Posts tagged with "March"

ILLUSTRATION BY NICOLE SALAZAR FOR USE BY 360 MAGAZINE

Top Stories – March

As we head towards another month is 2022, it seems as though this year will be quite eventful. Below are the top news stories for the final winter month!

Ukraine Huminitarian Crisis

The war in Ukraine is no longer just a story about a conflict between nations. It’s having an immediate impact on millions of people, creating multitudes of refugees, which in turn is creating a worldwide humanitarian crisis. It’s having an impact on global food insecurity since Ukraine produces a significant share of wheat supplies for other countries. While across the border, Russia also produces a large number of food experts, which are not inhibited by sanctions against the invading country.

Oil and gas experts from Russia are hanging in the balance as the West considers a ban on those imports. Financial institutions have sanctioned Russia, and the financial system in Ukraine has been impacted, causing a major economic disruption in that region of the world. The supply chain for goods from these countries and through them is being disrupted as a result of the violence. How can the West address and overcome all of these disruptions while taking a hard line against Russia’s aggression?

Ukraine Further Pushes No-Fly Zone

Ukraine’s defense ministry released a video of an edited hypothetical attack on Paris that would occur as a result of the Russian invasion of Ukraine. The ministry warned that this attack would be possible if a no-fly zone weren’t issued to prevent aerial attacks. The footage showed bombs going off near the Eiffel Tower.

Ukraine has called for a no-fly zone and other preventative measures in order to prevent Russia from overtaking more areas of the world. Many Ukrainian and global officials see the attacks against Ukraine as an unjust overtaking of territory. They consider Russia’s defense of the war as an attempt to prevent Ukrainian aggression as doctored. Others have suggested that the war is partially stemmed in history with Russia considering Ukraine and Russia to be the one and the same, as well as making note of Ukraine’s conveniently located Black Sea ports.

NATO has thus far been against a no-fly zone as that might invite Russian aggression towards NATO territories.

Jussie Smollett Sentencing

Actor Jussie Smollett was sentenced to 150 days in jail (around 5 months) and 30 months of parole after his 2017 scandal in which he lied to police officers about an attack that occurred against him. He was found to have paid for the attack to occur against him.

Smollett’s final comments before being taken away have been the result of much controversy. Smollett stated, “Your honor, I respect you and I respect your decision, but I did not do this and I am not suicidal. If anything happens to me when I go in there, I did not do it to myself, and you must all know that.” Many have found this statement humorous, including actor 50 Cent, who joked that he would say the same thing if he were to appear in front of a judge again.

Ryan Coogler Detained

Film director Ryan Coogler, known for 2018’s Black Panther, was briefly detained in January at a Bank of America in Atlanta, Georgia. Coogler’s medical assistant asked to be paid in cash, thus the director wrote a note suggesting the money should be counted discreetly given it was an amount over $10,000. 

However, despite Coogler not being visibly armed, officers arrived and pulled guns out on the director, who appeared visibly confused yet nonetheless complied with their orders. He was handcuffed and escorted to a police vehicle, but released moments later once his identity had been confirmed.

Senate Confirmation Hearings

As Justice Steve Breyer left his position as Supreme Court Judge, President Biden appointed Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson, who is now being confirmed by the Senate. Senator Ted Cruz (R-TX) asked the judge about critical race theory, because Brown serves on the board of a school district with curriculum including critical race theory.

Senator John Cornyn (R-TX) made a false statement suggesting Brown referred to President George W. Bush and former Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld as “war criminals.” Sen. Dick Durbin (D-IL) later corrected him.

St. Patty via Heather Skovlund for use by 360 Magazine

St. Patty’s Sip List

March has arrived, and while Spring is still a ways away, there’s still St. Patrick’s Day to look forward to. As it is a celebration of Ireland, lots of drinking is naturally associated with the holiday. As a result, 360 has compiled a list of the best beverages for your celebration.

Space Dust IPA

As one of the most celebrated holidays globally, St. Patrick’s Day is all about bringing people together, and what better way to do that than by raising a glass of Elysian Brewing’s best-selling Space Dust IPA (8.2% ABV), which balances bitterness with the sweetness of grapefruit, mango and orange aromas. 

If you’re searching for “something green” to bring to your St. Patrick’s Day party, look no further! Space Dust’s iconic green mascot, Dusty, featured on every can and bottle, is here to help you avoid the pinch. Plus, the Elysian team has released an easy-to-make festive drink recipe called the Irish Astronaut, which cleverly features 50% Nitro Irish Stout and 50% Space Dust IPA.

Tully Mule By Gillian Murphy

Ingredients:

  • 2 parts Tullamore D.E.W. Original
  • 0.5 parts Fresh Lime Juice
  • Top with Ginger Beer
  • Lime Wheel

Method:

  • Stir Tullamore D.E.W. Original and lemon juice in a mug filled with ice. 
  • Top with ginger beer and garnish with lime wheel.

Gold Rush By Gillian Murphy

Ingredients:

  • 2 parts Tullamore D.E.W.
  • 0.75 part fresh lemon juice
  • 0.75 part honey syrup

Method:

  • Add all ingredients to an ice filled shaker.
  • Shake and strain into an ice filled glass.
  • Garnish with a lemon twist. 

Green Machine By Gillian Murphy

Ingredients:

  • 2 parts Tullamore DEW Original
  • 0.5 part Lemon Juice
  • Juice of 1 fresh pressed green apple (or 6 parts cloudy apple juice)

Method:

  • Build in a highball glass over ice.
  •  Garnish with a lemon wedge.

Guy Fieri’s Caliente Margarita

Mixed with Santo Blanco Tequila and a hint of triple sec, the Caliente Margarita is a cocktail everyone will love. Santo keeps it simple for you to mix this cocktail up right at home, using muddled cilantro leaves and jalapenos to give it that unique kick we all look for in the classic libation. Fieri has even shared his one-of-a-kind recipe for Homemade Sour Mix that will take your Caliente Margarita to the next level. Finish it off with a salt rimmed glass and you are good to go. This bold and classic cocktail is guaranteed to satisfy your tastebuds, leaving you yearning for more.

Ingredients:

  • 6 oz Santo Blanco Tequila
  • 2 oz triple sec
  • 1 bunch cilantro leaves
  • 3 jalapeños (2 for muddling, 1 for garnish)
  • 1 lime, cut into wedges
  • 2 oz Homemade Sour Mix
  • 1 ½ cups sugar
  • 1 cup fresh lemon juice
  • 1 cup fresh lime juice

Method:

Muddle cilantro and two jalapeños in the bottom of a large pitcher. As you are muddling, add tequila and triple sec. At the same time, make the sour mix. Combine sugar with 1 ½ cups of water in a saucepan. Allow it to simmer until the sugar dissolves. Remove from heat. Once it has cooled, add the lemon and lime juice. Stir the margarita well, adding sour mix as you go. Pour into glasses rimmed with salt and garnish with a lime wedge and jalapeño slice.

1800 Earl Grey

Ingredients:

  • 2 oz. 1800 Cristalino
  • ¼ oz. Elderflower liqueur
  • ½ oz. Earl Grey syrup
  • ¾ oz. lemon juice 

Method: 

 Combine all ingredients in a cocktail shaker with ice and shake vigorously. Strain into a rocks glass over fresh ice cubes and garnish with an edible flower.

1800 Añejo Sunset

Ingredients:

  • 2 oz. 1800 Añejo 
  • ¾ oz. Demerara syrup
  • ¾ oz. carrot juice 
  • ½ oz. lime juice 
  • 3 dashes Angostura bitters 

Method: 

Combine all ingredients in a cocktail shaker with ice and shake vigorously. Strain into a rocks glass over fresh ice cubes and garnish with a lime wheel and a salted pepper rim.

1800 Tequila Tea

Ingredients:

  • 2 oz. 1800 Reposado 
  • ¾ oz. honey syrup 
  • ¾ oz. lemon juice
  • Iced peach black tea, to top

Method:

Combine all ingredients in a cocktail shaker with ice and shake vigorously. Strain into a highball glass over fresh ice cubes and garnish with a lemon wheel.

D’USSE Lemonade

This is a signature cocktail blending the sweet-tart flavor of lemonade with the smoothness of D’USSÉ

Ingredients: 

  • 1 ½ parts D’USSE VSOP Cognac  
  • 4 Parts Lemonade 

Method: Add D’USSE and lemonade into an ice-filled highball glass.

JAJA Mango Shandy

Ingredients:

  • 1.5 oz. JAJA Blanco
  • 1.5 oz. Mango Juice
  • Top with Mexican Lager 

Method: Combine all ingredients in a cocktail shaker with ice and shake vigorously. Strain into a rocks glass over fresh ice cubes and garnish with a mango slice to top off with a tajin rim.

JAJA Mexican Cold Brew

ingredients:

  • 2 oz. JAJA Añejo 
  • 2 oz. Cold Brew
  • Top with Tonic Sparkling Water 

Method: Combine all ingredients in a cocktail shaker with ice and shake vigorously. Strain into a rocks highball glass over fresh ice cubes and garnish with a lemon wheel.

JAJA Pineapple Mule

Ingredients: 

  • 2 oz. JAJA Reposado 
  • 1.5 oz. Pineapple Juice 
  • Top with Ginger Ale

Method: Combine all ingredients in a cocktail shaker with ice on the rocks and shake vigorously. Strain into a highball glass over fresh ice cubes and garnish with a pineapple wedge.

Chicago illustration by Alex Bogdan for use by 360 Magazine

St. Patrick’s Day in Chicago

Chicagoans, rejoice! Arguably one of the best days of the year in Chicago is quickly approaching—St. Patrick’s Day! From special cruises down the Chicago River during the river dyeing to delicious specials throughout Chicagoland, here are some of the best ways to celebrate the festive holiday this year. 

Chicagoans and out of towners are invited to cruise the newly dyed river on Saturday, March 12 with a selection of St. Patrick’s Day cruises with City Cruises Chicago! City Cruise’s Seadog cruise will be up close and personal to the river dyeing on the morning of March 12, allowing a unique viewpoint unlike anywhere else in the city, all while also providing unforgettable views of the city’s architecture down the Chicago River. Boarding for the cruise begins at 7:45 AM, so patrons don’t miss out on any of the festivities. For those who would prefer to cruise the lake instead, themed cruises down Lake Michigan will also be available, that include Irish-themed menu items such as a Corned Beef special, along with Irish tunes playing and St. Patrick’s Day décor throughout to keep the party going. To book a cruise today, please click HERE.

Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day at Kennedy Rooftop, fittingly named after the First Irish-Catholic President, JFK. Known for spectacular, unobstructed views of the Chicago skyline from the John Hancock to the Willis Tower, the rooftop boasts both a vibrant ambiance and a wide variety of delicious drinks and dishes to enjoy atop the Hyatt Place Wicker Park. For a limited time, the rooftop is also offering private igloo reservations with special food and drink packages and a rooftop curling rink for a little friendly competition and fun. For more information or to make an igloo reservation, please click HERE

Thorn Restaurant Lounge, located inside The Rose Hotel in Rosemont, is offering a classic Rueben special on St. Patrick’s Day, March 17 for those traveling in and out of town, with house braised corn beef, sauerkraut, aged swiss, Thousand Island dressing, rye bread, and a side of fries; plus, their draft beers will all be available to turn green, along with Guinness beers on special for $5 and $8 Irish Car Bombs. 

Ocean Prime, located on the iconic corner of Michigan Avenue and Wacker Drive on the second level of the LondonHouse at 87 E. Wacker Dr., invites guests to watch the Chicago River dyeing in style on Saturday, March 12 from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Open for lunch for one day only with a special Green River Day menu, guests can indulge in a variety of appetizers, soups, salads, seafood and steak entrees, signature cocktails, and a Wine Spectator honored wine list. For the best views of this year’s festivities, guests are encouraged to make a reservation on OpenTable.

North Shore Chicagoans are in luck! Oaken Bistro + Bar will be offering specials perfect for celebrating on Thursday, March 17. Enjoy delicious Stout-Braised Beef Tenderloin Tips with Colcannon Potatoes, Candied Bacon Green Beans, and a variety of drinks on special including Irish Mint Juleps with Proper Twelve Irish Whiskey, margaritas, and Green Draft Beer. For more information and to make a reservation, please click HERE

St. Patrick’s Day calls for all things festive, and Paper Source offers a wide variety of products to take the celebration to new heights this year. Offering everything from a wide selection of themed greeting cards for those you’ll be missing to supplies to get the party going including themed photo props, cocktail napkins and more, Paper Source is a one-stop shop to make the holiday one to remember.

Luft Balloons is SHAMROCKING Chicago this St. Patrick’s Day with a variety of seasonal balloon offerings. For a limited time only, the premier balloon store is offering festive items including rainbow balloons, colorful balloon bouquets, and more. To place an order, Chicagoans can call the storefront directly or visit the Luft Balloons website to schedule a pickup or delivery.  

Film artwork via Heather Skovlund for use by 360 MAGAZINE

THE CW NETWORKS DEBUTS “MARCH”

From the CW Network comes the brand-new documentary series MARCH, that navigates through the journey of competitive HBCU band culture. MARCH directly follows the lives of varying band members and leaders that are a part of the Marching Storm, Prairie View A&M University’s Marching Band.

The docu-series comes in eight parts, illustrating the efforts that the members put in behind the scenes to ensure success, and how they juggle their college life and academics with their commitment to the marching band. MARCH airs on Monday, January 25 (8:00-9:00 pm ET/PT) and then it moves to its regularly scheduled programming of Sunday nights beginning on February 26 (9:00-10:00 pm ET/PT), after ALL AMERICAN and ALL AMERICAN: HOMECOMING take place on Monday nights.

The new series MARCH highlights the stories of diverse and gifted college students that attend Prairie View A&M University. Whether they’re drummers in the marching band or dancers on the flag team, they all have one thing in common; they work hard at their craft, and they juggle the responsibilities of college on top of their musical endeavors. While delving into personal stories from individuals and staff associated with the 300-person marching band, MARCH also studies the rich legacy and history of Prairie View A&M, emphasizing the importance of the Marching Storm band has had on that powerful story. The series follows along the journey that they must go through to become the top ranked HBCU band in the nation. Performances include a captivating homecoming show with Texas A&M and Southern University.

From Stage 13, MARCH is executively produced by Cheryl Horner McDonough, Jamail Shelton, Shari Scorca and Marcel Fuentes.

About Prairie View A&M University

Serving as the second-oldest public institution of higher education in the state of Texas, Prairie View A&M University has instituted importance on individuality and self-expression. With an array of programs for engineers, nurses and educators, PVAMU has fitting baccalaureate, master or doctor degree through eight colleges and schools. PVAMU prides themselves on having top-tier mentors that are available to guide and advise their students towards their dreams. For more information on PVAMU, visit www.pvamu.edu.

Rita Azar illustrates March on Washington for 360 MAGAZINE

Al B. Sure! and Joe Madison co-MC March on For Voting Rights

The organizers for the March On For Voting Rights announced legendary R&B singer and radio host Al B. Sure! and national radio host and activist Joe Madison will serve as co-MC’s for the August 28 event in Washington, DC. The two hosts will lead a day-long march through Washington, DC and the speaker’s program which will include human and civil rights leaders like Rev. Al Sharpton, Martin Luther King III, and many others who will issue a call to action to pass federal voting rights legislation. 

Al B. Sure! is a singer, songwriter, record producer, radio host and former record executive who exploded onto the scene from Boston in 1988 with the best-selling single Nite and Day, and has been a force within the music industry since. As a writer and producer, he introduced to the music industry such multi-platinum acts as Jodeci and teen R&B performer Tevin Campbell, as well as Faith Evans, Dave Hollister, Case and Usher. Al B. Sure!’s work as a change agent finds him intersecting his role as the host of a leading nationally syndicated radio program, Love and R&B, to becoming a mouthpiece for the amplification of social justice and civil rights issues. In  the current climate, he utilizes his platforms to highlight the needs for racial justice, education equity, voter education, criminal justice reform, mentorship and much more. 

Al B. Sure! commented, “It is an honor to help mark this urgent moment by sending a message to the country that our votes will not be suppressed! Our voting rights are under attack all over America, and the people of D.C. are still being denied the full representation they deserve in Congress. I am looking forward to a great day of peaceful collective action and a clear message that the time is now for Congress to act in defense of our rights.” 

Joe Madison is a groundbreaking radio personality and civil rights activist who has devoted his career to raising awareness about issues around the world, encouraging dialogue among people of different backgrounds, and raising money to support multicultural education and institutions. Known as “The Black Eagle,” Joe can be heard weekday mornings on SiriusXM’s Urban View.

Joe Madison added, “My radio audience cares deeply about the issue of voting rights, so I look forward to using this opportunity to give voices to the millions of Americans who demand action from Congress to protect our voting rights, and seek full representation for the 700,000 residents of Washington D.C., most of whom are Black and Brown. This march will bring together leading civil rights advocates and every day people fighting the good fight at the grassroots level. We will put democracy into action.”

About March On For Voting Rights

March On for Washington and Voting Rights is a mass mobilization to demand that elected officials protect democracy, denounce voter suppression, make D.C. a state, and ensure fair, easy access to the vote. On August 28, the 58th anniversary of the historic March on Washington, we will march on cities across America to demand that the vision of MLK’s “I Have a Dream” speech be deferred no longer. That means passing the For the People Act, the John Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act, and the Washington, D.C. Admission Act. The march is led by Drum Major Institute, March On, the National Action Network, Future Coalition, SEIU, and 51 for 51, and is joined by over 140 other partners. The march is funded through the #ForJohn campaign, a grassroots effort co-founded by Martin Luther King III and Arndrea King to fight voter suppression. 

About March On

March On is a political organization composed of women-led political activist groups that grew out of the women’s marches of January 21, 2017. They have come together as a united force to take concrete, coordinated actions at the federal, state and local levels to impact elections and move the country in a progressive direction. For more information, click HERE.

About the Drum Major Institute

The Drum Major Institute advances the core mission of our founder, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., to assure that the arc of the moral universe continues to bend toward justice. Dr. King’s legacy and voice are as important today as they were upon our founding 60 years ago. To meet this historic moment, we are lending our unique ability to facilitate dialogue and collaboration to support the countless courageous acts of individuals and organizations across the nation and the world to ensure that the vital conversations that are now starting will sustain and advance far beyond this moment in time—and lead to tangible lasting outcomes. We encourage all people to embrace their role in the King legacy, take action in their community and strive to build the Beloved Community. Learn more HERE.

About SEIU

Service Employees International Union is an organization of 2 million members united by the belief in the dignity and worth of workers and the services they provide, and dedicated to improving the lives of workers and their families and creating a more just and humane society. For more information, click HERE.

About National Action Network

National Action Network is one of the leading civil rights organizations in the Nation with chapters throughout the entire United States. Founded in 1991 by Reverend Al Sharpton, NAN works within the spirit and tradition of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. to promote a modern civil rights agenda that includes the fight for one standard of justice, decency and equal opportunities for all people regardless of race, religion, ethnicity, citizenship, criminal record, economic status, gender, gender expression, or sexuality. For more information, click HERE

About Future Coalition

Founded by youth activists for youth activists, Future Coalition is a network and community for youth-led organizations and Gen Z and young millennial leaders from across the country that came into being as a project of March On in the fall of 2018. Future Coalition works collaboratively to provide young people with the resources, tools, and support they need to create the change they want to see in their communities and in this country. For more information, click HERE.

About 51 for 51 

51 for 51 is a coalition of D.C.-based and national groups committed to equal representation for the over 700,000 D.C. residents who remain locked out of our democracy. The coalition of 20 progressive groups believe American citizens living in the District deserve a voice in Congress and control over their own local laws. Already, President Biden, Vice President Harris, and Senators Warren, Markey, Gillibrand and Hickenlooper have endorsed 51 for 51’s proposed path to statehood.

Fortnite illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Fortnite Most Streamed Game on Twitch

Fortnite Most Streamed Game on Twitch for March 2021 – 7M Hours Streamed

According to data presented by Safe Betting Sites US, Fortnite was the most streamed game on Twitch for March 2021 – a total of 6.99 million hours streamed for the month.

Fortnite Leads Several of Twitch’s Key Metrics

Fortnite continues to dominate charts in 2021 and was the most streamed game on Twitch for the month of March. The popular online Battle Royale game logged a total of 6.99M hours streamed on the platform. The second most streamed game on Twitch was Call of Duty: Modern Warfare with a total of 5.03M hours streamed for the month of March.

Fortnite also led the charts in the number of streamers for the month of March 2021. A total of 669,749 streamers streamed Fortnite for the month. Minecraft had the second largest number of streamers with 468,017. Overall, the top 10 leading games in terms of the number of streamers for the month of March, were streamed by an estimated 3.2M streamers on Twitch.

The top 10 games on twitch with the most channels accounted for over 50K channels. Twitch had an almost 20% share of this total with 9,707 channels in March 2021. The second most was COD: Modern Warfare with just under 7K channels.

League of Legends had the largest recorded peak viewers on Twitch in March 2021 with 704,375 peak viewers. The second-largest belonged to Minecraft which recorded 663, 533 peak viewers in March 2021. Fortnite had the fifth largest peak viewers with 641, 227.

Rex Pascual, Esports Editor at Safe Betting Sites US commented: “Despite the rise of many other titles within the same game mode such as PUBG and Warzone, Fortnite continues to attract large audiences on video game streaming platforms. Fortnite’s status as the pioneer of the increasingly popular Battle Royale game mode gives it a loyal and avid fanbase that will keep it near the top of Twitch’s charts for years to come.”

You can read more about the story with more statistics and information here.

Kaelen Felix illustrates Amtrak for 360 MAGAZINE.

360 Magazine Marches on Washington

By Cassandra Yany × Armon Hayes, Vaughn Lowery

Recently, our team journeyed to Washington, D.C. for the National Action Network’s Commitment March. The August 28 march marked 57 years since the March on Washington where Martin Luther King Jr. gave his historic “I Have A Dream” speech. According to the National Action Network’s website, the goal of the march was to advocate for comprehensive police accountability reform, promote participation in the Census and motivate voters to cast their ballots in the upcoming Presidential election.

The National Action Network was founded by Rev. Al Sharpton in 1991. With nearly 100 chapters nationwide, the civil rights organization works in the tradition of Martin Luther King, Jr. to achieve “one standard of justice, decency, and equal opportunities for all people regardless of race, religion, ethnicity, criminal record, economic status, gender, gender expression or sexuality.”

The trip from New York to Washington, D.C. was made easy by taking Amtrak’s Acela service. Despite the higher price point, the Acela is newer and less crowded than regional trains. The express train eliminated the burden of tolls and stopped in only a few cities, arriving in D.C. after about three and a half hours. It can be stressful to travel right now, so it was a relief to see how clean the train was. The quiet car, basic free wifi and outlets on board provided the perfect environment to research and write articles on our tablets. We utilized our extra time to discuss with one another and prepare for our coverage of the march and our days in D.C.

The café offered coffee and various snack options, and the sliding glass doors made it easy for us to walk through the cars. The reclining seats were comfortable and allowed us to rest before our trip. There were also sections of four seats for those traveling in a larger group. Each passenger could bring two personal items weighing up to 25 pounds, and two carry-on bags weighing up to 50 pounds at no additional cost. Amtrak is currently offering reduced fares for two to six tickets purchased together where riders can save eight to 45 percent.

Kaelen Felix illustrates Amtrak story for 360 MAGAZINE

Luckily, we were able to call Amtrak in advance to ensure we could carry on our folding bicycles. With limited parking available in the city, electric bikes served as a great mode of transportation for many protesters. E-bikes such as the DYU Smart Bike and a custom scooter from Good Vibe Gliders were an affordable alternative to renting a car, and made covering and participating in the march much easier.

The Commitment March: Get Your Knee Off Our Necks started early Friday morning. Participants marched through the National Mall, many carrying signs remembering those whose lives have been lost in acts of police violence. Others displayed “Black Lives Matter” on flags, shirts and masks.

Some participants created street art during the event, voicing their support through their work. At one point, a number of demonstrators stood together in the Reflecting Pool in front of the Washington Monument. Marchers reached the section of 16 Street NW that has become known as “Black Lives Matter Plaza” around 3:30 PM before dispersing for the day.

Organizers of the march upheld COVID-19 guidelines and regulations. The National Action Network placed multiple signs throughout the National Mall encouraging social distancing, and took marchers’ temperatures as they entered the area. Face masks were distributed to people who did not have one, and visitors from high-risk areas were urged to join virtually from their homes. There was also a testing booth on site, as reported by WUSA 9.

Kaelen Felix illustrates Amtrak story for 360 MAGAZINE

The march was co-convened by Sharpton and Martin Luther King III. Among the thousands of attendees who gathered on the National Mall were the families of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Trayvon Martin, Eric Garner and Jacob Blake. Many members of these families gave speeches at the Lincoln Memorial, along with lawmakers from across the country. These congressmen and women pushed for legislation that would address cases of racial injustice.

Though she was not present, Vice Presidential candidate Kamala Harris shared her message to marchers via Twitter. In her speech, which was played at the event, she said, “…if we work together, to challenge every instinct our nation has to return to the status quo, and combine the wisdom of long time warriors for justice, with the creative energy of the young leaders today, we have an opportunity to make history, right here and right now.”

Yolanda Renee King took the stage to address the crowd, standing where her grandfather had led March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. In a video posted by CNN she said, “We stand and march for love and we will fulfill my grandfather’s dream.” She then led a chant of “Show me what democracy looks like; This is what democracy looks like!”

Friday was also the 65th anniversary of Emmett Till’s murder. The 14-year-old was lynched and thrown off a bridge while visiting family in Mississippi. He was abducted after “allegedly whistling at a white woman,” according to ABC 7 Chicago, and his body was found mutilated in the Tallahatchie River. Till’s family never received justice, as the two men responsible for his death were both acquitted. Till’s murder helped to spark the Civil Rights Movement in the 1950s. Civil rights leader and former congressman John Lewis wrote that “Emmett Till was [his] George Floyd” in a New York Times essay that was published on the day of Lewis’ funeral.

The trip provided a meaningful experience to stand in solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement, as well as time to see local relatives. 360 President Vaughn Lowery visited his uncle Leroy Lowery, the former executive director of the Martin Luther King Jr. National Memorial Project Foundation, who raised over $120 million for the Stone of Hope.

Leroy Lowery is the son of the late Rev. Joseph E. Lowery, a civil rights leader who helped Martin Luther King, Jr. establish the Southern Christina Leadership Conference, and received the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2009. Leroy Lowery attended the march with his father in 1963 and stated on Friday, “to see that we have to march [again] 57 years later is deflating.”

Kaelen Felix illustrates Amtrak story for 360 MAGAZINE
Gabrielle Marchan illustrates Dianne Morales for 360 MAGAZINE

Dianne Morales

As of late, one of our team members had the opportunity to sit down with New York City mayoral candidate Dianne Morales for an interview. After eight years under Mayor Bill de Blasio, New York City will see someone new in the position in 2021, and Morales, a member of the Democratic Party, is jumping at the opportunity.

360: What are the major points of inspiration throughout your life, so far, that have led you to where you are today?

Morales: At my core is a commitment to community, and I learned community at home. I am the youngest of three girls and the daughter of Puerto Rican parents. My mother, a secretary for the Leather Workers’ Union, and my father, a building manager on the waterfront, created a working-class life for us in Bed-Stuy. But our home was not just for me and my sisters. My grandmother, Mami, lived with us my whole childhood. In fact, she and I shared a bed until the day that I left home for college. Our home was a resting place, a layover, a transition point for whoever needed it. There was always someone new sleeping on the couch or joining us at the dinner table. Whether they had just arrived from Puerto Rico, were in between jobs, had just returned from the military or from being incarcerated, there were always other people staying with us while they “got back on their feet.” My parents opened their arms and their front door to whoever needed it. I never questioned this way of life. I was taught, “If you have, then you provide.” We took care of each other. I saw, firsthand, the opportunity created when we each take responsibility, not just for ourselves, but for our neighbors and for our communities. This belief has spurred me on through 30 years in the public sector, as an educator, a foster care worker and a leader of nonprofits.

As I established my own home in Bed-Stuy as a single mom, my children and I recreated the dynamic my parents had built. We always have a few extra people living in our home – whom we often refer to as our “chosen family.” These extended family members have filled my home with love and reciprocal support. In a twist of fate, since the pandemic hit, I have shared my home with my parents and my children. I envision a New York City where we take care of each other, where everyone is welcome to the dinner table, where neighbors provide more support than extra sugar and all of us have a warm place to rest our heads. Although NYC is vast with diversity, we are all inextricably bound together and are only as strong as our most vulnerable link.

360: How can a mayor, as opposed to any other civic official, lead unique positive changes for equity?

Morales: Over the past several months there is a mantra I have been repeating consistently: a budget is a reflection of our values. The mayor has executive power over what gets funded in the city and by how much. Funding for services that contribute to true public safety (access to housing, medical/mental healthcare, economic stability, job training, education) will provide access and opportunity to those who have historically been left behind by our elected officials. Line by line, the budget reveals the values of a city and government. The NYC budget passed in June was a failure. It failed the residents of NYC, who have been raising their voices in protest and demanding a divestment from law enforcement since May 29. It failed those whose lives have been lost at the hands of the NYPD. It failed communities of color that have been disproportionately impacted by violence and brutality.

The budget highlights the need for NYC leadership to put New Yorkers first by investing in communities. The NYC Mayor also has the ability to work to desegregate public schools and impact the quality of education provided to over 1.1 million students, many of whom are students of color living in poverty. This alters the course of a student’s life and provides an entry point to economic mobility and a true career trajectory. New Yorkers deserve a bold, transformational leader who is unapologetically committed to prioritizing justice in the budget’s bottom line. I fundamentally believe that those closest to the problem are closest to the solution. Our city needs a mayor that is in tune with her people and provides a vision for and direction for what is possible.

360: What are some of the most pressing or urgent issues that need attention within New York City, and how would you address them?

Morales: New York’s problems all stem from structural oppression by Race, Gender and Class, so our solutions must go deeper, all the way to the root causes. Too many New Yorkers are living in a time of scarcity, and that’s been going on since long before the virus hit. The are working two jobs, just barely surviving and always one misfortune away from losing everything. Instead of this “Scarcity Economy,” we need a “Solidarity Economy,” and that requires bold action. First, transforming public safety in the city by providing access to the same critical resources found in wealthy communities will be a critical step toward creating the long-term change we need for all to live in dignity. True public safety includes ensuring that every New Yorker has access to “life essentials,” like quality transportation, affordable housing, excellent and equal education and human-centered healthcare. All New Yorkers deserve access to these fundamental resources in order to live in dignity, and it is the necessary floor needed to break through glass ceilings.

Next, we must enhance and overhaul vital infrastructure requiring multi-part, creative solutions that address the deeper issues embedded in the fabric of NYC. To break the racist cycle of poverty that divides our city into the “haves” and the “have-nots,” we will establish a guaranteed minimum income. We will push for universal healthcare and eliminate inequities in the health system faced by women, and especially women of color. We will work to address the persistent segregation of our schools and disrupt the school-to-prison pipeline by replacing school safety officers with trained mental health professionals. The driving force behind all policy initiatives is the experiences, needs and voices of women of color. Particularly, Black women. As the Combahee River Collective wisely wrote in its 1977 statement, “If Black women were free, it would mean that everyone else would have to be free since our freedom would necessitate the destruction of all the systems of oppression.” We know that if New York does right by Black women, the entire city will be better for it.

360: How can you use your personal experiences with serving as a single mother and observing the many other challenges that face New York City residents to enact policy reform?

Morales: So many of New York’s problems have impacted me directly, and so much of who I am and what I know comes from being a mom. My greatest joy is being the mother of my two children, Ben and Gabby. They constantly push me, teach me and nourish me. As a single parent, I share experiences with hundreds of thousands of other New Yorkers. A 2018 study found that single-parent households are the second largest household type in New York City. I navigated New York City’s systems – economic, health and education – on my own. I balanced a budget for my family each month, figuring out how to make it work. My greatest challenge was parenting my children through the NYC education system. The rigid and unforgiving education that my children received did not allow any space for their learning differences. They did not see themselves in the white-centric curriculum and we struggled to find support during their developmental years. Advocating for my children was a full-time job on top of my paying-full-time-job. Again and again I have stood with parents for a more equitable and life-affirming education for our kids. It is with this same community spirit of coalition building, advocacy and bettering of our social safety nets that I will push for policies that support all types of families in NYC.

360: What is one of the most significant components of your background or experiential knowledge that separates you from any other candidate?

Morales: I am, in so many ways, the average New Yorker. I was born and bred in Bed-Stuy. I am an Afro Latina single-mom of two children who survived the New York City public school system. I am a first generation college graduate who came back home to my city after school. I am a woman of color who discovered that I was not being paid the same as my white male counterparts. I’ve watched my neighborhood change, I’ve seen Starbucks replace the corner bodega, and I have spent my weekends marching side by side – 6 feet apart – with my fellow New Yorkers demanding justice for those killed at the hands of a racist policing system. Because I am the average New Yorker, my voice reflects the voices of thousands of others. We share our lived experiences, frustrations and joys. I love New York City because I see our full potential for all of us.

360: How does your previous extensive work with social service nonprofits inform your motivations and goals to serve as Mayor?

Morales: For decades, I worked within the community to address structural inequities burdening communities of color. I worked alongside those experiencing the symptoms of our broken system most acutely – poverty, lack of access to education, homelessness and mental health services. I witnessed firsthand the day-to-day struggles of New Yorkers that are perpetuated by cycles of poverty and oppression. I worked from the ground, up and from the inside, out. But as I hammered away, I recognized these structural and institutional barriers, and began to ask, “So how do we burn them down?” It felt as though I was only tinkering around the edges of the problem and providing Band-Aid solutions to deep, deep wounds. The core, perpetuating issues were centralized and foundational. I realized that if I want to create lasting, effective change, I must address these systemic and political problems at the root. As Mayor, I would carry with me the voices of those I have served.

360: In outlining your points of action and reform for New York City, how does the COVID-19 pandemic affect any of these potential strides for change?

Morales: As we know, COVID-19 is a catastrophe that illuminates all of the cracks and splinters in our broken systems. At first, many claimed the COVID-19 was a “great equalizer,” affecting all people, regardless of race, class or gender. Instead COVID-19 disproportionately impacts people of color and low-income communities. This is not a coincidence or personal failing, but rather the direct result of racist systems, putting structural oppression in stark relief. While some New Yorkers are able to escape crowded areas, arm themselves with personal protective equipment and work remotely, others, namely people of color, are on the front lines providing essential services to our city.

As COVID-19 has had devastating consequences that will leave a lasting impact for years to come, it has also provided us with a unique moment. As we saw after the murder of George Floyd by the Minneapolis police, being homebound and isolated forces us to pay attention. We have paused. We have slowed down. With fewer distractions and a center of focus, folks all across the country have had the veil lifted. People are noticing the interconnected webs of oppression I have lived with and that I have been fighting to dismantle my entire life. In this moment, we need leaders in office who are of, by and for the movement for social change. There is a momentum and hunger for justice that can no longer be ignored. As we overcome the challenge of the disease, I will never let the city forget who is truly essential. Together we will create a world in which front-line workers are truly valued as indispensable. A world where we accompany our applause and platitudes with a livable wage, unquestionable dignity and real community power.

360: What are some of the most rewarding takeaways you have gained from leading several momentous organizations?

Morales: I’ve learned firsthand about the barriers and challenges that people have to overcome in order to gain access to opportunities that are alleged to be available to everyone. I also have watched as community members care for one another to bridge the gaps in access to those opportunities. This is testament to the power of our communities to be true partners in determining the solutions they face when given the resources to do so. Finally, I have been able to bear witness to what is possible when people finally gain access and opportunity and how that has the potential to change the trajectory of people’s lives and transform families and communities.

360: Regarding the national and global movement, Black Lives Matter, how will you utilize your unique identity to empower minorities in the City of New York?

Morales: Like many people of color, I have lived years of my life trying not to take up space. I have seen the ways that my identities – my Blackness, my Latina roots, my politics, my womanhood – make people, namely white people, uncomfortable. In these spaces I would constantly ask myself, “Do I seem too opinionated, too articulate, too aggressive?” I would contort and deflate myself to fit into tight corners and small boxes. I would shrink myself so that others could feel big. When making the decision to run for Mayor of NYC, I decided it was important for me to run as my full, unadulterated, unapologetic, multi-hyphenated self. There would be no more shrinking, questioning or self-doubt. I recognize that by the very nature of stepping into this space, I am opening up a path of possibility. As the first Afro-Latina running for mayor of New York City, I recognize the awesome responsibility I hold. I know that when I speak, unfairly or not, I am representing all Afro-Latina women. Missteps become mass stereotypes. Accolades become communal achievements.

This is both beautiful and deeply terrifying. But in moments of fear, I am guided by a greater purpose to bring with me those whom have been devalued and made to feel small, as I have been; to elevate the voices of those with shared experiences and claim our rightful place in democracy and representation in leadership. People like me, individuals and communities of color, women of color, we must be at the forefront of our politics and policies. I am deeply committed to divesting from racist systems and investing in Black and Brown communities. I am committed to reimagining public safety on our streets and in our schools. I am committed to shifting wealth opportunities to those who have been historically marginalized. I am committed to redressing and repairing the wounds of oppression that scar our city. I am in this race to stand taller in the face of a world that tells me to shrink. I am here to tell them that Black lives are beloved. We matter today and every day forward.

360: To all of the NYC citizens following your efforts to better numerous communities, what are some of the best ways individuals can support your campaign?

Morales: The best way to help me is to join the campaign with a small contribution. I am not a career politician, and unlike other candidates, I have not spent decades cultivating a war chest of people, networks and resources to kickstart my run for mayor. I want to be responsive to the people, not the special interests.. My campaign was born out of my home in Bed-Stuy, out of conversations with my neighbors, friends and colleagues. Our campaign is 100% powered by the people, not the 1%. We are an intersectional coalition of Black and Brown, Latinx, LGBTQIA and working class New Yorkers. We are backed by the people being hit the hardest at this moment in time. I am so incredibly humbled that in the middle of a pandemic, without employment, people are finding a way to donate to our campaign. I know what is at stake and the choices they have had to make to do so. If donating to our campaign is not possible for you during this financially uncertain time, we understand. Visit my website, dianne.nyc, for information and volunteer opportunities. Spread our mission to your fellow New Yorkers. Reach out to join our team. Remember me in November 2021.

To learn more about Dianne Morales, you can click right here. To learn more about her stances and solutions, you can click right here. To support Morales through donations, you can click right here. You can also support her on Twitter and Instagram.

Rita Azar, illustration, 360 MAGAZINE,

Digital Justice Gathering

On Saturday, the Poor People’s Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival will host the largest digital gathering of poor and low-income people in this nation’s history.

Streaming/Broadcasting Available in All Formats

What: Poor and low-income people from throughout the country will testify about their experiences of systemic poverty, systemic racism, the war economy, ecological devastation, and the false moral narrative of religious nationalism. They will be introduced by religious figures such as Rev. Dr. Bernice King, CEO of the King Center; Episcopal Bishop Michael Curry; Rev. Terri Hord Owens, the first black woman to lead the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ); and Rabbi Jonah Dov Pesner, director of the Religious Action Center of Reform Judaism. Artists and activists also will introduce testifiers, including Erika Alexander, David Oyelowo, Danny  Glover, Wanda Sykes, Jane Fonda, Debra Messing, and former Vice President Al Gore. Union leaders including SEIU President Mary Kay Henry, AFSCME President Lee Saunders, SEIU 1199 President George Gresham, and Sara Nelson, president of the Association of Flight Attendants in the Communications. Workers of America, also are part of the program.

The assembly will be streamed on major TV and radio networks, as well as at june2020.org.

*A virtual pressroom will be set up for reporters’ questions on June 20th. Media can register for it here.

**The event will be open captioned with ASL and Spanish interpretation, all of which will be accessible at june2020.org

Who: The Poor People’s Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival is co-chaired by Rev. Dr. William J. Barber II of Repairers of the Breach and Rev. Dr. Liz Theoharis of the Kairos Center, who will frame the day’s purpose. Rev. Barber will give a call to action after all the testimony, and Rev. Theoharis will challenge religious nationalism. The campaign has the support of 20 national religious bodies, 16 labor unions, and over 200 national organizations. See full partner list here.

When: 10 a.m. and 6 p.m., Saturday, June 20th, and 6 p.m. Sunday, June 21st. All times Eastern.

Where: This online gathering will be streamed at june2020.org as well as on major TV and radio networks, and will include participants from more than  40 states.

Why: More than 140 million poor and low-income people live in the United States, or 43% of the country’s population and 700 people die each day from poverty — and that was before the COVID-19 pandemic. The  Poor People’s Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival, with organizing committees in 45 states, is building a moral fusion movement to address the five interlocking injustices of systemic racism, systemic poverty, ecological devastation, the war economy and militarism and a distorted moral narrative of religious nationalism, to implement its Moral Agenda, based on years of policy research and budgetary analysis, and to uphold demands on systemic racism. Among the impacted people who will speak are service workers from the Midwest who have worked through the pandemic without PPE; a Kansas farm couple fighting for local health care; a coal miner from Appalachia; mothers who have lost children due to lack of health care, residents of Cancer Alley in Louisiana, and an Apache elder who is petitioning the federal government to stop a corporation from destroying a sacred site in Arizona.

As the nation rightfully continues protests in the wake of George Floyd’s death, the campaign upholds that public policy continues to disproportionately kill people of color and poor and low-income people across the country and that a budget is not simply an allocation of funds, but is a moral document that reflects social values. This digital mass assembly will call for poor and low-income people to build power and register to vote like never before. It presents an opportunity for all people to join together in a united call for justice from wherever they are.

We urge all members of Congress, all governors, the White House administration and both presidential candidates to watch the program to enlighten themselves about the lives of poor and low-income people in this nation and the need for a stimulus bill that helps people from the bottom up.

Background

In 1968, Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and many others launched the Poor People’s Campaign, seeking to build a broad, fusion movement that could unite poor and impacted communities across the country, and organize a “revolution of values” in the United States. In 2018, that call was picked up once again by the Poor People’s Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival.

Jadakiss x New Album Release Date

JADAKISS ANNOUNCES NEW RELEASE DATE MARCH 6TH FOR 5TH STUDIO ALBUM, IGNATIUS

NEW DEF JAM ALBUM FEATURES SINGLES “ME”, “KISSES TO THE SKY” AND HIGHLY
ANTICIPATED NEW SINGLE “HUNTIN SEASON”

“The New York hip-hop community is mourning the untimely passing of one of our brightest young stars, and I felt it was best to pause for a moment to come together and reflect. The IGNATIUS album means a lot to me – it celebrates the life of my brother Icepick Jay, another one we lost too soon. It was Jay’s dream for me to collaborate with Pusha T on a new song. The single we’d planned to release together – “Hunting Season” – is a lyrical metaphor about taking out MC’s in the rap arena, and we didn’t want anyone to confuse it with anything else. So out respect for Jay’s memory, for Pop Smoke’s memory, Pusha and I agreed to put this one on hold for a minute. You can hear it when the album drops on March 6th. Listen as it’s intended: two MC’s who love hip-hop, and have a lot of love and respect for the next generation coming up.” – Jadakiss

ABOUT JADAKISS:
For more than two decades, Jadakiss has been a hip-hop icon, a skilled lyricist revered and respected in New York City and nationwide. From his early days as part of the hip-hop group the LOX (with Styles P and Sheek Louch), Jada went on to blaze his own successful trail over the course of four essential albums: Kiss the Game Goodbye(2001, with “We Gonna Make It” featuring Styles P); Kiss Of Death (2004, with “U Make Me Wanna” featuring Mariah Carey, and “Why” featuring Anthony Hamilton); The Last Kiss (2009, with “Who’s Real” featuring Swizz Beatz and OJ Da Juiceman, and “By My Side” featuring Ne-Yo); and Top 5 Dead Or Alive (2015, with “Ain’t Nothin New” featuring Ne-Yo and Nipsey Hussle). There were collaborations with many major figures, among them Notorious B.I.G., Puff Daddy, Jay-Z, Nas, Mariah Carey, and the landmark project with Fabolous (Friday On Elm Street, 2017). Artists ranging from Eminem to Kanye West have named Jada as one of their favorite MCs ever to touch the microphone, hence the album title Top 5 Dead Or Alive. Outside of music, over the years Jadakiss has become an entrepreneur with several businesses in his hometown of Yonkers, New York, including a juice bar, clothing store and website.

FOLLOW JADAKISS:
Twitter | Facebook | Website

Jadakiss, Ignatius, Umusic, Vaughn Lowery, 360 Magazine,