Posts tagged with "leadership"

Business woman article illustration by Kaelen Felix for 360 Magazine

How To Host Inclusive Corporate Training

Is Your Corporate Training Program Inclusive? If Not, Here’s How You Can Do It

Inclusion is an important aspect of every workplace. However, surprisingly even the greatest of the companies with impeccable work culture often gloss over accessibility and inclusion in regards to training and development as an afterthought.

It’s crucial for every organization and its leadership to understand that training employees will never have a one-size-fits-all solution. Every employee has a different learning capability. They interact and engage with the program in different ways. Therefore, they cannot be expected to yield similar results. That’s simply impractical.

That’s where inclusive training plays an important role. Inclusive training includes the steps that you take to remove every hindrance that prevents, or could prevent, your workforce from reaching their full potential.

The more inclusive and accessible your training is, the more it’ll help employees retain what they learn. It helps a majority of employees stay engaged and consequently, improve the ROI of the program.

Here’s how you can achieve greater engagement and ROI:

  • Use the Right Language

Start by adopting an LMS that offers multilingual features. Take Totara LMS, for example. Once you have an LMS that supports different languages, identify the linguistic capabilities of your team members. Even if you have English as your working language, you can still translate training in the language that a maximum number of your employees speak.

When they learn in their own language, this helps them retain information and understand concepts better.

You should also tone down your training. Make it more user-friendly, avoid technical terms, steer clear of jargon, and use shorter sentences.

  • Adopt Different Methods to Deliver Content

We’ve already talked about how different learners have different capabilities to engage with the content. Thus, finding different ways to deliver content to your employees is considered one of the best practices.

While a few might learn better with employees, there are others that may prefer PDFs or infographics to grasp the content better. You should consider offering different options to employees if you want your training to be inclusive and effective.

Also, be sure that your content can be accessed from different operating systems on different devices. This will allow your employees to engage in microlearning and be a part of the program even when they’re on the go.

  • Consider Age and Technology Literacy Gaps 

Your entire workforce will not be tech-savvy and you need to keep this in mind. In an organization, you will not only find millennials that are comfortable around technology. You have your workforce that is built of individuals from varied generations.

While you wouldn’t want the baby boomers in your team to feel left out, you also wouldn’t want your millennials to lose interest. So, how do you create a balance? By pairing individuals from different age groups together.

Make employees from different generations and tech skills study buddies. While millennials can play their part in helping the older generation learn about technology, baby boomers can help millennials learn from their experience.

  • Encourage Self-Paced Learning 

As companies adopt remote working as their permanent or temporary work arrangement, remote training with the help of different online courses became a norm. However, the workplace was not the only change that individuals had to face.

Those in the workforce working from home had to deal with changes that were taking place at their home as well. Many have kids who are homeschooling, or may need to take care of elderly family members. It is likely their stress levels are higher than usual.

It’s true that the training program should be completed on time and it’s important for everyone to be involved. However,  inclusive training means offering flexibility and encouraging self-paced learning.

Conclusion 

Inclusive training in today’s time is a crucial practice. The best ways to make your training more inclusive is by using different language, delivering content in more than one way, pairing up different employees from different generations together, and encouraging self-paced learning. The more inclusive you make your training, the more successful it’ll be.

Award illustration done by Mina Tocalini of 360 MAGAZINE.

Best Culture & Fashion Lifestyle Publication – USA

360 MAGAZINE has been selected as Best Culture & Fashion Lifestyle Publication – USA

Awarded by the 2021 Global Business Insight Awards, which celebrates business leadership, innovation in finance and investment and sector success across all seven continents of the world, 360 Magazine is honored to receive this prestigious title. Global Business Insight has ranked 360 Magazine at the “pinnacle of its peers,” recognizing our magazine’s commitment to continued success and innovation.

What are the 2021 Global Business Insight Awards?

“The 2021 Global Business Insight Awards are an exact illustration of the very best this essential and competitive industry as to offer. By concentrating on a wealth of disciplines, our awards will endeavor to identify and celebrate those individuals and businesses within the Business Insight umbrella. From Financial Services and Technology to Construction and Healthcare – all sectors and company sizes are welcome, including individual recognition for outstanding achievements. Using our far-reaching and intense research process, we guarantee the selection of only the elite for our prestigious honors.”

How is the 2021 Winner List Formulated?

“The 2021 Global Business Insight Awards are a celebration of business leadership, innovation and sector success across the globe. Nominated through a legitimately independent process, each of the winners is carefully selected by the corporate community, raising the kudos of these annual awards. Business leaders are recognized across a full spectrum of sectors, from Financial Services and Technology to Construction and Healthcare and then judged in a range of categories.”

“Ensuring that the award evaluation process is neutral and valid, is a key priority and as a consequence votes are gathered year-round via a number of digital channels and then evaluated employing a transparent and dynamic framework. For each of the awards programs we utilize quantitative and qualitative studies which have been conducted by our experienced research teams and by measuring each business against a precise set of appraisal criteria, we have created a unique model which assures the validity of our results.  The criteria and sub-criteria offer a robust set of requirements that are then used as the methodology to not only benchmark but also create a depth of understanding amidst the participating businesses, ultimately allowing us to ensure that we capture different dimensions of the same phenomenon.”

Who Judges the Awards?

“The judges of the 2021 Global Business Insight Awards are highly experienced and diverse; the panel are made up of transnational and multi-lingual appointed individuals whose backgrounds span a host of different disciplines such as European languages, journalism, history, media and not least business. Headed up by an experienced academic leader of international schooling, who boasts years of coaching practice and is well-informed in research practices and the verification of facts and facilitation, the panel are able to run efficiently and dependably, ultimately ensuring the weight of these awards.”

Balance illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

3 Tips for Leaders

3 Tips for Leaders to Steady the Ship When Employees Lose Their Balance

Company leaders and managers have a big responsibility in overseeing employees. But they can’t see everything, and sometimes there’s more going on in a worker’s life than meets the eye.

Employee disengagement or burnout isn’t always apparent, and some employers may be in for a surprise if and when the COVID-19 pandemic winds down. One study shows that 57% of U.S. employees say they are burnt out, with many likely to leave their job after the pandemic is over. And a Gallup survey reveals that the percentage of engaged employees – those enthusiastic about their workplace – is under 40%.

What the numbers mean is leaders need to learn how to spot and help out-of-balance employees, says Mark McClain, CEO and co-founder of SailPoint and the ForbesBooks author of Joy and Success at Work: Building Organizations that Don’t Suck (the Life Out of People).

“One challenge leaders and managers routinely face is to recognize when the people around them – peers, colleagues, but especially subordinates – are out of balance or are heading in the wrong direction,” McClain says. “Beyond the potential impacts on their personal lives, you want to try to head off the negative effects such imbalances can have on their roles in the company.

“This may seem imposing, but you have to pay attention as a leader. No employee can run at a crazy pace forever, yet some companies let people run themselves right out of the building. Other workers who are disengaged can be harder to spot initially.”

McClain offers these tips for leaders to spot, address, and help out-of-balance employees:

  • Make work-life balance part of your culture. “You can expect much from your employees, but you don’t want them to fry themselves,” McClain says. “You don’t want them to harm their health, their family, or their relationships. If you have good people, ideally, you’ll grow them and help them work toward their vision of a healthy work-life balance. The sooner leaders confront imbalance in the equation, the more meat they put on the bones of company culture.”
  • Screen out for potential burnout. Some companies hire knowing they will overwork people or take advantage of their ambition to work extra hard and advance up the corporate ladder, McClain says. But that approach can lead to burnout and departure, which costs companies in terms of replacing them. “There are always going to be ultra-motivated climbers,” McClain says. “But exploiting them is beyond bad. Those who can’t stand it get out, and the HR departments plan on the fact that every four or five years, only 15 to 20 percent of those hires will be able to move up the ranks. These types of organizations instead should invest in pre-hiring assessments to screen out those who value a life outside of work. Doing so would save the companies money and turnover.”
  • Be a counselor. It’s not an invasion of privacy for a manager to show concern in an employee, McClain says, and probing is necessary to help the employee. “Like it or not,” he says, “being a counselor of sorts is part of managing people. Getting to know them as people, and their work styles, is what makes spotting imbalances possible. Its why good managers pull employees aside and say, ‘Hey, you’re here, but you’re not engaged. Is something going on?’ Managers who take that step are able to uncover issues and steer their employees to the help they need.”

“Many companies talk about caring for workers until they’re blue in the face,” McClain says. “But when you put in place the pieces to help them succeed, leaders walk the walk – and everybody wins.”

Chaos Ignites Agility Illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Chaos Ignites Agility

2020 exposed the collapse of standardization. We are rapidly moving away from an era defined by outdated standards that held people to conformity and limited their creativity—to today’s new era of personalization that honors one’s individual contributions and embraces fresh ideas and ideals,” said Glenn Llopis, president of GLLG, a leadership and business strategy consulting firm that authored a new report available today: CHAOS IGNITES AGILITY (download full report).

CHAOS IGNITES AGILITY captures the most intimate and disruptive insights from 46 executives across healthcare, corporate, and education. These leaders came together virtually for three days last October to share how they are working to restore individual dignity in how they serve patients, customers, employees, and students to thrive in a post-pandemic reality.

Themes emerged across the sectors, as doctors, professors, executives, deans, and presidents got real about how they have been adapting throughout the challenges and unpredictability of 2020. They collectively zeroed in on these major challenges and opportunities:

  • How to put patients, employees, and students at the center – to activate individual capacity.
  • How to lead through industry transformation when there’s so much uncertainty.
  • How to pursue and employ inclusion as a growth strategy going forward.

This riveting video tells the story.

Organizations represented in CHAOS IGNITES AGILITY include:

Healthcare:

  • CVS Health, Mount Sinai Health System, Anthem, Cancer Treatment Centers of America, Woman’s Hospital, Lenovo Health, Keck Medicine of USC, City of Hope Cancer Medical Center, and American Association of Critical-Care Nurses

Corporate:

  • Starbucks, Microsoft, Twitter, ViacomCBS, Mitsubishi Motors North America, Cost Plus World Market, Chico’s FAS, Inc., RBC Capital Markets, Farmers Insurance, H&R Block, Lyft, and Banfield Pet Hospital

Higher Education:

  • Clemson University, College of Business, Google, USC Marshall School of Business, Drake University, The Eagle Academy Foundation, Fairfield University, Lynchburg, College of Business, University of Washington, Bothell, University of South Florida, College of Business, California State University, Stanislaus, and Metropolitan Community College

Learn more at Age of Personalization.

Empowered Women Illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

CÎROC × COMBS ENTERPRISES EMPOWERED WOMEN

The first cohort of the 2021 Empowered Women honorees, including Iman, Valeisha Butterfield-Jones, and Fadia Kader, are announced in celebration of International Women’s Day.

 

Ciroc and Combs Enterprises are proud to announce the continuation of its Empowered Women platform. Empowered Women, first launched in 2016 by Combs Enterprises women-led executive team, uplifts, spotlights, and honors an eclectic and dynamic group of entrepreneurs, creatives, and businesswomen.

This year, Ciroc and Combs Enterprises partnered with Culture Creators, a cultural connectivity organization that aims to spotlight the contributions of individuals who have shaped the global view of Black culture. To further amplify the initiative, fittingly launched during Women’s History Month, Empowered Women will honor 50 successful women and share the narratives that formed them. Championing discussions around the value of mentorship, allyship, and leadership, Empowered Women highlights the importance of celebrating the current and uplifting the next generation of fearless leaders. Honorees represent five categories including social impact, technology, entertainment, art and style, and business.

Ciroc, Combs Enterprises, and Culture Creators will spotlight the honorees beginning in March and culminating this spring. The series will include custom digital content and exclusive honoree interviews shared via Culture Creators’ platforms, curated vodka cocktails, and an exclusive media partnership with women’s lifestyle publication, Elle Magazine.

It is an honor to continue to build and strengthen the Empowered Women platform alongside Culture Creators and Elle Magazine”, says Ingrid Best, Vice President of Global Marketing, Spirits, Combs Enterprises. “As a Black woman, it is my personal and professional mission to honor those who are breaking boundaries, while also providing a platform for us to continue to do the important work of mentoring and showing up for the next generation. We hope this program encourages young, budding professionals to push boundaries and redefine the status quo in their respective industries.”.

The first round of March 2021 honorees is below, representing the industry leaders paving the way for future generations.

 

Empowered Women Honorees – March:

  • Adrienne Lofton
  • Alencia Johnson
  • Brianna Agyemang
  • Caroline Yim
  • Dawn Dickson
  • Donna Stewart
  • Fadia Kadar
  • Heather Lowery
  • IMAN
  • Jamila Thomas
  • Morgan DeBaun
  • Sarah Jakes Roberts
  • Stephanie L. Young
  • Morgan Dixon
  • Valeshia Butterfield-Jones
  • Vanessa Garrison
  • Yvette Noel Schure

Joi Brown, Founder, and CEO of Culture Creators commented, “I started Culture Creators because I envisioned a platform that gives individuals who push the culture forward and strive for inclusion that flowers while they are still here while continuing to develop the next generation of leaders. Partnering with like-minded visionaries at Ciroc to bring Empowered Women to life marries the spirit of celebration and mentorship.”.

As part of its mission to propel Black culture, Culture Creators has consistently celebrated the accomplishments of key luminaries across a broad spectrum of industries, including entertainment, fashion, finance, technology, business, and more. The Innovators & Leaders Awards Brunch, Culture Creators’ annual signature event, exemplifies this mission and has previously honored Sylvia Rhone, Byron Allen, Marsai Martin, Jemele Hill, Kenya Barris, Charles D. King, and the late Andre Harrell, to name a few. In 2019, Culture Creators launched the first-ever C2 Summit, a platform that targets students of color across all universities and provides interactive educational experiences, employment opportunities, and creates access to leaders across various career paths. Today, Culture Creators further advances its mission with the launch of the Empowered Women platform.

Melvin Sampson illustration by Kaelen Felix for 360 Magazine

Remembering Melvin Sampson

By Hannah DiPilato

Melvin Sampson was a leader throughout his life and was dedicated to fighting for the rights of indigenous people. Before his passing, he was a tribal councilman that pushed for Native American’s rights. 

Some of his most monumental efforts include helping to establish the Indian National Finals Rodeo, assisting in the improvement of health care for Native Americans across the nation, advocating for the construction of the Yakama Nation Indian Health Services clinic west of Toppenish and pushing to improve fish restoration in the Yakima and Columbia basins.

Sampson passed in his home on December 11 at 82-years-old and left behind his wife, Betty Jean and his four daughters. He will be remembered by his big family of grandchildren and great-grandchildren. 

Sampson’s full obituary can be found on Heggies Colonial Funeral Home’s website and anyone is able to leave thoughts, prayers and condolences for Sampson’s loved ones. People can also send flowers or a virtual gift and share photos and videos, a beautiful way to share remembrance amidst the pandemic. 

“He’s bigger than the Yakama Nation,” said Yakama General Council Chairman Roger Fiander, who grew up beside Sampson. “Besides that, he was my roping partner.”

Sampson’s legacy of helping to gain rights for Native Americans will live on for generations. Hopefully, many more people will follow in his footsteps to preserve tribal culture. 

Sampson was an advocate of better healthcare for Native Americans for 17 years while he served on the National Indian Health Board. He also helped form the Portland Area Indian Health Board, which monitors the federal administration of Indian health services in Idaho, Oregon and Washington. 

In Washington D.C., Sampson was at the head of an effort to gain funding for a new Indian Health Clinic. Eventually, his efforts led to an expansion of the clinic which expanded it into a facility of over 80,000 square feet. 

Sampson also wanted to improve fish rearing practices in the Yakama and Columbia basins in order to help the fish that lived there. With Sampson in charge, the Yakama Nation gained control of the Klickitat Hatchery which is found on the Klickitat river outside of Glendale. This hatchery was designed to rebuild the population of salmon by mimicking the natural habitat system that fish thrive in. 

Everyone that knew Sampson believed he was a born leader. He had a diverse understanding of tribal culture and government which allowed him to make many changes in his lifetime. George Waters, a lobbyist for the tribe in Washington, D.C., said that Sampson was just a person able to operate in different worlds. 

He was able to create many amazing things such as doing leatherwork and beginning a shop in his basement. Sampson can also be remembered for his forward-thinking ways that were ahead of his time. 

Irving Pinkham, another childhood friend of Sampson, said that Sampson cared for everyone and always wanted to help indigenous people. “In our way, nobody is better than anyone else and that’s what he believed too,” Pinkham said. “He never was a person who said ‘I, I did this, I did that.’ He was always a person who said ‘We, we did this, we did that.’ “

Sampson’s perseverance and ability to understand people helped him become a success in many aspects of his life. He was able to improve healthcare and the way of life for those around him and his legacy will be seen in all of the work he accomplished over his lifetime.

Oprah Winfrey Virtual Town Halls

Oprah Winfrey announced plans Monday to host virtual town halls in states that look to play a large role in the upcoming election.

As part of OWN’s OWN YOUR VOTE get-out-the-vote initiative, the town halls will be a non-partisan effort to encourage, inspire and support voters across the country before Nov. 3.

The events are free and open to the public, and you can register in advance by clicking right here.

She will host an event for voters in Wisconsin Oct. 26, voters in North Carolina Oct. 27, voters in Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio and Pennsylvania Oct. 28 and voters in South Carolina Oct. 29. All of the town halls will begin at 8 p.m. ET.

Winfrey will speak with local voters in an effort to acquire adequate resources, information and inspiration to create a more informed voting base. Local voters, national thought leaders, voting rights experts and others who can provide insight and resources to voters will join her.

Speakers at the town halls include Brittany Packnett Cunningham, Representative Gwen Moore, Kristen Clarke, Vi Lyles, Kamilia Landrum, Andrea Hailey, Tameika Isaac Devine, Arisha Hatch, Tamika D. Mallory and Sherrilyn Ifill.

Representatives from women’s organizations will also attend, like Dr. Glenda Glover, Beverly E. Smith, Melanie Campbell, Glynda Carr, Dr. Johnnetta Betsch Cole, Dr. Kimberly Leonard, Rasheeda S. Liberty and Valerie Hollingsworth Baker.

For this event, OWN YOUR VOTE has partnered with the following organizations: 

Advancement Project National Office

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated

AME Church Social Action Commission

Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Incorporated

Fair Fight Action

Higher Heights Leadership Fund

Joseph and Evelyn Lowery Institute for Justice and Human Rights

The Kapor Center

The King Center (Martin Luther King, Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change, Inc.)

Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law

The Links, Incorporated

National Association for the Advancement of Colored People

NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc. (LDF)

National Council of Negro Women

National Urban League

Power Rising

Power to the Polls

Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority, Incorporated

Sistahs in Business Expo

Vote Run Lead

Vote.org

VoteAsIf.org

When We All Vote

Woke Vote

Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Incorporated

You can also learn more about OWN YOUR VOTE by clicking right here.

Jewish Community Foundation Supports Racial Equity

JEWISH COMMUNITY FOUNDATION OF LOS ANGELES AWARDS $325,000 TO SUPPORT RACIAL EQUITY

The Jewish Community Foundation of Los Angeles (The Foundation) today announced that it has awarded grants totaling $325,000 to seven local organizations to support racial equity.

The funding is being directed to programs that span a diverse range of areas including health care for Black women and infants; job opportunities for at-risk youth and those exiting the justice system; access to quality education; and leadership opportunities for Black professionals. The seven recipients are: A New Way of Life Reentry Project, African American Board Leadership Institute, Anti-Recidivism Coalition, Jews of Color Initiative, Black Women for Wellness, Los Angeles Brotherhood Crusade, and Social Justice Learning Institute.

President and Chief Executive OfficerMarvin I. Schotland stated: “In response to the current social unrest, The Foundation decided to make these grants. These inspiring programs align with our institution’s own values of creating a more civil, just and equitable society. We are proud to place our support behind these initiatives and look forward to following the progress of their meaningful work.”

Schotland indicated that to enhance The Foundation’s understanding of the important issues and organizations serving communities of color, it consulted with numerous prominent funders and experts in the field.

The Foundation CEO added: “These nonprofits have received prior support from trusted funders, as well as our foundation’s own donors, which helped to inform our decision-making. Beyond that, we established criteria that included being Black-led, well-established, located in the communities they serve, and focused on providing direct services.”

Susan Burton, founder and executive director of A New Way of Life, stated: “This grant will support our work and continued efforts in equity and opportunity for formerly incarcerated people and their children. With The Foundation’s support, we are able to expand our housing services with two more safehouses during the pandemic for the women we serve. Thanks to The Foundation, a safe and stable home is possible for current and future residents during these difficult times.”

Added Ilana Kaufman, executive director, Jews of Color Initiative: “With the generosity of The Foundation, the Jews of Color Initiative can expand our work to foster equitable Jewish communities and institutions by extending research and grantmaking efforts to support and advance the leadership and visions of Jews of Color.”

About the Recipients

A New Way of Life Reentry Project provides women exiting prison (primarily women of color) with a safe, welcoming and structured place to stay, education and employment opportunities, case management, and legal services as they re-enter the community.

African American Board Leadership Institute trains and places well-qualified African American professionals on boards across a number of well-known public institutions, recognizing the need for more equitable representation among corporate, nonprofit, and government boards and committees.

Anti-Recidivism Coalition works to end mass incarceration and reduce recidivism rates in California through justice-reform advocacy, re-entry support, mentoring, counseling, housing, and its career-development training and partnerships, as one of the most difficult parts of re-entering the community is access to work.

Jews of Color Initiative works to advance and build the professional, organizational, and communal field for Jews of color. This includes commissioned studies on the number and experiences of Jews of color in the U.S., as well as working to promote racially diverse engagement, and grantmaking to support diversity, equity, and inclusion.

Black Women for Wellness is committed to the health and well-being of Black women and girls and focuses on research, education, outreach, and leadership development of Black women to address the health challenges in their communities, where infant mortality and maternal death during childbirth run two and four times higher, respectively, than among white women regardless of socio-economic status.

Los Angeles Brotherhood Crusade is a longtime grassroots nonprofit based in South Los Angeles, focuses on addressing the unmet needs of low-income, underserved, under-represented, and disenfranchised individuals through initiatives such as its Youth Development Program which provides comprehensive services – mentorship, gang prevention, educational support, and career readiness – for at-risk youth and students.

Social Justice Learning Institute is dedicated to improving the education, health, and well-being of youth and communities of color across Inglewood, Compton, Watts, Lennox, Lancaster, and Palmdale through its Urban Scholars Program, which aims to increase students’ academic achievement and provide them tools and resources to advocate for an equitable education.

About The Jewish Community Foundation:

Established in 1954, the Jewish Community Foundation of Los Angeles manages charitable assets of more than $1 billion entrusted to it by over 1,300 families and ranks among the 10 largest Los Angeles foundations. It partners with donors to shape meaningful philanthropic strategies, magnify the impact of their giving, and build enduring charitable legacies. In 2019, The Foundation and its donors distributed more than $129 million in grants to 2,700 nonprofits with programs that span the range of philanthropic giving. Over the past 10 years, it has distributed nearly $1 billion to thousands of nonprofits across a diverse spectrum. www.jewishfoundationla.org

Jaden Smith illustration done by Mina Tocalini of 360 MAGAZINE.

Jaden Smith × Vote for the Earth

Future Coalition, the creators of Earth Day Live, one of the largest digital mobilizations in history held in April 2020 that garnered 5 million views worldwide – announced the “Vote For the Earth” livestream series. The series unites Black and Indigenous youth leadership and calls on young people to tackle systems of oppression by turning out the vote in November. In partnership with Earth Guardians, We Stand United, Hip Hop Caucus and the International Indigenous Youth Council, the event will air on Future Live, Twitch, Twitter, YouTube and Facebook. 

Vote For the Earth will reach a broad audience and leverage the best civic engagement technology and frontline and digital tactics to register new voters. It will encourage voters to access absentee ballots and to Vote For the Earth to build a sustainable future for the next seven generations. 

The livestream series features stories of power, resilience and movement-building on the ground from frontline community members, along with musical performances and speakers such as Jaden Smith and Van Jones. Speakers will share messages on the intersectionality of social justice and climate justice, while also sharing the many resources available from the climate movement. 

Vote For the Earth aims to contribute to a 55 percent youth voter turnout in the November election, while also aiming to reach 2 million Black and Indigenous youth eligible to vote. The series will also facilitate partnership building with Black and Indigenous organizers to diversify the climate movement and allow for partnerships with universities and organizations to register voters.

“Protecting our communities from systemic racism and violence and the climate emergency go hand in hand,” said Thomas Lopez, Partnerships Coordinator of the Climate Strikes with Future Coalition. “The youth vote is critical to turning the tide in the November presidential election, and Vote For the Earth will help us accomplish that.”

The 2-hour livestream will start at:

5 p.m. PST / 8 p.m. EST on Wednesday, August 12

To tune in, sign up at https://votefortheearth.us/

Featuring musical and spoken-word performances from artists involved in climate activism and social justice movements, including:

  • Xiuhtezcatl Martinez
  • Leala Pourier
  • Portugal the Man  
  • Zakaria Kronemer
  • Jasilyn Charger
  • Tokata Iron Eyes
  • Cody Looking Horse
  • Anjelah Johnson
  • The Grand Alliance – Sur Ellz , Kayla Marque & Crl Crrll
  • Van Jones
  • Simone Johnson
  • Reverend Lennox Yearwood
  • Kaylah Brathwaite
  • Jaden Smith
  • UMI
  • Supaman
  • Ayoni
  • Antoine Edwards & Nattaanii Means

The second and third livestreams of the series will air on September 16 and October 14. For more information, visit https://votefortheearth.us/

About March On: March On is a political organization composed of women-led political activist groups that grew out of the women’s marches of January 21, 2017. They have come together as a united force to take concrete, coordinated actions at the federal, state and local levels to impact elections and take our country in a better direction. March On is not affiliated with Women’s March, Inc. For more information, visit wearemarchon.org

About Future Coalition: Founded by youth activists for youth activists, Future Coalition is a network and community for youth-led organizations and Gen Z and young millennial leaders from across the country that came into being as a project of March On in the fall of 2018. The Future Coalition works collaboratively to provide young people with the resources, tools, and support they need to create the change they want to see in their communities and in this country. For more information, visit futurecoalition.org

About Earth Guardians: Earth Guardians began in 1992 as an accredited high school in Maui, Hawaii, focusing on environmental awareness and social justice issues. Seeing the need to empower and amplify the voice of a wider audience,Since then, Earth Guardians has become a global movement providing a platform for hundreds of youth crews in over 60 countries to engage in some of the greatest issues we face as a global community. Earth Guardians continues to inspire and train diverse youth to be effective leaders within the climate justice and environmental movement worldwide. For more information, visit https://www.earthguardians.org/.

About International Indigenous Youth Council: The International Indigenous Youth Council (IIYC) is a social justice non-profit that serves Indigenous and POC youth in their journeys as young leaders. IIYC provides education-based resources and training in direct action, resistance art, spiritual practice and civic engagement. IIYC was started and led by womxn and two-spirit peoples during the Standing Rock Indigenous Uprising of 2016 while peacefully protecting the Cannonball and Missouri Rivers against the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline. In 2017 IIYC extended the reach of the organization through a chapter model which serves youth across Turtle Island in areas including Chicago, Denver, New Mexico, Southern California, South Dakota, Texas (Yanaguana Chapter), Twin Cities Minnesota and Washington DC. The IIYC is a completely youth-led organization serving young people up to the age of 30. For more information, visit https://indigenousyouth.org/.

About We Stand United: We Stand United is an organization of award-winning artists, activists, political strategists and communications experts working together to protect our democracy and to advance social, economic, and environmental justice across the United States. https://wsucampaign.org/.

About Hip Hop Caucus: We link culture and policy to make our movements bigger, more diverse, and more powerful. We exist for everyone who identifies with Hip Hop culture to come together for positive change. Being part of Hip Hop Caucus means you can use your cultural expression to shape your political experience. For more information, visit https://hiphopcaucus.org/.

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WITI * Virtual Summit

WITI Hosts Its First Virtual Women in Technology Summit June 23-24, 2020

WITI (Women in Technology International), the leading advocate for innovation,
inclusivity and STEAM, kicks-off its first virtual Women in Technology Summit tomorrow, June 23, 2020. Themed ‘Adapt and Innovate’, the two-day summit is designed to spotlight leaders in technology and innovation, boost critical thinking and inspire students to pursue STEAM careers. This year’s summit will also address the impact of the pandemic on women in tech and the job market.

WITI launched the summit 26 years ago when there were no conferences geared towards supporting women in technology and business. Today, the Women in Technology summit is a premiere global tech conference, where professionals come to learn about trends, develop new skills and grow their business network.

“We will continue to provide the skills and tools women need to navigate the new normal and succeed in today’s digital world,” said Carolyn Leighton, CEO and founder, WITI. “This virtual summit offers an even broader global platform, with more opportunities for professionals to learn and interact with each other, irrespective of their location.”

Featured Speakers and Topics:

Blue Shield of California’s Karen Xie: How emerging technologies are transforming the way we consume and deliver healthcare.

Deloitte’s Beena Ammanath: The impact of artificial intelligence on society.

Huawei Technologies’ Joy Tan: How brands can leverage modern media to deliver meaningful stories to the public.

IDC’s Michelle Bailey: Results of the women in tech survey.

PTC’s Kathleen Mitford: The impact of diverse teams on innovation and tips on advocating diversity within an organization.

Trans Sahara Investment’s Ngozi Bell: Economic opportunities in a post COVID-19 era.

Rene Redwood, creator of the bi-partisan Glass Ceiling Commission: How businesses can address systemic racism.

Janice Kaplan, author of The Genius of Women: Powerful forces that have rigged the system against women and celebrating those who have triumphed.

BrainCandyLabs: Spotlight students and professionals who have been inspired by STEAM, including youngest astronaut-in-training Alyssa Carson, Ph.D. student Jordan Harrod and host of FOX’s Xploration Outerspace Emily Calandrelli.

WITI Hall of Fame Alumnae Genevieve Bell, Sara Rushinek and Elizabeth Xu: Staying motivated, overcoming problems and traits great leaders should possess.

Take the 2020 WITI-IDC Survey

Summit Overview:

More than 100 speakers and coaches will inspire and educate the 10,000 professionals who will be attending the event virtually.

Topics range from innovation and technology to leadership and growth.

The summit is sprinkled with keynotes and workshops to interactive networking and career fair.

Review the full agenda at WITI Summit 2020.

About WITI:

WITI (Women in Technology International) is committed to empowering innovators, inspiring future generations and building inclusive cultures, worldwide. WITI is redefining the way women and men collaborate to drive innovation and business growth and is helping corporate partners create and foster gender inclusive cultures. A leading authority of women in technology and business, WITI has been
advocating and recognizing women’s contributions in the industry for more than 30 years. The organization delivers leading edge programs and platforms for individuals and companies — designed to empower professionals, boost competitiveness and cultivate partnerships, globally.

WITI’s ecosystem includes more than three million professionals, 60 networks and 300 partners, worldwide. To learn more, please visit HERE.