Posts tagged with "poc"

Makeup Tips for Black Women

These are the Best Makeup Tips for Black Women

Finding the correct makeup that works specifically for you can be difficult no matter your skin type. And for women of color, this challenge is intensified. Luckily in 2022, women from all walks of life are catered for, and if we look at the foundation alone, especially for black women, there is every shade available; we couldn’t be happier! What should I know to make up a dark skin? Today we leave you some #MakTips

Gentle but effective cleaning

For this type of skin, we must use mild cleansers with decongestant and purifying properties that help balance sebaceous secretion, and thus we can avoid the appearance of pimples.

Hydration

Skins of color have a strong need for hydration. These have a greater loss of water by having more sweat glands, so they feel more dehydrated. This is one of the reasons why it is important to apply moisturizers.

Get the right foundation color

Probably the biggest one out of the lot! Finding the correct color foundation is tricky, maybe not as problematic as it was 10 or so years ago. However, it can still be difficult especially if you are new to makeup – and if you are, you are in luck as UK Black Girl Makeup is a beauty trend to help you on this journey. The first thing to remember is that no one has perfect skin and that you should embrace the skin you are in, blemishes, pimples, wrinkles, and all! The foundation helps you here and there are a few magic tricks, like using a yellow-based foundation! Foundation can smooth out any of those kinks you are self-conscious about. However, it’s truly magical when you find the foundation that matches your skin tone. You can use a foundation shade finder to help you pick out the shade you need, or you can head to the drug store and check with any of the ladies at the makeup counter to help you.  

Although remember, the ideal is to apply products with light textures that maintain a good level of hydration without making the skin feel heavy. A good option is the MAC Matchmaster SPF15 Foundation makeup base. This has intelligent pigments that have the ability to adapt to the different skin tones that the client may have.

Use the correct brush

Using the correct brush is an essential part since it serves to give light to this type of face. But there are some useful ways in which to use makeup brushes. Let’s look at how to apply makeup using a foundation brush. For black women or ladies with darker skin, try this. When applying your foundation, whether liquid or powder, apply it across your face in broad strokes. The next step is to start at the center of your face working outwards. After this, buff the product into your skin in circular motions using the foundation brush. After this, you need to buff your product until it blends evenly across your face and looks natural or to your desire. If done correctly, your foundation will be smooth and last all day.  

Build some layers

All of us want the all-day coverage, and some days our skin just does not have the natural glow we are used to. But there are ways to get that look you want. Now, building layers will allow for greater coverage and do this in a few ways. If you are after light coverage, you need to apply a lighter amount of product and go over your face with your brush a maximum of two times. For a fuller coverage look, opt for applying more product and go over your face with your brush several times and work the product into your skin in layers. Here is a pro tip from makeup artists: Apply primer before applying your foundation if you are after an all-day look. It’s also great for oil control.  

Use concealer

If you didn’t know, concealer is the makeup type you use to cover up any dark spots, blemishes or pimples, or breakouts. It is particularly wonderful for darker tones, so try to find one that complements your skin. Apply concealer to all areas you wish to cover, paying particular attention to the T-zone. Another trick for ladies with darker skin is to use concealer to highlight some of your features. Here you can apply it below your eyes, above the cheekbones, and on your chin. This way, you are using your concealer as a form of highlighting.  

Spice it up

When using bronzer and blush, especially if you have dark skin, you might end up with a completely weird makeup look if you are not careful. Now, you can use bronzer and blush, but you need to use them correctly. Since these are makeup basics, they are also easy to apply. So, you need to dust some bronzer on the side of your face, the hollow sections of your cheeks, and then on your nose as well. Then apply some blush on the apple of your cheeks. Once you smile, you will see your work of art! Get it, girl!  

Go for the perfect pout

In the past, lipstick colors didn’t favor black women, but over time the different lipstick shades started to include other colors that work for darker women. Today, black women can find a range of lipsticks that work so well, and we couldn’t be happier. The advice here is to test out different shades to find the ones you know will work with your skin tone. This year there are so many makeup trends that are going to look great on every black woman out there!  

Cheats – wildcard:

  1. Putting a bronze or peach color is always a success on dark skin.

2. For a fresh and beautiful look, draw a line with cream eye pencil on the inner part of the lower eyelid, so they will look more rested and larger.

3. If you prefer to wear a more basic makeup, it would be to prepare the skin by applying a light base and make a colored eyeliner (for example purple or blue), these colors serve to highlight the look 😉

Founders of La Impresora shot by Gustavo Castrodad for 360 MAGAZINE

Maniobra: A Cultural Employment Initiative

The Mellon Foundation and the Centro de Economía Creativa (CEC) announced Maniobra – a newly launched $8 million cultural employment initiative created to facilitate stable employment opportunities for artists while strengthening the administrative bandwidth of community-based cultural organizations across Puerto Rico. In its inaugural stage, Maniobra – named in reference to “the work of one’s hands” – is providing support including salary, training, health and other benefits, and more to 37 artists and 25 artist-centric organizations across 12 municipalities.

Puerto Rican artists play critical leadership roles within their communities, yet often live in a state of financial precarity, earning a median annual income of approximately $16,000 for their work, with 46% generating less than $12,000 annually. Through Maniobra, CEC and the Mellon Foundation underscore the labor of artists as valued work, while modeling remuneration that reflects artists’ formal education, experience, and contributions to society.

“This initiative shines an important light on the economic state and personal well-being of the artistic community and centers both as priorities for philanthropy and cultural policy,” said Javier Hernández Acosta, Founder of the Center and Dean of the School of Arts, Design and Creative Industries at the Universidad del Sagrado Corazón. “Equity and salary justice within the arts had previously been relegated to a secondary agenda item, but we are now thrilled to work with the Mellon Foundation to advance this important work through real action.”

Maniobra provides participating organizations with the financial support needed to hire at least one full-time artist and $20,000 yearly budget to support the organization’s programming and creative projects over the entirety of the three-year initiative. The funding will not only strengthen organizations’ artistic programming and financial stability, but will also serve as a pilot that could be expanded in the future and has the potential of driving philanthropic support to a more holistic approach.

“Lifting up and celebrating the creativity of Puerto Rican artists, writers, and performers means granting them the resources they need to pursue their callings, supporting the archipelago’s artistic and cultural organizations, and broadly fostering the work and preservation of Puerto Rican culture at a time when stable employment and funding for these efforts has been imperiled,” said Elizabeth Alexander, President of the Mellon Foundation.“We are honored to support Maniobra, and excited to see the work that comes from this remarkable initiative.”

Prior to the launch of Maniobra, CEC and the Mellon Foundation collaborated on artists-centered initiatives including the development of Nido Cultural – a platform created to support management services for artistic and cultural production in Puerto Rico, as well as on an initiative aimed at Mapping of Cultural Work in Puerto Rico. Maniobra was inspired by Creatives Rebuild New York (CRNY) – the $125 million Mellon Foundation-backed initiative created to help reactivate the creative economy of New York State and secure the future of its artists.

The artists selected for Maniobra, which commenced in early April, were selected by an advisory team of key stakeholders from the local artistic community. Considering the diversity of practices and approaches across the islands, collectives and organizations were selected based on their rich experience in artistic and cultural work.

“In addition to supporting these artists, we also expect to strengthen the work of the collectives and organizations by providing technical and managerial support as well as operational budgets for the execution of the initiatives,” said Sonia Méndez, Program Manager of the Centro de Economía Creativa, Inc. “It also represents a unique project that not only offers the artist a salary, but also fringe benefits and health care coverage.”

To learn more about the projects and initiatives of the Centro de Economía Creativa, you can visit its social media accounts or Centro de Economía Creativa Website

*Photo: Gustavo Castrodad

illustration by Mina Tocalini for use by 360 Magazine

Race for Change

The IRONMAN® Foundation announced partnerships with Black Kids Swim®, Black Runners Connection, and Major Taylor Cycling Club to build awareness and expand outreach in support of its Race For ChangeTM diversity initiative. The IRONMAN Foundation and the three affinity sports clubs will implement programming to address potential participation barriers that might prevent Black and other diverse athlete groups from competing in triathlons.

In 2020, with the mission to ensure equity for athletes in the sport of triathlon and the communities where IRONMAN athletes and first-time hopefuls live, train, and race, Race for Change was launched by The IRONMAN Foundation and The IRONMAN Group with an initial pledge of $1 million to support programming.

To kick off the collaboration, members from Black Kids Swim, Black Runners Connection, and Major Taylor International Cycling Alliance will form Race For Change relay teams to compete in several 2022 IRONMAN 70.3® events throughout the United States. The goal behind the Race For Change relay teams is to foster support for The IRONMAN Foundation’s diversity initiative and inspire more diverse athletes to consider IRONMAN events. The Race For Change relay teams will take part in the following races:

“We are thrilled to be teaming up with Black Kids Swim, Black Runners Connection, and Major Taylor International Cycling Alliance through our Race for Change diversity initiative. We consider these groundbreaking partnerships an important collaboration as we seek to remove participation barriers to welcome more people into our sport,” said Audra Tassone-Indeck, Executive Director of the IRONMAN Foundation.

Black Kids Swim is a nonprofit organization dedicated to increasing Black participation in competitive swimming. It encourages Black families to take advantage of the academic, professional, and personal opportunities available through proficient swim skills. Black Kids Swim wants to see Black children do more than ‘survive’ in the water. The organization helps Black children develop valuable techniques, sportsmanship, and discipline that can benefit them physically and professionally their entire lives.

“There is an immense amount of untapped talent in the Black swimming community that needs assistance and recognition,” said Black Kids Swim Founder and Executive Director Ebony Rosemond. “Black Kids Swim recognizes triathlon is growing in popularity and will soon become an NCAA sport. We view this exciting partnership with IRONMAN Foundation’s Race for Change initiative as something that will increase Black participation in both competitive swimming and triathlons.”

Black Runners Connection is a group that encourages Black people to embrace distance running throughout the world. It has more than 8,500 members nationwide and promotes the idea of a healthy mind and body as an athlete.

“Running is one of the most popular sports, and it is celebrated by being part of the largest endurance sport in the world,” said James Ravenell, president, and CEO of Black Runners Connection. “Being asked to be a part of IRONMAN Foundation’s Race For Change initiative will showcase how Black runners can participate in triathlons.”

Major Taylor International Cycling Alliance was named for Marshall “Major” Taylor, who in 1899 became the first Black American world champion in cycling. Major Taylor International Cycling Alliance is an all-inclusive cycling organization that looks to promote good health by supporting recreational and cycling activities in the community. It has clubs throughout the United States and overseas in Canada and Nairobi, Kenya.

“One of the goals of Major Taylor International Cycling Alliance is to show how inclusive cycling is and how it’s for all communities,’ said Bill Gaston, president of Major Taylor International Cycling Alliance. “We are excited and proud that the IRONMAN Foundation’s Race for Change initiative has invited our club to help with its diversity and inclusion efforts. Removing barriers and creating awareness of the multisport world is our goal. This is yet another avenue in the cycling community to be explored.”

Pro-triathlete coach, Morgon Latimore, will serve as a mentor and help each Race for Change relay team prep for their event. For more information on The IRONMAN Group, its brands, and global event series, click HERE.

BLK Fashion via KMJR for use by 360 Magazine

In the BLK

IN THE BLK powered by #CHANGEFASHION celebrated the work of three emerging Black designers during the inaugural IN THE BLK runway show at Spring Studios. House of Aama, Khiry, and Third Crown each presented their AW22 Collections to guests such as Chanel Iman, Richie Shazam, Raquel Willis, Rashad Robinson, and Mayor Eric Adams. The runway show was sponsored by Color of Change, a leading racial justice organization, and UPS, which has a longstanding commitment to supporting women-owned and diverse-owned businesses. 

Additional notable guests included:

Arisha Hatch, Managing Director of Campaigns 

Aurora James, Brother Vellies Designer 

Brandon Blackwood, Brandon Blackwood Designer 

Chris Chambers, President The Chambers Group 

Edvin Thompson, Theophilo Designer 

Kevin Warren, UPS CMO 

Marjon Carlos, Author 

Steven Kolb, CFDA Chief Executive Officer 

Victor Glemaud, Victor Glemaud Designer 

Young Emperors, Influencers 

For the show, each designer debuted their latest collections which all shared a similar theme, a continuation and evolution of the designer’s previously shown pieces and featured IMG talents: Lameka Fox, Mahogany Wade, and AwengChuol 

Husband and wife duo Kofi Kristen Essell of Third Crown opened the show with their Edelsteen collection. As the preface of Third Crown’s story, the pair sought to use gemstones in their initial design concepts, repurposing some of those ideas and expanding them into new shapes while incorporating classic silhouettes. As the opening to the In the BLK showcase, the name of the AW22 collection comes from the South African language, Afrikaans—Edelsteen is Afrikaans for “gemstone” which are known not only to have beautiful, natural colors but also have various healing properties. 

Following Third Crown’s Edelsteen collection was mother and daughter duo Rebecca Henry and Akua Shabaka of House of Aama. Entitled Heritage Bloodroot Collection – Into the Archives, the latest offering is a new rendition of the nostalgia-inspired Heritage Bloodroot collection shown in 2017, which introduced the brand’s storytelling appeal and timeless silhouettes. Inspired by the rare bloodroot herb which has been used by old-time conjures and root workers as a powerful Guardian for the Family, the line is an ode to Southern Creole spiritually, African Roots, and is an archival find of the Rootworker, Southern lady, and Bluesman archetypes unearthed for a new audience.

Closing the show was KHIRY founder Jameel Mohammed’s latest, a continued storyline from last season’s debut pieces with Fights Reveal Futilities. A new demi-fine jewelry collection shown alongside custom-made garments reflect a clean, futuristic presence that is articulated with sharp embellishment reflecting the many spikes, thorns, daggers, and stingers found in nature. Of the 20 pieces of jewelry showing alongside the 16 runway looks, standout styles include the X Cuff named after Malcolm X, the Talon Pendant and the Orb Protection ring which balance the hand-sewn garments in melodic chaos, representing a battle; external and internal, lending material dimension to the tensions between our soft and aggressive impulses. 

Immediately following the runway show, IMG hosted a curated panel entitled Black Representation Beyond the Runway. Moderated by stylist, Alexander-Julien, panelists included: 

● Victor Glemaud, Designer & Founder of In The BLK 

MoAnA Luu, Chief Content & Creative Officer, Essence 

● Aurora James, Founder of Brother Vellies and the 15 Percent Pledge 

IN THE BLK runway show is part of IMG’s commitment to empowering and elevating Black fashion talent. IMG recently announced the creation of an Inclusion Rider for the fashion industry which will serve as an equity clause and ensure underrepresented talent are being provided opportunities within the fashion industry–in front of and behind the scenes. 

“Action is important. We felt the timing and the ability to leverage the power of IMG was critical in taking steps to make real and measurable progress with the #ChangeFashion Inclusion Rider. It is imperative that we create opportunities to empower Black talent and to diversify the input of NYFW: The Shows and of the larger fashion industry,” said Leslie Russo, President of IMG Fashion Events.

health via 360 Magazine for use by 360 Magazine

New Latinx Community Studies

 Leading Latino digital media company mitú, in partnership with premier multicultural marketing and communications agency The MRKT, released the first of a series of studies titled The mitú InTell Series. The studies aim to gain and socialize insights on the current state of the U.S. Hispanic community while digging deeper into their motivations and behaviors behind topics ranging from health and wellness to finance, sports, food, commerce, and travel.

“As a digital media brand that has stood for Latinx representation for 10 years, mitú has conversations with millions of Latinos daily. This interaction and our editorial process allows us to gather signals and real-world concerns from our audience to develop insights not only on what our community is thinking, but also why, and to do so while the topics are still actionable and timely,” said President of mitú, Stephen Brooks. “Ultimately we feel a responsibility to not only share these insights, but to give a voice to our audience.”

Both mitú and The MRKT are inherently able to provide insights into the state of the U.S. Hispanic population both from a macro, public perspective and at an interpersonal scale, allowing them to uncover nuances and evaluate the community from a unique point of view not seen before. 

“As a leading multicultural marketing and communications agency, our team lives and breathes the experiences that permeate the cultural zeitgeist within our community, making the issues that affect the U.S. Hispanic community incredibly evident to us. It is with that real-world and professional experience that we help create these studies which we hope enable other entities and organizations to identify the most current needs of the U.S. Latino population and bring us closer to a future where our community is fully seen and heard.” said President of The MRKT, Marcos Barron.

This first online quantitative study – conducted by a third party, HyperFocus ROI, with a sample size of 1,000 U.S. Hispanics–consisted of evaluating participants for their various attitudes, perceptions and behaviors across a number of demographic segments relative to the broader topic of health & wellness. Four key areas under this topic–medical, mental health, fitness, and nutrition–were evaluated across key audience segments broken out by age, income, gender, and country of origin.

While specific insights relative to each of these four areas were uncovered across the various audience segments, mental health emerged as the most common denominator, garnering the highest overall importance ratings when compared with the other three subcategories, with 65% of all respondents rating mental health as very important. Notably, mental health has declined across all segments of the U.S. Latino population vs. two years ago.

 Additional key findings include:

  • U.S. born Latinos are reporting health issues that affect multiple generations at nearly twice the rate as non U.S. born Latinos.
  • 37% of the Latinos surveyed report that the #1 reason they don’t have a primary care physician is their financial situation, with non U.S. born Latinos expressing this as a barrier with even more frequency at a rate of 46%. 
  • Latinos in the lowest income bracket (earning under $49K) are rating all of the health subcategories (medical, mental health, fitness, nutrition) as being somewhat/not at all important to them. However, there are some key barriers and reasons that surfaced on why they may not be placing importance on their health when compared to the other groups.
  • Out of the four subcategories, Latinos aren’t placing as much importance on fitness even though their reported habits are demonstrating that they are exercising at higher rates when compared to two years ago, with 45% stating that they are exercising more often.

For more key insights and to read the full study, click HERE

About mitú

Mitú is the leading digital media company representing the Latino point of view among consumers 18-44. Through our multiple touch points in video, editorial, social media and commerce, we connect brands, content buyers, and creators to the massive community of Latino consumers in America. Our audience is the 200%, 100% American and 100% Latino, who inspire us to create authentic, culturally relevant stories. We reach a massive, cross-cultural audience across a variety of social and O&O platforms. Mitú is a GoDigital Media Group company headquartered in Los Angeles, CA with operations in New York, Miami, Chicago, Mexico, Colombia, Belarus, Sri Lanka and South Korea. 

About The MRKT

The MRKT is the full-service multicultural marketing and communications division of Terry Hines & Associates (THA), a leading entertainment-marketing firm for over 40 years. The MRKT offers a comprehensive approach to creating narratives and experiences that connect clients to diverse, multicultural demographics via culture and lifestyle, over stereotypes and assumptions. The MRKT specializes in reaching Latinx, African American, and AAPI consumers and executes campaigns with both a national and local footprint, all infused with cultural resonance, across several disciplines including: PR, social media, influencer marketing, experiential, grassroots, and creative (print, digital, AV) on behalf of some of the largest entertainment and consumer brands in the world.

aria brooks image by PRIME for use by 360 magazine

ARIA BROOKS Q×A

Aria Brooks (ARIA) is an actress from Atlanta, Georgia who joined the cast of All That in the second half of its first season. Growing up around a family of performing arts teachers and musicians, ARIA has turned to a path in the entertainment industry. We got to speak with ARIA about her debut EP castles and she touches on topics such as mental health and real-life issues affecting youths today.

  1. What has the reaction to castles been like?
    The reaction has been great! People have been streaming it and I am beyond grateful. My fans seem to have the same favorites as I do, which has been cool to see.
  2. What was your songwriting process for your debut EP?
    My songwriting process in general has been based on my mood. I only wrote when I was inspired to write because that’s how my best songs come out. For castles, I started writing in 2020 until the beginning of 2021 on and off because I needed to be in the correct mindset to write.
  3. How long did the production of castles take?
    I started recording in January of 2021. We built a home studio and got to work. The official production lasted from January to March for castles pt.1. We’re still finalizing pt. 2 to be released later this year.
  4. Is there a certain track off castles that you’ve noticed is a fan favorite? If so, why do you think that is?
    The fan favorite has been Dear Brown Girl since I first released it. I did a focus group prior to the release and it seemed to be a favorite then as well. I think that is because of the overall vibe…it’s empowering and very musical.
  5. Do you prefer making music or acting on the big screen?
    I cannot pick which one I like better. Music is my foundation, but I’ve grown to love acting just as much. I think there are pros and cons to both though.
  6. Fans love your single “Fire x Water.” Can you describe the sound of the single in three words for those who haven’t heard it?
    It is mysterious, subliminal, and climatic. I was so excited to share it with the world.
  7. For your 14th birthday, you created the “14 til 14 Challenge” to support tolerance and acceptance. Can you speak a bit more about your vision behind this challenge?
    I didn’t really know what I wanted for my birthday, so I figured I could do some kind of Instagram challenge. I wanted the challenge to have some kind of meaning behind it, so my mom helped me come up with the idea of having a different challenge every day for 14 days. There were challenges that focused on social issues and I am glad I got to educate my followers and bring light to the things that were important to me.
  8. Your followers really seem to love your Instagram Live show, Ask Aria. What did you enjoy most about making the show?
    I enjoyed getting to learn about the industry from people like Tabitha Brown, Kenan Thompson and Chantae Cann. I got a chance to ask for advice that helped me as an artist, and I am sure it helped a lot of my followers as well.
  9. You’re such a young artist who has already done so many amazing things. What is your main focus or goal in the entertainment industry?
    My goal is to inspire people. Sharing my art with the world is like sharing a piece of myself. So, I hope to be relatable and inspiring to people. I also want people to know that prioritizing yourself is not a bad thing. Your mental health is just as important as your physical health.
  10. Can fans look forward to any other upcoming projects/releases from you in 2021?
    I have another single being released this year. I can’t reveal too much, so you’ll just have to wait and see. I am also releasing castles pt. 2 later this year, along with more visuals.

Keep up with Aria on Instagram.

Image via The Purple Agency for 360 Magazine

Crowns & Hops Brewing Co. Launches Crowdfunding Campaign

Black-Owned Crowns & Hops Brewing Co Launches Equity Crowdfunding Campaign Inviting The Community To Be Owners With Crowns

Today Crowns & Hops Brewing Co, the first Black-owned craft beer brand in Inglewood, CA, launches their equity crowdfunding campaign OWN CROWNS to invite the community to invest in the brand’s mission and success. The capital raised will go directly to the buildout of the new flagship restaurant/brewpub Crowns Inglewood, secured at 3200 W Manchester Blvd, Inglewood, CA. In an effort to collaborate with the community of Inglewood and those who champion racial equity in the U.S., co-founders Beny Ashburn & Teo Hunter believe this opportunity will allow for the community to invest in the city’s development while supporting Black-owned businesses in the region.

Crowns Inglewood will be a community establishment based in the heart of Inglewood and will provide a safe family-friendly space to gather, dine and have delicious independent craft beer. During a time where most Black & Brown communities feel left out of the development of their own neighborhoods, this investment opportunity allows for the community to participate in the revitalization efforts of the city. Crowns & Hops will offer locals and visitors alike an opportunity to publicly connect in Inglewood/South L.A. to enjoy premium products produced in Inglewood.

This Crowns & Hops early-stage investment opportunity is made possible by the efforts of the Obama Administration who passed the JOBS Act (2012), allowing cited Americans from all walks of life to invest in start-up businesses, not just the wealthy and well connected.

As stated by Beny Ashburn, CEO, Our brand started with the community, now we want to offer the community an opportunity to own a part of Crowns in the City of Champions and wherever we expand.

We have always celebrated the mission of community and ownership in the craft beer industry. We’re excited to bring these concepts of investment and equity to a region that has been starved of resources for generations, said Teo Hunter, COO & Head of Beer Operations.

WHAT

Crowns & Hops Brewing Co launching an equity crowdfunding campaign for the community to invest in the Crowns & Hops brand. Capital will be used for the completion of the flagship restaurant/brewpub Crowns Inglewood

WHEN

Starting Tuesday, 7.20.21

HOW

Through equity crowdfunding platform Start Engine was also successfully used by U.K.-based BrewDog. The JOBS Act, allowing all Americans to invest in start-up businesses, not just accredited Investors

WHERE

To learn more about the Crowns & Hops Brewing Company’s equity crowdfunding campaign and to invest, please visit their website.

Find Crowns and Hops Brewing Company via Instagram, Twitter, official website, Facebook and to invest

ABOUT CROWNS & HOPS BREWING COMPANY

In 6-years, Co-Founders Teo Hunter & Beny Ashburn have become the leaders and voices of a craft beer movement bringing much-needed diversity and inclusion to the industry. Hunter & Ashburn disrupted the status quo of the craft beer industry and built a brand that is bigger than beer. Through their global social movement #BlackPeopleLoveBeer & #BrownPeopleLoveBeer, they have been able to galvanize the voice of people of color in craft beer. Crowns & Hops Brewery Co. will be the first Black-owned brewery in Inglewood, CA, a few short miles from the new Rams/Chargers Stadium.

Crowns & Hops Brewing Co’s mission is to create spaces that are community-centric driving diversity, racial equity, economic growth, and influencing inclusion. This creates jobs and new career paths for people of color in and around the beer industry. Crowns & Hops Brewing Co. is the first-ever craft beer brand that bridges lifestyle, communities of color, dope culture, and delicious craft beer. Welcome to The New Now of craft beer. #OWNCROWNS

Mare Monstrum/Drown in My Magic, a digital exhibition by David Uzochukwu on Artsy for use via 360 Magazine

David Uzochukwu – Mare Monstrum/Drown in My Magic

Mare Monstrum/Drown in My Magic, a digital exhibition by David Uzochukwu on Artsy

2016 – ongoing.
Italy, Senegal, Germany

Artist statement:

Mare Monstrum / Drown In My Magic channels the power of myth by explicitly visualizing Black merfolk. It envisions water as expanse which the characters can cut through, be safe in. No longer are they subject to whims of the tide, or drift into a void that holds the potential for destruction. Instead, the portrayed are equipped to survive and find freedom in the monstrous.

It almost seems as though Blackness is inevitably linked to a passage through the waters of the Atlantic Ocean, the Mediterranean Sea, Evros River, whether historic or recent. The potential of self-actualisation lapping at someone’s feet always calls to mind the blood, sweat and tears of those who have come before them. Can new lore shift the entanglement of Black bodies and their environments, making unquestionably clear that they belong?

About the series:

David Uzochukwu’s photographs deliver you into warm and sensitive worlds where humans and nature entwine in search of belonging. Expanses of sand, water or sky embrace Black bodies emanating strength and resilience. Often their limbs morph into fantastical forms against hyper-real landscapes that offer a space for contemplation or escape. It’s this interplay between the natural and supernatural, between the visible and invisible, that imbues the artist’s images with an arresting presence.

Uzochukwu’s ongoing body of work, Mare Monstrum / Drown In My Magic, uses the central idea of Black mermaids to explore both the historical relationship between the African diaspora and the water, and contemporary politics around illegal migration. A great part of the images were made in Senegal in 2018 and show mermen emerging from the seas protecting and healing one another. The most recent images came together in Germany and introduce a whole community of hybrid merfolk in states of solace and rebirth. An incubated baby, a proud centaur and a tender couple, among others, inhabit a boundless realm.

The Austrian-Nigerian artist was born in 1998 in Innsbruck. His photographic practice began as a teenager with intimate self-portraiture that soon gained recognition. He’s enjoyed collaborations with artists including FKA Twigs, Pharrell Williams, Ibeyi and Iris van Herpen. Since joining Galerie Number 8, he’s exhibited at Bozar, Photo Vogue Festival, Unseen Amsterdam, Off Biennale Dakar and LagosPhoto. He was named ‘One to Watch’ by the British Journal of Photography in 2020, and his first co-directed short film, Götterdämmerung, was selected for Max-Ophüls-Preis in 2021. He is currently studying philosophy at HU Humboldt University of Berlin.

“The long history of oppression experienced by people of color in the West makes an unlikely context for art devoted to the fantastical. All the more so when you consider recent developments such as the racist rhetoric and anti-immigration policies of the Trump administration, the chilling roll call of African-Americans killed by US police (Freddie Gray, Eric Garner, Philando Castile) and the bigotries unleashed in Britain by Brexit (monkey chants at football matches and a spike in xenophobic hate crimes). Under such conditions, it’s worth asking if a turn to the fantastic by black artists is driven by a desire to escape from the charged and painful circumstances of daily life. Yet the opposite seems to be true. What characterizes much of the imagery being produced today is an eagerness to grapple with urgent questions of culture, identity and history– albeit through imagery that accentuates the extraordinary rather than the everyday. (…)

Ultimately, the Berlin-based David Uzochukwu – whose recent Drown in my Magic project situates a panoply of mythical water creatures within arid landscapes – may speak for all the artists currently finding inspiration in fantasy. The goal, as Uzochukwu puts it, is to reclaim the narrative of fantasy’ by embracing ‘the alien otherness projected onto black bodies in a way that could be read as pure empowerment.’”
-Extract of the essay “A Fantastic Turn” by Ekow Eshun for Unseen Magazine.

Drown in My Magic will go live starting April 16th 2021 on Artsy HERE.

Mare Monstrum/Drown in My Magic, a digital exhibition by David Uzochukwu on Artsy for use via 360 Magazine

Mare Monstrum/Drown in My Magic, a digital exhibition by David Uzochukwu on Artsy for use via 360 Magazine

Alondra Delgado shot by Tim Schaeffer, Makeup/Hair by Johnna J. Perez, Styled by Sean Dylan Perry. For use by 360 Magazine

Alondra Delgado Q&A

By: Javier Pedroza

From acting out telenovelas scenes on “The Island of Enchantment” to Hollywood, California…

Say hello to actress Alondra Delgado, born in Mayaguez and raised in Arecibo Puerto Rico. Ms. Delgado is very proud of her Latina heritage and can currently be seen as Vanessa Montes on the CW football drama , ‘ALL AMERICAN’  ’, which follows the journey of star player Spencer James (Daniel Ezra) as he is recruited away from his homeschool to play for Beverly Hills High. Vanessa is the daughter of the new head coach and the confident new girl at school who has a history with one of her classmates. The cast also includes Taye Diggs and Samantha Logan. The third season is airing now. While Delgado has guest starred, wrote, and produced other shows and short films, this role has introduced the young actress to an exciting new level of stardom. Here at 360 Magazine, we dished with Delgado about her role on All American, upcoming involvement in the film Safe House, her Puerto Rican heritage and Latinx idols, and more.

  1. How was your upbringing in Puerto Rico?

My childhood in Puerto Rico was beautiful. I love Puerto Rico. It involved a lot of dancing, since that’s what I started with first when I was two and a half years old, going to the beach, studying in a bilingual school, and acting on feature films when I was seven years old. It was great! 

  1. What are some of your favorite things about your community / culture?

I love the people and the warmth and passion we all have; and of course the food!  We always have a party in every activity. We are loud, passionate, and very prideful of our tiny Island! 

  1. What attracted you to begin a career as an actress?

Growing up I never liked cartoons that much. I was always fascinated with the Telenovelas and would play out scenes and act like the mean characters. My mom saw my passion so she put me with a talent agency. I did my first feature film when I was seven, and I fell in love. 

  1. Where were you and what was your reaction when you received the call from CW confirming your role as Vanessa Montes?

I was at my mom’s house with all my family decorating for Halloween. My manager and agents called me and I screamed and jumped and hung up the phone three times by accident. I was so excited! And it was great that my close family was there because we got to celebrate right away.

  1. How has your experience been, so far as the new girl at school on All American?

It’s been great! I’ve had a lot of fun and have learned a lot. It’s an experience I’ll never forget.

  1. Can you describe how you feel working alongside Taye Diggs and Samantha Logan?

It is amazing. At first I was a bit scared and nervous to be on set because this is a great cast. But once I was there, they were very nice to me and I’ve been learning a lot about them. 

  1. Will we see more writing & producing any time soon?

I’ve been writing some things recently so that is definitely something that will come soon, hopefully. 

  1. Who are your role models in life?

There are many Puerto Rican figures that always inspire me, like Rita Moreno and Benicio del Toro, who have had a great career in Hollywood and always represent the Island. Someone I always look up to is Roberto Clemente, who had a huge passion for baseball and loved helping others. That is something I would love to do!

  1. With the lack of Latinx talent representation (in front and behind the cameras) in Hollywood, how would you advise “the industry” to move forward?

I think lately there have been a few more Latinos out there, but we definitely need more. I would say that we need to stop writing characters that are specifically Hispanic rather than giving roles to Hispanic actors. There is always this mindset that the character has to be this or has to be that, rather than hiring people because of talent and not looks. So many people have started to watch All American and are excited because there is more Latino representation now. We need to change our mindsets and hire because of talent! 

  1. Any advice for teenagers who dream of writing, acting and producing?

Go for it! If you have a passion, you have to try it. You have to have a positive mindset because it will not be easy and you’ll face rejection, but you have to learn how to trust and believe in yourself and your talent. If you work hard enough, you’ll make it. 

  1. What is one of your top acting tips?

I love to learn the lines and then just play with it. Read it with different people and you will find different things from each read that will help you create a character with more depth. 

  1. What can you tell us about your upcoming film Safe House?

I am so excited for this one! It’s an action film. I play Carla and she is the lead character. She’s a strong female lead with a lot of stunts and drama. People will love her! 

Alondra Delgado shot by Tim Schaeffer, Makeup/Hair by Johnna J. Perez, Styled by Sean Dylan Perry.

Illustration of a Booker by Kaelen Felix for 360 Magazine

New World Model

By Dana Feeney × Vaughn Lowery

The modeling industry has two very different faces. One side are supermodels, like Gigi and Bella Hadid, glamorously modeling, making millions of dollars, and traveling the world. The other are the unknown models working job to job, facing exploitation and manipulation by their agencies and clients, and trying to make their name in the industry. The mistreatment of models is as old as the industry itself. Skinny, cis, and white models experience this brutal reality. Working as a model is only worse for people of color [POC], LGBTQA+, and immigrants because of the lack of transparency or regulation and rampant misconduct.

New Players

The current push for diversity and inclusion has caused a much higher demand for POC, and LGBTQA+ models with different body types. In recent months, a few new players in the game are building their reputations on accountability and proper treatment of the models and creatives they represent. Several small agencies and one superpower are disrupting the model representation world: New Pandemics, Zandwagon, Community New York, We Speak Models, and film and television power player Creative Artists Agency (CAA).
The way modeling deals traditionally work is that a model signs to an agency, such as Next Models, Ford Models, IMG Models, or Wilhelmina Models. The agency provides its models with certain services such as housing, transportation, portfolio shoots, and more. In most cases, anything an agency provides for a model they have to pay back to the agency, often at a high-interest rate. The interest rate means the longer they take to pay it back, the more they owe to the agency.

Although models sign contracts to agencies, they are not considered employees of those agencies and instead are independent contractors who the agency aids in booking jobs. The agencies do not keep models on their payroll. They do control the money that the models earn on a job and how their money models earn is distributed. Bad payment practices reach far beyond the agencies. The agencies are responsible for billing the client right after the model completes their job. Payment for jobs by agencies to their models is notoriously sketchy because clients are not required to pay upfront before shoots and can legally take up to 90 days to settle up. Most agencies take at least a 20% fee out of any money their models make and charge clients a “booking fee,” so for a $1000 job, they would charge $1200 but only pay the model $800. Worst of all, if a client does not pay the agency for work a model did, the agency does not owe the model the money they earned. The common practice in the industry is that the model only gets paid if the agency gets paid.

The film and television management world contrasts the modeling world in many ways. The modeling industry as a whole is riddled with misconduct, manipulation, and poor treatment of models by their agencies and brands. Many modeling agencies use contracts that include fees and costs they can pull out of the model paychecks and use debt, housing, and visas to keep their models dependent.

Agencies in other media such as film, only make money if their clients make money. In film, the percentage is around 10% because of unions. Although, none of these industries are flawless especially considering scandals in the film and tv world with predators like Harvey Weinstein and Matt Lauer.
Creative Artists Agency (CAA) has a long history of representing talents across film, tv, music, and more. In August of 2020, CAA announced their partnership with KCD Worldwide, a fashion services agency, which signaled CAA’s entrance into fashion model management for the first time in the agency’s history. CAA has a strong legacy of representing high-profile individuals and building their careers. They have also stated that they only take a 10% fee out of their models’ earnings, half of the general standard of 20%. Despite their claims for better treatment of models, CAA is not blemish-free when it comes to allegations of abuse and sexual misconduct. Multiple former CAA agents have faced lawsuits.

Additionally, CAA has previously represented multiple people accused of misconduct, including Shia LaBeouf, Chris D’Elia, and Marilyn Mason; all of whom are no longer represented by CAA.
On the opposite end of the spectrum are the smaller boutique agencies mentioned earlier, New Pandemics, Zandwagon, and Community New York. New Pandemics is “a casting and management agency dedicated to increasing LBGTQ+ visibility.”

Zandwagon is “a talent management company that could guide everyday life individuals who are breaking beauty standards daily” according to their website. Community New York is run by Butterfly Cayley, Moe Lamstein, and Richie Keoall, three first-generation immigrants from Laos, and “is founded on inclusivity and progressive values by changing not only the style but the very structure of management.” Cayley, Lamstein, and Keoall have impressive experience at agencies including DNA and Elite Model Management. Community New York now represents stars such as Hunter Schafer, who is well known for her work on the hit HBO show “Euphoria” and is now a brand ambassador for Shiseido.

With small diversity forward agencies up and coming, the existing modeling industry is under attack from all sides. All three of these agencies emphasize how much they value representation and inclusivity in this industry that has avoided breaking societal beauty standards for so long. They also claim they will be different from other agencies and provide better treatment for their clients. These agencies are sending the message that you’re either with them or against them, and they’re willing to think outside of the box to get proper treatment and equity for models from all walks of life.

Same Old Problems

Many of the biggest fashion houses in the world are still reckoning with the #MeToo movement. The fashion industry is known as a highly predatory business. Many of even the largest names in modeling have had to survive people abusing their power on sets and behind the scenes to become who they are. Household names, such as Kate Upton, Coco Rocha, and Cameron Russel, have all spoken out about their experiences with the abuse they’ve experienced while working as models.

Kate Upton spoke out against Paul Marciano in 2018, which led to a total of $500,000 in settlement agreements involving five individuals. He has remained an active participant at GUESS as a board member and chief creative officer, despite resigning from his position as an executive. At the beginning of February, the news broke that Marciano is once again being sued over sexual assault allegations by a woman who has chosen to remain anonymous. The allegations against Marciano are not an isolated incident. Similarly, allegations were brought against Alexander Wang in December of 2020 but began as early as 2017, yet some still chose his side despite the overwhelming corroboration of multiple individuals. If the word of a woman as successful as Kate Upton is not enough to oust a predator from power, it’s unclear what realistically can protect vulnerable individuals with less acclaim from the same experiences or worse.

The silver lining of these allegations coming to light is the industry supporting the individuals coming forward more than ever before. In the past, many models lost their careers before they had even begun due to the actions of predators and the mechanisms powerful people use to silence their victims. Accounts such as @shitmodelmgmt and @dietprada have been using their online platforms to expose predators and condemn their actions openly across Instagram and Twitter. Additionally, the Model Alliance, an organization dedicated to giving models a voice in their work, has also spoken out against Wang on their Instagram saying, “We stand with David Casavant, Owen Mooney, Gia Garison, and all the accusers of @alexanderwangny in their pursuit towards justice.”

The upheaval that began in 2006 with survivor and activist Tarana Burke’s creation of the #MeToo movement has continued into 2021. Slowly but surely survivors are taking their power back and pushing to create real change in media industries that have exploited them for far too long.

Illustration of models by Rita Azar for 360 Magazine