Posts tagged with "philanthropy"

business brief case illustration by sara davidson for use by 360 Magazine

Celebrity-Designed Bag Auction for Chema Vision Children’s Center

Big Hearted Celebrities Act Fast to Help Children from Kibera Slum Go to School

Naomi Campbell, Halle Berry, Lenny Kravitz, Zoe Kravitz, Usher, Lionel Richie, Eddie Murphy, Evan Ross, Maggie Q, Raquel Bitton, Chrome Hearts and more come together using art and fashion so that students at Kibera’s Chema Vision Children’s Center can receive a quality education and a daily meal.

LA’s art and luxury fashion retailer to the stars Church Boutique and the eco-fashion house Ministry of Tomorrow (MOT) have teamed up with Christie’s and their charity auction partner Charitybuzz to produce “Art for Education”– the inaugural celebrity art auction fundraiser to benefit the Chema Vision Children’s Center (Chema) in Nairobi, Kenya.

The Chema School is situated in the midst of Kibera, Africa’s largest urban slum. The Chema School was established to provide quality education for some of Kibera’s most vulnerable children. Many of the students are orphans or children of single parents without income to pay for school fees.

Just before the pandemic, Chema was forced to relocate because the school structure was not up to code.  MOT’s vegan bag production facility is located near the school and Julian Prolman, president of MOT heard about the school’s dilemma. Through an initial fundraiser orchestrated by MOT, Chema was able to relocate to a safe building. However, Chema is currently lacking much needed funds to pay its teachers and cover its operational expenses that includes a daily meal for the students.

When Church Boutique’s founders Rodney Burns and David Malvaney learned about the urgent need at Chema from their supply partner MOT, whose branded bags are featured at The Church Boutique, they quickly reached out to their celebrity friends to request their support. Celebrities will be painting their artistic expressions on MOT’s new organic canvas tote bags that will be auctioned online through Christie’s auction partner, Charitybuzz, starting June 1, 2021 with the final bid accepted on June 16.

Prior to the auction launch, the bags will be on display from May 19– 26 at Church Boutique in Hollywood, CA, and then brought to New York where the bags will be on display at Christie’s during the auction.

Without hesitation, Rodney and David’s luminary friends offered to help including Naomi Campbell, Halle Berry, Lenny Kravitz, Zoe Kravitz, Usher, Lionel Richie, Eddie Murphy, Maggie Q, Evan Ross and Raquel Bitton, with more mega stars soon to be announced. In addition, Laurie Lynn Stark, the creator of the international jewelry and clothing brand Chrome Hearts, has joined in to create her own unique MOT tote.

“We believe that luxury is a privilege that comes with the responsibility to care for others in need and therefore we are thrilled to collaborate with MOT to do what we can to make a difference in the lives of children born into challenging circumstances” said Rodney Burns.

The opening minimum bid for each one-of-a-kind celebrity designed bag will begin at $1,000.

All proceeds from the auction will be donated to Chema to help fund the schools operating budget with a goal to raise $100k.

“Chema is a Swahili word meaning something good, and that is what we are trying to do with Art for Education” said Julian Prolman.

About Chema

At the heart of Kibera, Africa’s largest urban slum in Nairobi, Kenya, is the Chema Vision Children’s Center, a school that offers quality education to some of Kibera’s most vulnerable children. Learn more at Chema Vision’s website.

About the Church Boutique

The Church Boutique, located in West Hollywood, offers mid-century modern home décor, exclusive high-end avant-garde fashion, fine art photography, art, jewelry, and more. Visit The Church Boutique’s website here.

About the Ministry of Tomorrow

MOT is a for-profit social enterprise that designs and produces high quality, eco-luxury, vegan bags and accessories that are sold directly to consumers on their website.

About Christie’s  

Christie’s is a name and place that speaks of extraordinary art, unparalleled service and international expertise. Founded in 1766 by James Christie, Christie’s has conducted the greatest and most celebrated auctions through the centuries, providing a popular showcase for the unique and the beautiful. Christie’s offers around 350 auctions annually in over 80 categories, including all areas of fine and decorative arts, jewelry, photographs, collectibles, wine, and more. Prices range from $200 to over $100 million. Christie’s also has a long and successful history conducting Private Sales for clients and online sales are offered year-round across all categories. Christie’s global presence is spread across a network of international sale rooms and 61 representatives and offices. Christie’s website provides detailed articles and videos on the objects offered for sale alongside the latest advances in digital viewing tools to make Christie’s accessible to all.

*Please note when quoting estimates above that other fees will apply in addition to the hammer price – see Section D of the Conditions of Sale at the back of the sale catalogue. 

*Estimates do not include buyer’s premium. Sales totals are hammer price plus buyer’s premium and are reported net of applicable fees. 

Ava Della Pietra - Press Photo by Prospect PR for use by 360 Magazine

Ava Della Pietra QxA

“Ava Della Pietra is a pop powerhouse sure to inspire her listeners with her passionate lyricism and beautiful delivery.”  –360 Magazine

“Ava Della Pietra Follows Breakthrough Year With “Home,” her “Inspiring, Empowering…pop ray of hope” Parade Magazine

“With pure pop sensibility, catchy hooks and heartfelt lyrics…this young Broadway veteran aims at inspiring young listeners to feel proactive and empowered. Her spot-on vocals and sweet delivery will have you singing along and cheering for the power of open-minded activism.”  –Parade

Proceeds will be donated to charities dedicated to reuniting and rehoming children at the southern border.

Listen to “Home” by Ava Della Pietra here.

15-year-old singer/songwriter Ava Della Pietra has just released her most poignant single to-date with “Home,” inspired by the devastating stories of families torn apart on the southern border. Parade Magazine called the song “inspiring,” “empowering,” and a “pop ray of hope,” with “pure pop sensibility, catchy hooks and heartfelt lyrics…inspiring young listeners to feel proactive and empowered.” With lyrics that touch on fear, loneliness, and hope, “Home” is universal anthem for any young person struggling with life’s challenges, as relevant to those on the southern border as to the everyday teen. Parade adds, “Her spot-on vocals and sweet delivery will have you singing along and cheering for the power of open-minded activism.” Proceeds from the single and merchandise will be donated to charities dedicated to reuniting and rehoming children at the southern border.

Over the past few years, Ava has emerged as one of the most promising young artists on the pop scene today. Having established herself on the Broadway stage in the original cast of School of Rock, Ava’s debut single “Christmas Tonight” was named one of the “Best Holiday Songs” of the year by Tiger Beat Magazine, alongside artists like the Jonas Brothers and Liam Payne, and her follow-up single “Optimist” reached #50 on the Top 40 Radio chart, earning praise from American Songwriter, Just Jared Jr., and Newsday, who called Ava a “rising star.”

Produced by Will Hicks (Ed Sheeran, Jamie Lawson), “Home” is one of fifty songs that Ava has written, and the first of ten already produced, to be released in the coming months. Ava collaborated with some of the world’s top producers on her upcoming album, including Hicks, Justin Gray (Avril Lavigne, Mariah Carey), and Adrian Gurvitz (Andra Day, Jesse McCartney, Cheetah Girls). Alongside “Home” and “Optimist,” the album will also feature songs like “Forgotten,” dedicated to the people of Puerto Rico suffering in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria, as well as Ava’s upcoming single “Isolation,” slated for release this spring.

“Over the past few years, I have been shocked to learn about the terrible conditions that children have had to endure at the border–being separated from their families and left alone,” Ava said. “I also know that there are kids around the world struggling in other ways, including emotional challenges, pressures at school, problems at home, and so much more. I hope this song can encourage people to lend a helping hand and be there for one another.”

A multi-instrumentalist who plays piano, bass, guitar, violin, and ukulele, Ava began performing at age four and writing songs at age five. She performed on the national tours of “Les Misérables” and “White Christmas” before joining the original cast of “Broadway’s School of Rock”, and has been featured on “Good Morning America”, “Sesame Street”, the Tony Awards, “Last Week Tonight with John Oliver”, and more. Ava has performed at the Sundance Film Festival, the Great South Bay Music Festival, the New York Tennis Open, and at Madison Square Garden in front of 20,000 Knicks fans, as well as at My Father’s Place in Roslyn, New York, and in front of a sold-out crowd at NYC’s Rockwood Music Hall. Most recently Ava launched “Talking Tunes with Ava Della Pietra,” a new music column with Teen Kid News, where she is reviewing popular hits. Ava was also featured on the soundtrack for “Secondhand Lions: A New Musical.”

A supporter of both local and national charitable organizations, Ava is dedicated to advocating for young people, inspiring others to believe in themselves and follow their dreams. For more information on Ava Della Pietra, please visit her website.

Here at 360 Magazine, we sat down with Ava to discuss the release of “Home,” her rise to fame, and how she finds inspiration for her soulful songwriting.

  1. Are there any specific charities you’d like to shout out of which to proceeds of “Home” are going toward? Yes, I am giving proceeds from “Home” to non-profit agencies helping unaccompanied minors to reunite with their families and find homes.

    2. You’ve written over 50 songs! That’s very impressive. Where do you find inspiration for writing all of these tracks?  

    Most of my inspiration comes from real life. I really enjoy expressing my emotions through my songwriting because I think it helps me discover more about myself. Sometimes, I will just be walking around my house and a thought will pop into my head. Unconsciously, I come up with a melody to that phrase, and occasionally I’ll create a song. Other times, I’ll simply sit down and think, “I want to write a song today!”

    3. Of the songs you’ve written that haven’t yet been produced, what other themes do you discuss within your music that you think are most important to bring awareness to?

    A few themes I explore in my songs are love, empowerment, mental health, confidence, and friendship. For example, I’ve recently written a few songs about overcoming insecurities. Something I like about my music is that even though a couple of my songs may focus on sad topics, almost all of them have a positive or hopeful spin to them by the end.

    4. Even though other young people’s situations may not be as severe as those at the southern border, how do you see “Home” as a relatable anthem for all listeners?

    “Home” is about lending a helping hand to those in need. This idea can apply to a wide range of situations, from daily encouragement to serious national issues, such as the southern border.

    5. What is the most standout performance of your career, in your opinion?

    In terms of acting and performing arts, “School of Rock” on Broadway was definitely a dream come true. In regard to my singer-songwriter career, Sundance Film Festival was one of my favorite experiences. I also really enjoyed singing the National Anthem at Madison Square Garden for a Knicks game, singing at My Father’s Place, and traveling out to Las Vegas to perform.

    6. You recently launched “Talking Tunes with Ava Della Pietra.” What artists do you particularly enjoy and inspire your own performance?

    Some of my favorite artists are Lauv, Conan Gray, Halsey, Lewis Capaldi, and Camila Cabello. I also like Ed Sheeran and his performance style. He uses a loop pedal which allows him to add the different layers of a song live. I’ve recently started to use a looper, and I find it really fun to incorporate all 5 of my instruments into my performance.

    7. Do you have a “dream musical” you’d love to be involved with in the future?

    I’m a huge fan of “Dear Evan Hansen”, so being a part of that musical would be absolutely incredible!

    8. You began performing at such a young age. When did you, or your parents, first recognize your natural ability to perform?

    I’ve been singing more or less my whole life! I was in my first community theater production when I was four, and people began to approach my parents and encourage them to find me an agent. When I was six, I booked my first role in the National Tour of “Les Misérables.” Everything kind of skyrocketed from there.

    9. What are you most excited about regarding the upcoming release of your debut album?

    I’m just so excited for people to listen to my music. Over the past year, my style has changed a lot, and I can’t wait for people to hear what I’ve been working on!

The Weeknd illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

The Weeknd Donates 2 Million Meals

Superstar The Weeknd Donates 2 Million Meals to Hungry People in Ethiopia Through the United Nations World Food Program

This $1 million donation will provide lifesaving food to those living in the Tigray Region

Multi-platinum selling singer, songwriter and record producer Abel Tesfaye, better known as The Weeknd, has donated $1 million to World Food Program USA, the U.S. affiliate of the United Nations World Food Program, which was the 2020 Nobel Peace Prize Laureate, in support of hunger relief efforts in Ethiopia. The significant donation, which equates to 2 million meals, will provide lifesaving food to those affected by conflict in Ethiopia’s northern Tigray Region.

This generous gift will support the U.N. World Food Program’s efforts to ramp up emergency food assistance response to reach up to 2 million people in the next six months. So far, the humanitarian agency has provided corn, rice and vegetable oil to 60,000 people in towns in the eastern and southern parts of the region. In addition to delivering emergency food assistance in Tigray, the U.N. World Food Program has started providing nutrition support for vulnerable pregnant or breastfeeding women as well as children in the region, planning to reach 875,000 people. The U.N. World Food Program has also delivered three rounds of monthly food rations in the two accessible and operational refugee camps in Tigray.

“My heart breaks for my people of Ethiopia as innocent civilians ranging from small children to the elderly are being senselessly murdered and entire villages are being displaced out of fear and destruction. I will be donating $1 million to provide 2 million meals through the United Nations World Food Program and encourage those who can to please give as well,” said Abel Tesfaye (The Weeknd).

“We are extremely concerned about the food security situation in Tigray,” said World Food Program USA President & CEO Barron Segar. “As poor households exhaust food stocks, people will fall deeper into emergency levels of hunger. This generous donation from The Weeknd will provide immediate lifesaving food for people who need it urgently.”

The government estimates that 4.5 million people need emergency food assistance until late this year and has requested the U.N. World Food Program support 1.4 million of them. The outbreak of conflict in Tigray last November coincided with the peak harvest period, meaning employment and incomes were lost, markets were disrupted, food prices rose and access to cash and fuel became very difficult.

About the United Nations World Food Program/World Food Program USA

The United Nations World Food Program is the 2020 Nobel Peace Prize Laureate and the world’s largest humanitarian organization, saving lives in emergencies and using food assistance to build a pathway to peace, stability and prosperity for people recovering from conflict, disasters and the impact of climate change.

World Food Program USA, a 501(c)(3) organization based in Washington, DC, proudly supports the mission of the United Nations World Food Program by mobilizing American policymakers, businesses and individuals to advance the global movement to end hunger. Our leadership and support help to bolster an enduring American legacy of feeding families in need around the world. To learn more about World Food Program USA’s mission, please visit this website.

About The Weeknd

Filtering R&B and pop through an ambitious widescreen lens, The Weeknd took over popular music and culture on his own terms. The multi-platinum and Diamond certified star is one of the most listened to artists in the world on Spotify (over 51 billion streams) and is a top 10 artist of all time for RIAA singles. His 2020 album After Hours is the #1 most streamed R&B album of all time (followed by his 2016 album Starboy at #2), and his 80’s nostalgic track “Blinding Lights” went 5X RIAA-certified platinum and broke the record for Billboard’s longest-running #1 on its US radio chart. The track quickly became his fifth to go #1 on the Billboard Hot 100.

Alongside his gilded musical career, he’s graced the covers of TIME, Forbes, Variety, Rolling Stone, Esquire, Harper’s Bazaar, and GQ along with late night TV stages with heralded performances on SNL, Jimmy Kimmel, Stephen Colbert and the VMA’s where he accepted the awards for Video of the Year and Best R&B. In recent times he has made acting appearances in TV and film with 2019’s film Uncut Gems as well as starring in and co-writing an episode of the hit show American Dad. He generously shares, with over $2M in donations made in 2020 to various charities. The continuous record breaking of charts, sales and streams, headlining the biggest festivals and stadiums in the world including this year’s Super Bowl, and his ever mysterious public persona combined solidifies The Weeknd as one of the most compelling and significant artists of the 21st century.

Motorbike illustration by Kaelen Felix for 360 magazine

Celebration of Life Ride

Make-A-Wish Founder Celebration of Life Ride – Organized by the Wish Riders: “Kickstands Up” for Charities

Arizona resident, Frank Shankwitz, co-founder, CEO, and the first President of the Make-A-Wish Foundation, passed away on January 22nd, 2021. The founder of the greatest global non-profit for children was asked: “What’s your wish?” His response? “To have my story told…”

Wish Riders is hosting a Celebration of Life Memorial Ride to honor the life of Frank Shankwitz on May 1st, 2021. The ride will originate in New River, Arizona at the Roadrunner Restaurant and Saloon, which is located at 47801 N. Black Canyon Hwy. Riders will meet at 10:00 am with “kickstands up” heading to Prescott at 11:00 am.

Riders will stop at Legends Harley Davidson in Mayer, Arizona for a rest stop with provided beverages and snacks. They will leave there and head out to circle the courthouse square and arrive at the Prescott Rodeo Grounds at 840 Rodeo Dr. Prescott, Arizona 86305 for the 1:00 pm celebration. It will be a day filled with music including; Justin Hitson & Southbound and Ryan Weaver, vendors, tributes, family, and friends as we celebrate Frank and his legacy.

In 2015, Frank was identified as one of the “10 Most Amazing Arizonans.” Now Arizonans will have one helluva ride in honor of Frank’s life. The event will have pre-sale discounted tickets available for $10 and can be purchased at this website. Frank’s family will use the money made to benefit charities Frank supported including; The Wounded Blue, U.S. Vets, The Western Heritage Center, Prescott Chapter, and United Animal Friends, Prescott Chapter.

Frank was a U.S. Air Force veteran and had a long and distinguished career in law enforcement. He began as an Arizona Highway Patrol Motorcycle Officer, and retired as a Homicide Detective with the Arizona Department of Public Safety, with 42 years of service. He was featured in numerous publications and television programs and received several notable awards, including the White House Call To Service Award from both President George W. Bush and President Donald J. Trump, and the “Making a Difference In The World” award from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point.

In 2015, Frank joined six U.S presidents as well as Nobel Prize winners and industry leaders as a recipient of the Ellis Island Medal of Honor. In 2017, Frank was presented the Unite4: Humanity Celebrity ICON Social Impact Award. In February 2018, Frank shared the stage with Matthew McConaughey at Universal Studios at the LA City Gala and was presented the first City Gala Hero Award. In June 2019, Frank joined 89 celebrities when he received his “STAR” on the Las Vegas Walk of Fame.

Frank’s life story was told in his book, Wish Man, and was later featured in a motion picture by the same name that was released in June 2019, which can be seen on Netflix. Copies of the book, Wish Man will be available for purchase at the event along with a children’s book he wrote called Wishes Won’t Wash Dishes to raise additional funds for his charities.

The thing about wishes…They sometimes come true. Now and then they’ll be granted. You can work for them too.” – Frank Shankwitz

About In The Limelight Media

In the Limelight Media is multi-media platform comprised of video, a podcast, and a digital magazine dedicated to offering educational, empowering, and entertaining subject matter. With a laser focus on showcasing entrepreneurs, the shows can be seen on ROKU, Apple TV, Amazon Fire, Google Play, Sony, Tivo, DailyMotion, and many more. The ITL podcasts are heard on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Amazon Music, Pandora, Podbean, Spotify, Stitcher, and Inspired News Radio. The In the Limelight magazine is a quarterly digital publication.

Women's Month illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Where Women Made History campaign

National Trust and Benjamin Moore Honor Women’s Impact on American History

This month, the National Trust for Historic Preservation, in partnership with Benjamin Moore, announced plans to restore two buildings that honor the significant contributions of diverse women to American progress.  Azurest South in Petersburg, VA, was designed in 1939 by Amaza Lee Meredith, one of the country’s first Black female architects; and the McDonogh 19 Elementary School in 9th Ward of New Orleans, LA, was one of the first schools integrated in New Orleans after the landmark 1954 Supreme Court case, Brown v. Board of Education.

Both projects are part of the National Trust’s Where Women Made History campaign and a continuation of the collaboration between the National Trust and Benjamin Moore launched in 2020 with the interior restoration of the Women’s Building in San Francisco, CA, and the exterior transformation of the Odd Fellows Building in Astoria, OR.  Support from the National Trust and Benjamin Moore for these sites of women’s achievement and empowerment comes during a critical time of global pandemic and economic uncertainty in which women across the country are in crisis.

Christina Morris, manager of the Where Women Made History campaign for the National Trust, said, “The women whose stories are preserved in these places embody the spirit of the Where Women Made History campaign.  These are women who pushed beyond the boundaries of what they were told was acceptable or even possible.  We owe them an enormous debt for establishing the essential—but often unseen—foundation that lifts up women and girls today and gives them the freedom to pursue their own dreams.”

“It is a privilege to be able to preserve several historic sites with significant roots in women’s history,” said Jeannie West, Benjamin Moore Senior Vice President of Human Resources.  “Together with the National Trust, we’ll pay homage to these female trailblazers who helped shape us into the nation we are today.”

The National Trust’s Where Women Made History campaign is designed to address the centuries of gender inequality that have led to the erasure of many pivotal stories of women’s history, creating an inaccurate perception of their fundamental role in shaping American identity.  These inequalities have been laid bare over the last year of the COVID-19 pandemic, with its disproportionate and devastating effects on women, particularly women of color, who were forced to shutter their businesses and who became unemployed at a rate four times higher than their male counterparts.  Through the Where Women Made History campaign, the National Trust plans to raise and invest $10 million in philanthropic support to elevate and preserve 100 places across the country where women of all backgrounds, ages, beliefs, and identities have made history.

In addition to the four Benjamin Moore projects, the campaign is active on many other fronts, conducting a nationwide crowdsourcing effort that garnered over 1,200 formerly unrecognized places where women made history from across all 50 states; adding new sites related to women artists to expand the diversity and representation in the National Trust’s Historic Artists Homes and Studios program; providing grants to directly support dozens of projects and places of women’s history around the country; creating the first all-female HOPE (Hands-On Preservation Experience) Crew projects to empower the next generation of female preservationists and craftspeople through the restoration of women’s history sites; sharing the stories of groundbreaking female leaders in Preservation magazine; and taking action to save nationally-significant places of women’s history, such as the San Francisco, CA, home of LGBTQ+ civil rights pioneers and activists Del Martin and Phyllis Lyon, Natalie de Blois’s spectacular Terrace Plaza Hotel in Cincinnati, OH, and the National Historic Landmark Harada House in Riverside, CA, where Sumi Harada played a critical role in a lawsuit that allowed Japanese Americans to own property in California and later provided a safe haven for Japanese Americans who had been forcibly relocated to incarceration camps during World War II.

In partnership with Benjamin Moore, the two new sites announced this month highlight the impact African American women have had on American history.

Architect, educator, and artist Amaza Lee Meredith designed Azurest South in 1938 as the lifetime residence and personal studio for herself and her partner, Dr. Edna Meade Colson. Ms. Meredith also is credited with establishing and running the Fine Art Department at Virginia State University (VSU) for over two decades.  The home is now owned by the VSU Alumni Association. Benjamin Moore will provide approximately 150 gallons of paint to help with restoration work on both the interior and exterior of the small but stunning Moderne property, and we hope to include students in the VSU Fine Art Department in the project to carry Amaza Lee’s legacy forward to the next generation.

McDonogh 19 Elementary is one of two historic sites in the 9th Ward of New Orleans, LA, where school desegregation first took place. On November 14, 1960, three six-year-old girls – Leona Tate, Gail Etienne, and Tessie Prevost – made history when they climbed the 18 stairs to enter the then all-white school. On the same morning, Ruby Bridges integrated William Frantz Elementary. These four girls became the first African Americans to integrate formerly all-white schools in the Jim Crow Deep South and have since been known as the “New Orleans Four.”

Closed in 2004, the McDonogh 19 Elementary School is currently being transformed by the Leona Tate Foundation for Change, Inc. as a mixed-use facility, that, in addition to senior housing, will feature education and exhibition space dedicated to the history of New Orleans public school desegregation, civil rights, and restorative justice.  The building is being renamed the Tate Etienne & Prevost Interpretive Center.

Both sites are expected to be completed by summer 2021, and their progress and transformation will be documented with photos and videos that will be released later this year.

About the National Trust for Historic Preservation
The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded nonprofit organization, works to save America’s historic places.

 

The Ford Foundation’s Darren Walker in Conversation with Andre Leon Talley

The Ford Foundation’s Darren Walker will be interviewed by André Leon Talley on a zoom call Thursday, February 11th at 7:00 pm EST hosted by the Museum of Arts and Design (MAD).

The Ford Foundation’s president Darren Walker and fashion icon André Leon Talley join MAD Interim Director Terry Skoda for a Black History Month special edition of MAD Moments, exploring Walker’s path to the Ford Foundation, his vision for the future of philanthropy, and the role of museums in reimaging who has a seat at the table and a voice in the room.

Closed captioning provided.

ABOUT THE PANELISTS

André Leon Talley was the indomitable creative director at Vogue during the magazine’s rising dominance as the world’s fashion bible. Over the past five decades his byline has appeared in Vanity Fair, HG, and The New York Times. He began his career as an assistant to Diana Vreeland at The Metropolitan Costume Institute, later working at Interview magazine, and as Paris Bureau Chief for Women’s Wear Daily. He is the author of books including two autobiographies, The Chiffon Trenches and ALT, as well as Little Black Dress, A.L.T.:365+, MegaStar, and Oscar de la Renta: His Legendary World of Style. He is also the subject of the documentary The Gospel According to André. Mr. Talley received his MA in French Studies from Brown University and served on the board of trustees for the Savannah College of Art and Design for twenty years.

Darren Walker is president of the Ford Foundation, a $13 billion international social justice philanthropy. He is co-founder and chair of the Presidents’ Council on Disability Inclusion in Philanthropy. Before joining Ford, Darren was vice president at Rockefeller Foundation, overseeing global and domestic programs. In the 1990s, he was COO of the Abyssinian Development Corporation, Harlem’s largest community development organization. Darren co-chairs New York City’s Mayoral Advisory Commission on City Art, Monuments, and Markers, the New York City Census Task Force, and the Governor’s Commission and serves on The Independent Commission on New York City Criminal Justice and Incarceration Reform and UN International Labour Organization Global Commission on the Future of Work. He serves on many boards, including Carnegie Hall, the High Line, VOW to End Child Marriage, the Committee to Protect Journalists, the National Gallery of Art, and the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History & Culture. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and is the recipient of 16 honorary degrees and university awards, including Harvard University’s W.E.B. Du Bois Medal. Educated exclusively in public schools, Darren was a member of the first Head Start class in 1965 and graduated from The University of Texas at Austin. He has been included on Time’s annual 100 Most Influential People in the World, Rolling Stone’s 25 People Shaping the Future, Fast Company’s Most Creative People in Business, and OUT Magazine’s Power 50.

Eminem illustration by Kaelen Felix for 360 MAGAZINE

EMINEM’S MMF

EMINEM’S MARSHALL MATHERS FOUNDATION TO RELEASE EXCLUSIVE DOWNTOWN BOXING GYM COLLAB ON BLACK FRIDAY

Just in time for Black Friday, the Marshall Mathers Foundation is releasing a limited-edition line of clothing for a good cause. The designs also make a nod to “Stan” and the 20th anniversary of The Marshall Mathers LP. 

The Marshall Mathers Foundation x DBG #Stan #MMLP collab on Carhartt gear will raise funds to help the Downtown Boxing Gym (DBG Detroit) knock out COVID-19 related learning loss. DBG is a free academic and athletic program on Detroit’s east side that’s working around the clock to prevent students from falling behind during the pandemic. 

“We’re facing a crisis like we’ve never seen and we’re doing everything we can to support our kids and help them make it through,” said Khali Sweeney, DBG’s founder and CEO. “To have Eminem and the Marshall Mathers Foundation step up during this time and help raise much needed funds means the world to us. This is what we do in the D. We take care of each other. And we are truly grateful.” 

Royce Da 5’9”, Director of Community Engagement and Social Justice Initiatives for The Marshall Mathers Foundation, said: “I’ve experienced firsthand the discipline, commitment, and focus that boxing training instills in young people. I’m passionate about the sport, and I’m passionate about the role that DBG plays in our community.  We need to make sure the important work they do continues.” 

The t-shirts and hoodies sell for $30 and $60 and are available online at the Eminem Store (shop.eminem.com) while supplies last. 100% of the proceeds will support DBG’s tutoring, mentorship, enrichment programs, college and career prep, social-emotional skills building, and basic needs support like transportation, meals, and more. Learn more at dbgdetroit.org

The Marshall Mathers Foundation is a charitable organization dedicated to disadvantaged and at-risk youth in Detroit, Michigan and its surrounding communities. Our mission has expanded to stand as an ally in the fight against social injustice and for racial equality nationwide.  

After being featured on ESPN’s UFC 257 creative for the last month, Eminem will debut his new music video for “Higher” during ESPN’s UFC 257 Countdown: Poirier vs. McGregor 2 at 2 p.m. ET this Saturday, January 23 on ABC. The video will also re-air on ESPN just prior to Saturday’s main event.

The song comes from the latest Eminem release, Music To Be Murdered By – Side B (Shady Records/Aftermath Entertainment/Interscope Records), which was released on December 18, 2020 and is the expanded edition of Music To Be Murdered By, his 11th studio album released January 17, 2020. The music video prominently features footage from ESPN’s UFC coverage and centers around Eminem inhabiting roles as both a musician and a world-class athlete, drawing allusions between the way a musician creates and prepares to perform and how an athlete trains and prepares for competition. The video, featuring cameos from Dana White and ESPN’s Michael Eaves, will revolve around Eminem’s most important battle: the one against his own demons. 

“We have always been interested in fostering the synergy between music and sports and along with ESPN we have created many great moments together,” says David Nieman, VP, Sports and Gaming for Interscope Geffen A&M. “Working together to amplify Eminem’s artistic vision in such a unique way for this highly anticipated UFC event is absolutely a high point.” 

“It’s always been amazing to be able to work with Eminem for promotional and programming content on various ESPN properties over the years,” said Kevin Wilson, ESPN music director. “To be able to work on this video together with his team – not only featuring our team’s great UFC coverage but also debuting it exclusively on ABC, is just invaluable.” 

Eminem has been featured in a number of promotional and programming content for ESPN recently, including UFC 248, UFC 246, a spot with a custom remix and the tease for this year’s College Football Playoff National Championship, featuring him narrating the introduction and more.

First Jewish American Heritage National Park Made Law

Yesterday marks a significant win in the decades-long effort to recognize and celebrate the philanthropic legacy of Julius Rosenwald and his impact on American democratic equality.  With the president’s signing of the Julius Rosenwald and Rosenwald Schools Act of 2020, a process begins that would lead to the establishment of the first National Park Service site to honor a Jewish American and celebrate the contribution of a Jewish American to our society, while preserving a selection of iconic Rosenwald Schools.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation first highlighted the threatened natureof the Rosenwald legacy by placing Rosenwald Schools on its 11 Most Endangered Historic Places List in 2002. The National Trust supported the preservation of Rosenwald Schools for many years, providing workshops, conferences, and technical assistance – including a publication: the Grassroots Guide to Preserving Rosenwald Schools.

The heightened awareness created by the endangered list designation and Rosenwald Schools initiative  ultimately led to a partnership between the National Trust, the Campaign to Create the Julius Rosenwald and Rosenwald Schools National Historical Park, and the National Parks Conservation Association, which together collaborated to achieve the successful enactment of the Julius Rosenwald and the Rosenwald Schools Act of 2020 (H.R.3250).  Within this effort the Trust’s African American Cultural Heritage Action Fund established a grant fund that has provided over $2.5 million in matching grants to advance Rosenwald School preservation, including planning, engineering studies, architectural plans, archaeology, research, and rehabilitation.

“Rosenwald Schools unearth a fascinating and true history of African American activism, achievement, and resilience in the United States,” said Brent Leggs, executive director of the African American Cultural Heritage Action Fund.  “Their permanent preservation and interpretation broadens our understanding of the civil rights fight for equality in twentieth century America and the enduring power of interracial cooperation.”

BACKGROUND
Born in 1862 in Springfield, Illinois not far from the residence of then President Abraham Lincoln, Julius Rosenwald made his fortune as co-owner of Sears, Roebuck and Company. His own parents, however, had fled persecution in Germany in the late 1900s, and he began to channel his experience of hatred and bigotry into the creation of the Rosenwald School Fund, which had a lasting impact on education in America.  A prominent philanthropist, Rosenwald joined the board of esteemed black educator Booker T. Washington’s Tuskegee Institute in 1912.  Together, these two champions of social justice, one a former slave and the other a first-generation American refugee from persecution, used architecture and innovation to address the crisis in education facing Black families across the South.

Between 1917 and 1932, the Rosenwald School Fund, working in partnership with local Black communities, helped to finance the construction of more than 5300 state-of-the-art school buildings for community and academic use.  The schools served as a lifeline for students and educators whose progress was held back by the separate and unequal school system that ruled the Jim Crow South.  By 1928, one-third of the South’s rural African American school children and teachers were educated in Rosenwald Schools.  Notable former students include poet and activist Maya Angelou and the late Rep. John Lewis (D-GA), among many notable others.

“History shows us,” Leggs continued, “that countless ordinary citizens were the vanguards of collective action and human innovation.  These stories and landmarks serve as a testament to our progress, and they remind us that our work is not complete.”

Passage of the bill was a multi-year effort, but yesterday it was signed into law.  The legislation,  sponsored by Representative Danny Davis (D-IL) and Senator Richard Durbin (D-IL), directs the Department of the Interior to conduct a special resources study of sites associated with the life and legacy of Julius Rosenwald, with a special focus on Rosenwald Schools and determine how they might be designated as a new unit within the National Park System.  Once established, the Rosenwald park unit would become the first of over 420 National Park Service sites to honor the life and contributions of a Jewish American.

About the National Trust for Historic Preservation
The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded nonprofit organization, works to save America’s historic places.  http://savingplaces.org | @savingplaces

About the African American Cultural Heritage Action Fund
The African American Cultural Heritage Action Fund is a multi-year initiative of the National Trust for Historic Preservation in partnership with the Ford Foundation, the JPB Foundation, the Open Society Foundations and other partners, working to make an important and lasting contribution to our cultural landscape by elevating the stories and places of African American achievement and activism. Visit http://www.savingplaces.org/actionfund

Senate called on to include $200 billion for charities in relief package

A coalition of nonprofit groups is calling on the U.S. Senate to include a temporary emergency stimulus in its next pandemic relief package. The proposal would unlock $200 billion in charitable funds to assist charities overwhelmed by the pandemic, with updates to the laws governing private foundations and donor-advised funds (DAFs). The proposal would release more of the estimated $1.2 trillion they currently hold by increasing required distributions to 10 percent annually for three years.

“Nonprofits need emergency help right now. Millions of nonprofit jobs have been lost, one-third of them in health care. Up to 120,000 nonprofits are shutting down completely,” said Scott Wallace, co-chair of the Wallace Global Fund, a private foundation that committed to spend 20 percent of its own endowment in 2020. “We urge Congress to enact an Emergency Charity Stimulus to force philanthropies to increase their support for nonprofit organizations – immediately, urgently, and temporarily, to allow time for deployment of a vaccine and economic recovery.” 

“We are collectively facing the most dire moment that many of us have seen in our lifetimes, and it is likely the tip of the iceberg in terms of the challenges that await us as a society and a planet,” said Aileen Getty, founder and president of the Aileen Getty Foundation and granddaughter of billionaire J. Paul Getty.

“While some foundations and donors are stepping up at this moment, others continue to treat the five percent payout as a ceiling not a floor,” said Chuck Collins, director of the Charity Reform Initiative at the Institute for Policy Studies. ““Donors have already taken the tax break for these contributions. Congress needs to raise the bar for those donors who haven’t figured out this is no time to sit on your treasure.”

Led by the Charity Reform Initiative of the Institute for Policy Studies, Patriotic Millionaires, and the Wallace Global Fund, the groups first proposed the idea in May with a letter to Congress. The letter has now been signed by almost 800 philanthropists and leaders of foundations as well as several thousand nonprofit leaders and staff.

The proposal calls for a temporary doubling of private foundation payout from 5 percent to 10 percent for three years and would establish a similar 10 percent payout for donor-advised funds (DAFs) that currently have no mandate.

Researchers at the Institute for Policy Studies estimate these policies would unleash an estimated $200 billion in additional charity funds over three years, with no additional cost to taxpayers. The independent nonprofit sector is part of the front-line response to the pandemic and other natural disasters. The sector employs 12 million workers or more than 10 percent of the private workforce.

Prominent signers of the letter include: Scott Wallace, Wallace Global Fund (PA); Abigail Disney (NY); Aileen Getty, Aileen Getty Foundation (CA), Sara Miller, Miranda Family Fund (NY), Rory Kennedy (CA), Ning Mosberger-Tang (CO); Catherine Gund, George Gund Foundation (NY); Mary Mountcastle, Mary Reynolds Babcock Foundation (NC); Anna Fink, Amalgamated Charitable; Ellen Friedman, Compton Fund (CA); Jerry Hirsch, Lodestar Foundation (AZ); Morris Pearl (NY); and Stephen Prince (TN). 

About the Charity Reform Initiative

The Charity Reform Initiative of the Institute for Policy Studies aims to modernize the rules governing philanthropy to increase the flow of resources to the nonprofit independent sector and protect the integrity of the tax system. 

About the Patriotic Millionaires

The Patriotic Millionaires are high-net worth Americans, business leaders, and investors who are united in their concern about the destabilizing concentration of wealth and power in America. The mission of The Patriotic Millionaires organization is to build a more stable, prosperous, and inclusive nation by promoting public policies based on the “first principles” of equal political representation, a guaranteed living wage for all working citizens, and a fair tax system. 

About the Wallace Global Fund

The mission of the Wallace Global Fund is to support people-powered movements to advance democracy and rights and to fight for a healthy planet.

Covid-19 Impact on Artists

Story × Art: Alex Rudin

As we head into the eighth month of Covid-19, the distractions of apple picking, pumpkin carving, and outdoor dining are behind us. Lockdowns have long been lifted and social gatherings have become commonplace. The ominous inevitability of a deadly third wave looms. This guaranteed “dark winter” begs one to reflect on the early days of the pandemic. A time when fear, disinformation, and isolation plagued every household, no matter its inhabitants. 2020 has been a year of postponement, grief, isolation, and reckoning. Yet with struggle comes the opportunity for growth, change, and creation… If you let it. As Andy Warhol once said, “they always say time changes things, but you actually have to change them yourself.”

As a self-employed artist, uncertainty is a language I speak well. Prior to Covid-19 I spent my days in the School of Visual Arts printshop in NYC. From conceptualizing and prototyping new products for my business, Rudin Studios LLC, to fumbling around for an answer to the age-old question of “what to make,” it is clear I was lost in an artistic haze of looking for purpose. Then Coronavirus hit. Instantaneously everything turned upside down. Suddenly, I was in an unfamiliar town, without the ability to work (silkscreen), miles away from the studio I call home. I remained glued to the news awestruck by the infection and mortality rates. I racked my brain for something to do, how to help, what to make.

I became focused on those who were not as privileged as me. Those who were struggling to find housing, to feed themselves, to protect themselves from this deadly virus which was clearly and disproportionately hurting people of color. I began working on a series of paintings to be auctioned off, 100% of the proceeds going to homeless and trafficked youth in NYC. While the fundraiser was a success, I could not help but feel the conceptual aspects of the work were not important, relevant, or impactful. If I learned anything from my education at Parsons School of Design, it is that concept is king. My artwork slowly began to shift towards the idea of documentation. Buzzwords like “historical” and “unprecedented” flew across the airwaves and fueled my desire to capture and document the struggles of 2020. This was just the beginning.

Soon to follow were the atrocious murders of George Floyd, Ahmed Arbery, and Breonna Taylor, which brought racial justice to the forefront of the American conscience. While the President continuously fanned the flames of racism, the cries for equality and allyship were deafening. It was time to allow my artwork to reflect the times and struggles of our country which so deeply affected me and so many others. Black Lives Matter, and it is the white person’s responsibility to be educated allies; to use the privilege we are born into to advocate for our oppressed brothers and sisters. I wanted to help acknowledge, reflect, and correct the institutional racism that is so insidiously intertwined with our institutions and the American way of being.

Concurrently, the 2020 Presidential election was ramping up. Climate change’s incendiary winds pillaged the west. The wearing of masks became a polarizing political tool. And all the while, the current administration refused to acknowledge or accept responsibility for any of it. Rather shifting blame, denying, and lying became the governing practice. The global importance of what was taking place in the United States was apparent. Election 2020 was to be a reckoning. On the docket: racial justice, women’s rights, climate change, science, and healthcare, to name a few. A polarizing choice between Id and empathy.

For the first time in my career, my purpose seemed clear. I began making work that focused on the progression of human rights, equality, and fairness relying on my trusty formula of stylized portraiture and anecdotal commentary. I firmly believe that artists have a social responsibility to reflect the times we live in. The majority of my work has focused on uncovering and expressing truths about what it means to be a woman in 2020. However, one cannot comment on the feminine experience without addressing the current political situation and the oppression experienced by American minorities. While the Trump Administration continued to attack women’s rights, promote violence, ignore climate change, and fan the flames of racism, I relied on my creative voice to talk about the challenges we faced not only as women, but as a nation. That being said, I decided to devote my time to creating a series of posters for the 2020 election to help galvanize the female vote. This included partnering with Women for Biden Harris 2020, Women for the Win, and Article 3 among numerous other female-run organizations.

While the trials and tribulations of 2020 have forever altered the fabric of American reality, so has it altered me. A year such as this begs internal personal reflection if not metamorphosis. To find purpose, love, and empathy through the chaos of hate and violence is the silver-lining we all need. In a time where division is the name of the game, we must transcend the idea of the “other.” As the most recent Covid-19 wave surges across the country, I implore anyone with the creative impulse to say something, to do so. Pick up the pen. Document the times, the thoughts, the fears that come along with living through such tumultuousness. Follow the empathy, the creativity, and the voice inside telling you to advocate for those less fortunate. As Thomas Paine aptly stated, “The real man smiles in trouble, gathers strength from distress, and grows brave by reflection.” If you find yourself in a place of privilege, take it upon yourself to seize the opportunity in front of you. It is not an opportunity for financial incentive or career advancement, but for internal revolution. Soon, life will “go back to normal,” but there’s nothing normal about what we have witnessed. Allow the intensity of experience to alter you. For when the time has come and gone, and you reflect upon 2020, wouldn’t it be nice to say that through all the sadness, grief, and fear a better version of yourself was uncovered?