Posts tagged with "New Jersey"

Baseball illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

All American Grass

All American Grass at the Baseball Field

By: Lively Root

An American past time, baseball wouldn’t be quite what it is without the peanuts and popcorn and, of course, the field. Surprisingly, most fields don’t seem to give you any stats on the green so Livelyroot gives us the scoop:

Patterns
Most greens are taken care of by the groundskeepers at the park and, without a doubt, they take pride in the patterns they create. From checkerboards to logos, circles, and diamonds a-plenty, this process is known as lawn striping, and it’s done by using old-fashioned mowers that have a roller behind the blades. It’s this roller that bends the grass to create the patterns. To create a checkerboard, a mower would pass over the grass in side-by-side rows, first going north to south and then east to west, intersecting the stripes.

Varieties
At most ballparks, they use different types of grass depending on how they want to enhance the game and look of the field. Usually you’ll find fescues, rye, and bluegrass. If they use warm season grass, there’s likely less contrast to the patterns because they have to use Bermuda.


Learn more about the different types of grass at each stadium below.

Angel Stadium – Tifway 419 bermudagrass
A product of West Coast Turf, the playing surface used in Anaheim is the only one in MLB that is on native soil without a drainage system installed underneath it. The reason for the unusual distinction? The threat of a rainout is almost non-existent. In fact, the Angels have been rained out at home just once in the last 20 years (July 19, 2015). So, it doesn’t really matter that the grass here sits on top of soil rather than sand, as is the helpful for water drainage custom elsewhere.

AT&T Park – Tifway 419 bermudagrass
Grown in Stockton, CA by Delta Bluegrass Company. In the past, the Giants used a Kentucky bluegrass blend called “Blue Rye” that was provided by the same company to cover their field.

Busch Stadium – Kentucky bluegrass
Grown by Graff’s Turf Farms in Fort Morgan, CO, from where the first batch of sod used at the Cardinals’ stadium arrived in March 2006 via 28 flatbed trucks. The field has since been resodded multiple times using Graff’s grass.

Camden Yards – Kentucky bluegrass
Tuckahoe Turf Farms in Hammonton, NJ supplies the turf for Baltimore’s field and its sod farm, which is in center field, behind the batter’s eye. So, it’s from there where grass patches are pulled during the season when repairs are needed. And the Orioles haven’t always used Tuckahoe. For example, when resodding Camden Yards in November 2005 the team chose grass from Collins Wharf Sod Farm in Eden, MD.

Chase Field – Bull’s Eye Bermuda grass
Made by West Coast Turf, who commercially sells the stuff as BOBSod, a play on the nickname of Bank One Ballpark (BOB), the original name of Chase Field and what the D-backs’ home was called when Bull’s Eye Bermuda was installed in 1999. For its first season, the Phoenix ballpark used a zoysia blend called DeAnza, which browned badly over the summer. So, it was replaced by Bull’s Eye, which was designed to thrive in warm to hot climates and has the best shade tolerance of all bermuda grasses, therefore making it ideal for a desert-based retractable-roof stadium.

Citi Field – Kentucky bluegrass
According to Citi Field’s Twitter feed, the playing field consists of four different strains of Kentucky bluegrass. Apollo, Midnight Star, Moonlight and P105 are the specific strains.

Citizens Bank Park – Riviera Bermuda grass (outfield) and Kentucky bluegrass (infield)
To fully cover the Phillies’ field, 101,000 square feet of grass is needed, and all of it was provided by Collins Wharf Sod Farm of Eden, MD. In 2012, their Bermuda blend replaced entirely what had been an all-Kentucky bluegrass field partly due to its ability to better withstand Philadelphia’s weather extremes. However, in 2016 the thicker-than-Bermuda bluegrass was reinstalled in the infield, with the change made to slow down ground balls, which was desired by Phillies personnel, who made the request for the switch. Thus, two different types of Maryland-grown grass now cover the two distinct areas of Philly’s field.

Comerica Park – Kentucky bluegrass
Supplied by Graff’s Turf Farms in Fort Morgan, CO and was laid down in 2014, when Detroit’s field was fully resodded for the first time since 2007.

Coors Field – Kentucky bluegrass blend
The Rockies get their grass from a Colorado company, Graff’s Turf Farms, that is 75 miles northeast of where they play ball in Denver. The five-variety blend of dwarf type Kentucky bluegrass that is used at Coors Field is intended to have a lifespan of about six years.

Dodger Stadium – Tifway 419 bermudagrass overseeded with perennial ryegrass
Grown by West Coast Turf in Palm Desert, CA, where a Bermuda hybrid is overseeded with rye, which is better tolerant to the normally cool temperatures at the beginning of the season. By the summer months the more heat-tolerant Bermuda grass supplants the ryegrass.

Fenway Park – Kentucky bluegrass
The oldest ballpark in baseball gets its grass from New Jersey, and specifically Tuckahoe Turf Farms.

Globe Life Park – Tifway 419 bermudagrass
The Rangers’ grass is Texas grown, as it comes from Tri-Tex Grass, which appropriately has three Texas locations. The current Bermuda blend used in the infield replaced a zoysia in 2013. The outfield has been covered with the same Tifway 419 for a while.

Great American Ball Park – Perennial ryegrass mixture
Ryegrass replaced Kentucky bluegrass on Cincinnati’s field in 2007, when a five-way blend was laid down prior to the season, with the grass a mixture of stuff called Exacta II, Fiesta IV, Linedrive GLS, Panther GLS and SR4600. The original perennial ryegrass sod was used through 2012. When the Reds announced a new field of perennial ryegrass would debut in 2013, they noted it was grown at farms in southeastern Indiana.

Guaranteed Rate Field – Kentucky bluegrass
Really no information is available on the grass used on the South Side of Chicago, other than it’s tended to by “The Sodfather,” the nickname bestowed upon third-generation MLB head groundskeeper Roger Bossard, who assumed the White Sox job in 1983 after taking over for his father, Gene, who had been the head groundskeeper at old Comiskey Park since 1940. So the bluegrass sod at the Cell is watched over by the most experienced caretaker possible.

Kauffman Stadium – Grass blend that varies during the season
As the season progresses, the grass composition at the Royals’ stadium is altered. Its Bermuda is fine for the warm months but cooler times of the season see the grounds crew mixing in bluegrass, fescue or rye, choices which keep the field aesthetically pleasing when temperatures are not ideal for grass growth.

Marlins Park – Platinum TE paspalum
The ballpark debuted in 2012 with a field full of Celebration bermudagrass, began 2013 with an outfield of Tifway 419 Bermuda and infield of Platinum TE paspalum, and finally in 2014 the whole field was covered with the paspalum, which handles Miami’s hot and humid weather much better than the other two grasses the Marlins tried.

Miller Park – Kentucky bluegrass
The four-blend field of bluegrass that the Brewers use is covered during much of the offseason by a special tarp that helps it go through the proper growing cycle so that the playing surface is ready in time for Opening Day. The sod seen at Miller Park is a product of Robert Heath Farms in Coloma, WI.

Minute Maid Park – Seashore Paspalum
In late 2008, the Astros resodded their field with a new kind of turf grass called Platinum TE paspalum. Grown by Phillip Jennings Turf Farms in Soperton, GA, it was invented in 2007 by a company in Florida and is ideal for a retractable roofed stadium due to the lower sunlight requirements needed to maintain its dark green color. While what the Astros now get from Georgia goes by the name Seashore Paspalum, it’s not used on the ballpark’s most notable feature, Tal’s Hill, which is covered by zoysia grass.

Nationals Park – Kentucky bluegrass
When they played at RFK Stadium, the Nationals did so on a Bermuda grass field, mainly because that kind of sod was ideal for soccer and RFK was also home to a Major League Soccer team (D.C. United). When the Nationals finally got a home of their own in 2008, Kentucky bluegrass from New Jersey’s Tuckahoe Turf Farms was chosen for the baseball-only playing surface. The original crop lasted four years then was replaced by the same stuff, which the Nats say is a three-way blend of bluegrass, with Brilliant, Midnight Star and Princeton 105 the varieties used.

Oakland Coliseum – Kentucky bluegrass
The A’s (and Raiders) play on a field of Kentucky bluegrass and West Coast Turf grows what the Coliseum needs on one of their California-based farms. While the type of turf used in Oakland has changed over the years, because the Coliseum is the only venue to host MLB and NFL teams its field must be resodded every year, which happens about a month before the baseball season.

Petco Park – Bandera Bermuda
In 2014, the Padres made the decision to try a new type of Bermuda sod, replacing the “Bull’s Eye” variety that had always been used at Petco Park with what their grass provider, West Coast Turf, calls Bandera, a California-grown grass that doesn’t need much water to thrive.

PNC Park – Kentucky bluegrass
The sod that the Pirates use was grown in New Jersey at Tuckahoe Turf Farms, where four blends of bluegrass were mixed to produce the Pittsburgh playing field. As of the 2009 season, the varieties of bluegrass that comprise the Bucs’ mixture are: Brilliant, Midnight Star, Moonlight and P105. That’s different from when PNC Park opened, as strains with names such as Abbey and Ascot were a part of the Pirates’ original hybrid Kentucky bluegrass field, which came from Berrien Springs, Michigan and a place called the Magic Carpet Turf Farms.

Progressive Field – Kentucky bluegrass
The Indians are one of a handful of MLB clients of Tuckahoe Turf Farms, from whom they now get sod that is grown in New Jersey. The ballpark’s original Kentucky bluegrass came from a state much closer to Ohio, however, as it was grown in neighboring Indiana.

Rogers Centre – AstroTurf 3D Xtreme
The days of a fake field in Toronto are numbered, as the Blue Jays plan to install real grass inside their retractable-roofed home for the 2018 season. So, the now-used turf, which was first laid down in 2015, has only three baseball seasons to get through, although the Rogers Centre baseball field often must be rolled up so the floor underneath can be used for the numerous non-baseball events the venue hosts. The Jays’ current version of AstroTurf, which when removed equals 145 rolls, replaced the AstroTurf GameDay Grass 3D surface that debuted in 2010. AstroTurf is made in the “Carpet Capital of the World,” as Dalton, Georgia is often referred to.

Safeco Field – Kentucky bluegrass and perennial ryegrass mixture
The Mariners’ turf hails from the Washington state capital, as it’s grown by Country Green Turf Farms of Olympia. Except for as-needed repairs, the original playing surface went unaltered through the 2011 season, after which new 100% Kentucky bluegrass sod was installed in the infield. Elsewhere, the grass is a combination of four kinds of bluegrass and two types of perennial ryegrass.

SunTrust Park – Seashore Paspalum Platinum TE
The new home of the Braves is covered with 109,000 square feet of sod that was grown in Foley, AL at Bent Oak Farm before it was installed March 4-5, 2017 in the suburban Atlanta ballpark. SunTrust Park is about 15 miles northwest of Turner Field, where the Braves used the Alabama-grown paspalum grass only in the infield from 2012-2016, when the team used Tifway 419 bermudagrass in the outfield. Now the Braves’ field is completely covered with the same type of grass, which was grown a couple miles from the Gulf of Mexico, making “Seashore” an apt descriptive name for the type of paspalum used.

Target Field – Kentucky bluegrass
Graff’s Turf Farms grew the Twins their grass in Fort Morgan, CO, from where it was transported to Minneapolis in 19 refrigerated trucks. The team and manufacturer both refer to the sod that was installed at Target Field as a 4-way blend of Kentucky bluegrass.

Tropicana Field – TruHop Synthetic Turf
The Rays’ current carpet was installed in time for the 2018 season and was essentially a do-over for the previous surface, which was only used for the 2017 season, after which a replacement was deemed necessary for an aesthetic reason: the initial edition of the TruHop “Triple Crown” synthetic turf manufactured by Shaw Sports Turf didn’t look right on TV. So the 143,370 square feet of it was removed and replaced with a darker colored version of the same style of turf, which then became the sixth artificial field used in the Trop’s history. Prior to switching to a surface made by Calhoun, Georgia-based Shaw, the majors’ only remaining domed stadium had used a fake field supplied by another Georgia company, the well-known AstroTurf brand, as their GameDay Grass 3D was the field of choice for the Rays from 2011-2016.

Wrigley Field – Kentucky bluegrass
The Friendly Confines finds their grass in Colorado, where it’s grown for the Cubs by Graff’s Turf Farms. Since 2008, the sod at Wrigley has taken root on a level playing field. Prior to then, right field was uneven, and the field had a crown to assist in water drainage.

Yankee Stadium – Kentucky bluegrass
Since 2000, the Yankee Stadium grass has come from East Coast Sod & Seed in Pilesgrove, NJ. The sod farm there was purchased in 2000 by Long Island-based DeLea Sod Farms, from whom the Yankees had, on an on and off basis, purchased their field grass over the four decades preceding the opening of the current Stadium.

Field Facts

Kentucky bluegrass is easily the most popular type of playing surface found in major league baseball; it’s the full field grass of choice for 16 ballparks. Additionally, a 17th ballpark, Citizens Bank Park, has a Kentucky bluegrass infield. Eight ballparks have a bermudagrass field, with Tifway 419 the most common variety. Bandera, Bull’s Eye and Riviera bermudagrass are each used at a single ballpark. Tifway 419 bermudagrass gets its name from where it was developed: Tifton, Georgia. At least 10 grass farms provide sod for major league teams. Graff’s Turf Farms, Tuckahoe Turf Farms and West Coast Turf are each the grass growers for five MLB ballparks, which mean those three farms provide the sod for half of all ballparks. Fake grass, like AstroTurf and FieldTurf, has mostly become a field surface of the past thanks to the new generation of ballparks. Teams to directly move from a stadium with a turfed field into a new grass-filled ballpark are the Mariners (1999), Astros (2000), Pirates (2001), Phillies (2004) and Twins (2010). Outfield dimensions are what sets each ballpark’s playing field apart, since rulebook defined distances make all infields the same size and shape. As for the span of minimum and maximum measurements to straight away center field and the left and right field foul poles, they are: Left field: 310′ at Fenway Park to 355′ at Wrigley Field
Center field: 395′ at Dodger Stadium to 436′ at Minute Maid Park
Right field: 302′ at Fenway Park to 353′ at Wrigley Field

More about Lively Root

At Lively Root, the green spaces created have been instrumental in development as horticulturists, for an ideal green space. Lively Root’s plants are home-grown and full-scale fulfillment centers. They only sell eco-friendly products that are packaged and delivered right to your doorstep. Founding members have over a century of horticultural experience as growers, retailers, and landscapers, ranging from small plants to indoor plants, outdoor plants, large trees, and flowering shrubs. They have planted & maintained trees on residential and commercial properties. Plants improve health by purifying the air, soothing stress, making people feel happier, and offering style and ambiance. 

Transgender Sports illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

NCAA LGBTQ OneTeam

NCAA LGBTQ OneTeam facilitators publish open letter condemning anti-transgender legislation

The NCAA LGBTQ OneTeam, a group of NCAA- trained facilitators at colleges across the country published an open letter condemning the actions taken by 28 states across the country to introduce, pass, and sign anti-transgender legislation. 2021 has been a record year for anti-transgender legislation, with 93 anti-transgender bills introduced across the country, the vast majority of which attempt to ban transgender women and girls’ participation in girls’ sports or ban transgender youth from accessing medically necessary, gender-affirming health care.

Laws have been signed banning transgender women and girls’ participation in girls’ sports in Mississippi, Tennessee, and Arkansas, with Executive Orders being signed to the same effect in South Dakota.  Legislators across the country have failed to provide examples of issues in their states to attempt to justify these attacks, laying bare the reality that these are attacks on transgender youth that are fueled by discrimination and not supported by fact.  Collegiate and professional sports organizations have had trans-inclusive policies for years without incident, and there is no reason any state would need a ban on transgender participation in sports.

The NCAA LGBTQ OneTeam open letter reads as follows:

An Open Letter in Support of Transgender Student-Athletes

We, the undersigned, are facilitators of the National Collegiate Athletics Association’s (NCAA)Division III LGBTQ OneTeam Program, which is a national training program that fosters LGBTQ+ inclusion in NCAA Division III athletics, and members of the NCAA’s Division III LGBTQ Working Group. Given the recent rise in legislation that is focused on excluding transgender people from athletics across the country, we have decided to use our collective voice to condemn such actions. We call on elected officials across the country to immediately halt legislation that is aimed at excluding transgender youth and young adults from equal and equitable participation in sport.

In our role with the NCAA’s LGBTQ OneTeam Program, we train coaches, athletics administrators, and student-athletes across the whole of Division III athletics. This program is aimed at helping to understand the importance of LGBTQ inclusion in college athletics, while also identifying strategies and best practices for institutions and conferences to better ensure that all student-athletes–regardless of their sexuality, gender identity, and/or gender expression–can participate in an inclusive and safe athletic climate. We cannot, in good conscience, fail to speak out at this critical moment.

In the past several weeks, actions–which are aimed at excluding transgender youth and young adults from equal and equitable participation in sport–have been taken by elected officials inseveral states, including Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Maine, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, and West Virginia. At the time of this writing, the Governors ofArkansas,Idaho,Mississippi, andTennessee have already signed such dangerous legislation into law. 

Legislation aimed at categorically banning transgender people–and particularly transgender girls and women–from sport is inherently discriminatory. Such legislation is often “informed” by hate and misinformation rather than science, and it is most certainly “informed” byfear instead of fact. Conversely, trans-inclusive policies, such as those established by theNCAA and theInternational Olympic Committee (IOC), are better informed by the current scientific evidence, and this evidence shows that transgender women do not have an inherent competitive advantage over cisgender women.

Furthermore, discriminatory legislation that is aimed at excluding transgender people from sport has a number ofserious consequences for transgender students. Such legislation dehumanizes transgender students, refuses them the opportunity to participate equally and equitably in athletics, undermines their support in educational settings, damages their mental health, and ultimately harms these students, while also contributing to an exclusionary athletic environment and a more hostile school climate for all students.

We immediately call for 1) an end to such legislation in all states and 2) a repeal of such laws in Arkansas, Idaho, Mississippi, and Tennessee. And finally, we also encourage our legislators to better consider theNCAA best practices and importance of an inclusive athletic environment for all student-athletes.

Sincerely,

The Undersigned

Timothy R. Bussey, Ph.D.

Pronouns: they/them

Associate Director, Office of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion | Kenyon College

Kayla Hayes, M.Ed.

Pronouns: she/her

Associate Head Women’s Basketball Coach Dept. of Athletics | Denison University

Kyrstin Krist, Ph.D.

Pronouns: she/her

Associate Professor of Kinesiology and Faculty Athletic Representative | Methodist University

Melynda Link, M.B.A.

Pronouns: she/her

Director of Athletic Facilities & Game Day Operations, Dept. of Athletics | Haverford College

Kathleen M. Murray

Pronouns: she/her

President, Office of the President | Whitman College

Jess Duff

Pronouns: she/her

Assistant Athletic Director for Student Athlete Services & Internal Operations Dept. of Athletics | Bates College

Jessica Weiss

Pronouns: she/her

Head Field Hockey Coach, Dept. of Athletics | Randolph-Macon College

Jennifer Dubow

Pronouns: she/her

Executive Director | Southern California Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (SCIAC)

Maura Johnston

Pronouns: she/her

Head Field Hockey Coach, Dept. of Athletics | Fairleigh Dickinson University

Scott McGuiness

Pronouns: no pronouns

Director of Athletics, Dept. of Athletics | Washington & Jefferson College

Danielle Lynch, M.S.Ed.

Pronouns: she/her

Senior Woman Administrator and Head Track and Field/Cross Country Coach Athletic Department | Penn State University – Harrisburg

Melissa Walton

Pronouns: she/her

Senior Associate Athletic Director Athletic Department | Albion College

Amy Reed

Pronouns: she/her

Senior Woman Administrator and Head Women’s Basketball Coach Dept. of Athletics | Rochester Institute of Technology

Donna M. Ledwin

Pronouns: she/her

Commissioner | Allegheny Mountain Collegiate Conference (AMCC)

Donnesha Blake, Ph.D.

Pronouns: she/her

Director of Diversity and Inclusion Dept. of Student Affairs | Alma College

Tim Wilson

Pronouns: he/him

Assistant Track and Field Coach, Dept. of Athletics | Stevens Institute of Technology

Anne Kietzman

Pronouns: she/her

Head Field Hockey Coach, Dept. of Athletics | Washington College

Ashley Crossway, D.A.T., A.T.C.

Pronouns: she/her

Assistant Professor and Coordinator of Clinical Education Dept. of Kinesiology | SUNY Cortland

Melissa Brooks

Pronouns: she/her

Head Women’s Basketball Coach Athletic Department | Fairleigh Dickinson University – Florham 

Tiffany Thompson

Pronouns: she/her

Associate Director of Gender and Sexuality Initiatives, Intercultural Center | Swarthmore College

Kirsten Clark

Pronouns: she/her

Associate Athletic Director, Dept. of Athletics and Recreation | Clark University

Kate Levin

Pronouns: she/her

Assistant Sports Information Director Dept. of Athletics | Ramapo College

Cori Collinsworth

Pronouns: she/her

Head Softball Coach, Athletic Department | Hanover College

Bethany Dannelly

Pronouns: she/her

Associate Director of Athletics, Dept. of Physical Education and Athletics | Washington and Lee University

Jennifer Childress-White, M.Ed.

Pronouns: she/her

Assistant Athletic Director and University Title IX Coordinator Dept. of Athletics | Pacific Lutheran University

Elise Fitzsimmons, M.S., A.T.C.

Pronouns: she/her

Assistant Athletic Trainer, Dept. of Athletics| SUNY Oswego 

Amanda Walker

Pronouns: she/her

Athletic Program Coordinator Athletics Department | Lake Forest College

Danielle O’Leary

Pronouns: she/her

Senior Woman Administrator and Head Women’s Lacrosse Coach Athletics Department | Mount Aloysius College

Crystal Lanning

Pronouns: she/her

Director of Athletics, Dept. of Athletics | University of Wisconsin – River Falls

Neil Virtue

Pronouns: he/him

Assistant Director of Athletics and Head Swimming Coach | Dept. of Athletics, P.E., and Recreation Mills College

Jose’ Rodriguez, M.Ed.

Pronouns: he/him

Chief Diversity Officer, Office of University Diversity Initiatives | Cabrini University

Karen Moberg, M.Ed., L.A.T., A.T.C.

Pronouns: she/her

Associate Athletic Trainer, Athletic Department | Macalester College

Yishka Chin

Pronouns: she/her

Coordinator for Tutoring Services and Trailblazer Program Director, Dept. of Student Success | Notre Dame of Maryland University

Renee Bostic

Pronouns: she/her

Director of Athletics & Wellness Dept. of Athletics & Wellness | Notre Dame of Maryland University

Megan Cullinane

Pronouns: she/her

Assistant Athletic Director and Deputy Title IX Coordinator for Athletics Dept. of Athletics and Recreation | University of Massachusetts – Boston

Maureen Harty

Pronouns: she/her

Executive Director | College Conference of Illinois and Wisconsin (CCIW)

Stephanie Dutton

Pronouns: she/her

Commissioner | North Eastern Athletic Conference (NEAC)

Sharia Marcus-Carter

Pronouns: she/her

Senior Woman Administrator and Director of Compliance, Athletics Department | Brooklyn College

"90s Kids" by Jax artwork by Ted Sullivan via Atlantic Records of Warner Music Group for use by 360 Magazine

JAX – 90s Kids

JAX does it for the “90s Kids”

Multi-talented singer-songwriter premieres nostalgia anthem, available now via Atlantic Records

STREAM “90S KIDS” HERE

Singer-songwriter Jax has premiered her highly anticipated new single “90s Kids” – available now via Atlantic Records. The nostalgia-fueled anthem became an instant fan-favorite after being previewed on TikTok late last year, packed with all the quintessential decade references from Tamagotchi to Britney Spears.

“I’m obviously a 90s kid, and grew up with all these amazing trends that I’m still obsessed with today” said Jax. “One night at 3am I was just thinking of all the times I’d watched ‘Saved By The Bell,’ played Super Smash Bros, danced to Britney Spears and I just put it all in a voice memo. Next thing I knew by sunrise I had this anthem to rep all my fellow 90s babies.”

“90s Kids” follows the release of “Ring Pop,” Jaxs major label-debut which yielded a massive viral response and high-profile appearances on The Ellen DeGeneres Show, Access Hollywood & more. Initially teased on TikTok, “Ring Pop” instantly captivated fans with its honest lyrics that perfectly encapsulate the emotions being felt by so many in today’s predicament. Her warm delivery coasting over dreamy guitar and snappy percussion as she croons to her boyfriend, “Don’t need no diamonds, you’re my rock, and I’m okay with a ring pop.

Raised in New Jersey by way of New York, Jax got her start by performing a wide variety of genres and in bands growing up. At the age of 18, she developed cancer above her vocal cords, which returned following a couple months of remission right as she relocated to Los Angeles in pursuit of her music. Left unable to sing herself, Jax turned to songwriting for others and found industry success behind-the-scenes.

As her ability to perform returned, Jax needed to pivot yet again when the COVID-19 pandemic struck. This time she turned to TikTok, posting a hilarious response to the pop gem “Stacy’s Mom” from “Stacy’s Mom’s Perspective” which exploded with nearly 9 million views in just a few months and “Update from Avril Lavigne & Sk8er Boi 18 years later” which became her most successful parody to date with over 14.5 million views. She continued to go viral a dozen or more times over, eventually amassing over 1.6 million followers on the platform, 200 million total views and 28 million “likes.” With a massive online audience under her belt, Jax began sharing her own original music in late 2020 to an overwhelmingly positive response – ultimately leading to her singing with Atlantic Records for her forthcoming debut full-length.

DIYhome-01 by Imagine It Media for 360 Magazine

3 Step Process For Repairing Polished Concrete or Epoxy Floors

Although polished concrete is a highly durable flooring option, it can succumb to damage after a long time. The damage usually occurs and can be caused by; using harsh soaps to clean it, stains caused by other liquids seeping through the concrete, exposure to high foot traffic, and exposure to high impact. 

We interviewed an epoxy flooring contractor near marlboro NJ can also wear and tear if the contractor laid the foundation improperly. Improperly laying the polished concrete can cause air pockets and bubbles inside the concrete. These bubbles later worsen and crack. 

Luckily, there are ways to fix the small imperfections that occur over time. Read on to find out how to repair polished concrete floors.

Repairing Dulling 

A polished concrete floor can become dull when exposed to high traffic, usually by foot. This can occur in places like restaurants, school’s common areas, or grocery stores. Typically, this happens when the floor features a burnished tropical treatment or a sealer to give it a shiny look. These features usually wear out fast over time. 

If you went for a mechanically polished concrete floor where physical buffing is done to produce a shiny appearance, your floor’s shine might last for a while compared to when you use chemicals to get the same effect.  Nevertheless, the polished concrete floor is bound to become dull after some time, no matter how well it is polished.

A mere rebuffing process can make your polished concrete shiny again to fix the dulling. The floors will look as good as new once a professional rebuffing is done. 

Fixing Cracks

Besides dulling, cracking is another common problem for polished concrete floors. And just like dulling, you cannot entirely avoid cracking. Cracking usually occurs when the chemicals used in making the concrete floor shrink. Also, adding more water to the concrete puts the concrete at more risk of cracking. 

However, unlike dulling, cracking is not easy to fix, especially when the cracks appear in small areas. Replicating a good finish can be challenging in such areas, and pouring more concrete into the cracks will not do the trick. When your concrete develops small cracks, the advisable thing to do is to consult a professional contractor first to assess the extent of the damage and have them give their advice on the best way to fix the cracks. 

Typically, an epoxy repair mortar is used to repair concrete cracks. The other alternative is by using control joints. Control joints are more of a preventive measure than a repair method since they are fixed on the concrete floor when the concrete is being laid. The control joints help provide stable and durable flooring and limit the threat of cracking. 

Fixing Crazing

Cracks are known as crazing when they become interconnected, forming a hexagonal shape. The cracks result in a sloppy and unsightly appearance. 

Crazing occurs when the finishing of the concrete floor is poorly done or when the concrete dries too fast. Fortunately, concrete contractors can fix the crazing when it occurs during the construction. They do this using a method known as moist curing. Moist curing is a popular repair product that features a spray-on with chemicals that fix the crazing. Alternatively, the contractor can use other stiffer and drier mixing solutions.

Other more straightforward methods that do not involve chemicals include using a broom to brush over the concrete floor in the final stages. This method is useful in masking cracks and other surface blemishes of a minor scale. Prompt repair of crazing is necessary to avoid severe damage when the crazing is left for longer. 

Finally, since it is almost impossible to prevent the concrete floor from dulling and cracking, the best thing to do is to ensure you involve professional contractors when installing the polished concrete floor. This will enable you to at least enjoy your beautifully shiny concrete floor before you have to think of repairing it. But make sure you involve professional flooring contractors to get quality results.

Gabrielle Archuleta illustration for on-line games article for 360 MAGAZINE

How the gambling houses have shaped the popular taste

The casino industry has evolved a lot over the last few centuries. In Europe during the 18th century, the underground gambling halls morphed into the first legal casinos. Eventually, the same thing happened in the United States, with Nevada’s fledgling Las Vegas providing entertainment for the workers of the nearby Hoover Dam.

From those sawdust-covered floors, modern casinos developed with names like the Golden Nugget in the 1940s. The giant integrated resorts we know today began springing up in the 1980s, and online casinos came into existence in the late 1990s.

Today, most of Europe and a growing number of US states have legalized online casinos, though New Jersey continues to lead the way on this side of the pond, with more than 23 online casinos to choose from in NJ.

At every stage along the way, these casinos have influenced pop culture, changing what we watch, what we read, and what we listen to.

Casino’s Influence on Language

You may be surprised at just how many casino-related words and phrases you use in your everyday conversations. Casino and card games have been around for the best part of a millennium, with blackjack being the descendent of several card games that go back as far as the 13th century AD. 

Having been around for such a long time, words and phrases while playing these games have worked their way into the common vernacular. 

For example, “hedging one’s bets” is a phrase we use regularly to explain when we’re not committing to one particular option to protect ourselves from a negative outcome. In betting, you may hedge your bets by wagering on two opposing outcomes, while in life you might take a job interview while staying at your old job until you see which is the better option. 

All commonly used phrases include “all bets are off,” which can mean no one is sure about the outcome of an event; and “poker face,” which describes someone who is not displaying any emotion.

Casino’s Influence on Music

Speaking of poker faces, Lady Gaga’s hit song is one of the most recent examples of the influence of casino games in music. But there are plenty of others

The country and western singer Garth Brooks had a hit with Two of a Kind Working on a Full House back in 1990. The song leaned heavily on references to poker hands to discuss his relationship with his wife (two of a kind) and the fact that they planned to build a life together (a full house). The song contained betting references all the way through, with links like “I’m her wild card man” and “a real hot hand.”

Other popular songs that have been created by the influence of casinos and casino games include The Gambler by Kenny Rogers, House of Cards by Tyler Shaw, and Ace of Spades by Motörhead.

Casino’s Influence on Movies

Perhaps the most obvious influence that casinos have had on popular culture is in movies. Hollywood loves to set a movie in Las Vegas and its casinos, with at least 92 movies set in the city since 1941. 

Popular examples include Ocean’s Eleven (and its 21’st century remake), Viva Las Vegas, Diamond Are Forever, The Godfather, Casino, The Hangover, and 21. 

Writers often find the excitement and mystery that casinos offer are a great setting for their stories, with films like Ocean’s Eleven and Casino entirely based around the inner workings of the gaming business. 

Others, including many James Bond movies, use casinos in certain scenes as they offer a great way to show the characters outwitting their rivals. A casino setting is also one of the few places where a protagonist and villain could sit in the same room and talk without being forced to attack or fight each other. 

Vaughn Lowery illustration by Allison Christensen for his book Move Like Water x Be Fluid produced by 360 MAGAZINE

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Move Like Water × Be Fluid

By Katrina Tiktinsky

Vaughn Lowery, founder and publisher of 360 MAGAZINE, is set to release his first book this month. Move Like Water × Be Fluid is a stunning memoir documenting the author’s journey from a childhood in the Detroit projects to a successful career in fashion and media. The arc of this remarkable passage twists and turns in surprising ways, ensuring readers will believe in the concept that this life truly is what you make it. The text will debut as an exclusive multi-volume installation within 360 MAGAZINE and marks the inception of the brand’s foray into publishing.

This provocative coming-of-age story explores the power of branding strategy, a technique the writer developed at an early age and carried with him throughout his lifetime. Lowery, from the time he was a young child, is able to comprehend that one’s innate, individual self is their greatest commodity in life. Through the highs and lows that inform his experience, he stays true to that ideal. Lowery puts forward a raw and compelling narrative of a child, and later a man, who repeatedly picks himself up, reimagines his life, and finds innovative ways to move forward. The self-empowerment so emblematic in Lowery’s character and story promotes readers to adopt the author’s tactics in their own lives.

The influence of prominent civil rights leader Joseph Lowery, the writer’s grandfather, is prevalent in this work. A beacon for both hope and progress during the Civil Rights Movement, the legacy of Joseph Lowery weighs heavily on the narrator. This, along with his upbringing and existence as a black man in America, make Lowery both introspective and contextually aware when it comes to race. Moreover, draws parallels between the movement his grandfather championed and led, and the Black Lives Matter movement of today, exposing the failures of our system and calling for meaningful, systemic change. Both Joseph and Vaughn Lowery are members of the first intercollegiate historically African American organization Alpha Phi Alpha. Lowery simultaneously considers the work he can do, as a singular human being, to forward social justice causes in his day-to-day life and interactions with others. 

In 1920, his grandmother, Agnes Christine Moore Lowery (the little girl in the blue dress, also a member of Alpha Kappa Alpha), came with her grandmother to become the first black to vote in Tennessee. The kids’ book, The Big Day, depicts their journey the day she voted, now available on Amazon here.

Photo of LaJUNE by Armon Hayes for 360 Magazine

Photo: Armon Hayes, Talent: LaJUNE

360 Magazine is also now selling one of a kind home goods via Chairish, a curated marketplace for the best in vintage and contemporary furniture, decor and art. Check out this piece designed by 360’s founder Vaughn Lowery.

In the year 2020, which has been afflicted with an overwhelming amount of change, there has never been a timelier moment for insight from a man like Lowery. As mentioned, Lowery’s deep ties and connections to racial justice in America feels incredibly relevant, as do his thoughts on digital media, something Lowery pioneered years before COVID-19 forced the world hurriedly online. Constantly at the forefront of social change, Move Like Water × Be Fluid offers an understanding of the current moment, yet looks forward to the possibility of an evolved, cosmopolitan world. One that Lowery aspires to through all his works, including this installation and 360 MAGAZINE.

As we follow the author through grade school, high school and on through Cornell University, we collect advice from a myriad of powerful secondary characters. From all walks of life, these secondary support systems offer Lowery the push he needs to continue on striving towards something better. We watch Lowery model the work ethic of his admired older sister, gain confidence from an encouraging teacher, change the trajectory of his life due to a neighborhood mentor, and learn from the critique of a Residential Advisor. This self-help-book stands apart for never failing to appreciate the importance of an individual’s support system. Fittingly, while the book catalogues Lowery’s journey to success, it inspires and encourages readers in the same way Lowery’s community uplifted him – to take action towards a meaningful life.

Comparable titles to Move Like Water × Be Fluid include other stories of individuals who later turned to publishing their experiences in self-help books. Numerous celebrity examples include Becoming by Michelle Obama, Shoe Dog by Phil Knight, or The Path Made Clear by Oprah Winfrey. These titles, as well as Lowery’s first book, all feature introspection and explanations regarding the course of the authors’ lives. 

The following descriptions outlines the chapter-by-chapter journey within Move Like Water × Be Fluid.

Chapter 1: The beginning of Lowery’s journey is marked by his complicated childhood in Detroit, distinctly connected to his sense of place and community. Financial struggles and surroundings reminiscent of the song “Gangsta’s Paradise,” as well as the author’s early experience with assault contextualize the course of Lowery’s life.

Chapter 2: A childhood mood, coupled with the realization of his intelligence, swiftly changed the direction of Lowery’s life. Following a move to New Jersey to live with his older sister, Lowery’s early experiences of racism shine a light on his passion for racial justice today. The opportunity to participate in an honored education program again changes the trajectory Lowery follows.

Chapter 3: This chapter offers insight into the ups and downs of high school, a narrative many are familiar with. Yet, Lowery’s poised observations throughout the chapter reflect his early understanding of the world.

Chapter 4: After a remarkable yet complex journey through high school, Lowery achieves the first of many dreams by gaining the chance to attend Cornell University in New York. At Cornell, he is able to expand his understanding of self and what he hopes to accomplish.

Chapter 5: Saks Fifth Avenue recruits Lowery to work in their corporate office, marking Lowery’s first foray into the world of economics and fashion. The advice he gains from mentors in the field prompts him to shift towards a career in acting and modeling, supplemented by working in the Medicare Department of U.S. Healthcare.

Chapter 6: New York, in all its hectic nature, pointed Lowery west towards California where he could further capitalize on his talents in the entertainment industry.

Chapter 7: This chapter details one of the events in Lowery’s life for which he is best known: his commercials as “Joe Boxer Guy” that overwhelmed the nation. Following ups and downs in Los Angeles, this success cemented Lowery’s understanding of his own talents as well as his ties to L.A.

Chapter 8: Following an offensive home invasion, Lowery pivots to continue embracing what life throws at him with appearances on NBC’s “Scrubs” and “America’s Next Top Model.”

Chapter 9: With plenty of capital and the space to complement his next steps, Lowery founded 360 MAGAZINE in 2008, powering through the tidal wave that was the recession all due to his own brains and the belief in his product and brand.

Chapter 10: After another painful reminder of the inadequacies of the justice system in America due to an unjust prison stay, Lowery’s comprehension of what is truly important is once again realigned. Despite his negative experiences, his magazine is able to be on the cutting edge of the Los Angeles scene.

Chapter 11: The number 360 is ubiquitous to Lowery – one embodies the other. His appreciation for both his own capabilities and expertise, as well as the ones of others, assures his magazine and brand are constantly evolving. 

Chapter 12: Thinking on the future following the tragic death of a friend, Lowery is nowhere near finished and is more than ready to continue is many metamorphoses. He now exists in a space where he strives to empower others, all around the world. 360.

Move Like Water x Be Fluid, by Vaughn Lowery, is available this month exclusively on the 360 MAGAZINE’s website. 360 MAGAZINE has received numerous accolades, and has recently been featured on Dancing with the Stars. Stay in touch by following both Lowery (@vaughnlowery) and 360 (@360magazine)

Additionally Vaughn has an audio book titled, “Say Uncle: The Story of Vaughn Lowery” which loosely based on his childhood. It is available for here on Amazon Music. For additional info on Vaughn Lowery visit Wikipedia and IMDb.

ICYMI: Amended Lawsuit Alleges NJ Governor Allowed Institutional Racism

Blueprint Capital Advisors (Blueprint), the only Black asset manager in the state of New Jersey by and through its undersigned counsel, Brown Rudnick, LLP and the Constitutional Litigation Advocacy Group, P.C., today filed an amended complaint directly against New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy and senior members of his administration charging blatant, aggressive, and unapologetic racist abuse from the State of New Jersey and seeking injunctive relief for his failure to address the maltreatment.

The amended complaint adds federal racketeering claims against former and current employees of New Jersey’s Division of Investment (DOI) on quid pro quo schemes, entrenched corruption and malfeasance, where external investments were granted to firms on the basis of racial preference using discriminatory practices and policies and in multiple instances Black-owned firms like Blueprint had their intellectual property stolen and provided to larger firms thereby unjustly enriching the firms and individuals who participated in the schemes.

In the amended complaint, the Plaintiff Blueprint seeks declaratory, injunctive and equitable relief, as well as monetary damages, to redress Governor Murphy and the DOI’s violations of 42 U.S.C. § 1981 (“Section 1981”), 42 U.S.C. § 1983 (“Section 1983”), New Jersey Civil Rights Act, racketeering in violation of 18 U.S.C.§ 1962 and N.J.S.A. 2C:41-2, violation of the Fifth Amendment Takings Clause, breaches of contract, fiduciary duty, duty of confidentiality, as well as claims for unfair competition, civil conspiracy, fraud, commercial disparagement, tortious interference with prospective economic advantage, aiding and abetting racketeering, and aiding and abetting fraud.

Blueprint filed its original complaint against the State of New Jersey on June 23, 2020 for racial bias, and also sued BlackRock and Cliffwater LLC for profiting from Blueprint’s proprietary investment program. On September 30, 2020 Blueprint announced that attorneys Michael J. Bowe of Brown Rudnick and Jay Sekulow of Constitutional Litigation and Advocacy Group (CLAG) would join Blueprint’s legal efforts against New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy’s Department of the Treasury, Division of Investment (DOI), BlackRock Alternative Advisors, and Cliffwater LLC for racial discrimination, fraud and retaliation.  CLAG has been intensely focused on New Jersey’s refusal to comply with the New Jersey Open Records Act and release public information Blueprint believes demonstrates the racial animus and bias that has characterized its relationship with the DOI and underlies their refusal to provide opportunities for other Black-owned firms.

“A Black-owned firm with an innovative solution to New Jersey’s pension fund crisis, was shamefully exploited by the DOI’s entrenched “old-boys” network of political patronage and Wall Street money,” said attorney Michael Bowe. “But, this is not only a case about a past abuse, it is a case about a wrong that continues today, and will continue every day Governor Murphy does nothing. Governor Murphy and his administration shouldn’t say another word about what they are doing about systemic injustice before they address this injustice they are themselves perpetuating. Our 100- page detailed complaint speaks for itself and Governor Murphy should fix this before a Federal court does.”

“Governor Phil Murphy frequently cites with dishonest pride the diversity of his state, his cabinet and the state Democratic Party yet, over the last four years, began working with the DOI and the Assistant Treasurer to attack Jacob Walthour, Jr. after he publicly reported Blueprint’s abuse to, and sought the support of, the African-American community and its religious and political leaders,” said Pastor David Jefferson, Senior Pastor, Metropolitan Baptist Church and board member of National Action Network. “This is a necessary legal fight against Governor Murphy and the DOI to put a stop to exclusionary policies and practices that hurt certain groups and hold all parties who preclude fair and equal access to opportunities accountable.”

“While Blueprint is forging new paths in the financial service sector, they should not have to contend with systemic and systematic racism from Governor Murphy and his administration,” said attorney Jay Sekulow. “Racial and economic justice is everyone’s fight and anti-racism is not only bi-partisan, it transcends politics. This landmark case is about affording equal access and exposing the veil of inequality that exists in the asset management and financial services sector for Black Americans in New Jersey and this country.”

Arcade – Duncan Laurence ft. Fletcher

Duncan Laurence teams up with Capitol Records label mate FLETCHER on a poignant new version of his global hit, Arcade. Download / stream Arcade ft. Fletcher HERE. In the cinematic lyric video, Laurence descends to the depths physically and emotionally and emerges with fresh hope. View HERE.

Laurence won the Eurovision Song Contest 2019 with Arcade. His performance of the song at the competition was hailed as “powerful” by The New York Times and “haunting” by The Guardian. Arcade which has amassed more than 250 million combined global streams took the No. 1 spot on Spotify’s Global Viral chart last year and has since received radio airplay in 58 countries. The track recently went viral on TikTok following its use in the Dracotok meme, which pairs Arcadewith a deleted scene from a Harry Potter film.

Arcade appears on Laurence’s debut album, Small Town Boy, which was released earlier this month by Capitol Records. Throughout the album, his powerful, expressive tenor flows from a gentle whisper through fluttering falsettos to a full-blown force. But the scope of the music never overpowers the intimacy of the stories Laurence tells.

“I see music as a platform to tell stories that might be a bit sad, but always have this hopeful ending or hopeful core inside of them,” Duncan Laurence says. “I think trying to see the positive in something negative gives you a certain strength through life.”

Combined global streams of Laurence’s songs are approaching 300 million, including over 25 million for the anthemic Love Don’t Hate It. Prior to the global pandemic, Laurence played the prestigious Pinkpop Festival and over 30 European headline shows.

FLETCHER praised by leading outlets like TIME, Wonderland, V Magazine, Nylon, Harper’s Bazaar, Interview Magazine, GQ, The Guardian and more hails from Asbury Park, NJ, where she cultivated her passion for music and unforgettably candid storytelling. After graduating from NYU’s famed Clive Davis Institute for Recorded Music, FLETCHER carved out a distinct space for herself in pop music with her 2019 debut EP you ruined new york city for me (Capitol Records). The EP featured her breakthrough hit Undrunk, a track that spent several weeks on the Billboard Hot 100, scored the #1 spot on Spotify’s Viral Chart and emerged as the fastest-rising song at pop radio from a new artist in the past five years.

Since arriving in September 2020, FLETCHER’s new EP, THE S(EX) TAPES, hit No. 1 on iTunes across all genres and has earned critical acclaim from Teen Vogue, SPIN, PAPER and many other outlets. Her new single, Bitter, a collaboration with Billboard-charting artist Trevor Daniel and produced by Kito (Diplo, Empress Of, Aluna George), has amassed over 70 million global streams to date.

Kaelen Felix Illustrates a Drug Article for 360 MAGAZINE

Oregon Decriminalizes Drugs

By Justin Lyons

This year’s election will go down as a legendary one in the history of the United States of America, and for some of the bigger fights, the country still doesn’t have an answer.

Where answers do exist seem to be in propositions and measures, and the big winners are those hoping for the decriminalization of drugs. Mississippi, New Jersey, South Dakota, Montana and Arizona all approved the legalization of recreational marijuana.

The biggest victory for those in favor of drug decriminalization probably came in Oregon, where the penalty for small amounts of heroin, methamphetamine, cocaine and other drugs was lessened.

According to Ballotpedia, Oregon’s Measure 110 would reclassify the possession of controlled substances such as those listed above from a Class A misdemeanor to a Class E violation, which would result in a $100 fine or the necessity of a “completed health assessment.”

The Oregon Criminal Justice Commission estimated that convictions for possession would decrease by 90.7%.

Addiction recovery centers conduct the health assessments, which will include a screening from a certified alcohol and drug counselor and must be completed within 45 days of the Class E violation.

The funds for the assessments and the recovery programs will come from the Oregon Marijuana Account and money the state of Oregon saves from reductions in arrests, incarceration and official supervision. The recovery centers will provide treatment 24 hours per day along with health assessments, intervention plans, case management services and peer support and outreach.

The possession quantity of the now decriminalized drugs to be classified as a Class E violation are as follows: one gram of heroin or less, two grams of cocaine or less, two grams of methamphetamine or less, one gram or five pills of MDMA or less, 40 or fewer user units of LSD, less than 12 grams of psilocybin, fewer than 40 user units of methadone and fewer than 40 pills, tables or capsules of oxycodone.

A person carrying more than the specified amounts may face a misdemeanor with less than a year imprisonment, a $6,250 fine or both.

According to Yes on Measure 110, more than 125 Oregon-based organizations endorsed the measure, including Oregon Chapter of the American College of Physicians, Oregon Nurses Association, Oregon School Psychologists’ Association and Law Enforcement Action Partnership.

Ballotpedia also said the Democratic Party of Oregon, Multnomah Democrats and Working Families Party of Oregon support the bill, right alongside 11-time-GRAMMY-Award-Winning artist John Legend.

The measure is to be implemented no later than Feb. 1 of 2021.

Fousheé Signs with RCA Records

Today, genre bending singer/songwriter and multi-instrumentalist Fousheé announces she has signed with RCA Records. After garnering attention from the likes of SZA, Noname and more, and rising up the charts with her hit single “Deep End,” Fousheé first shared the news with her growing fanbase via Instagram. Click HERE to see her billboard announcement in Los Angeles.

On the signing, Chairman and CEO of RCA Records, Peter Edge says: “Fousheé is one of the brightest new voices with a clear creative vision and we are thrilled to welcome her to the RCA family. We look forward to helping her amplify her vision and reach new milestones together.”

Fousheé says: “I went with RCA because we speak the same music language. So many of who I’d consider to be the greats passed through there so I feel like I’m in good hands and it was important for me to still have creative control and a fair deal. I’m looking forward to pushing myself creatively. I want to create the soundtrack of this generation. “

Fousheé emerged this summer with the release of her track “Deep End” which garnered critical attention from the likes of FADER, OkayPlayer, Pigeons & Planes, 2DopeBoyz and more. Most recently Noisey included the track on their “Best R&B Songs of Summer 2020” list describing,”…a haunting voice…nestled comfortably on the production…At a time when so many of us were speechless [following George Floyd’s death], Fousheé found the words we wanted to say.”

Since then, the track has taken off hitting major milestones including reaching #5 on the Spotify Global Viral 50 chart, landing in Spotify’s Today’s Top Hits, Pop Rising, Hot Rhythmic playlists and Top Global 200 (sitting at #73), as well as #1 on the Global Shazam chart. The track has been streamed over 30 million times worldwide and currently sits at #1 on Apple Music’s Alt R&B playlist.

Internationally the track has made waves as well reaching Top 5 on the Top Daily Spotify charts in various Eastern European markets including #1 in Russia.

Fans first heard Fousheé’s pristine vocals on Sleepy Hallow’s “Deep End Freestyle” track, but she was not named as the vocalist. After the track took off, her mother and sister inspired her to come forward in a TikTok video, which now has over 6 million views and fans called for her to release a full version which she released in July along with the Blaxploitation film inspired visual directed by Zachary Sulak.

Check out the billboard announcing her signing, listen/watch “Deep End” and keep an eye out for more on Fousheé coming soon.

Watch/Listen to “Deep End

Watch/Listen to “Deep End (Acoustic)

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About Fousheé:

Born and raised in New Jersey, Fousheé  grew up with music in the forefront her entire life. Her mother, who hails from Jamaica, got her start in music as the drummer for a female reggae band named PEP before moving to America and starting a family. During her early childhood, Fousheé was exposed to a variety of different sounds from her mother’s record collection including Bob Marley, Toni Braxton and Etta James who she now counts as influences along with artists she personally gravitated to over the years like Frank Ocean.

Writing her first song at age six and performing with different girl groups created with childhood friends throughout her formative years, Fousheé  always knew that she wanted to pursue a career in music seriously. Yet, she found herself following in the normal footsteps of a teenager and enrolling in college, while still working on music and performing at local café’s on the side. It wasn’t until she and her mom were involved serious car accident that forced her to drop out and help her mom recover from injuries that she fully realized how important her dreams were and that was the turning point.

After living in NYC and experiencing the music scene there, she set her sights on LA where she was embraced by the music community of creators and began to pursue her dream, honing her craft and learning to play the guitar most recently. Fast forward to 2020, little did Fousheé  know that her voice would become streamed by millions as the hook on Sleepy Hallow’s viral track “Deep End (Freestyle),” influencing her to reveal her identity as the vocalist in a TikTok video that now has nearly 6 million views. With a clear creative vision and the release of her own full version of “Deep End,” Fousheé  is ready to show the world who she is.