurant with organic produce year-round from its farm and garden. Green Gulch Farm has been a model of sustainable organic farming and gardening.

Occupying a former Army warehouse in Fort Mason, the restaurant is adorned with floor to ceiling windows and quintessential views of the Golden Gate Bridge, Marin headlands and The Marina. The space was constructed by carpenters from the Zen Center, including lead designer Paul Discoe, an ordained Zen Buddhist priest, using reclaimed wood and recycled material. Central to the familiar dining room are works by local Bay Area artists: a curving three-ton, tour de force of woodcarving, redwood installation by J.B. Blunk, original landscapes hanging on the walls by painter Willard Dixon, and specially made service areas and entryway by designer Jason Lees.