Posts tagged with "students"

Rita Azar illustrates a candy article for 360 MAGAZINE

Sugarfina Care Packages

Going back to school this year is different from every other year. Instead of loading up on pencils, notebooks, markers and erasers, students are logging into computers every morning to attend virtual versions of their classes. Teachers are also preparing in a way they’ve never had to. Online lesson plans and zero face-to-face contact are making it more difficult for teachers to engage with students.

Sugarfina, a luxury candy store specializing in candy for grown-ups, recognizes that struggle. Accordingly, they have put together care packages for anyone in need of a little bit of sweetness during this time.

The care package includes Sugarfina specialties like Peach Bellini gummies, Birthday Cake Caramels, Rainbow Bears, Pink Sparkle Pops, Cold Brew Bears, Peanut Butter Milkshake malt balls, Dark Chocolate Sea Salt Caramels and Ice Cream Cone gummies.

Sugarfina is also giving away one of these care packages every day from August 17 to August 31. They’re encouraging Instagram users to nominate someone deserving of a special treat by posting a video with #TreatItForward.

Scott LaPorta, the CEO of Sugarfina, said Sugarfina was inspired by people sending each other candy during the quarantine period.

“Whether you’re treating a classmate, hard-working teacher, first responder, or fellow homeschool parent, this set is the perfect gift to put a smile on their face,” LaPorta said.

Sugarfina will also take entries into the “Thinking of You Sweepstakes” between August 20 and August 31. Anyone looking to share a $2,500 care package with a loved one can enter right here.

The standard care packages are $24 by themselves or $28 with a hand-written note and are available online or in Sugarfina boutiques.

Gabrielle Marchan illustrates Dianne Morales for 360 MAGAZINE

Dianne Morales

As of late, one of our team members had the opportunity to sit down with New York City mayoral candidate Dianne Morales for an interview. After eight years under Mayor Bill de Blasio, New York City will see someone new in the position in 2021, and Morales, a member of the Democratic Party, is jumping at the opportunity.

360: What are the major points of inspiration throughout your life, so far, that have led you to where you are today?

Morales: At my core is a commitment to community, and I learned community at home. I am the youngest of three girls and the daughter of Puerto Rican parents. My mother, a secretary for the Leather Workers’ Union, and my father, a building manager on the waterfront, created a working-class life for us in Bed-Stuy. But our home was not just for me and my sisters. My grandmother, Mami, lived with us my whole childhood. In fact, she and I shared a bed until the day that I left home for college. Our home was a resting place, a layover, a transition point for whoever needed it. There was always someone new sleeping on the couch or joining us at the dinner table. Whether they had just arrived from Puerto Rico, were in between jobs, had just returned from the military or from being incarcerated, there were always other people staying with us while they “got back on their feet.” My parents opened their arms and their front door to whoever needed it. I never questioned this way of life. I was taught, “If you have, then you provide.” We took care of each other. I saw, firsthand, the opportunity created when we each take responsibility, not just for ourselves, but for our neighbors and for our communities. This belief has spurred me on through 30 years in the public sector, as an educator, a foster care worker and a leader of nonprofits.

As I established my own home in Bed-Stuy as a single mom, my children and I recreated the dynamic my parents had built. We always have a few extra people living in our home – whom we often refer to as our “chosen family.” These extended family members have filled my home with love and reciprocal support. In a twist of fate, since the pandemic hit, I have shared my home with my parents and my children. I envision a New York City where we take care of each other, where everyone is welcome to the dinner table, where neighbors provide more support than extra sugar and all of us have a warm place to rest our heads. Although NYC is vast with diversity, we are all inextricably bound together and are only as strong as our most vulnerable link.

360: How can a mayor, as opposed to any other civic official, lead unique positive changes for equity?

Morales: Over the past several months there is a mantra I have been repeating consistently: a budget is a reflection of our values. The mayor has executive power over what gets funded in the city and by how much. Funding for services that contribute to true public safety (access to housing, medical/mental healthcare, economic stability, job training, education) will provide access and opportunity to those who have historically been left behind by our elected officials. Line by line, the budget reveals the values of a city and government. The NYC budget passed in June was a failure. It failed the residents of NYC, who have been raising their voices in protest and demanding a divestment from law enforcement since May 29. It failed those whose lives have been lost at the hands of the NYPD. It failed communities of color that have been disproportionately impacted by violence and brutality.

The budget highlights the need for NYC leadership to put New Yorkers first by investing in communities. The NYC Mayor also has the ability to work to desegregate public schools and impact the quality of education provided to over 1.1 million students, many of whom are students of color living in poverty. This alters the course of a student’s life and provides an entry point to economic mobility and a true career trajectory. New Yorkers deserve a bold, transformational leader who is unapologetically committed to prioritizing justice in the budget’s bottom line. I fundamentally believe that those closest to the problem are closest to the solution. Our city needs a mayor that is in tune with her people and provides a vision for and direction for what is possible.

360: What are some of the most pressing or urgent issues that need attention within New York City, and how would you address them?

Morales: New York’s problems all stem from structural oppression by Race, Gender and Class, so our solutions must go deeper, all the way to the root causes. Too many New Yorkers are living in a time of scarcity, and that’s been going on since long before the virus hit. The are working two jobs, just barely surviving and always one misfortune away from losing everything. Instead of this “Scarcity Economy,” we need a “Solidarity Economy,” and that requires bold action. First, transforming public safety in the city by providing access to the same critical resources found in wealthy communities will be a critical step toward creating the long-term change we need for all to live in dignity. True public safety includes ensuring that every New Yorker has access to “life essentials,” like quality transportation, affordable housing, excellent and equal education and human-centered healthcare. All New Yorkers deserve access to these fundamental resources in order to live in dignity, and it is the necessary floor needed to break through glass ceilings.

Next, we must enhance and overhaul vital infrastructure requiring multi-part, creative solutions that address the deeper issues embedded in the fabric of NYC. To break the racist cycle of poverty that divides our city into the “haves” and the “have-nots,” we will establish a guaranteed minimum income. We will push for universal healthcare and eliminate inequities in the health system faced by women, and especially women of color. We will work to address the persistent segregation of our schools and disrupt the school-to-prison pipeline by replacing school safety officers with trained mental health professionals. The driving force behind all policy initiatives is the experiences, needs and voices of women of color. Particularly, Black women. As the Combahee River Collective wisely wrote in its 1977 statement, “If Black women were free, it would mean that everyone else would have to be free since our freedom would necessitate the destruction of all the systems of oppression.” We know that if New York does right by Black women, the entire city will be better for it.

360: How can you use your personal experiences with serving as a single mother and observing the many other challenges that face New York City residents to enact policy reform?

Morales: So many of New York’s problems have impacted me directly, and so much of who I am and what I know comes from being a mom. My greatest joy is being the mother of my two children, Ben and Gabby. They constantly push me, teach me and nourish me. As a single parent, I share experiences with hundreds of thousands of other New Yorkers. A 2018 study found that single-parent households are the second largest household type in New York City. I navigated New York City’s systems – economic, health and education – on my own. I balanced a budget for my family each month, figuring out how to make it work. My greatest challenge was parenting my children through the NYC education system. The rigid and unforgiving education that my children received did not allow any space for their learning differences. They did not see themselves in the white-centric curriculum and we struggled to find support during their developmental years. Advocating for my children was a full-time job on top of my paying-full-time-job. Again and again I have stood with parents for a more equitable and life-affirming education for our kids. It is with this same community spirit of coalition building, advocacy and bettering of our social safety nets that I will push for policies that support all types of families in NYC.

360: What is one of the most significant components of your background or experiential knowledge that separates you from any other candidate?

Morales: I am, in so many ways, the average New Yorker. I was born and bred in Bed-Stuy. I am an Afro Latina single-mom of two children who survived the New York City public school system. I am a first generation college graduate who came back home to my city after school. I am a woman of color who discovered that I was not being paid the same as my white male counterparts. I’ve watched my neighborhood change, I’ve seen Starbucks replace the corner bodega, and I have spent my weekends marching side by side – 6 feet apart – with my fellow New Yorkers demanding justice for those killed at the hands of a racist policing system. Because I am the average New Yorker, my voice reflects the voices of thousands of others. We share our lived experiences, frustrations and joys. I love New York City because I see our full potential for all of us.

360: How does your previous extensive work with social service nonprofits inform your motivations and goals to serve as Mayor?

Morales: For decades, I worked within the community to address structural inequities burdening communities of color. I worked alongside those experiencing the symptoms of our broken system most acutely – poverty, lack of access to education, homelessness and mental health services. I witnessed firsthand the day-to-day struggles of New Yorkers that are perpetuated by cycles of poverty and oppression. I worked from the ground, up and from the inside, out. But as I hammered away, I recognized these structural and institutional barriers, and began to ask, “So how do we burn them down?” It felt as though I was only tinkering around the edges of the problem and providing Band-Aid solutions to deep, deep wounds. The core, perpetuating issues were centralized and foundational. I realized that if I want to create lasting, effective change, I must address these systemic and political problems at the root. As Mayor, I would carry with me the voices of those I have served.

360: In outlining your points of action and reform for New York City, how does the COVID-19 pandemic affect any of these potential strides for change?

Morales: As we know, COVID-19 is a catastrophe that illuminates all of the cracks and splinters in our broken systems. At first, many claimed the COVID-19 was a “great equalizer,” affecting all people, regardless of race, class or gender. Instead COVID-19 disproportionately impacts people of color and low-income communities. This is not a coincidence or personal failing, but rather the direct result of racist systems, putting structural oppression in stark relief. While some New Yorkers are able to escape crowded areas, arm themselves with personal protective equipment and work remotely, others, namely people of color, are on the front lines providing essential services to our city.

As COVID-19 has had devastating consequences that will leave a lasting impact for years to come, it has also provided us with a unique moment. As we saw after the murder of George Floyd by the Minneapolis police, being homebound and isolated forces us to pay attention. We have paused. We have slowed down. With fewer distractions and a center of focus, folks all across the country have had the veil lifted. People are noticing the interconnected webs of oppression I have lived with and that I have been fighting to dismantle my entire life. In this moment, we need leaders in office who are of, by and for the movement for social change. There is a momentum and hunger for justice that can no longer be ignored. As we overcome the challenge of the disease, I will never let the city forget who is truly essential. Together we will create a world in which front-line workers are truly valued as indispensable. A world where we accompany our applause and platitudes with a livable wage, unquestionable dignity and real community power.

360: What are some of the most rewarding takeaways you have gained from leading several momentous organizations?

Morales: I’ve learned firsthand about the barriers and challenges that people have to overcome in order to gain access to opportunities that are alleged to be available to everyone. I also have watched as community members care for one another to bridge the gaps in access to those opportunities. This is testament to the power of our communities to be true partners in determining the solutions they face when given the resources to do so. Finally, I have been able to bear witness to what is possible when people finally gain access and opportunity and how that has the potential to change the trajectory of people’s lives and transform families and communities.

360: Regarding the national and global movement, Black Lives Matter, how will you utilize your unique identity to empower minorities in the City of New York?

Morales: Like many people of color, I have lived years of my life trying not to take up space. I have seen the ways that my identities – my Blackness, my Latina roots, my politics, my womanhood – make people, namely white people, uncomfortable. In these spaces I would constantly ask myself, “Do I seem too opinionated, too articulate, too aggressive?” I would contort and deflate myself to fit into tight corners and small boxes. I would shrink myself so that others could feel big. When making the decision to run for Mayor of NYC, I decided it was important for me to run as my full, unadulterated, unapologetic, multi-hyphenated self. There would be no more shrinking, questioning or self-doubt. I recognize that by the very nature of stepping into this space, I am opening up a path of possibility. As the first Afro-Latina running for mayor of New York City, I recognize the awesome responsibility I hold. I know that when I speak, unfairly or not, I am representing all Afro-Latina women. Missteps become mass stereotypes. Accolades become communal achievements.

This is both beautiful and deeply terrifying. But in moments of fear, I am guided by a greater purpose to bring with me those whom have been devalued and made to feel small, as I have been; to elevate the voices of those with shared experiences and claim our rightful place in democracy and representation in leadership. People like me, individuals and communities of color, women of color, we must be at the forefront of our politics and policies. I am deeply committed to divesting from racist systems and investing in Black and Brown communities. I am committed to reimagining public safety on our streets and in our schools. I am committed to shifting wealth opportunities to those who have been historically marginalized. I am committed to redressing and repairing the wounds of oppression that scar our city. I am in this race to stand taller in the face of a world that tells me to shrink. I am here to tell them that Black lives are beloved. We matter today and every day forward.

360: To all of the NYC citizens following your efforts to better numerous communities, what are some of the best ways individuals can support your campaign?

Morales: The best way to help me is to join the campaign with a small contribution. I am not a career politician, and unlike other candidates, I have not spent decades cultivating a war chest of people, networks and resources to kickstart my run for mayor. I want to be responsive to the people, not the special interests.. My campaign was born out of my home in Bed-Stuy, out of conversations with my neighbors, friends and colleagues. Our campaign is 100% powered by the people, not the 1%. We are an intersectional coalition of Black and Brown, Latinx, LGBTQIA and working class New Yorkers. We are backed by the people being hit the hardest at this moment in time. I am so incredibly humbled that in the middle of a pandemic, without employment, people are finding a way to donate to our campaign. I know what is at stake and the choices they have had to make to do so. If donating to our campaign is not possible for you during this financially uncertain time, we understand. Visit my website, dianne.nyc, for information and volunteer opportunities. Spread our mission to your fellow New Yorkers. Reach out to join our team. Remember me in November 2021.

To learn more about Dianne Morales, you can click right here. To learn more about her stances and solutions, you can click right here. To support Morales through donations, you can click right here. You can also support her on Twitter and Instagram.

Rita Azar illustrates a video game article for 360 MAGAZINE

Video Games x Standardized Testing

Standardized testing in schools is one of the most hotly contested subjects in academics. Does it actually measure academic skills and learning progress? Is there a better, more definitive way to measure those skills? Is standardized testing punishing hard workers and high achievers who also happen to be anxiety-ridden or bad test-takers?

In an interview with CMRubinWorld, video gaming industry veteran and founder of Breakaway Games Doug Whatley said the next step for these pesky measuring sticks is in the video game world.

“We already have simulation games that are capable of being used as a standardized test, so I think there is real promise for many types of tests to be replaced by games,” Whatley said, adding that games are often better, more secure and more affordable tests.

Whatley also predicted that free-to-play games and large market games would close the gap between the two.

“Mobile apps will get bigger and AAA games will get smaller using multiple season type distribution,” he said.

Whatley used that premise to make five more predictions. First, he said video games will cover a wider variety of content. Next, he said phones will become more powerful, thus driving more gamers to mobile devices as a gaming platform. Third, he expects to see games use new media platforms like Zoom and Google Classroom. Fourth, he expects to see more distribution in rolled out packages, like the already popular DLC model, and finally, he anticipates student-created content to be judged and used by peers.

The pandemic has forced education to adapt on its feet, and it appears technology and video games will be beneficiaries of its modern adjustments and pivots.

Mask illustrated by Mina Tocalini for 360 MAGAZINE.

Indiana School Quarantines on First Day

By Eamonn Burke

Greenfield Central Junior High School in Indiana opened on Thursday, as one of the first high schools to do so in the country. Within hours, the school had to quarantine when a student tested positive for the COVID-19 virus. It appears that the student was tested days before and went to school without knowing the results.

The emergency “Positive COVID-19 Test Protocol” that went into action following the testing involved isolating the student and a two week quarantine order for those who had come in contact. The schools superintendent, Harold E. Olin, knew the situation was coming but was “shocked it was on Day 1.” Nonetheless, Olin said in a letter that “It was very evident today that nearly all of our families and students were prepared to properly follow the safety protocols we have established”.

This comes amidst a national debate over the re-opening of schools in the fall. While most major school districts have announced a remote start, some in places like Texas and Florida, where the virus is running rampant, plan to open in the fall. Teachers unions have been vehemently opposing an in-person opening, threatening and executing lawsuits and strikes to make their point. They put pressure on Trump’s administration, who is urging for children to get back to school.

Further complicating matters is a study from Northwestern and a Chicago Pediatric Hospital found that children five years and younger carry the virus in high concentrations, although a study on their transmission rate has not been conducted.

On top of all the virus concerns is that of the mental health and success of students who are learning virtually. This spans everything from eye health to sleep patterns to ability to socialize. In addition, it can be harder for many students to pay attention and retain material when studying from home.

Bed Bath & Beyond has products, services, and solutions to help everyone get ready for on or off-campus living. As seen in 360 MAGAZINE.

Bed Bath & Beyond

By Armon Hayes

Post quarantine, many global citizens are adapting to the New World Order grand opening. College students, in particular, are navigating this semester, presenting new challenges, and subsequently shaping the future. COVID-19 has not only impacted economics across the board, but education as well.

Bed Bath & Beyond has products, services, and solutions to help everyone get ready for on or off-campus living. This is a crucial decision that many students will face, so it’s important that Bed Bath & Beyond makes college shopping easier and more convenient with great services and solutions. Bed Bath & Beyond is here to help with essentials, across the country students share faves and recommendations of what they couldn’t live without at school. Check out recommendations HERE.

No need to lug stuff from home to school. Students can pick out what they love online or at their local store and pick up at a store near campus to build a personalized workspace, whether students are home or away. From bedding to lighting, and décor, find everything needed to make a space cozy, functional, and authentically “you”! Utilize the Dorm & Apartment Checklists: A favorite resource among students and parents. These checklists have all they need for dorm or apartment life. Get it in-store or purchase online.

Whether it’s building a study-at-home setup or outfitting a new space, as of late, Bed Bath & Beyond outfitted live-work space for 360 Magazine. Gifting included Wamsutta collective comforter, designed with glamping in mind – a tent inspired bed set that’s beyond practical with deep cargo pockets, each at the head to store bedtime necessities. It is army green, which is the perfect neutral and ideal for anyone who enjoys snacks in bed. To complete the set, there are matching pillow shams with ringlet outline details. The awesome extras were two Dawson UGG pillows reminiscent of their iconic footwear and comfort.

They are experts for all thing’s college and solutions to help everyone get ready for on or off-campus living based on a student’s needs and budget. Save with Bed Bath & College Savings Pass: Get 20% off every purchase. Receive a great value on made-to-last items when shopping with the College Savings Pass! Unlimited use in-store or online through 9/30/20! Sign up HERE.

Jericho High School Students illustration done by Mina Tocalini of 360 MAGAZINE.

Student Led Leukemia Fundraiser

Three students from Jericho High School have broken a national fundraising record – previously set by one of the students’ older brothers last year – by collecting more than $430,000 in just seven weeks for the annual Leukemia Lymphoma Society “Students of the Year” campaign. 

Team Just Cure It (2.0) was led by co-candidates 15-year-old Harrison Berger, 15-year-old Alexandra Gatoff, and 15-year-old Jake Gershwind of Jericho High School in Long Island, NY. Harrison’s brother Ryan was a co-candidate for Team Just Cure It (1.0), which was the previous national record holder, set in 2019. 

“What they have accomplished is nothing short of remarkable,” said Sara Lipsky, President of Leukemia & Lymphoma Society Long Island Chapter. “Cancer doesn’t stop for a pandemic and to see what they accomplished provides families who are fighting cancer together a lot of hope.” 

Harrison says the outlook for fundraising was intimidating, including rising to the challenge of beating his brother’s team’s success. But he says he saw the opportunity to develop a network and personal skills of persuasion – including talking CEOs into donating tens of thousands of dollars for LLS – as something that would benefit him long term as well. 

Jake says he and his teammates each have a connection to cancer: his grandfather passed away from stomach cancer when he was five years old. That, and the realization that blood cancer is the key to fighting all variety of cancers – including those afflicting children – was the motivation he says he needed to pull together his family and friends to help. “I thought we had zero chance to win, because the previous record was so big,” said Jake. “But I kept telling myself, we gotta keep going.” 

“We did lots of planning and had donations set up to come in right away,” says Jake. “Still, you have to be persistent. Not everyone will say yes at first. But we kept following up and didn’t let people say no.” 

The Just Cure It (2.0) team also enlisted the help of about 25 of their classmates from Jericho High School and pulled in the donations before the COVID-19 lockdowns went into effect. 

“COVID has taught us to look on the positive side,” says Jake. “We’re changing lives, helping people survive. One kid might have better cancer treatment because of the money we raised.” 

The Leukemia Lymphoma Society (LLS) is the world‘s largest voluntary health agency dedicated to blood cancer. The LLS Mission: Cure leukemia, lymphoma, Hodgkin’s disease and myeloma, and improve the quality of life of patients and their families. LLS funds lifesaving blood cancer research around the work and provides free information and support services.

360 MAGAZINE, illustration, sara sandman

7 Tips to Start Building Your Career While Still in College

No matter what college year you are in, it’s crucial to devote time to planning your after-college life. The sooner you find the time and take concrete steps, the better job you will be able to get. Study the following career information for student and make them real to achieve success in their future career. 

Start Acting Immediately

Everybody knows that work experience is precious, and each employer would like to employ an experienced specialist as there is no time to waste time teaching him. So, be proactive in gaining experience in the field you picked up. Of course, a lot of students find it challenging to make time even for completing college papers and often ask someone, “Please, help me with my science homework,” but working side by side with professionals worth your time.

Share Your Ideas 

Feel free to share your career goals with your teachers, classmates, friends, and your family members. Tell them about your plans to get work experience while you are at college. Perhaps, they will help you to find a place for an internship or a part-time job. You can also look through vacancies on the Internet and respond to the job openings you are interested in. Some companies look for young people and teach them to have highly-qualified staff in the future.

Look for Opportunities to Prove Yourself

One more tip on career planning for high school student is to be active and try to prove yourself in different situations. For instance, ask your teacher to put you in touch with his colleagues for an interview for a college newspaper or ask a student newspaper editor to write an article. You can miss dozens of opportunities if you don’t ask to prove yourself.

Find a Mentor

It’s vital to have a person nearby with solid knowledge who might become your mentor. He will nudge you in the right direction and generates new ideas for you. It would be great if this person could take responsibility for his advice.

Pay Attention to Self-Development Every Day

This tip is an important focus in student aid prepare for career opportunities in the future. While studying at college, you are involved in writing a lot of papers. Use opportunities to educate outside the classroom if you want to broaden your knowledge horizons. Follow the novelties in your specialty—read books and blogs, watch educative videos to see how to apply theoretical knowledge on practice. 

Be Curious

Train your brain every day. Technologies are continually advancing, and you need to keep up with them. If you are naturally curious, you don’t mind improving yourself every day as you realize that you will take advantage of gained knowledge in the future. Visiting new countries and exploring new cultures also make a significant contribution to your life experience.

Plan Everything in Advance

If you learn to plan everything at college, you will have good time management in the future. It’s not a small point: you will manage to complete your work issues on time, make time for your family and your personal needs. Some students have poor time management skills and, thus, they have no time to do homework and try to solve this problem for one night browsing through writing services and begging, “I need help with my math homework. Can you do it for me?”

COLLEGE SOPHOMORE MAKES 3-D MASKS

Although Cedarville University sophomore Connor Hart of Loveland, Ohio has more than two years remaining in college, he is putting his education in 3-D printing to work during the COVID-19 pandemic.

As a freshman, Hart, the founder of Hands of Hope Foundation, started creating 3-D prosthetics for children with limb differences.  Since social distancing has become protocol to help flatten the COVID-19 curve, Hart stopped meeting with his clients, but switched to printing masks that could help medical professionals and nursing homes during the pandemic.  

“What I love most about working for Hands of Hope is knowing I am positively impacting the lives of both our clients and volunteers,” expressed Hart. “Knowing I provided joy to someone else with no strings attached is what keeps me smiling and driven toward giving others the same opportunities I have been given.”

His love for others fits perfectly with the core values that are espoused throughout the university: Love for God, Love for Others, Integrity in Conduct, and Excellence in Effort.

Motivated by his care for others and multiple news reports about the shortage of qualified masks for doctors and nurses, Hart searched for a way he could pitch in. When the Hands of Hope Foundation received encouragement from a team of doctors about the need for masks, he decided to begin printing and distributing reusable masks. Hart started making 3-D plastic masks last week and sent them to various medical facilities.

Hart, who is majoring in mechanical engineering, can make eight masks a day through his 3-D printing equipment and has printed and shipped 25 masks so far. Each mask can be sanitized to allow for extended use.

According to Hart, each mask is completely reusable, meaning one mask can last for months if it is sanitized effectively and the filter is changed regularly. Hands of Hope Foundation has shipped masks to medical agencies, including a nursing home in Holgate, Ohio.

Hands of Hope Foundation has shipped masks to medical agencies, including a nursing home in Holgate, Ohio.

Hands of Hope started in September 2015 when Hart and three classmates at Milford High School in Milford, Ohio, volunteered to create a 3D-printed prosthetic for Hope McGill, a 7-year-old girl from the community missing her left arm from the elbow down.

“Hope was adopted from China. She had been taught from an early age to hide her arm, making her self-conscious about it. Because of the prosthetic, Hope became more confident in her little arm,” noted Catherine McGill, Hope’s older sister and a Cedarville student.

Hands of Hope became a club at Milford High School and made prosthetics for three other children. However, in the spring of 2018, Milford High School decided to drop Hands of Hope as an extracurricular group due to a lack of interest from the student body. Not wanting to see the organization dissolved, Hart transformed Hands of Hope into an official nonprofit and invited Catherine McGill to serve as the Foundation’s media director.

Hart and McGill created The Hands of Hope Foundation’s chapter on Cedarville University’s campus. This was made possible by Cedarville’s school of engineering and computer science.

“Connor went the extra mile prior to coming to campus for his freshman fall semester,” said Robert Chasnov, dean of the school of engineering and computer science and senior professor of engineering. “He needed a space for the 3D printers he uses to manufacture the hands his team would be designing. Since we had a project lab that was being used primarily to store mobile test equipment, I set him up in that space.”

Located in southwest Ohio, Cedarville University is an accredited, Christ-centered, Baptist institution with an enrollment of 4,380 undergraduate, graduate and online students in more than 150 areas of study. Founded in 1887, Cedarville is recognized nationally for its authentic Christian community, rigorous academic programs, including its Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering program, strong graduation and retention rates, accredited professional and health science offerings and leading student satisfaction ratings. For more information about the University, visit www.cedarville.edu.

Vaughn Lowery, 360 MAGAZINE, smile, dentistry

Top 10 college mistakes to avoid

Though the first year of college does not require you to take complex subjects and write a dissertation, you may find it surprisingly difficult as compared to your last high school year. In most colleges, the freshmen curriculum has plenty of subjects, and teachers’ expectations seem to exceed students’ abilities. However, your academic performance can be better than you think. To realize how much you can achieve as a freshman, try to avoid these common mistakes most people make when entering college or university. 

Skipping classes repeatedly

This is a major temptation for all students living on campus. When there is no one out there to control you, it is easy to skip all morning classes and attend just the ones you like. At first, some teachers may seem quite tolerant of student absences. However, you may regret skipping classes when it comes to tests or exams. Of course, it may be wise to skip a class occasionally after having a big party or spending a long night studying. Just make sure it does not happen often. 

Ignoring time management

When there are many things to do, you need to utilize at least some time-management techniques. Even though the first year is merely an introduction to college life, the pressure in academic subjects is crushing. Now, you have to decide what tasks are a top priority and how much time you can devote to each of them. 

Avoiding communication with teachers

All the teachers at college are new to a freshmen. Most of them devote some time to students who are willing to ask questions. Sometimes, it is the only way to make teacher’s instructions clear. So, take an opportunity to communicate with your teacher. It may help you write better papers and escape conflicts in your college life. 

Wasting money

If this is the first time you have lived on your own, you may go off budget. Now you have to pay for housing, cover your educational needs, and still have money for eating nutritiously. So, you need to make your monthly budget and decide how much you can spend on what. Keep your expenses under control, and you will save more time and energy for what is most important to you. 

Living off campus

There is nothing wrong with living at your parents’ place if your college is situated in your hometown. However, if you need to take a long daily commute, it would be better to move to campus. This way you will save precious time for studying, fun activities, and essential rest. Wasting a few hours on commute every day can kill your ambitious plans and deprive you of energy. 

Oversharing student life on social media

Many freshmen find their new experiences exciting. Still, be careful about what you put on social media. Always think about how your teachers or your future employers would react to your Facebook or Instagram profile. Despite privacy policies, what’s posted on the web can become more public than you may want. 

Depriving yourself of sleep

It happens to all students and everyone else. Nevertheless, studying all night long can kill your performance in a long-term prospect. Do not forget to take care of your health. Try to get as much sleep as you need. Remember that your daily productivity as well as your ability to enjoy life depends on how well-rested you are.

Not asking for help

No doubt, a freshman’s life is more difficult than people expect. Still, many students decide to cope with all their assignments alone. While it is good to be ambitious, it would be even better to learn to delegate your tasks. Ask RapidEssay to complete English 101 essays for you. Decide with your roommates who does what in the dorm. Asking for help is an essential skill that will help you immensely to get through your adult life.

Taking on too much

Besides home assignments and daily chores, your college life is full of fun activities. In participating too much, you can easily exhaust yourself and overlook some important tasks. At first, you can find yourself capable of doing many of the things that you like, but over time, you will see that you are ignoring your less than favorite, but still very important, tasks on a daily basis. 

Staying secluded more than necessary 

Clearly, not all people enjoy new challenges, social events, and stepping out of their comfort zone. If you are one of them, you may find yourself constantly hiding at home, doing the bare minimum of tasks you are expected to complete. In such a case, you are probably missing useful opportunities and potentially interesting activities. Try to take part in some campus events every now and then. As you stop fearing over-exhaustion, you will see many things that may interest you around school. Try one or two of them as they can be an enriching experience.

These are 10 common mistakes that either diminish our productivity or add more trouble to our lives as freshmen. By refraining from these compulsions, you may find it easier to perform well and actually enjoy your college life. 

Vaughn Lowery, 360 MAGAZINE, smile, dentistry

How to Improve Creative Writing Skills in English: Tips from Experts

Strong creative writing skills can bring you a lot of benefits and even profits. 

For example, they are crucial for crafting better and professional essays (though some students turn to academic essay writing services e.g. CustomWritings and never bother their heads about it) 

Another big benefit of great writing skills is that they can help you land a profitable job. Good content writers and copywriters are in great demand now. 

Anyways, in this blog, we’ve listed amazing tips on how you can improve your writing skills. 

Read a Lot of Books 

Why is reading important? It improves your writing. It gives you fresh ideas and inspiration. It serves you as an example of how you can write. It enriches your vocabulary. It shows how other writers use metaphors, stories, neologisms, etc. 

It unlocks your mind to do the same. If you want to improve your creative writing skills, you should read a lot. Choose books that appeal to you. Make a reading list. Execute it. 

Make Writing Your Daily Habit 

Habits are very powerful. They can make or break your life. That’s why it’s very important to eliminate bad habits and cultivate good ones. For example, instead of watching Netflix you can make writing your daily habit and benefit from it.  

Start small. Set the goal of writing at least 500 words a day. Write about the things that you like. Don’t skip it. Write every day even if you don’t feel like. If it’s challenging for you to write 500 words, write at least 200 words. It’s better than skipping it altogether. 

Once you write 30 days in the raw, it will give you a great feeling that you can deal with the challenge. It will boost your confidence in your writing skills. Motivate yourself to do this. Think big. The best way of mastering your writing skills is practice.  Once you master them writing can become a source of income for you as you can land a good writing job. 

Here’s another benefit. It’ll be easier for you to complete your essays and writing assignments. 

Master the Art of Storytelling 

The ability to tell a good story is crucial for any kind of creative writing. Storytelling can bring your copy, content or essay to a new level if you learn how to integrate it smoothly into your piece of writing. 

The reason behind this lies in the fact that everybody likes stories. For centuries, people have been telling each other stories and learning from them. 

A story creates an emotional bond between you and your readers. Nowadays storytelling is widely used in advertising. 

Pixar team is full of true masters of storytelling. If you’d like to learn from them, we recommend you check this free course

Participate in Writing Competitions 

There are various online writing competitions out there. Some of them grant some set amount of cash as a prize. Some contests can land you a scholarship. 

So, it can be a good idea to search for these writing competitions and participate in them. Not only they help you master your writing but also they give you an opportunity for an additional income.  

Write Essays on Topics That You Like  

Choose the topic that is interesting for you and write an essay on it. Do it once or 2 times a month. Do it for fun. It will improve your research and writing skills sufficiently. 

Start Your Own Blog  

Choose a niche that appeals to you. Don’t go too broad. For example, instead of cooking, it’s better to choose cooking for busy moms. Do detailed research to see what’s already been done. Think about how you can monetize blogging. There are 3 main ways to do this: 

  • Affiliate program. 
  • Adsense or putting banners of other companies/products on your site.
  • Collecting emails and selling your own product to your subscribers. 

Start to blog weekly. You can use WordPress for free to do this. 

Write Engaging Posts on Social Media 

You can start posting meaningful posts on social media. Instead of using Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, etc. for having fun, you can use them to write posts that are useful for other people. 

In this way, you can master your writing skills, build a loyal audience, and monetize on it later. 

Subscribe to a Newsletter  

If you are dead serious about improving your writing skills, we recommend you subscribe to CopyHackers newsletter or follow Jeff Goins. They will send you tons of useful free content that will help you master your writing. 

Take Online Course on Writing  

There are dozens of writing courses online now. There are both free and paid courses. So, you can find and take free courses if you are short of money. Though usually the best courses are paid ones. 

Get a Freelance Writing Job to Practice Your Skills and Earn Some Cash 

After taking a writing course, you can be more confident in your writing skills. Why not try to land a writing job or gig? 

There are many options. You can apply for in-house positions. You can go to freelance platforms like UpWork. You can find content writing agencies and contact them directly. 

Conclusion  

Here you go! Now, you are fully loaded with awesome tips and resources to improve your writing. Use them. Go ahead and take action!