Posts tagged with "gallery"

Merde via Alyssa fo Alyssa Davis Gallery for use by 360 Magazine

Merde!

In the wake of the demise of NYC’s most wanted criminal art dealer comes Merde!

On May 26th, Alyssa Davis Gallery will host a gala like no other. They have outfitted the sprawling 13,000 sq. ft. venue to accommodate every partygoer’s pace. The guests will be welcomed with a full red carpet experience staffed with a professional photographer. The indoor stage features a premium sound system and lighting to host a genius lineup of music that will keep the dance floor going all night.

Beyond the dancefloor, guests will find multiple bars, spaces to lounge, a live sculpture auction, a video art program, and of course—an ice sculpture. Outside in a stunning courtyard, there will be space to roam, relax, smoke, enjoy food and drinks and get up close and personal with a series of 20+ live performances. Additionally, they are offering VIP packages including access to a VIP suite with a private bar and courtyard and an exhibition curated by Ludovica Capobianco.

Merde! is organized by Alyssa Davis, Genevieve Goffman and Rachel Rosheger.

Alyssa Davis Gallery

Since 2016, Alyssa Davis has exhibited out of her 11th floor corner apartment in a 1907 residential building at 2 Cornelia Street. The gallery has held 19 exhibitions with emerging artists, often presenting first solo shows and unique site-specific installations, Alyssa Davis Gallery’s last show, Abby Lloyd‘s “Goodbye Dolly,” was just spotlighted in The New York Times. “Goodbye Dolly” closed on April 3rd, 2022 along with the Cornelia St. location itself.

No Agency New York

No Agency is a talent management company representing the next generation of multitalented female and GNC artists. Their roster has been recognized in the worlds of music, fashion, visual art and video, featured in campaigns for brands from Apple to Alexander McQueen, in magazines from Vogue to King Kong, and even on Netflix. The agency has been covered by Vogue, Teen Vogue, Dazed, i-D and more.

SEIS via Kamila Baron of House of Baron for use by 360 Magazine

SEIS

Fashion designer Peter Cohen and co-founder Francisco Cohen announce the opening of SEIS, an art gallery/exhibition hall, next door to his manufacturing & design plant on 6th Ave and Washington Blvd. The new space endeavors to be a showplace for a range of visual expressions from South Africa and California. 

For its opening, SEIS presents the work of renowned LA light and space artist Peter Lodato in collaboration with the enchanting bronzes of the late, great Cape Town sculptor Bruce Arnott.

Designer Peter Cohen was called “LA’s best secret” by the LA Times, dressing celebrities like Oprah and producing consciously and ethically out of his Los Angeles atelier.  For more information about SEIS, click HERE.

Panel with a Striding Lion, Neo-Babylonian period, 605-562 BC, glazed ceramic. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Fletcher Fund, 1931 via Cole Calhoun Getty Communications for use by 360 MAGAZINE

Getty’s MESOPOTAMIA

Getty’s online digital experience, MESOPOTAMIA, is now viewable in Arabic, French, Hindi, Mandarin Chinese, Spanish, and English. MESOPOTAMIA offers an intimate look at ancient objects from a recent exhibition at the Getty Villa, some dating up to 5,000 years old.

MESOPOTAMIA reimagines how art collections and archives can be experienced online, taking users on a journey that presents objects in lifelike detail. Visitors can simply scroll to tour the online experience at their own pace, accompanied by a narrative that details the symbolic, religious, and sometimes practical meanings and purposes of these ancient works of art.

Featured objects in MESOPOTAMIA were captured using photogrammetry and in some cases, additional LIDAR and structured light scanning to replicate every detail. This allows users to see nearly every wedge-shaped impression on a 4,000-year-old cuneiform tablet, or the hairline cracks on other ancient tablets. In one instance, users can see the bubbles in the glaze of a lion relief that once lined Babylon’s Ishtar Gate.

To give objects a sense of size, scale, and context, the feature situates the objects within their gallery setting, and strings the experience together using a Steadicam video capture. This creates the sense of floating through the space, from one highlight to another.

As technology continues to advance and audiences anticipate more dynamic visual experiences, Getty is committed to experimenting with innovative ways of visual storytelling,” says Serena Parr, immersive lead at Getty. “MESOPOTAMIA is an example of Getty’s goal to bridge the gap between ancient art history and online learning, and we hope global audiences will enjoy diving into this fascinating time period.

Other recent Getty digital experiences include Return to Palmyra12 Sunsets, and Bauhaus: Building the New Artist.

Brooke Cashin for use by 360 MAGAZINE

Flore Drops “Unidentified Foreign Objects” NFTs

The one-of-a-kind, acclaimed artist Flore is joining forces with Art Angels to drop a new line of NFT designs on Nifty Gateway. The collection will release on Thursday, January 13, featuring a group of collectible pieces titled “Unidentified Foreign Objects.” Flore’s inspiration for the pieces of work stem from the Atomic Era, a period where curiosity of outer space ventures and mid-century modern design came together.

The collection of NFTs includes six assets with a physical piece that is currently held in the LA-based gallery of Art Angels. The drop is sure to attract collectors across the metaverse to engulf themselves in Flore’s point-of-view throughout the space-time continuum with six new UFOs. The physical piece of art will become that of the owner of the NFT ‘Invader.’

Art Angels

Art Angels is the admired, female-owned contemporary art gallery in Los Angeles. Known for their provocative style, collectors are attracted to the diverse collections of art at the gallery. The gallery has gained success swiftly, appealing to high-profile businesses and individuals, offering a VIP experience paired with a sociable vibe. Housing an array of avant-garde pieces by Hollywood elites like Elizabeth Taylor and Simon Cowell, Art Angels is a luxury brand that houses truly eccentric pieces of art.

WonderWorks Unveils Fall Programs

WonderWorks Panama City Beach Unveils Fall Programs, Includes Art Contest and National STEM Day

WonderWorks Panama City Beach offers over 100 interactive exhibits for guests to explore and enjoy all year long. This fall, the attraction is focused on bringing their guests even more science-based learning opportunities. WonderWorks will be offering fun, educational programs for students and families this fall, such as the annual art contest, National STEM Day festivities, and a Saturdays in Space virtual “Ask An Astronaut” program.

“Fall is always an exciting time of year for us because we get to host incredible programs for our community such as our FLO-ART art contest and our National STEM Day program,” said Michael Walsingham, general manager of WonderWorks Panama City Beach. “Students love getting to see their work on display at the upside-down house, and we’re excited to welcome a new class of artists to the gallery.”

Students and families have a variety of ways to engage at WonderWorks this fall, including with these new programs and exhibits:

FLO-ART: This fall, WonderWorks will be opening applications for its North Florida Youth Art Gallery. This year’s theme is “Imagination.” Submissions are currently being accepted online only. The deadline to apply is Wednesday, December 15, 2021. Local artists will have their work displayed in the gallery for a full year, and winners will receive free tickets to WonderWorks to see their work on display. To enter the contest or read the submission guidelines, visit the site: Here.

Saturdays in Space – Every Saturday during October, guests and followers will get the chance to learn more about life in space and the career of an astronaut through the Ask an Astronaut Q&A series. Dr. Don Thomas, a former NASA astronaut, will be answering questions that were submitted by teachers and students in the community. His video responses will be posted each week for viewers to tune in on the WonderWorks’ YouTube Channel: Here.

National STEM Day – WonderWorks will be honoring this special day for the second year in a row. To highlight the importance of STEM, there will be fun science labs and experiments throughout the building all day on Monday, November 8, 2021. The labs will give people a chance to learn more about pressure, temperature, density, origami, and more.

“Fall is also a great time for our local schools to book a field trip to give their students a hands-on way to make a connection with science,” added Walsingham. “We look forward to providing the community with a fun and interactive fall.”

WonderWorks Panama City Beach offers many STEM-related exhibits and activities all year long. There are also demonstrations, activities, virtual learning labs, science fair partnerships, homeschool days, and more. In addition to offering families hands-on learning opportunities, they also provide educational field trips for schools and student groups. To get more information about WonderWorks’ STEM programs, visit their website: Here.

Desenio Illustration by Reb Czukoski for use by 360 Magazine

Desenio AW21 Collection

Interior design group, Desenio, has launched four trend collections for autumn and winter this year, AW21. Each collection has a distinct color scheme and vibe, so no matter your taste, there is a fit for everyone. Easily match prints together to create a beautiful gallery wall and find your favorites in all of their palettes.

WOODLAND RETREAT

The Woodland Retreat trend invites you to imagine taking time to experience the purity of nature. Walk through dewy forests filled with birdsong, breathe in the cool, pure air, and take time for yourself.

“Sustainability and natural materials continue to be a huge trend in interior design. The Woodland Retreat trend ties together rustic elegance with an eco-friendly approach to design,” says Annica Wallin, Executive Creative Director at Desenio.

If you feel at your calmest when surrounded by nature, this is the trend for you. Complete the look by adding luscious plants and cozy textures to a room that features the Woodland Retreat collection of wall art.

CLASSIC CONTRASTS

The Classic Contrasts trend is all about juxtaposing shapes and textures for the ultimate elegant touch. Mix soft beige shades with defining darker tones for a balanced, classic finish.

“The Classic Contrasts collection hones into one of the key interior trends we’re seeing for AW21. Timeless elegance takes a modern twist to bring about a refreshing take on the monochromatic look,” says Annica Wallin.

If you’re someone who prefers to choose statement pieces rather than gravitate towards the latest styles, the Classic Contrasts collection is the perfect choice. After choosing your favorite prints, add the  monochromatic accessories to your home to achieve a sophisticated look.

ROMANTIC REBELLION

The Romantic Rebellion collection enables you to bring your personality to life in your home by choosing art that’s as bold as you are. Whether you want to create a beautiful thematic experience in your dining room or add radiant pinks to your bedroom, it’s time to get creative and reimagine your walls.

“The Romantic Rebellion trend is a chance to embrace glamour and opulence within your interiors. Baroque imagery is remixed with a modern and edgy twist to create a playful vibe,” says Annica Wallin.

The Romantic Rebellion collection is the choice for you if you want to make your home feel glamorous and feminine with a hint of edginess. Pinks, purples, and hints of gold is the way to embrace this to its fullest. Alternatively, you can go for a more pared-back look by choosing prints as statement pieces in a more minimalistic room.

SOFT MOMENTS

The Soft Moments trend is about breathing into the present and resetting your space with warm tones and relaxing neutral prints. Sink into soft blankets with a hot drink and a good book because the world can wait.

“The Soft Moments trend collection celebrates elegance and serenity through a curated and clean nordic style with a Japanese touch. Natural browns and shadow grays come together to create a comforting, natural, and modern space where one can be at peace,” says Annica Wallin.

Choose the Soft Moments collection if you crave a calming space to retreat to after a hectic day. The quotation prints from get you in the right headspace and you can style your room with neutrally-toned accessories for the ultimate zen.

Photo by Desenio for Use by 360 Magazine
Photo by Desenio for Use by 360 Magazine
Photo by Desenio for Use by 360 Magazine
Optimistic Vivacity via Tim Tadder for use by 360 Magazine

Interview with Tim Tadder

If you have ever seen photos of an Olympic athlete, you have no doubt seen Tim Tadder‘s work. As a photographer, he has captured the likes of Michael Phelps and Simone Biles. Recently, Tadder hosted an exhibition at Avant Gallery in New York City. 360 was given the opportunity to ask him about his artistic inspirations and his style.

How did you get into art? Was there a moment you realized you wanted to do art professionally?

I’ve always been involved in some capacity with art as a major thematic in my life. It was always what I most enjoyed in school, as a hobby, & just overall being creative. I left a career as a teacher and pursued photography as a craft and a creative expression form when I was 27, after realizing I needed to enjoy my occupation and creating was a massive part of that. 

When did you realize art was the career choice for you? Was there a moment when you realized you were gaining recognition and success in the art world?

People see me as a highly creative photographer and artist. The way that I see the world has a particular point of view that is sought after. I think embracing that as who you are and what you do and how you perceive and see has value and therefore is a viable career once you can monetize that vision. Everything else falls into place from there. 

People will collect and want to own a piece of your vision and hang it on a wall, which ultimately empowers you as an artist to continue to create and explore your vision knowing that you have the financial support in order to do so. 

When ‘Nothing to See’ first was shared as large format prints, the response was overwhelming. It was at that point that I knew there was serious traction in a new marketplace, one that I had always dreamed of being a part of and was fortunate that this particular series of images was embraced by collectors and galleries. 

How does knowing a multitude of art mediums help you with your artwork?

I come from a background of 20 years of creating advertising campaigns for the world’s biggest brands and our job is to create on demand art that sells a product. And in doing so, you learn to use all the tools at your disposal to make the most powerful image for that purpose. I have been able to use all of that skill and knowledge and channel it into my personal fine art work to create images that convey messages that are important to me and that should be heard around the world. 

What do you look at to get inspiration to create?

Pre-COVID I attended a lot of art fairs and contemporary museums to look at trends, masters, & to find inspiration on how people explore visual presentation. I found that going to those events and seeing the art in person really helped me refine my message and refine my voice. In a COVID world, I try to follow artists on IG and Twitter who I’m inspired by and keep abreast of their new work and from there I try to find my own lane to blend out, be distinct, and be noticeable. Right now there’s so many rabbit holes that one can go down to find inspiration, whether it’s instagram or twitter or the NFT space.

You use bright and vibrant color schemes in your artwork, when and how did that start? What’s your process when deciding about the colors you will use?  

I’ve always been attracted to bold use of color. It’s been a monochord in my commercial work since my career began. For me that’s an instinctual choice. To use bold colors to help story tell. In choosing, a lot of it comes from instinct and a lot comes from what those colors represent. For ‘Nothing to See,’ I chose the bed, black, & white hues because they were historically represented of fascist banners and that collection was born out of a desire to create iconic, anti-fascist imagery. 

You photograph both still-lives (mostly mannequins) and people. Is there one you prefer to photograph? What led to you choosing a humanoid inanimate object as your main subject in many photos/series? 

I choose to use real people and not mannequins. I select models that have very androgynous, mannequin-esque features because I want my images to represent humankind and not just a type of individual, which sometimes comes from casting talent with defining characteristics. It’s not a picture of someone, it’s a picture of something

You edit with high contrast, high-saturation as your signature style. What drew you to this editing style?

Instinctive choices. It’s how I see, it’s how I visualize, it’s what I as an artist feel is beautiful. It wasn’t a choice to follow a trend, it was my own visual aesthetic.

art illustration by Gabrielle Marchan for use by 360 magazine

Parcours des mondes

Parcours des Mondes is the world’s largest international tribal art, Asian arts and archaeology fair. This year, the Parcours des Mondes will celebrate its 20th anniversary from 7th– 12th September in the Saint-Germain-des-Prés neighborhood, which has been home to the event since its beginnings.

To date, 40 French and international gallerists have confirmed that they will be participating. 42 galleries have confirmed their participation including two from the US, one from the UK and others from Australia, Belgium, Spain, Finland, Italy, Switzerland, the Netherlands, and, of course, France.

The Parcours des Mondes is the opportunity for all collectors and enthusiasts from the world over to gather in this multiple-venue event’s galleries on the rue de Seine, rue des Beaux-Arts, rue Visconti, rue Guénégaud, and a few other small streets in this beautiful neighborhood.

Parcours des mondes is pleased to announce that the Honorary President of this 20th anniversary edition of the fair will be Guy Delcourt, founder of the famous French publishing house Éditions Delcourt, specialized in comics, manga and graphic novels who is a passionate aficionado of Tribal Art and Art Brut.

The dates for your diary are 7th-12th September for this unmissable show, which is supported and produced by Tribal Art Magazine. It coincides with the magazine’s 100th issue in its 25 years of existence which will also be published this year.

Image via A&O PR for 360 Magazine

Hidden Threads Art Exhibition

Hidden Threads

A multidisciplinary group exhibition explores the spontaneous side of memory.

HOT•BED is pleased to present Hidden Threads, a group exhibition curated by Bryan Hoffman that explores the subconscious memories that inform our identities. As we navigate daily life, sensory stimuli may provoke unrelated recollections or emotions from the past. The work in the show is inspired by these involuntary memories, also known as mind-pops, which form the hidden threads that weave together our everyday experiences. Inspired by this idea, artists Katee Boyle, Carlos Alejandro, Alex Griffin, and János Korodi are exhibiting works spanning painting, photography, videography/projection mapping, sculpture, installations, and works on paper. In addition to their individual pieces, Boyle, Alejandro, and Nelson have also contributed new collaborative projects created especially for this exhibition. This is the first exhibition that will utilize the entirety of HOT•BED’s space, including its main gallery and MICRO•GALLERY. Hidden Threads will flow through the gallery, intensifying as it goes, while acting as a subconscious space that visitors are invited to explore. Staff will intentionally provide little direction, as to ensure total autonomy over how deeply visitors would like to dive into the recesses of the space and mind. Hidden Threads will be on view from September 11 – November 12, 2021 with an opening event on September 11, 2021 at 6-10 pm EST. To RSVP, please visit the site.

Mind-pops occur without effort or exerted influence, often during habitual activity. Everyone experiences these moments — when you taste, see, hear, smell, or touch something and suddenly a rush of memory surfaces. These memories can be powerful catalysts for creative expression or harmful triggers for negative emotions. What it shows us is that our subconscious often knows the meaning of an experience, even if consciously we don’t, Professor Lia Kvavilashvili of the University of Hertfordshire told Scientific American. Inspired by this phenomenon, each artist in Hidden Threads references or explores the idea through their own distinct style and conceptual lens.

Korodi considers memory by portraying the visceral experience of moving through space and time. His never-before-exhibited Transfer series (2020) continues his work with street views in a new medium; the artist takes images from Google Maps and prints them onto raw plywood sheets using a dye sublimation process. The romantic yet ghostly works retain the patterns and textures of the wood, with the street view images superimposed on top of them, mirroring the way memory is layered over the present. Korodi will also be showing works from his Motion and Bridges in Motion series.

Boyle gives us an intimate window into the place where past, present, and future are always meeting, fighting, coexisting, and collaborating. Her work resonates with a tug of memoir, the desire to move forward but always with a strong gravitational pull of the past. For Hidden Threads, Boyle has teamed up with Alejandro and Matt Nelson of N.E. Thing Productions on a series of flip book video projections, which expand upon the narrative of Boyle’s paintings and sculptures. The projections — shot by Alejandro and featuring Boyle — will be exhibited mapped over Boyle’s installation pieces, on top of horticulture displays designed by curator Bryan Hoffman, and against the walls of the gallery, creating an immersive experience that echoes the disarray of the subconscious.

In addition to the projections, Alejandro also contributes individual works to the show, including photographs and enlarged negatives hung in a line to mimic the setup of a dark room. By utilizing the traditional medium of analog photography — including a variety of uniquely complex techniques for developing and printing his images — Alejandro reflects on memory, artistic craft, and what is lost or preserved in the passage of time.

Griffin paints landscapes and architectural spaces in a raw, fuzzy style that mimics the haze of the past, but retains its emotional resonance. Though the pieces are often somber and visually sparse, Griffin gives structure to memory, making it visible in new ways. Rather than striving for photorealistic perfection, the artist captures what it feels like to almost grasp a memory before it slips back into the subconscious layers of the mind. (Griffin and Boyle have previously shown work together at Scarlett Thicket Farms in Chester County.)

Altogether, the exhibition presents a rich and layered depiction of memory and its elusive mind pops. In probing the possibilities of this complex, confounding, and distinctly human experience, Hidden Threads asks us to consider what we know we know, as well as that which we can only hope to catch a glimpse of someday. For more information and additional updates on Hidden Threads, please visit the site.

About Carlos Alejandro

Born in New York City. Grew up in public housing projects. Classically trained musician. 35 years of successful editorial, commercial, and fine art photography. Advocate for creativity, children, education and the environment.

About Katee Boyle

Katee Boyle, Scarlett Forge; Kennett Square, Pennsylvania explores a wide range of media including drawing, painting, sculpture, photography, words, sound, and installation to create the artifacts and narratives attributed to her work. A conceptually-driven expressionist, her stories stem from personal tributes to the human experience and unyielding faith in the power of emotional responses. Boyle’s work responds to the question: what does it mean to feel human, unapologetically from the female perspective. The manifestation of Her documents offers a representation of memory energized by a sense of momentum. Her work shares a strong temporal dimension – a place where the past, present, and future are always meeting, often colliding or in conflict. Boyle’s work resonates with a tug of memoir, the desire to move forward but always with a strong gravitational pull of the past. Speaking in a viscerally raw language of unbridled honesty on female invisibility and social conditioning, Boyle presents the viewer with a deconstructed female perspective on emotional life.

Boyle’s Artifacts reflect on cultural and gender-nuanced elements of life: birth, death, mother, family, discord, trust, and healing. Her work explores the mapping of connections and growth between that which is tangible and that which is most often unmentionable and fleeting. Her narratives embody the external social messages that speak to personal and private but simultaneously mingle and resonate with her audience as emotionally responsive, collectively shared experiences.

Boyle’s work is in private collections internationally. She has exhibited at SOFA Chicago, is a Winterthur Museum Maker- Creator Fellow, and a United States Artist Nominee.

About Alex Griffin

Alex Griffin creates landscapes that move among the past, present and future. Taking on multiple roles of painter, historian and storyteller, he reconstructs realities by inviting the viewer into imaginary scenes – a field, an urban landscape, a quiet walkway. His paintings have a cinematic effect and are filled with dreamlike imagery and structure. He builds up the surfaces of his canvases with layers of narratives and surrealist images. Griffin received a BFA from Virginia Commonwealth University in 2008. He lives and works in Philadelphia, PA.

About János Korodi

János Korodi was born in Budapest, Hungary in 1971. He is a visual artist, primarily a painter, and deals with different forms of printmaking, murals, and occasionally participates in interdisciplinary collaborations. By the time he received his doctoral degree in visual arts from the Hungarian University of Fine Arts, at the age of 42 in 2013, he was already in the process of relocation to the US. In the last 25 years, his works have been shown in various countries in Europe and the US. He has spent a six-months artists residency at TerraCycle Inc. in Trenton, NJ in 2015, awarded the 2010 Eötvös Scholarship of the Hungarian State–a studio residency in New York City, a 2008 scholarship at the Hungarian Academy in Rome, the 1999–2001 Derkovits Fellowship for emerging artist in Hungary, and the 1996 scholarship from the Tóth Menyhért Foundation of Kecskemét, Hungary. Korodi’s works are in permanent public and private collections internationally. He has lived and worked in Philadelphia since 2015. Through the 2000’s, Korodi has dealt with architecture and urbanism, and its visual and theoretical aspects for his Genius Loci – Spirit of the Place paintings and program, which concluded in his thesis. Later, he found his new self in “motion”, and the phenomenon of transition between places. This move colluded and bound together with the human exodus of the recent decade, as well as with his own immigration, and it reflects on the Spirit of the Place problem, too.

About HOT•BED 

Established in 2017, HOT•BED is a gallery and creative lifestyle space in Philadelphia that unites art, horticulture, and design. Helmed by Creative Director, Bryan Hoffman, HOT•BED is a catalyst and a conduit for futures not yet realized. It’s a gathering place, not unlike the Paris Salons of the Nineteenth century, where visitors and artists alike have the opportunity to collaborate, exhibit, and explore new ideas in a welcoming and judgment-free environment.

Image via Gruin Gallery for 360 Magazine

Keelin Montzingo – Cosmic Latte Nostalgia

Keelin Montzingo’s Cosmic Latte Nostalgia

Opening Thursday, September 9th, 2021 from 6-8pm with artist in attendance

Exhibition through October 10th, 2021

Make an appointment here

Location: 1515 N Gardner St, Los Angeles, CA, 90046

We are homesick most for the places we have never known. – Carson McCullers

Gruin and Show Gallery are pleased to present Keelin Montzingo’s first solo exhibition in Los Angeles entitled Cosmic Latte Nostalgia. 

Longing for a time that never was and a place that is accessible only within the imagination, Keelin Montzingo presents a collection of exciting new work that navigates the space between notions of home and the projected world we occupy online. Here, home refers not to where we live, but how we exist within our bodies and how this has changed over time as technology has developed and our sense of self has become increasingly warped and abstracted.

Cosmic Latte is known to be the average color of the universe, the compression of all we know to exist, a milky beige which is found in all of Montzingo’s new paintings. Referencing the mirroring of the cosmos within the Internet, these works explore the dichotomy between self-expression and entrapment within simulation. The search for authenticity in the contemporary world is inextricably linked to public displays of fictionalized behavior. As we seek to find ourselves we develop increasingly more sophisticated ways to invent who we are for others.

The mirror and the real meet and connect at a threshold where we can either try to untangle the facade or find ways of working with where we have arrived, understanding that we cannot revert back to the myths we have cultivated. This journey of controlling representation is nothing new, the Internet is simply a contemporary vehicle for a process we have been undergoing for centuries. The difference is that now we are accelerating at a pace we cannot keep up with or control.

Montzingo does not seek to judge those who cultivate personas, she does not perceive this behavior as duplicitous but rather as an act of creativity. Our ability to imagine is what has led us to turn the camera on ourselves and use the body as a platform for storytelling. Ironically the most extraordinary aspect of humanity, our ability to envision, is also what leads us to invent ever more creative ways to attack the psyche and enact destructive behaviors. Whenever something verges towards a deeper truth, a deeper facade comes with it. Reflected in the cosmos we cannot escape the laws of attraction and opposition.

Montzingo longs to escape the complexity of the now, to dwell in the pastel landscapes of a 1970s Palm Springs utopia where all is simplified and we are distilled to archetypes, the female body a symbol of the mother, the creator, the lover, the seer. But this is impossible, so instead she affords her subjects the freedom of time travellers, moving back and forth through data, creating a link between an imagined past, the contemporary world and projections of the future. For this reason, instead of painting women she knows, Montzingo paints models who are anonymous to her, employing the silhouette of the conventionally celebrated body to free this stereotype and speak of all female identity.

Keelin Montzingo (b.1992) is New York based painter. She studied Communications at the University of Massachusetts and Modern and Contemporary Art at Christies. Montzingo’s paintings are housed in collections in the USA, UK, Singapore, Switzerland, Lebanon, Italy and Thailand. She has exhibited in Paris, New York, and Los Angeles.

VISITOR INFORMATION

Show Gallery is located between Hollywood and Sunset at 1515 N. Gardner Street off of Sunset Boulevard. There is limited parking in the lot directly behind the gallery. Show Gallery is open by appointment only.

Visit Keelin’s artwork on Gruin and learn more via their website and Instagram.