Posts tagged with "PBS"

Victoria Alonso's photo via JRPR Music & More for use by 360 Magazine

VICTORIA ALONSO RECEIVES 2022 Vision Award

The Hispanic Heritage Foundation (HHF) announced on August 04, 2022, that Victoria Alonso, a powerful Latina presence in Hollywood and an executive producer of Marvel Studios’ biggest global film releases, will receive the 2022 Vision Award during the 35th Annual Hispanic Heritage AwardsThe historic program, which was created by the White House to commemorate the establishment of Hispanic Heritage Month in America, is among the highest honors by Latinos for Latinos and supported by 40 national Hispanic-serving institutions. Presented by TARGET with Official Broadcast Sponsorship by Nationwide, the 35th Annual Hispanic Heritage Awards. will air Friday, September 30th on PBS stations and stream on pbs.org and the PBS Video app. Alonso will be honored alongside recently revealed Arts Honoree Los Lobos, and additional celebrated Latino artists and visionaries to be announced shortly.

“The Hispanic Heritage Foundation is thrilled to honor Victoria Alonso’s incredible career as an executive for Marvel Studios, but, moreover, as an actionable leader in ensuring the industry’s representation looks and sounds like what the world looks and sounds like in an authentic way,” said Jose Antonio Tijerino, president and CEO, HHF.  “Her elevated position as a Latina in Hollywood and corporate America cannot be overstated as our stories are told at a global level. It’s our turn to tell her story and celebrate our community’s accomplishment, cultural pride, and great promise.”

A native of Buenos Aires, Victoria Alonso moved to the U.S. on her own at the age of 19. She worked her way up through the film and TV industry, beginning as a PA before working at the VFX powerhouse Digital Domain. She served as VFX producer on a number of films, including Ridley Scott’s Kingdom of Heaven, Tim Burton’s Big Fish, Andrew Adamson’s Shrek and Marvel’s Iron Man. She won the Visual Effects Society (VES) Award for outstanding supporting visual effects/motion picture for Kingdom of Heaven, with two additional nominations shared for Iron Man.   

Victoria joined Marvel as the company’s executive vice president of visual effects and post production, doubling as co-producer on Iron Man, a role she reprised on Iron Man 2Thor and Captain America: The First Avenger. In 2011, she was upped to executive producer on the blockbuster hit The Avengers, a role she has maintained on all Marvel Studios’ releases since then, including Iron Man 3 Captain America: Civil WarAvengers: Age of UltronAnt-ManGuardians of the GalaxyDoctor Strange, Spider-Man: HomecomingThor: RagnarokBlack PantherAvengers: Infinity War Captain Marvel, Avengers: Endgame, Spider-Man: Far From Home, Black Widow, Spider-Man: No Way Home and, most recently, Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness and Thor: Love and Thunder. During her tenure at the studio, Marvel films have amassed over $27 billion in global box office. In addition to executive producer, Alonso also serves as the studio’s President, Physical and Post Production, Visual Effects, and Animation Production.

Alonso has become an important voice in Hollywood as a producer, a Latina, and a senior female executive. She was honored with the Visionary Award at the 2021 Outfest Legacy Awards. In both 2019 and 2020, she was named one of People en Español Magazine’s top “Poderosa” Most Influential Hispanic Women. On multiple occasions, she has been named to Variety’s Power of Women L.A. Impact Report and The Hollywood Reporter’s Women in Entertainment Power 100.  With numerous other industry awards to her credit, 2019 also saw Alonso become the first woman ever to receive the key to La Plata, the capital city of Buenos Aires, where she was born.

Alonso is now joining Arts Honoree Los Lobos, A small sampling of previous HHA winners across the last 35 years include Rita Moreno, Celia Cruz, Tito Puente, Gloria Estefan, Justice Sonia Sotomayor, Martin Sheen, Ricky Martin, Rubén Blades, Fania All-Stars, José Feliciano, Los Tigres Del Norte, Anthony Quinn, Juanes, Diego Luna, Juan Luis Guerra, and right up to the continued relevancy of recent winners such as Carlos Santana, Linda Ronstadt, Bad Bunny, Ivy Queen, Zoe Saldana, Residente, Selena Gomez and more inspiring figures ranging from essential farmworkers to pioneering NASA engineers.

National AIDS Memorial quilt shot by Amy Sullivan via 360 Magazine

AIDS MEMORIAL QUILT

35 YEARS SINCE ITS FIRST PANELS WERE STITCHED, THE AIDS MEMORIAL QUILT REMAINS A POWERFUL TEACHING TOOL FOR HEALTH ACTION, REMEMBRANCE AND SOCIAL JUSTICE

Thousands see largest Quilt display in a decade with 3,000 panels made during the darkest days of the pandemic and in recent years, a reminder that the fight for a cure, health and social justice is not over

 National AIDS Memorial announces $2.4 million grant from Gilead Sciences to launch the Quilt Southern Initiative for new Quilt programming to tackle rising HIV rates within communities of color

It has been 35 years since the first panels of the AIDS Memorial Quilt were stitched together, sparking a national movement for action, justice and remembrance for an epidemic that has claimed over 36 million lives around the world. 

More than 3,000 Quilt panels were displayed in Golden Gate Park – each 3’ x 6’ panel the size of a grave – remembering a life lost to AIDS.  The Quilt’s presence – the largest display in more than a decade – demonstrated its unique power to comfort, heal and be used as a catalyst for action today in the ongoing struggle for health and social justice.

“What started as a protest thirty-five years ago to demand action turned into a movement that served as a wake-up call to the nation that thousands upon thousands of people were dying. Today, the Quilt is just as relevant and even more important, particularly in the wake of Covid-19 and recent gun violence our nation has faced,” said Cleve Jones, who joined with co-founders Mike Smith and Gert McMullin to begin the unfolding and reading names ceremony. “The fact is that the struggles we face today which result from health and social inequities are the issues we will face again if we don’t learn from the lessons of the past.”

A constant each day was the continuous reading aloud of names lost to AIDS, which could be subtly heard throughout the meadow. On display were many original panels made during the darkest days of the AIDS pandemic as well as ones made in recent years, a reminder that the AIDS crisis is not over.  Thousands of visitors took part in the historic two-day event, experiencing the beauty of each panel and the stories of love stitched into their fabric.

“The Quilt remains a powerful symbol of hope, remembrance and action by pulling the thread from one generation to the next for health and social justice,” said John Cunningham, CEO of the National AIDS Memorial. “We must continue the Quilt’s 35-year legacy of bringing it to communities throughout the nation to fight for a cure, and to serve as a teach tool and catalyst for change.”

In the midst of this powerful backdrop, the National AIDS Memorial announced a $2.4 million grant from Gilead Sciences to launch the Quilt Southern Initiative to create new Quilt programming to address the disproportionate impact of HIV in the Southern U.S. A major focus will be to reach communities of color, which experience higher rates of new infections and lower rates of treatment and prevention.

“Throughout its 35-year history, the Quilt has touched hearts and minds by connecting communities through hope and remembrance,” said Daniel O’Day, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Gilead Sciences. “This new initiative with the National AIDS Memorial will bring the Quilt to the Southern United States, reaching communities most affected by HIV/AIDS with the powerful stories that are stitched into its panels.”

Working together with the Southern AIDS Coalition and other community partners, the National AIDS Memorial will launch a Call My Name Southern Quilting program, organizing new panel-making workshops to ensure that southern communities and stories are reflected in the Quilt, to build on the Quilt’s legacy of activism, and to raise greater awareness of lives lost to HIV/AIDS, then and now.  Later this fall, sections of the Quilt will be displayed in communities of impact in the South as part of a curated storytelling exhibition, programming and activities in partnership with local organizations and advocates.

“Quilt making has such powerful storytelling tradition and deep history in the South, particularly within the Black community,” said Dafina Ward, Executive Director of the Southern AIDS Coalition. “We are honored to work in partnership with the National AIDS Memorial and Gilead to launch this new program and connect the AIDS Quilt to southern communities. The Quilt symbolizes the power of community, of remembrance, and celebrating legacy. All of which is critical to ending HIV-related stigma.”

Today, more than 1.3 million people are living with HIV in the United States with over 30,000 new cases being reported each year. Marginalized populations, particularly Black, Hispanic, API and LGBTQI+ communities, are disproportionately impacted. Four decades since the first cases of AIDS were reported, more than 700,000 lives have been lost to the disease in the U.S. alone.  In 1993, HIV was the leading cause of death for Black men between ages 25-44. By 2004, HIV became the leading cause of death for Black women in the same age group. Today, according to the latest figures provided by the CDC, Black Americans make up 42% of all new HIV diagnoses in the U.S., with half of those diagnoses occurring in southern states, and rates rising among certain segments of the population. While rates of infection have decreased overall in recent years, rates continue to rise among Black men.  Racism, HIV stigma, homophobia, poverty, and barriers to health care continue to drive these disparities.

“We are thankful to Gilead for its leadership and vision and look forward to working together with many community partners in the coming months to launch this meaningful initiative,” added Cunningham. “Making new quilt panels is a way to bring to the forefront the impact of HIV/AIDS on the Black community and a way to raise greater awareness that change these statistics.”

The Quilt is considered the largest community arts project in the world, now surpassing 50,000 individually sewn panels with more than 110,000 names stitched into its 54 tons of fabric that honors lives lost to AIDS.  Its first panels were created in June of 1987 when a group of strangers, led by gay rights activist Cleve Jones, gathered in a San Francisco storefront to document the lives they feared history would forget. This meeting of devoted friends, lovers and activists would serve as the foundation for The NAMES Project’s AIDS Memorial Quilt.  Each panel made measured 3 ft by 6 ft, the size of a human grave. They saw the Quilt as an activist tool to push the government into taking action to end the epidemic.

Gilead Sciences is the presenting partner for the 35th Anniversary Display of the Quilt. Other major partners include Quest Diagnostics, San Francisco Recreation and Parks, UCSF, Wells Fargo, Bank of America, Chevron, Dignity Health, Goldman Sachs, Uber, Verizon and ViventHealth.  A complete list of partners can be found HERE.

Learn more about the National AIDS Memorial, the Quilt and this historic display HERE.

*Photo by Amy Sullivan

Christmas in Tahoe via conduit media solutions for use by 360 Magazine

Christmas in Tahoe

Laura Osnes makes a holiday return to the Hallmark Channel this Christmas season, starring in an original movie, Christmas in Tahoe, premiering this Sunday, November 28, 2021 at 6 PM ET / 5 PM CT. 

Osnes has become a familiar and beloved face to Hallmark fans, starring in One Royal Holiday, In the Key of Love, Raise a Glass to Love, as well as in A Homecoming for the Holidays for Hallmark Movies & Mysteries.

Broadway aficionados have long been privy to Osnes’ talent. The two-time Tony Award nominee has headlined multiple musicals on the great white way, including the Tony-Award winning Bandstand, starring as Cinderella in Rodgers + Hammerstein’s Cinderella, Anything Goes, Bonnie and Clyde, South Pacific and Grease.

Osnes enjoys her work with Hallmark stating: “These movies are such a joy to make! This Thanksgiving weekend, I am so grateful to share Christmas In Tahoe with the Hallmark viewers and lovers of Christmas movies! Not only will Pat Monahan and Kyle Selig sing for you in this film, but they both kept me laughing every day on set. I just know it’s going to bring a smile to a lot of faces and ring in the Christmas season.”

Osnes has had quite the career so far, with New York and regional credits including The Scarlet Pimpernel and Crazy for You (Manhattan Concert Productions); The Threepenny Opera (Drama Desk Award nomination; Atlantic Theater Company); City Center Encores! productions of The Band Wagon, Randy Newman’s Faust; The Sound of Music (Carnegie Hall); On the Town (Boston Pops); Carousel (Lyric Opera of Chicago) and Broadway: Three Generations (Kennedy Center).

Her television credits include Dynasty (The CW), Fosse/Verdon (F/X), Elementary (CBS), Six by Sondheim (HBO), Live from Lincoln Center: Bernstein on Broadway, A Capitol Fourth (PBS), Sondheim: The Birthday Concert, the HBO pilot The Miraculous Year and the The Kennedy Center Honors : A Celebration of the Performing Arts (2011), The 35th Annual Kennedy Center Honors (2012) and The 43rd Annual Kennedy Center Honors (2021). In addition to touring the country with Broadway Princess Party, her popular concert series, her many concerts and cabarets include performing with Michael Feinstein, the New York Philharmonic, The New York Pops, The Mormon Tabernacle Choir, The Boston Pops, The San Francisco Symphony and The National Symphony Orchestra, as well as appearing in such venues as Carnegie Hall, The Café Carlyle, Lincoln Center, The Smith Center in Las Vegas and the Minnesota Orchestra Hall. 

Osnes can be heard on several original cast recordings and her two solo albums, Dream A Little Dream: Live at The Café Carlyle and If I Tell You: The Songs of Maury Yeston.

Tracy Sugarman’s Works Offered at Auction

“AND ALL THAT JAZZ”! WORKS BY TRACY SUGARMAN – ARTIST TO THE MUSIC INDUSTRY, TO BE OFFERED AT AUCTION

September 2021. Artworks by the American illustrator, Tracy Sugarman (1921-2013), who documented some of the most momentous events in American history, such as Mississippi’s Freedom Summer of 1964 (a milestone in the civil rights movement in America) and images of World War II, will be offered in Dreweatts Modern and Contemporary Art sale on October 12, 2021.

As well as encapsulating historical moments in a unique way, Sugarman illustrated hundreds of books and record covers in a career spanning 50 years. The group of works coming up for auction spotlights Sugarman’s work for the music industry. Between 1954 and 1959 he produced more than a hundred album covers for the record labels Grand Award and Waldorf Music Hall Records. These were later reissued on CDS.

His illustrations were published in hundreds of magazines and books, as well being shown as on TV (PBS, ABC TV, NBC TV, and CBS TV). He was in high demand as a multi-talented artist, scriptwriter, producer, and author and won numerous awards from the Society of Illustrators in New York and the Art Directors Club in Washington, D.C. He was also a civil rights activist, something he also captured in his artworks.

While carrying out his commissions for the music industry he was given complete artistic freedom to create the works as he wished. Commenting he said: “I had been able to explore every medium from scratch-board to oils, from pastels to watercolors and seen them reproduced. I had captured Mahalia Jackson singing gospel and Knuckles O’Toole playing ragtime piano.” A work in 2007 marked the beginning of a lifelong love affair with jazz and the works in this sale show how he creatively captures the spirit and energy of Jazz.

In the Studio (lot 301) in its bright red hues, communicates the passion and vibrancy of Jazz and music in general. Dark lines contrast the colour, creating the shapes of the figures, resulting in a simple, but powerful piece. It carries an estimate of £400-£600. Portrait of a Trumpet Player (lot 299) by Tracy Sugarman captures a trumpet player in full flow. Created in wax crayon, the raw image brings the paper to life. It is estimated to fetch £400-£600. The Thinker (Lot 300) in wax crayon and watercolor shows the creative process and thinking behind the creation of music. In rough strokes Sugarman conveys all of this in a minimal way, creating the impact by its very simplicity.  The work is estimated to fetch £400-£600.

More works by Sugarman can be seen in the online catalogue, follow the link here

image by Sara Davidson for use by 360 Magazine

KENNY BURRELL CONCERT DOCUMENTARY

All-Star Tribute Features LIVE Performances from Music Legends B.B. King, Stevie Wonder, Lalo Schifrin and Dee Dee Bridgewater

KCET, showcasing the best of PBS and the leading source for arts, culture and news in Southern California, announced the airing of the concert documentary SOUTHLAND SESSIONS special “Kenny Burrell: Jazz Master and Mentor” timed to the trailblazing jazz artist’s 90th birthday. The 90-minute concert documentary weaves archival footage, performances and interviews with legendary jazz guitarist Kenny Burrell including a behind-the-scenes look from his 80th birthday celebration at UCLA’s historic Royce Hall in 2011. SOUTHLAND SESSIONS: “Kenny Burrell: Jazz Master and Mentor” premieres on Wednesday, August 4 at 10 p.m. on KCET.

The show features performances by Burrell and musical luminaries like blues legend B.B. King, multi-Grammy-winning singer-songwriter Stevie Wonder, pianist Lalo Schifrin, Grammy-winning vocalist Dee Dee Bridgewater and others. The 18-piece band features the first performance of Los Angeles’ repertoire orchestra, the Los Angeles Jazz Orchestra Unlimited (LAJOU), and a standout set from renowned four-horn and four-rhythm jazz tribute ensemble, Jazz Heritage All Stars. Interviews with Burrell and his peers tell the story of his commitment to the future of jazz, as a performer, teacher, and founder of the Jazz Studies program at UCLA.

An apostle of the late Duke Ellington, Burrell embraced many of the ideas of the great American composer as an accomplished producer and guitarist dazzling audiences around the world for over six decades. Throughout his life and career, his work with UCLA students and the LAJOU has led to a flourishing jazz culture in Southern California.

The special is part of a continuation of the SOUTHLAND SESSIONS series spotlighting prominent artistic voices and cultures around Southern California. SOUTHLAND SESSIONS debuted last summer to allow the Los Angeles community to experience their regional arts and cultural institutions, when attending in-person, cultural events was not an option. As regional artists adapted to an uncertain future due to the pandemic and the influence of social uprisings across the country, the new broadcast and digital initiative drew together prominent voices from around Southern California for up-close, virtual “sessions.” Through SOUTHLAND SESSIONS, viewers witnessed artists inspire audiences with a front-row seat to the creative process, guided by the community’s arts leaders.

Southland Sessions was originally supported in part by the City of Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs, the Los Angeles County Department of Arts and Culture, the Ralph M. Parsons Foundation and other institutional funders who prefer to remain anonymous.

Join the conversation on social media using #SouthlandSessions and #KCET.

Luciela via Carlos Hernandez for use by 360 Magazine

Luciela

“Luciela,” an incredibly moving short film about a young girl who gets reminded how her family has been torn apart on her favorite holiday, premiered today on the PBS Short Film Festival running from July 12-23. The film, directed by Erin Ploss-Campoamor, is available now on all PBS and station digital platforms, including PBS.org, YouTube and the PBS Video App and is a co-production of Mare’s Hoof Production and Latino Public Broadcasting (LPB).  Click HERE to watch Luciela. The short tells the story of a fiercely independent Mexican-American girl who loves the 4th of July because every year her Papi throws a huge party. He does one of the best firework shows in Lincoln Heights, their immigrant neighborhood in Los Angeles which delights all. But this year he can’t, because he’s been deported. So Luciela decides to set off a few sparks of her own. 

“I first conceived of this story a few years ago. A friend invited me to her home in Lincoln Heights, to watch the fireworks on the 4th of July. If you are not familiar with Lincoln Heights, it is a mostly Latinx, mostly immigrant neighborhood, up in the hills of Los Angeles,” shared filmmaker Erin Ploss-Campoamor. “It felt especially poignant that I was experiencing this in a predominantly Latinx neighborhood, knowing that immigrant rights were actively under threat and xenophobia was on the rise. I loved that this community was celebrating our country’s Independence Day so loudly and proudly. Filling the sky, saying, “See us! Hear us! We are here! From that experience, the seeds of this story were planted.”

“Luciela” represents the experiences of many children whose families live in the shadow of deportation,” shares Sandie Viquez Pedlow, Executive Director of Latino Public Broadcasting. “Sadly, this is an unfortunate reality in our country. Latino Public Broadcasting is proud to work with Erin Ploss-Campoamor to bring films such as “Luciela” to the forefront and hopefully create a better understanding of these divisive issues and the consequences to our young children.” 

The festival features 25 short-form independent films presented in six categories: culture, family, humanity, identity, race and society. And for the first time in the festival’s history, all 25 films will be presented in virtual reality, accessible on any VR device. Audiences can also use a computer without a headset and still look around 360 degrees.

About The PBS Short Film Festival

The PBS Short Film Festival is part of a multiplatform initiative to increase the reach and visibility of independent filmmakers from across the country and amplify the voices of diverse content creators. Since its inception in 2012, hundreds of films celebrating love, acceptance, family, strength, equality, friendship, loyalty and more have been presented under the festival’s banner. The 2021 festival carries the tagline “A Decade of Being Seen” as a reminder that the festival has always striven to amplify the untold stories of America.

Starting at midnight on Monday, July 12, audiences can watch and share all 25 films. In addition, a panel of nine jury members will select their favorite film of the festival for the Juried Prize. Jury members are respected professionals in independent film and public media and were invited by PBS to participate.

Cardi B Illustration for 360 Mag

21 in 21

21 Afro-Latinxs to celebrate in 2021 and beyond! 

By: Javier Pedroza

It’s Black History Month, which gives the planet time to reflect on how African American achievements have contributed to US history and how African achievements have contributed to the world. Although, don’t forget it is important to highlight and celebrate Black accomplishments year around. Due to the current global climate, it’s important to become more knowledgeable and celebrate the Afro-Latinx population for its contributions to US history and the world.

After 2020, it is an especially important time to embolden the community to take part in the celebration of Black culture. This year, the Black History Month theme is “Black Family: Representation, Identity and Diversity” which explores the African diaspora and their contributions.

To really understand the African diaspora it is essential to acknowledge that there were more African slaves to Latin America than to the United States. “There were 11.2 million Africans who came to the New World in the slave trade and of that 11.2 million, only 450,000 came to the United States,” Harvard professor Henry Louis Gates Jr. said in a discussion about his PBS documentary series Black In Latin America. He added, “The real black experience, in terms of numbers, is all throughout the Caribbean and Latin America.”

Today, Latinx should understand their roots, which have an undoubtedly long history of African heritage. Hispanics & Latinx identities are beautifully complex, multifaceted and multidimensional. A Pew Research Center survey of Latinx, adults shows that one-quarter of all U.S. Latinx self-identify as Afro-Latinx, Afro-Caribbean, or of African descent with roots in Latin America. This is the first time a nationally representative survey in the U.S. has asked the Latinx population directly whether they considered themselves Afro-Latinx.

Many Latinos identify with their ancestral countries of origin – Puerto Rico, Colombia, Mexico, Nicaragua, Cuba, Peru, the Dominican Republic, etc. Others may also identify with their Indigenous roots and all of these experiences made contributions to Black History. A goal to have moving forward is to celebrate global Black History and continue to recognize the contributions African-Americans have made to the world, including achievements made by Afro-Latinxs & Afro-Indigenous people. It’s imperative for Latinxs to acknowledge their African & Indigenous heritage given that history and cultures are inextricably linked to slave trade in the Americas, genocide and the African Diaspora. 

Here’s a growing list of amazing Afro-Latino (a,x) heroes and their contributions. 

1. Arturo Alfonso Schomburg

(January 24, 1874 – June 10, 1938)

Place of birth: Santurce, Puerto Rico 

Contributions: Arturo Alfonso Schomburg, born to a Black mother and father of German descent, was a historian. Mr. Schomburg is considered to be one of the Fathers of Black History & a key figure in the Harlem Renaissance. Schomburg’s lifework consisted of research and preservation—work that would lead him to become one of the world’s premier collectors of Black literature, slave narratives, artwork, and diasporic materials. 

2. Dr. Marta Moreno-Vega 

(January 3, 1942)

Place of birth: East Harlem, New York

Contributions: Dr. Marta Moreno-Vega is an Afro-Boricua who established the Caribbean Cultural Center African Diaspora Institute (CCCADI). Dr. Moreno Vega has been an advocate for cultural equity, cultural studies and education. As the second director of El Museo del Barrio, one of the founders of the Association of Hispanic Arts, Network of Centers of Color and the Roundtable of Institutions of Color, Dr. Moreno Vega has contributed to assuring that the contributions of African and African descendants are integral to the lives of civil society in the Americas. 

3. Celia Cruz 

(October 21, 1925 – July 16, 2003)

Place of birth: Havana, Cuba

Contributions: Celia Cruz was a singer & recording artist born and raised in Havana, Cuba. She was one of the most iconic artists of the 20th century. Her many honors included three Grammy Awards and four Latin Grammys for recordings such as Ritmo en el corazón (1988; with Ray Barretto) and Siempre viviré (2000).

4. Dr. José Celso Barbosa 

(July 27, 1857 – September 21, 1921)

Place of birth: Bayamón, Puerto Rico 

Contributions: Dr. José Celso Barbosa was a Physician, Sociologist and Politician.  Known as the father of the Statehood for Puerto Rico movement, Barbosa was the first Puerto Rican, and one of the first persons of African descent to earn a medical degree in the United States.

5. Ruth Fernández (Ruth Noemi Fernández Cortada) 

(May 23, 1919 – January 9, 2012)

Place of birth: Ponce, Puerto Rico

Contributions: Ruth Fernández, “El Alma de Puerto Rico Hecha Canción” (“The Soul of Puerto Rico Turned Song”) was a Puerto Rican contralto, actress, and a member of the Puerto Rican Senate. She was the first and only singer ever elected to the Senate of Puerto Rico. She was considered by many to be the Rosa Parks of Puerto Rico when she refused to enter the Vanderbilt Hotel in San Juan through its back entrance because she was a woman of color. The owners of the hotel stated that blacks had to enter through the rear of the building, but during one evening where she was set to perform at the hotel’s ballroom, she marched into the hotel via its front entrance. After this event, the hotel changed its policy.

6. Cardi B (Belcalis Marlenis Almánzar)

(October 11, 1992)

Place of birth: Manhattan, New York

Contributions: Afro-Latina Cardi B is a Dominican & Trinidadian rapper, songwriter, and actress raised in the Bronx, New York. Recognized by Forbes as one of the most influential female rappers of all time, Cardi B is known for her aggressive flow and candid lyrics, which have received widespread media coverage. She is the highest certified female rapper of all time on the RIAA’s Top Artists (Digital Singles) ranking, also appearing among the ten highest-certified female artists and having the two top-certified songs by a female rap artist.

She is the only female rapper with multiple billion-streams on Spotify and became the first artist to top the inaugural Billboard Global 200. Her accolades include a Grammy Award, eight Billboard Music Awards, five Guinness World Records, five American Music Awards, eleven BET Hip Hop Awards and two ASCAP Songwriter of the Year awards. In 2018 Time magazine included her on their annual list of the 100 most influential people in the world, and in 2020, Billboard honored her as Woman of the Year. 

7. Rosa Alicia Clemente 

(April 18, 1972)

Place of birth: Bronx, New York

Contributions: Afro-Boricua Rosa Alicia Clemente is the 2008 United States Vice-Presidential Candidate, Producer, Journalist, Political Commentator & Scholar-Activist. Rosa is a graduate of the University of Albany and Cornell University. She is currently a doctoral student in the W.E.B. Du Bois Department of Afro-American Studies of University of Massachusetts Amherst. 

8. Congressman Ritchie John Torres 

(March 12, 1988)

Place of birth: Bronx, New York

Contributions: Ritchie Torres is an Afro-Boricua politician who is a member of the Democratic party. He is the US representative for New York’s 15th congressional district. Torres was the first openly gay candidate to be elected to legislative office in the Bronx, and the youngest member of the city council. Torres won the November 2020 general election and assumed office on January 3, 2021. This makes him one of the first openly gay Black men elected to Congress (along with Mondaire Jones). This also made Torres the first openly gay Afro Latino elected to Congress. As such, he is one of the nine co-chairs of the Congressional LGBTQ+ Equality Caucus in the 117th United States Congress. 

9. Zoe Saldana (Zoë Yadira Saldaña Nazario) *Trending Now

(June 19, 1978)

Place of birth: Passaic, New Jersey

Contributions: Zoe Saldaña is of mixed ethnic heritage, with her mother being of Puerto Rican descent and her father hailing from the Dominican Republic. Zoe is the only performer to get star billing in more than one movie that grossed over $2 billion worldwide with Avatar and Avengers: Infinity War. 

10. Dr. Pedro Albizu Campos 

(September 12, 1891 – April 21, 1965)

Place of birth: Ponce, Puerto Rico 

Contributions: Dr. Pedro Albizu Campos was a Puerto Rican attorney, social activist, nationalist and the son of a mixed-race mother who was the daughter of slaves and a Basque father from a farming and landowning family. The latter not only provided no financial support but also did not legally recognize his son until he was 19, and Albizu Campos grew up in poverty. In 1912 he was awarded a scholarship to study chemistry and engineering at the University of Vermont. He transferred a year later to Harvard University, majoring in chemistry and literature and becoming the first Puerto Rican Harvard graduate. Many people in Puerto Rico consider Dr. Pedro Albizu Campos the father of the Puerto Rican Independence Movement. 

11. Carmelo Kyam Anthony

(May 29, 1984)

Place of birth: Brooklyn, New York

Contributions: Carmelo Anthony is an Afro-Latino professional basketball player. He has been named an NBA All-Star ten times and an All-NBA Team member six-time Anthony also played in the 2016 Olympic Games, his fourth straight stint in the Olympics, which was a record for a US male basketball player, breaking the old record of having played in three Olympiads he shared with James and Robinson. He has celebrated his roots by giving back to Puerto Rico, remodeling basketball courts in a poor neighborhood 3 years in a row now. 

12. La La Anthony (Alani Nicole Vázquez) 

(June 25, 1981)

Place of birth: Brooklyn, New York

Contributions: La La Anthony is an Afro-Puerto Rican actress, host, producer and New York Times best-selling author. La La Anthony has supported charities such as the Elton John AIDS Foundation, Gabrielle’s, Angel Foundation, GLAAD and Voto Latino. 

13. Rosie Perez (Rosa María Perez) 

(September 6, 1964)

Place of birth: Brooklyn, New York

Contributions: Rosie Perez is an Afro-Latina actress, choreographer and community activist. Rosie was appointed to the Presidential Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS by President Barack Obama in 2010. Among many honors, Rosie was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for her performance in Fearless as well as three Emmy Awards for her work as a choreographer on In Living Color (1990–1994).

Perez has also performed in stage plays on Broadway, such as The Ritz, Frankie and Johnny in the Clair de Lune, and Fish in the Dark. In addition, she was a co-host on the ABC talk show The View during the series’ 18th season. 

14. MJ Rodriguez (Michaela Antonia Jaé Rodriguez) 

(January 7, 1991)

Place of birth: Newark, New Jersey

Contributions: MJ Rodriguez is an African American and Puerto Rican actress who is among the largest cast of transgender actresses on the show Pose. MJ made history by becoming the first Trans woman to ever sign a beauty deal with Olay Body. MJ was awarded the Hispanic Heritage Special Trailblazer Award at the 31st Hispanic Heritage Awards in Washington D.C. 

15. Ramon E. Contreras 

(22-years-old)

Place of birth: Brooklyn, New York

Contributions: Ramon Contreras is a young political activist, advisor and filmmaker who is changing the nature of civic engagement by championing and encouraging minorities to participate in politics. Ramon is a fierce gun control enthusiast and founded YouthOverGuns, a platform advocating for change in underserved communities of color. He led a protest of thousands across the Brooklyn Bridge and is the National Strategist for the nation-wide organization, March for Our Lives. 

16. Laith Ashley De La Cruz 

(July 6, 1989)

Place of birth: Harlem, New York

Contributions:  Laith Ashley is a model, actor, singer-songwriter and entertainer of Dominican descent. He was the first transgender man to be featured in a Diesel campaign. Laith has been on the cover of countless magazines and has had featured stories published on countless others all around the world; ie, British GQ.

Laith was on the cast of the reality TV series, “Strut,” executive produced by Whoopi Goldberg, and raised the heart rates of viewers in his appearance on hit series, “Pose,” on FX. Ashley is also an activist, particularly in transgender issues. He worked with FLUX, a division of the AIDS Healthcare Foundation, which is dedicated to raising awareness and providing support to trans and gender-nonconforming people. 

17. Dianne Morales 

(June 21, 1967)

Place of birth: Brooklyn, New York 

Contributions: Double Ivy League graduate Dianne Morales is an Afro-Boricua with degrees from Harvard University and Columbia University. Dianne is the former CEO of several multi-million dollar social service nonprofits and is also the first Latina / Afro-Latina candidate for New York City Mayor. 

18. Johnny Pacheco 

(March 25, 1935 – February 15, 2021)

Place of birth: Santiago De Los Caballeros, Dominican Republic

Contributions: Johnny Pacheco was one of the most influential artists of Latin music. He was one of the creators of The Fania All-Stars and Fania Record (#latinmotown), the most successful record label in the history of Latin music. 

19. Aida Rodriguez (Aida Margarita Parada Rodriguez) 

(August 29, 1977)

Place of birth: Boston, Massachusetts

Contributions: Aida Rodriguez is a comedian, host, producer, actress and the first Latina / Afro-Latina (Puerto Rican & Dominican) to appear in two comedy specials airing in one month on both HBO and Showtime. Aida’s latest comedy special premiered on Netflix as part of the “They Ready” series hosted by Tiffany Haddish. Rodriguez has also appeared on Comedy Central’s This Week at the Comedy Cellar, The Nightly Show, five-time host of the PBS Imagen Awards, NBC Last Comic Standing’s finals, TRUtv’s Laff Tracks and is also a regular contributor for The Young Turks. 

20. Indya Moore 

(January 17, 1995)

Place of birth: Bronx, New York

Contributions: Indya Moore is of Haitian, Puerto Rican, and Dominican ancestry. They are an actor among the largest cast of transgender on the show Pose. Moore does not identify as a Latinx, and instead identifies as Afro-Taíno. In June 2020, in honor of the 50th anniversary of the first LGBTQ Pride parade, Queerty named them among the fifty heroes “leading the nation toward equality, acceptance, and dignity for all people.” 

21. Gina Torres 

(April 25th, 1969)

Place of birth: Manhattan, New York 

Contributions: Gina Torres is an actress and the first Afro-Latina to create, produce and star in her own show, ‘Pearson’. Torres won the ALMA Award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Syndicated Drama Series for her role in Cleopatra 2525. Gina also received the Best Supporting Actress award by The Imagen Foundation (Spanish for “image”) Awards, the only premier Latino entertainment awards program dedicated to honoring the positive portrayal and creative excellence of Latinos and Latino cultures on screen. 

Fact Check: We strive for accuracy and fairness. If you see something that doesn’t look right, contact us!

Mister Rogers illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Happy Birthday Mister Rogers

Virtual “Happy Birthday, Mister Rogers” Celebration Streams This Saturday, March 20th to Commemorate the Legacy of America’s Favorite Neighbor, Fred Rogers

Premiering on Saturday, March 20 at 10 am CT, Tom Bergeron (America’s Funniest Videos, Dancing with the Stars) will host a special virtual presentation of “Happy Birthday, Mister Rogers,” to commemorate America’s favorite neighbor, Fred Rogers’ 93 birthday. The virtual show will stream at the Mister Roger’s website, Facebook and on YouTube. It includes cameos and birthday shout-outs by celebrity recording artists Kellie Pickler, Vanessa Williams, Lee Greenwood, The Cowsills, Jaci Velasquez, Jim Brickman, Jon Secada, Marilyn McCoo & Billy Davis Jr, Micky Dolenz, and Sandi Patty. The virtual celebration is also dedicated to the late Joanne Rogers, wife of Fred, who passed away earlier this year.

The virtual birthday bash is the brainchild of two-time Grammy and Emmy winning producer, Dennis Scott, who has produced two albums of Fred Rogers’ music: Songs from The Neighborhood – The Music of Mister Rogers (2005) & Thank You, Mister Rogers – Music & Memories (2019). Scott also interviewed numerous fans and supporters of Mister Rogers and was surprised by how many people received personal letters from him over the years. One compelling story is that of a young Connecticut girl who was visited by Fred while she was in a coma recovering from brain surgery.

“I wanted to give folks a chance to tell their stories and express their gratitude to Fred on what would have been his 93rd birthday,” said Scott.

Coincidently, producer Dennis Scott is simultaneously spearheading a grassroots campaign to get Fred Rogers nominated to the Songwriters Hall of Fame. A petition in support of that is viewable here.

“Fred loved writing songs and becoming a member of the Songwriters Hall of Fame, alongside other great American composers, is the best birthday present we could give him,” said Scott. “Happy Birthday, Mister Rogers!”

AUSTIN CITY LIMITS – THE MAVERICKS

By Cassandra Yany

Austin City Limits will spotlight renowned rock and country trailblazers The Mavericks on Nov. 21 at 8 p.m. CT/ 9 p.m. ET on PBS. The installment is part of the series’ 46th season and will showcase the band’s chart-topping, all Spanish-language album En Español.

The GRAMMY, CMA and ACM award-winning band reaches a career milestone with this being their first Spanish-language album, which debuted at no. 1 on Billboard’s Latin Pop Albums Chart. The genre-bending group return to their Miami roots to blend their eclecticism with a collection of Spanish language originals and traditional Latin songs that inspired them.

The four core Mavericks members— lead singer and songwriter Raul Malo, guitarist Eddie Perez, keyboardist Jerry Dale McFadden and drummer Paul Deakin— are elevated by horns, accordion and backing vocals for a powerful nine-musician combo. The band celebrates the diversity of cultures with their unique take on classic tracks from the vast Latin American catalog, starting off with the Cuban country track “La Sitiera,” which escalates to an exciting full-band bloom complete with horns and accordion. 

Malo— who is a first-generation Cuban American— introduces his late grandfather’s favorite song, “Me Olvidé de Vivir” by Julio Iglesias, which the Mavericks made their own in a country rendition. He also salutes one of his own favorite artists with the mariachi-flavored spin they take on Juan Gabriel’s “No Vale La Pena.”

The group delivers thrilling performances of new originals, including “Recuerdos,” which is backed by horns, and “Suspiro Azul,” which is amplified by standout harmonies. In tribute to performing at the house that Willie Nelson built, Malo gives a solo acoustic take on Nelson’s “Blue Eyes Crying In the Rain.” The band also performed Latin-influenced tracks form their 2013 reunion album In Time, including the lush “Come Unto Me,” featuring dueling guitar and accordion solos, and the energetic, rockabilly-flavored “As Long As There’s Loving Tonight.”

“Showcasing The Mavericks first all-Spanish album on Austin City Limits during the same week as the Latin Grammy Awards is perfect timing,” said ACL executive producer Terry Lickona. “Since I became co-producer of the Latin GRAMMYs, I’ve made it my mission to bring the joy and beauty of Latin music to the ACL stage every year. This show is a great ‘primer’ for that!”

The Mavericks’ episode was recorded in September and will be the second no-audience taping of the program due to the coronavirus pandemic. This marks the group’s third appearance on the show, being their first in two decades. 

During these tough times, ACL continues to provide viewers with a front row seat to live performances. The series airs weekly across the nation and full episodes are made available online for a limited time immediately following the broadcast. The second half of the Season 46 will be announced soon, with six new episodes to begin airing in January. Fans can also find exclusive songs, behind-the-scenes videos and full-length artist interviews on the ACL YouTube channel.

Check your local listings here

View the YouTube preview here

Episode setlist:

  1. La Sitiera
  2. Recuerdos
  3. Back In Your Arms Again
  4. Easy As It Seems
  5. No Vale La Pena
  6. Me Olvidé De Vivir
  7. Suspiro Azul
  8. Blue Eyes Crying In The Rain
  9. Come Unto Me
  10. As Long As There’s Loving Tonight

About Austin City Limits

Austin City Limits (ACL) offers viewers unparalleled access to featured acts in an intimate setting that provides a platform for artists to deliver inspired, memorable, full-length performances. Now in its 46th Season, the program is taped live before a concert audience from The Moody Theater in downtown Austin. Austin City Limits is the longest-running music series in television history and remains the only TV series to ever be awarded the National Medal of Arts. Since its inception, the groundbreaking music series has become an institution that’s helped secure Austin’s reputation as the Live Music Capital of the World. The historic KLRU Studio 6A, home to 36 years of ACL concerts, has been designated an official Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Landmark. In 2011, ACL moved to the new venue ACL Live at The Moody Theater in downtown Austin. ACL received a rare institutional Peabody Award for excellence and outstanding achievement in 2012.

Austin City Limits is produced by Austin PBS, KLRU-TV and funding is provided in part by Dell Technologies, RigUp, the Austin Convention Center Department and Cirrus Logic. Additional funding is provided by the Friends of Austin City Limits. Learn more about Austin City Limits, programming and history at acltv.com.

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