Posts tagged with "graphic"

Danilo Nedić wall art made of skateboard decks via 360 MAGAZINE

Danilo Nedić – ArtDecko

Former skater and founder of Dutch design studio Focused Skateboard Woodworks, Danilo Nedić, turns old skateboards into colorful, geometric works of art.

The inspiration for his work are the classic line patterns of the Art Deco style movement from the 1920s and 1930s. “Looking for a way to translate the colourful veneer of old skateboards into these line patterns, I discovered a geometrical world behind these patterns with infinite possibilities,” Nedić says.

The result of his quest: colorful wall art with unique geometric patterns that play with the viewer’s senses. The colored veneer layers of the skateboards, give depth to each patterns, which seem to change shape with each new look. Nedić: “In this way I try to capture the playful, wayward and creative character of skateboarding with every ArtDecko wall art piece.”

Sustainable Art 

Every year, hundreds of thrashed skateboard decks are left behind at skateboard shops across the world. The decks are no longer suitable for skateboarding, but Nedic gives the wood a second life. The old decks are collected at local Dutch skate shops and processed into sleek furniture, home deco and works of art.

From skateboard to artwork

The old skateboard decks get stripped of their griptape, sanded clean and sawn into strips. The strips are glued into rainbow blocks in stacks of seven skateboards under high pressure. These blocks are then sawn into veneer slices. The rainbow line pattern is created by the colorful veneer layers of the used skateboards.

Colorful geometric patterns

The veneer slices are sawn into different shapes with extreme precision and puzzled together into colorful, geometric line patterns, which give depth to each artwork. Each of the unique ArtDecko art pieces seems to change shape right before the eyes of the viewer.

About Danilo Nedić

Danilo Nedić (47) is the creative mind behind the Dutch design studio Focused Skateboard Woodworks, which he and Jeroen Dekker (47) founded together in 2015. Each work of art from the ArtDecko wall art series is personally designed and handmade by Nedić.

About Focused Skateboard Woodworks

Focused is a Rotterdam based Dutch design studio specialized in transforming old skateboards into colorful and sleek furniture and home deco. Focused is known for the DecksTop and DecksPad tables and has made custom recycled skateboard furniture for Google Creative Lab (New York)Varonis (New York)Golden Road Brewing (Los Angeles) and many other companies around the world.

Hold me tight 2 ©Vivi Film animation via Sara Bleger for use by 360 MAGAZINE

FIAF – ANIMATION FIRST FESTIVAL

The French Institute Alliance Française (FIAF) recently revealed further installments to their 2022 Animation First Festival. FIAF, too, publicized that the animation festival will showcase a virtual programming of the animated film AN AMERICAN TAIL by esteemed filmmaker Don Bluth, with the US debut of the TV special THE MYSTERIES OF PARIS, revitalizing one of the earliest novel series of France.

The French animation festival commemorates its fifth anniversary in 2022. This year’s event showcases two programs: in person from February 11-13, and virtually from February 14-21.

Just Announced:

Past Announced Showcases:

About Animation First   

Serving as the single film festival in the United States that honors French animation, Animation First reviews the impacts of animation film. France serves as Europe’s leading curator and the world’s second runner up producer of animated film. The event aims to educate film lovers on the rich history of animation in France.

James Gilbert Morgan Motor Co for use by 360 MAGAZINE

MORGAN PLUS FOUR LM62

The Morgan Motor Company recently revealed the launch of the Plus Four LM62. This revamped version of the traditional Morgan Plus Four consists of only 62 examples and pays homage to the Morgan Plus 4 SuperSports – aka TOK 258 – that won the 2.0-litre class at the 1962 24 Hours of Le Mans.

The original TOK 258 was designed in a dark green color, in contrast to the trendy red shade that was showcased on Morgan vehicles during that time. The Plus Four LM62 combines the use of both timeless colors. Featuring a Heritage White hardtop, this color is available as a first for the model. Continuing to reference the commemorative Morgan is an LM62 graphics pack with roundels of the number ’29,’ and an LM62 rear badge, silver wire wheels, a Le Mans-inspired fuel filler cap and an arched back panel.

The interior of the model comes embellished with an LM62 metal plaque that highlights the car’s distinctive and rare structure. Another exquisite feature of the model stages an LM62 laser-stamped black saddle-leather door pulls and headrests stitched with the same LM62 graphic. Heated black leather Comfort Plus seats come adorned with horizontal pleating, perforated seat centers and matching stitch color, finishing off with leather wrapped seat backs.

If clients are interested in additional alterations to a Plus Four LM62, there is availability to include a soft-top hood, LM62 photographic build record and an LM62 accessory pack showcasing two-eared wheel spinners, a Moto-lisa steering wheel, headlight tape and a chrome interior rear-view mirror.

The Chairman and CEO of Morgan Motor Company Steve Morris spoke on the model, stating, “The 1962 Le Mans class-winning Morgan Plus 4 holds a special place in the hearts of Morgan enthusiasts, employees and owners around the world. It marked one of Morgan’s greatest motorsport achievements, the car covering more than 2,200 miles at an average running speed of almost 94mph, and triumphing – like David vs Goliath – over our bigger, and better funded, rivals of the time.

“With the Morgan Plus Four LM62, we pay homage to this famous vehicle and incredible moment in time, 60 years on. Limited to just 62 individually numbered examples, the bespoke touches and enhanced level of standard specification make these cars an enticing proposition for customers wanting a piece of Morgan history.”

Available now from Morgan Dealers worldwide, the Plus Four LM62 is offered in left- or right-hand drive, with the option of manual or automatic transmission. In the UK, it prices from £78,995. For pricing in other regions, check with your local Dealer.

Gaming Reviews

Going in Reverse of Graphics Escalation

When one thinks of the cutting edge in gaming, graphics are what comes to mind. How well does this game render characters and the environment? How real does it look? Video games continue to push the boundaries of what modern computers could do. What was once science fiction is now a household name.

As spectacular as these games are to behold, they represent only one part of the gaming market. Not all popular games embrace the hyper-detailed graphics of AAA studio games. Other gamers embrace simpler, less tech-intensive art styles. Many of these games are as popular with the general public for a plethora of reasons. They’ve since carved a niche for themselves in a world where hyperrealism is king.

The Road to Realism

Today’s hyper-real graphics reflect developments that fueled gaming since the early days. Then as now, graphical sophistication was a major selling. Consoles duked it out to see which could render games with better graphics. Each new console and game promised better art than the last. Meanwhile, PC gamers, with their customized rigs, could push graphics even further.

Amazing graphics can immerse players into the worlds they play. Many of the big names in gaming today boast of immersive, hyper-realistic environments. Today’s visual spectacles like Assassin’s Creed and Final Fantasy rival theatrical animated films in detail. The best of these games bring historical and fantasy environments to life at home.

The Limits of Hyperrealism

But as amazing as these visuals would look on screen, it comes at a heavy price. In a very literal sense, playing these games is not easy on the pocket. Many titles from AAA studios are quite demanding from technology. Both consoles and an excellent gaming PC come with a hefty price tag. This proves to be a great barrier to entry for gamers on a budget.

Meanwhile, PC gamers must also contend with the complexity of customization. It takes awhile to learn the ropes of the visual settings. The average player must be patient when tweaking them to one’s liking. Even dialing down the graphics is confusing for the novice.

Games that aim for too much realism stand the risk of evoking the uncanny valley. This term was first coined by roboticist Masahiro Mori in the 1970s to describe unsettling robots. Its impact on realistic graphics, however, mustn’t be understated. Even small breaks in realism will be off putting for audiences. Avoiding this is a taxing endeavor. One either attempts to amp up realism (which is costly) or embrace a more stylized depiction. The best 2D and 3D games, fortunately, avoid the worst of this.

Finally, the aesthetic that comes with games takes a toll on development teams. Game development studios have come under fire for crunch culture that overworks and underpays their developers. Often, this has roots in the near-impossible deadlines brought on by game hype. And better 3D graphics don’t always lead to a better product. The buggy messy Cyberpunk 2077 fiasco alone proves that.

A Different Direction

The big names in gaming embraced more elaborate, graphics-intensive art styles. Others, meanwhile, chose a different path. Many indie developers embraced stylized 3D or more isometric or side-scrolling art styles. Mostly, this was a budgetary choice. Advancements in technology have made developing 2D games cheaper and faster.

In the heyday of Flash, developers could build a simple vector graphics game within days or weeks. It allowed indie developer communities to flourish. Soon, sites like Kongregate and Newgrounds had massive archives of 2D games. Even today, older games once made in Flash could be found in archival sites like Plays.org.

Today, developer teams can create complex games using either 2D engines or a hybrid of 2D and 3D graphics. By eschewing the complexities of hyperreal graphic engines, they can focus on refining other aspects of gameplay. Choosing less graphics-intensive visuals also lets them experiment with other genres. Many small titles embrace 2D graphics without sacrificing storytelling. A cartoony point-and-click, Broken Age toys with two different yet unified narratives.

A Flourishing Market

There are a host of reasons why people gravitate toward games with cartoonish art styles. Lower-tier 3D games won’t tax computer hardware as much. Meanwhile, all but the slowest low-end computers can play 2D Flash or HTML games without a hitch.

Devs can even port these games into social media. There was a reason why elderly gamers flocked to Farmville in its heyday, after all. Mobile gaming also fueled the development of less graphic-intensive games. Side-scrollers and isometric games play smoother in smartphones. By using cartoonier and flatter visuals, these games don’t sap the phone’s batteries. Players on mobile can sink hours into these games. This is a lucrative outcome for mobile game developers.

This level of accessibility and portability can prove to be a winning ticket. InnerSloth’s game Among Us, follows the same cel-shaded 2D style of its previous releases. This simple spot-the-impostor social game became a pop culture phenomenon in 2020.

More Than a Throwback

The appeal of 2D gaming lingered even after the rise of 3D graphics. The most popular games in the 1990s still had dedicated communities well into 2010. Some older games, like Age of Empires, enjoyed incredible appeal through gameplay alone. First released in 1999, Age of Empires II continued to have a fan following well into the 2010s. This led to the development of not one but two remasters of the game. It was also followed by several new expansions introducing a mix of new playable cultures.

Throwbacks to retro-style gameplay became a selling point by the 2010s. The wildly successful game Cuphead combined 1980s-style gameplay with 2D 1930s-style cartoons to great effect. This and other games like it capitalized on a niche that 3D platformers couldn’t fill. They also introduced a new generation of gamers to the joys of 2D platform gaming.

Nostalgia didn’t play as big a role in the staying power of these games as one would think. Many developers created side-scrollers to experiment with unique gameplay concepts. Braid played around with time control, creating tactical challenges for the player. These simple games also play around with many game conventions. The popular Undertale subverts the idea that video game characters should slaughtering their enemies. Here, you have the option to negotiate. Different actions create varying outcomes for the player… all in glorious pixelated 2D.  Through its plot twist, Braid makes a statement on how you see its player character.

A Niche of Their Own

There’s room in the larger gaming community for both 2D and 3D games in various levels of realism. Each level of graphics have their own appeal and cater to different types of players. Not every game needs realistic lighting to suspend a gamer’s disbelief.

Graphics-intensive 3D games grew with the idea that video games should be immersive. They are at once a technical and artistic achievement. The best of them are a spectacle that can captivate gamers from all walks of life. Games on the lower end of the graphic scale, however, are no slouches in that department. Some stand out as interactive artistic expressions. They can be an exciting challenge to play and ponder. Others offer a fun and enthralling experience that keeps players on their toes.

Less graphic intensive games add more variety to the gaming market. The lower graphic requirements let developers introduce new gameplay and story concepts. The lower barrier to entry also helps make these games more accessible to a larger audience. Ever wanted a good game that won’t overwork your computer? There’s going to be a 2D or low-end 3D game somewhere.

5 Essential Skills of a Graphic Designer

Are you thinking of pursuing a career in graphic design? Be sure to master these essential skills of a graphic designer.

If you have a passion for art and would like to earn money from it, look no further.

Graphic design is something that many businesses invest in because it allows them to create customized advertisements. Aside from that, they can use graphic design for logos, essentially helping them make a name for themselves as a brand.

Most of the job skills of a graphic designer aren’t that hard to obtain, but they require a lot of patience and determination. Graphic design is an art, so you’ll have to spend time practicing before you’re ready to sell your work.

Keep on reading to learn about 5 essential graphic designer skills!

1. Creativity

One of the most important skills a graphic designer must have is creativity. As a graphic designer, you must be able to come up with new ideas on the fly. No graphic designer works with one client and all projects are unique.

When working with multiple clients, you’ll need to give them ideas that will help them achieve whatever their goals are. While it’s acceptable to have a certain style, you don’t want one client’s designs to look similar to another’s. This can create branding problems because consumers might confuse one client for another.

With creativity comes the ability to draw sketches, brainstorm, balance artistry with technique, and pay attention to detail. If you’re not a creative person, you’ll have a hard time coming up with ideas and helping clients see through theirs.

2. Communication

Communication is the most important skill after creativity. Graphic designers don’t pay themselves. Instead, they work with clients that pay them to complete projects. When working with clients, a graphic designer must be able to portray their ideas and give visual representations of what a client wants.

Graphic design skills revolve around being able to multi-task and work with a team, and communication will play a role in almost every task. Any time you make something, you’ll need to communicate it to your client.

Whenever a client makes a request, you must be able to fill in the gaps to understand what exactly they want.

This skill is especially important if you’re working remotely because it’s much harder to work with a client when you can’t see them in person. When working remotely, most of your communication will take place over video chats.

Without being able to quickly sketch something for a client, you need to know how to explain what you’re thinking about.

3. Time Management

Most graphic designers work with multiple clients at once because the work usually doesn’t take up an entire day. Because of this, a graphic designer must be able to effectively manage their time if they’d like to earn a decent income.

This line of work revolves around completing projects within a set period. When working with multiple clients, you must keep track of when projects are due. Most designers will allot certain hours to a client so that they can stay consistent while working.

Knowing when to prioritize a project is also important. For example, a project that has a deadline in 2 weeks should be focused on more than a project that’s due in 2 months. However, you can’t neglect anything as you must ensure that all projects are steadily progressing.

4. Technology

Understanding how to use technology is necessary when becoming a graphic designer because most of your work will take place on the computer across various programs.

You’ll need to know how to make something on a program and transfer it to another location while preserving its quality.

The most important thing to focus on is learning how to use the programs that you’ll be designing on. Programs like Photoshop provide users with a plethora of tools and features that allow them to manipulate their projects to their liking.

You’ll also need to know how your computer functions because Windows and Mac have many differences. For example, knowing how to remove icons from top bar Mac will give you more space to work on projects, something that many people are unaware of.

Tech skills will come in handy when working with clients remotely. You’ll have a better understanding of what kind of things you can get done and what will require in-person exchanges. You can then provide clients with this information so that they understand what needs to be done.

5. Typography

Typography is the skill of making text look visually appealing. This is often done with copywriting and it has a major role in graphic design. Typography skills typically come with creativity, but they’re something that most people should focus on because many clients will want text in their designs.

Keep in mind that most people looking for graphic designers are trying to create ads and build a brand. When you come up with a good font, your client can build off that and start getting recognized more often.
Now You Know the Skills of a Graphic Designer

Graphic design skills revolve around being artistic and knowing how to associate with clients. After obtaining the skills of a graphic designer, you can start working for clients and earn a decent income. Graphic design is something that will never go away, so you can get started whenever you’re comfortable.

We encourage you to start brushing up on your art skills. If you can’t draw but know how to design things on the computer, start focusing on that. When you’re ready to start taking clients, you simply need to find them on a job board or you can apply to companies.

Browse our articles to learn more about a variety of topics!

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JENNA MORELLO

Jenna Morello is a multi-disciplinary artist from Brooklyn. At home, she creates large-scale bold, expressive walls as well as meticulously crafted sculptures. She mixes and matches multiple mediums to create nature-based, sometimes anatomical art which speaks for itself. Her work is internationally sold; and her murals can be seen around the world. She has completed projects for The Ritz-Carlton, the World Trade Center, Universal Music Group, Macy’s and the Super Bowl. As of late, she’s been featured in both The New York Times and Forbes.

http://www.jennamorello.com/

Pokémon x UNIQLO UT 2019 Grand Prix

UNIQLO announces that it will launch UNIQLO T-shirts (UTs) featuring winning designs from its Pokémon-themed UT GRAND PRIX 2019 design contest. Items will become available from June 28th at UNIQLO stores and through UNIQLO.com.

The contest attracted a record of more than 18,000 entries worldwide, reflecting the staggering popularity of Pokémon. The judging panel selected 22 winning designs.

Comment from UT GRAND PRIX Judge:

“Entries from more than 40 countries and regions demonstrated tremendous enthusiasm and wide-ranging interpretations of Pokémon. We were delighted with the prize-winning UT designs, and we are certain people everywhere will love wearing them.”


Overview of UT GRAND PRIX 2019 T-Shirts

Launch date

June 28, 2019

Pricing

$14.90 for men and women and $9.90

No. of colors and patterns

22 (10 for men, 10 for women, and 7 for kids)

Sizes

XS to 3XL* for men and women, Kids ages 3-12

*Available online only

Special website

http://www.uniqlo.com/utgp/2019/us/en/

About Pokémon

Pokémon, one of the world’s most popular entertainment franchises, began with the launch of the Pokémon Red and Pokémon Blue video games in Japan in 1996. Pokémon gameplay, which features collecting, training, and trading unique creatures, rapidly gained tremendous popularity around the globe. The video games were soon followed by the introduction of the Pokémon Trading Card Came and beloved animated series. With total games sold in excess of 300 million and the Pokémon GO mobile game released in 2016 reaching over 850 million downloads worldwide (as of August 2018), Pokémon has been loved by people of all ages for over 20 years.

About the UT GRAND PRIX

UNIQLO has conducted its UT GRAND PRIX design competition since 2005 to foster creativity and talent around the world. The contest is open to anyone regardless of age, gender, or nationality. Previous contest themes have included Nintendo, Star Wars, and Marvel, and have attracted numerous entries, with winning designs being been sold around the globe.

About Judge of UT GRAND PRIX

The team is consisted of special 3 members, Tsunekazu Ishihara, president and CEO of the Pokémon Company, Ken Sugimori, Character Design and Art Director of GAME FREAK inc, and NIGO, Merchandise Department of the Pokémon Company and UNIQLO UT Design Team. Tsunekazu Ishihara is designed the characters of the Pokémon game series, and worked on official illustrations for all the main works. Ken Sugimori is a managing director of GAME FREAK inc. involved in all works of Pokémon software. NIGO is creative director of UNIQLO UT.

HERON PRESTON x Off-White

VIRGIL ABLOH AND HERON PRESTON REVEAL “COLLABORATION” HANDBAG

For their first collaborative release, Virgil Abloh (Off-White ℅ Virgil Abloh) and Heron Preston present “COLLABORATION”, a concept carryall that incorporates the designers’ common exploration of industrial elements. This accessory is a living hybrid: its dual-colored strap is a fusion of Off-Whites graphic yellow Weight Securing System strap and Preston’s signature orange band with the branded word “Style” in Russian. The strap is a purposeful note of asymmetry in a piece with clean balance. The transparent body is printed with Off-White’s famed diagonal white lines, along with the words “COLLABORATION”. Black carabiner clips secure the strap, while inside, an industrial netting-inspired inner tote is a textural contrast to the sleek exterior. Substantial industrial hardware finishes the design, with metal nuts that cleanly secure orange leather straps.

“Heron Preston’s ability to think without limits comes to life in this bag we created together,” Abloh says. “The mix of the materials combined with Off-White DNA lead to a final product that suggests a different idea of a “handbag”.”

PRICING
“COLLABORATION” – Mini – $942.00
“COLLABORATION” – Medium – $1,232.00

ABOUT HERON PRESTON

Heron Preston is the true embodiment of an artist born of the post-internet generation. Multi-faceted and genre-bending, he is a cultural icon in youth culture, and emerging designer in high fashion. He founded his eponymous fashion brand in 2016, and in two short seasons has garnered an international following. The common thread among his impressive bodies of work is a commitment to innovation, experimentation, and unpredictability. Heron Preston finds particular joy in the unexpected; taking conventional themes and reinterpreting them. Take for example his “UNIFORM” project from 2015, the designer’s first major collection, in which he collaborated with the NYC Department of Sanitation on a series of zero waste themed clothes and accessories. He’s also served as the global digital producer for Nike and of course, creative consultant to Kanye West, most notably on his work for the Life of Pablo and Yeezy fashion label.

@HERONPRESTON

 

ABOUT OFF-WHITE ℅ VIRGIL ABLOH

Established in 2013, Off-White is defining the grey area between black and white as a color.  Under the brand name, seasonal collections of men’s and women’s clothing, objects, furniture, and publications are articulating a current culture vision. Collections embedded in a recurrent back story with an emphasis on creating garments that have an identity by design. With a design studio based in Milan, Italy the label harnesses the history and craftsmanship within the country yet offers a global perspective in terms of design and trends. With a clear vision of splicing the reality of how clothes are worn and the artistic expression of high-fashion, creative director and designer Virgil Abloh explores concepts in the realm of youth culture in the contemporary context.

@off____white

 

MEDIA CONTACT

“impulses, restraints, tones”

“impulses, restraints, tones” New Compositions by Hannah Quinlivan

Opening Reception: March 1, 2018, 6-8pm
Exhibition Dates: March 1 – April 20, 2018

February 16, 2018 (New York, NY) – JanKossen Contemporary is pleased to present impulses, restraints, tones an exhibition by Australian contemporary artist, Hannah Quinlivan. impulses, restraints, tones is the artist’s first exhibition in New York and will be on view from March 1 – April 20, 2018 with an opening reception on March 1 from 6-8pm.

Best known for her work within the movement of experimental drawing, Quinlivan expands upon the medium to create drawings that employ wire, steel, salt, yarn, shadow, and LED light, constantly evolving and dissecting the elements of a drawing to investigate the confines of the line itself. Twisted wire structures are the basis for her shadow drawings, which Quinlivan later develops further into sculptures; 2D drawings turn into 3D drawings, that are then turned back into 2D drawings. With a deep commitment to the exploration of and innate response to her materials, Quinlivan composes lyrical artworks that stitch together a response to the passing of time. Each element of the work is endlessly translated into an infinite looping web; traveling through our consciousness and drawing attention to the subjectivity of the phenomena of recollection and forgetting.

impulses, restraints, tones exhibits brand new “Spatial Drawings,” as well as two delicate, yet powerful, site-specific and interactive installations that respond to the gallery space and flux of bodies within it. The well-known “Spatial Drawings” walk the line between sculptural weaving and graphic mark making and explores concepts of temporal reality and memory. Quinlivan’s “Spatial Drawings” performance develops from wire armatures suspended from the ceiling. The shadows of these wire armatures are the basis for Quinlivan’s live and in-person crystalline salt drawings that will be developed over the course of three weeks during exhibition.

This work, shown for the first time in New York City, forms part of a series of site-specific ephemeral drawings Quinlivan has been making in Cambridge, Berlin, Hong Kong, Australia, and Colorado from since 2016.

Curator Marguerite Brown, explains “Linear threads and their manipulation have for millennia been symbolically connected to notions of time. The Moirai of ancient Greek mythology, also known at the Fates, were three goddesses who through the act of spinning thread with distaff and spindle, controlled the life of every person from birth to death, when their thread was abruptly cut. Similar female deities exist in Roman, Norse and Slavic mythologies, where thread is consistently wielded as a manifestation of destiny. As such, a simple strand and the way it is stretched, allotted and truncated, became an ancient way of comprehending the movement of a human life through time.”

ABOUT HANNAH QUINLIVAN
Hannah Quinlivan, named by BMA Magazine as one of the Six Canberra Artists to watch in 2018, was a finalist for the 2014 Alice Prize and has received such prestigious accolades as the Canberra Critic Circle Award, Shire of East Pilbara Residency Award, Cox Prize, Don Moffat & Cecilia Ng award, People’s Choice Award, Megalo Print Studio and Gallery Residency Award, and the Jan Brown Drawing Prize. She has exhibited major presentations at Canberra Museum and Art Gallery, Canberra; National Portrait Gallery, Canberra; Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Cambridge University, London, Pembroke College, Cambridge; Deakin University, Melbourne; The Hong Kong Harbourfront, Hong Kong; and Kuala Lumpur Biennale, National Art Gallery of Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur. She is in such prestigious public collections as National Gallery of Australia, Gregory Allicar Museum, The Australian High Commission (Singapore), Philip Cox Collection, Deakin University, The Australian National University, KPMG Art Collection, Gaw Capital collection, Colorado State University, Megalo Print Studio + Gallery, Shire of East Pilbara, Ormond College Collection. She was recently selected by the curators of Urban Art Projects to create a major public art commission where her work will be featured on the glazed screen of every platform of the Canberra Light Rail network.

ABOUT JanKossen
JanKossen Contemporary, founded in 2009 by Dr Jasmin Kossenjans, is an international dealer of contemporary art representing artists working across disciplines. Its principal focus is the representation of an international group of contemporary artists whose diverse practices include painting, drawing, sculpture, video, large scale installation, and performance. Aside from its represented artists, the gallery collaborates directly on exhibitions and projects with other artists and guest curators. The gallery is committed to presenting its artists’ work in an international context and to firmly establishing their contributions to the cannon of art history. Gallery artists are in the collections of, and have been part of exhibitions at, many museums around the world. Their works have been widely published as artist monographs, in art journals, and among critical theory texts. The gallery operates in Basel, Switzerland; Venice, Italy; New York, NY; and will open a new exhibition space in Hong Kong in 2019.

Related Events
Opening Reception
March 1, 2018
6-8pm

Daily Performances
March 1 – 17, 2018
1-3pm

Artist Talk and Final Performance
March 17, 2018
6-8pm

Location
JanKossen Contemporary
529 W 20th Street, 7th floor, 7W
New York, New York 10011

Gallery Contact
Karen Gilbert
Karen.gilbert@jankossen.com

Media Contact
Lainya Magaña, A&O PR
347 395 4155
lainya@aopublic.com

SOCIALFABRIK & PATRICK CABRAL ‘MAKE SOME NOISE’

If you’re after an antidote to the high-end band tees, look no further; Manchester-based indie clothing brand Socialfabrik is here.  

Over the past few years, Socialfabrik has amassed an impressive range of graphic t-shirts collaborating with some of the world’s most notable graphic designer/illustrators – Stanley Chow (an acclaimed artist who’s iconic portraits have been commissioned by the likes of Saatchi & Saatchi and McDonalds) as well as Boris Pelcer (a Bosnian illustrator who’s been commissioned by Nike and Converse) have curated for the collection.

As of late, they’ve added a new design to their roster of limited edition shirts. Inspired by the war cry of the MC & Rock n Roll frontman, ‘Make Some Noise’ is the result of their latest collaboration, this time with Manila-based artist/calligrapher Patrick Cabral. This exclusive piece of wearable art is screen printed by hand in Manchester on an 100% organic cotton and is exclusively available at the Socialfabrik’s digital store.

www.socialfabrik.co.uk

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