Posts tagged with "latinx"

Jamaine Ortiz Illustration for 360 Magazine by Kaelen Felix

Q×A with Jamaine Ortiz

Jamaine “The Technician” Ortiz, an up and coming, 23-year-old boxer, is making his name in the world of boxing. After growing up in Worcester, Massachusetts, the young boxer turned pro in 2016. His amateur record is 100-14 and he has already won many awards for his skill.

During the recent Mike Tyson vs. Roy Jones Jr. fight that was shown on pay-per-view, Ortiz was victorious over Sulaiman Segawa of Silver Spring, Maryland. After scoring a technical knockout in the last 10 seconds of the seventh round, Ortiz gained the WBC USNBC Silver lightweight title. This was his first fight outside of New England and he certainly made himself known in the fighting community. After winning this fight, Ortiz jumped from 76th to 44th in the world for the lightweight division. If he keeps winning, Ortiz is predicted to fight for a major world title by late 2021.

360 Magazine sat down with Ortiz to ask him questions about his professional career, personal life and future.

What was your upbringing like? Was there always a focus on athletics?

I started boxing at seven years old, and I was always an athletic kid, playing sports and outside.

Where did you learn to box?

I learned how to box at the Boys & Girls Club of Ionic Ave.

Why boxing?

I use to get into fights as a kid, I like that its a one on one sport I don’t have to rely on anyone. Over time, I noticed I was winning a lot and kept it going.

Who are your role models, boxing or otherwise?

My role model was my coach Carlos Garcia.

You’re currently the Undefeated World Boxing Youth World lightweight champion. What does this accomplishment mean to you?

I’m actually the former Youth World lightweight champion due to my age since I turned 24 last April, currently, I hold the WBC USNBC Silver lightweight title. The accomplishment is just a stepping stone, I have far more to go and I understand its a process and this is part of the process.

Your nickname is ‘The Technician’ where does this come from?

A technician is a person skilled in an art or craft by dictionary standards and when it comes to boxing, and me being a carpenter, I’m now an active trader. It was a perfect fit since everything I do, including things in my personal life, I’m technical about it. So it’s a name that reflects more than just boxing.

You’ve been boxing competitively for more than a decade. How have you evolved during that time, technique-wise and also personally?

Time is the mother of greatness, practicing repeatedly overtime is only natural; I’m going to get better.

How has your career been impacted by COVID-19 and 2020?

Luckily I was able to get a fight right before the impact of covid came I didn’t get to fight as much as I normally would. I probably would have had about 4 fights in a year but I had two with the last one being a great exposure bout.

Tell us about your interests outside of boxing.

I enjoy nature and I spend most of my time with family. Always working on self-development, a lot of stocks, and trying to find real estate deals.

Do you still have Olympic aspirations? What are your future boxing goals?

Olympics of boxing is an amateur sport but recently I think in 2016, they allowed pros to compete but it is heavily dominated by amateurs. In the next year, I see myself becoming World Champion at the lightweight Division and reaching for that pound for pound list.

What is your go-to move in a fight?

Not sure, probably switching from orthodox to southpaw.

What makes you unique as a boxer?

My ability to switch stances easily and my technique.

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Behind The Ropes

Carmen DeLeon releases new single X video – Juegas

Carmen DeLeon is joined by acclaimed Colombian artist FEID on her new single, “Juegas,” a playful, romantic ode to the start of a new relationship.

View “Juegas” Official Video HERE

Paired with a pop-infused beat, the song’s lyrics evoke the “butterflies in the stomach” deeling that are a hallmark of infatuation. Listen to “Juegas,” which was released today by Capitol Music Group and Universal Music Latin Entertainment, HERE.

Earlier this month, FEID received TWO 2020 LATIN GRAMMY nominations for BEST REGGAETON PERFORMANCE and BEST URBAN MUSIC ALBUM, both recognizing the success of his collaboration with Justin Quiles on PORFA and his breakthrough album, FERXXO (VOL. 1: M.O.R.).

“Juegas” is the follow-up to “Volver,” the summer 2020 single that launched Carmen DeLeon’s career. She and FEID wrote the new song with Maxium, Mista Bombo, Leon Yamil and Jonathan Tobas. It was produced by Maxium, Mista Bombo and Leon Yamil.

“Juegas” is as authentic as it comes, especially when DeLeon describes what she draws inspiration from and how she puts pen to paper.

Carmen DeLeon says, “I wrote “Juegas” one night in Miami around one a.m. with one of my best friends. I wanted to write a love song that focused on the need to give and receive in a relationship. To me, that’s the best part of living life with a partner. I hope that people feel inspired when they hear this song and understand the importance of giving and receiving.”

Directed and produced by Gian Rivera (aka “Death of Gian”), who helmed Feid‘a video for “PORFA (Remix),” the official video for “Juegas” was shot in Miami and is infused with the kind of energy and enthusiasm that is characteristic of DeLeon’s style and artistic sensibility. Much like the theme of reciprocity that DeLeon highlights, the song’s combination of vibrant beat, melody and lyrics remind listeners that music is the ultimate antidote. Watch the video HERE.

Volver,” Carmen DeLeon’s debut single, has already amassed more than 800,000 combined global streams. It was produced by Tainy, the Puerto Rican mastermind who’s been responsible for some of the biggest hits in reggaeton and trap. In a few short months, DeLeon has grown a considerable following on her social channels, with 30,000 monthly listeners on Spotify and more than two million views on her YouTube channel. Born in Venezuela, she is now based in Miami.

Euphoria said, “Carmen DeLeon commands the world as her stage with fiery gusto and an undeniable sense of positivity. Further proving her right as music’s next breath of fresh air, the spry 19-year-old artist masters the microphone with “Volver,” a fiery ode to budding passion and power.”

Wonderland noted, “Sharing her struggles with anxiety, the highs and lows of these uncertain times and how it’s okay not to be okay, DeLeon brings her Latin roots to the fore on the laid-back tune, reminding us all exactly why she’s a force to be reckoned with.”

Praising the sing-along banger, Idolator declared, “Carmen DeLeon needs to be on your pop radar.”

Follow Carmen DeLeon:

Instagram | YouTube | Facebook | Twitter

Lunay illustrated by Maria Soloman for 360 MAGAZINE

Lunay

Breakout Artist Lunay Showcases How Latinx Music Has Lent New Vision to Fashion

‘As artists like Lunay, Bad Bunny, Rosalia, J Balvin and more continue to dominate music, here’s a look at how they’re tapping into their culture to influence their fashion.’

Read article HERE.

LUNAY is also scheduled to take part in the virtual “On The Rise Panel” during Billboard’s upcoming Latin Music Week.

“Lunay is Urbano’s Next Superstar! …when a new artist does manage to cut through the fray, we really should pay attention, [and LUNAY is] one of the freshest upcoming stars in the game. Every single he’s released thus far has been a hit… the 19-year-old from Puerto Rico is on a rapid ascent… and Épico [was] a 14-track wonder of reggaeton, dancehall and trap influences that mark a young artist who is already well on his way to mainstay status – Remezcla

“A Billboard Latin Artist On The Rise… Discovered by Latin producers Chris Jeday and Gaby Music, Lunay… Lunay has had entries on the Billboard Hot 100, Hot Latin Songs and Latin Airplay charts, [and] became a household name with his 2019 hit ‘Soltera’ and its remix featuring Daddy Yankee and Bad Bunny.” – Billboard

“Watch out, because he’s on his way. Lunay has all eyes on him… The Puerto Rican regggaeton artist is following in the footsteps of those who came before him – and getting their seal of approval.” – HOLA

ABOUT LUNAY

While a large number of new Latin music artists are looking to continue the surge in global success of Reggaeton, Latin Trap and other Rhythmic music styles in Spanish, it has become clearly evident that Puerto Rico’s dynamic, still only 19, musical“wunderkind” (RS), LUNAY is the genre’s undisputed new generation superstar. After bursting into the playlists and video streams of fans across the world with “Soltera” and it’s soon to follow, and widely regarded ‘Song of Summer’ remix with Daddy Yankee and Bad Bunny, LUNAY’s credits were quickly boasting two #1 Latin Airplay singles, a rare #1 full album debut with the 14-track ‘ÉPICO,’ and over a Billion views quickly collected on YouTube. With the support of super-producers Chris Jedi, Gaby Music, and their Star Island label, Lunay’s rapid rise has already resulted in a trophy case full of breakthrough artist award recognition including: the 2019 LATIN AMA’S “NEW ARTIST OF THE YEAR, 2019 BILLBOARD “ARTIST ON THE RISE” recognition, SPOTIFY TOP 3 “BREAKOUT ARTISTS OF YEAR, 2019 APPLE MUSIC “UP NEXT ARTIST” and FOUR PREMIOS JUVENTUD victories: “ON THE RISE ARTIST” & ”REMIX OF THE YEAR” (2019) and most recently “BREAKING THE INTERNET” & NEW GENERATION – MALE (2020). Following a few quiet months due to the Covid pandemic postponing a series of highly-anticipated concert appearances, LUNAY is once again resuming his ascent to the upper reaches of the genre with recent features alongside Lil Mosey and Jhay Cortez, and his recent standout single “Relaciones” – which Rolling Stone hailed as the week’s best new Latin music track upon its release.

Connect With LUNAY: INSTAGRAM / TWITTER / FACEBOOK / TIKTOK

Kaelen Fenix illustration for homelessness in 360 MAGAZINE

Covid-19 Increasing Homelessness

By Eamonn Burke

A study back in May of this year by a Columbia professor found that the unemployment resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic could increase homelessness by 45%, following a peak unemployment rate in April of 14.7%. Using data from previous recessions as well as current unemployment trends, Dr. Brendan O’Flaherty estimated that another 250,000 people would become homeless this year, bringing the total number of homeless in the country to 800,000. Across the nation, evidence of this narrative coming to fruition is clear. In West Virginia, there are 10,000 homeless students. 125 homeless people have died this year in San Francisco. Homelessness is increasing in Ohio and Texas, and Residents of Long Island are petitioning for another homeless shelter. This is just some of data to show the trend of widespread homelessness as a result of the coronavirus.

Besides taking the lives of many through infection, the coronavirus has caused a massive recession, like likes of which have not been seen since the Great Depression in the 1930s. As of last month, 22 millions Americans are receiving unemployment payments, coming after one of the best economic stretches in American history.

In addition to unemployment benefits, many people were also protected by the moratorium under the Federal CARES Act, which has since expired, allowing evictions to resume. An Aspen Institute study estimates 30-40 million people could be evicted by the end of 2020. This means even more people out on the streets and more vulnerable to getting COVID, which creates a vicious cycle and creates more pressure on emergency services. Shelters are available but often overcrowded and unsanitary.

There is also the issue of those who are older and who have preexisting conditions, who have been identified as higher risk for COVID-19 and who also are becoming more prevalent among homeless populations. Over 100,000 people over 45 years old were estimated to be living outside on an average night in 2019. Another study showed that around 85% of unsheltered people had physical health issues in 2019. Lastly, a Harvard study revealed that roughly 11 million households spend at least half of their income on housing, making them vulnerable in a recession.

There is also a racial undertone of the homelessness crisis from Covid-19, as black and Latinx people make up a large portion of the population and 58% of black and Latinx people lack the sufficient liquid assets to survive a recession. This can lead to greater racial disparity in an already tumultuous period for race relations in the country.

The CARES act also provided $4 billion in funding, which the Center on Budget Policy and Priorities, along with The National Alliance to End Homelessness used to develop a framework for how to use the money to fight homelessness. It focuses on five major points: services for the unsheltered, housing, shelter, prevention and diversion, and improving future systems.

It is expected that the rising homelessness rate with correlate with the projected rising unemployment rate through 2022. The homelessness rate was already rising with overpopulation, and the pandemic is acting as a catalyst for the issue.

Gabrielle Marchan illustrates Dianne Morales for 360 MAGAZINE

Dianne Morales

As of late, one of our team members had the opportunity to sit down with New York City mayoral candidate Dianne Morales for an interview. After eight years under Mayor Bill de Blasio, New York City will see someone new in the position in 2021, and Morales, a member of the Democratic Party, is jumping at the opportunity.

360: What are the major points of inspiration throughout your life, so far, that have led you to where you are today?

Morales: At my core is a commitment to community, and I learned community at home. I am the youngest of three girls and the daughter of Puerto Rican parents. My mother, a secretary for the Leather Workers’ Union, and my father, a building manager on the waterfront, created a working-class life for us in Bed-Stuy. But our home was not just for me and my sisters. My grandmother, Mami, lived with us my whole childhood. In fact, she and I shared a bed until the day that I left home for college. Our home was a resting place, a layover, a transition point for whoever needed it. There was always someone new sleeping on the couch or joining us at the dinner table. Whether they had just arrived from Puerto Rico, were in between jobs, had just returned from the military or from being incarcerated, there were always other people staying with us while they “got back on their feet.” My parents opened their arms and their front door to whoever needed it. I never questioned this way of life. I was taught, “If you have, then you provide.” We took care of each other. I saw, firsthand, the opportunity created when we each take responsibility, not just for ourselves, but for our neighbors and for our communities. This belief has spurred me on through 30 years in the public sector, as an educator, a foster care worker and a leader of nonprofits.

As I established my own home in Bed-Stuy as a single mom, my children and I recreated the dynamic my parents had built. We always have a few extra people living in our home – whom we often refer to as our “chosen family.” These extended family members have filled my home with love and reciprocal support. In a twist of fate, since the pandemic hit, I have shared my home with my parents and my children. I envision a New York City where we take care of each other, where everyone is welcome to the dinner table, where neighbors provide more support than extra sugar and all of us have a warm place to rest our heads. Although NYC is vast with diversity, we are all inextricably bound together and are only as strong as our most vulnerable link.

360: How can a mayor, as opposed to any other civic official, lead unique positive changes for equity?

Morales: Over the past several months there is a mantra I have been repeating consistently: a budget is a reflection of our values. The mayor has executive power over what gets funded in the city and by how much. Funding for services that contribute to true public safety (access to housing, medical/mental healthcare, economic stability, job training, education) will provide access and opportunity to those who have historically been left behind by our elected officials. Line by line, the budget reveals the values of a city and government. The NYC budget passed in June was a failure. It failed the residents of NYC, who have been raising their voices in protest and demanding a divestment from law enforcement since May 29. It failed those whose lives have been lost at the hands of the NYPD. It failed communities of color that have been disproportionately impacted by violence and brutality.

The budget highlights the need for NYC leadership to put New Yorkers first by investing in communities. The NYC Mayor also has the ability to work to desegregate public schools and impact the quality of education provided to over 1.1 million students, many of whom are students of color living in poverty. This alters the course of a student’s life and provides an entry point to economic mobility and a true career trajectory. New Yorkers deserve a bold, transformational leader who is unapologetically committed to prioritizing justice in the budget’s bottom line. I fundamentally believe that those closest to the problem are closest to the solution. Our city needs a mayor that is in tune with her people and provides a vision for and direction for what is possible.

360: What are some of the most pressing or urgent issues that need attention within New York City, and how would you address them?

Morales: New York’s problems all stem from structural oppression by Race, Gender and Class, so our solutions must go deeper, all the way to the root causes. Too many New Yorkers are living in a time of scarcity, and that’s been going on since long before the virus hit. The are working two jobs, just barely surviving and always one misfortune away from losing everything. Instead of this “Scarcity Economy,” we need a “Solidarity Economy,” and that requires bold action. First, transforming public safety in the city by providing access to the same critical resources found in wealthy communities will be a critical step toward creating the long-term change we need for all to live in dignity. True public safety includes ensuring that every New Yorker has access to “life essentials,” like quality transportation, affordable housing, excellent and equal education and human-centered healthcare. All New Yorkers deserve access to these fundamental resources in order to live in dignity, and it is the necessary floor needed to break through glass ceilings.

Next, we must enhance and overhaul vital infrastructure requiring multi-part, creative solutions that address the deeper issues embedded in the fabric of NYC. To break the racist cycle of poverty that divides our city into the “haves” and the “have-nots,” we will establish a guaranteed minimum income. We will push for universal healthcare and eliminate inequities in the health system faced by women, and especially women of color. We will work to address the persistent segregation of our schools and disrupt the school-to-prison pipeline by replacing school safety officers with trained mental health professionals. The driving force behind all policy initiatives is the experiences, needs and voices of women of color. Particularly, Black women. As the Combahee River Collective wisely wrote in its 1977 statement, “If Black women were free, it would mean that everyone else would have to be free since our freedom would necessitate the destruction of all the systems of oppression.” We know that if New York does right by Black women, the entire city will be better for it.

360: How can you use your personal experiences with serving as a single mother and observing the many other challenges that face New York City residents to enact policy reform?

Morales: So many of New York’s problems have impacted me directly, and so much of who I am and what I know comes from being a mom. My greatest joy is being the mother of my two children, Ben and Gabby. They constantly push me, teach me and nourish me. As a single parent, I share experiences with hundreds of thousands of other New Yorkers. A 2018 study found that single-parent households are the second largest household type in New York City. I navigated New York City’s systems – economic, health and education – on my own. I balanced a budget for my family each month, figuring out how to make it work. My greatest challenge was parenting my children through the NYC education system. The rigid and unforgiving education that my children received did not allow any space for their learning differences. They did not see themselves in the white-centric curriculum and we struggled to find support during their developmental years. Advocating for my children was a full-time job on top of my paying-full-time-job. Again and again I have stood with parents for a more equitable and life-affirming education for our kids. It is with this same community spirit of coalition building, advocacy and bettering of our social safety nets that I will push for policies that support all types of families in NYC.

360: What is one of the most significant components of your background or experiential knowledge that separates you from any other candidate?

Morales: I am, in so many ways, the average New Yorker. I was born and bred in Bed-Stuy. I am an Afro Latina single-mom of two children who survived the New York City public school system. I am a first generation college graduate who came back home to my city after school. I am a woman of color who discovered that I was not being paid the same as my white male counterparts. I’ve watched my neighborhood change, I’ve seen Starbucks replace the corner bodega, and I have spent my weekends marching side by side – 6 feet apart – with my fellow New Yorkers demanding justice for those killed at the hands of a racist policing system. Because I am the average New Yorker, my voice reflects the voices of thousands of others. We share our lived experiences, frustrations and joys. I love New York City because I see our full potential for all of us.

360: How does your previous extensive work with social service nonprofits inform your motivations and goals to serve as Mayor?

Morales: For decades, I worked within the community to address structural inequities burdening communities of color. I worked alongside those experiencing the symptoms of our broken system most acutely – poverty, lack of access to education, homelessness and mental health services. I witnessed firsthand the day-to-day struggles of New Yorkers that are perpetuated by cycles of poverty and oppression. I worked from the ground, up and from the inside, out. But as I hammered away, I recognized these structural and institutional barriers, and began to ask, “So how do we burn them down?” It felt as though I was only tinkering around the edges of the problem and providing Band-Aid solutions to deep, deep wounds. The core, perpetuating issues were centralized and foundational. I realized that if I want to create lasting, effective change, I must address these systemic and political problems at the root. As Mayor, I would carry with me the voices of those I have served.

360: In outlining your points of action and reform for New York City, how does the COVID-19 pandemic affect any of these potential strides for change?

Morales: As we know, COVID-19 is a catastrophe that illuminates all of the cracks and splinters in our broken systems. At first, many claimed the COVID-19 was a “great equalizer,” affecting all people, regardless of race, class or gender. Instead COVID-19 disproportionately impacts people of color and low-income communities. This is not a coincidence or personal failing, but rather the direct result of racist systems, putting structural oppression in stark relief. While some New Yorkers are able to escape crowded areas, arm themselves with personal protective equipment and work remotely, others, namely people of color, are on the front lines providing essential services to our city.

As COVID-19 has had devastating consequences that will leave a lasting impact for years to come, it has also provided us with a unique moment. As we saw after the murder of George Floyd by the Minneapolis police, being homebound and isolated forces us to pay attention. We have paused. We have slowed down. With fewer distractions and a center of focus, folks all across the country have had the veil lifted. People are noticing the interconnected webs of oppression I have lived with and that I have been fighting to dismantle my entire life. In this moment, we need leaders in office who are of, by and for the movement for social change. There is a momentum and hunger for justice that can no longer be ignored. As we overcome the challenge of the disease, I will never let the city forget who is truly essential. Together we will create a world in which front-line workers are truly valued as indispensable. A world where we accompany our applause and platitudes with a livable wage, unquestionable dignity and real community power.

360: What are some of the most rewarding takeaways you have gained from leading several momentous organizations?

Morales: I’ve learned firsthand about the barriers and challenges that people have to overcome in order to gain access to opportunities that are alleged to be available to everyone. I also have watched as community members care for one another to bridge the gaps in access to those opportunities. This is testament to the power of our communities to be true partners in determining the solutions they face when given the resources to do so. Finally, I have been able to bear witness to what is possible when people finally gain access and opportunity and how that has the potential to change the trajectory of people’s lives and transform families and communities.

360: Regarding the national and global movement, Black Lives Matter, how will you utilize your unique identity to empower minorities in the City of New York?

Morales: Like many people of color, I have lived years of my life trying not to take up space. I have seen the ways that my identities – my Blackness, my Latina roots, my politics, my womanhood – make people, namely white people, uncomfortable. In these spaces I would constantly ask myself, “Do I seem too opinionated, too articulate, too aggressive?” I would contort and deflate myself to fit into tight corners and small boxes. I would shrink myself so that others could feel big. When making the decision to run for Mayor of NYC, I decided it was important for me to run as my full, unadulterated, unapologetic, multi-hyphenated self. There would be no more shrinking, questioning or self-doubt. I recognize that by the very nature of stepping into this space, I am opening up a path of possibility. As the first Afro-Latina running for mayor of New York City, I recognize the awesome responsibility I hold. I know that when I speak, unfairly or not, I am representing all Afro-Latina women. Missteps become mass stereotypes. Accolades become communal achievements.

This is both beautiful and deeply terrifying. But in moments of fear, I am guided by a greater purpose to bring with me those whom have been devalued and made to feel small, as I have been; to elevate the voices of those with shared experiences and claim our rightful place in democracy and representation in leadership. People like me, individuals and communities of color, women of color, we must be at the forefront of our politics and policies. I am deeply committed to divesting from racist systems and investing in Black and Brown communities. I am committed to reimagining public safety on our streets and in our schools. I am committed to shifting wealth opportunities to those who have been historically marginalized. I am committed to redressing and repairing the wounds of oppression that scar our city. I am in this race to stand taller in the face of a world that tells me to shrink. I am here to tell them that Black lives are beloved. We matter today and every day forward.

360: To all of the NYC citizens following your efforts to better numerous communities, what are some of the best ways individuals can support your campaign?

Morales: The best way to help me is to join the campaign with a small contribution. I am not a career politician, and unlike other candidates, I have not spent decades cultivating a war chest of people, networks and resources to kickstart my run for mayor. I want to be responsive to the people, not the special interests.. My campaign was born out of my home in Bed-Stuy, out of conversations with my neighbors, friends and colleagues. Our campaign is 100% powered by the people, not the 1%. We are an intersectional coalition of Black and Brown, Latinx, LGBTQIA and working class New Yorkers. We are backed by the people being hit the hardest at this moment in time. I am so incredibly humbled that in the middle of a pandemic, without employment, people are finding a way to donate to our campaign. I know what is at stake and the choices they have had to make to do so. If donating to our campaign is not possible for you during this financially uncertain time, we understand. Visit my website, dianne.nyc, for information and volunteer opportunities. Spread our mission to your fellow New Yorkers. Reach out to join our team. Remember me in November 2021.

To learn more about Dianne Morales, you can click right here. To learn more about her stances and solutions, you can click right here. To support Morales through donations, you can click right here. You can also support her on Twitter and Instagram.

Dominican Republic Flag illustration done by Mina Tocalini of 360 MAGAZINE.

Dominican Day Parade

This Sunday, thousands of New Yorkers and visitors would usually be flooding Sixth Avenue to celebrate the culture and heritage of the Dominican Republic at the Dominican Day Parade. 

While the event is going to be celebrated a bit differently this year, Presidente beer and Presidente Chairman, Alex Rodriguez, are giving fans nationwide a way of observing this day with those who share their passion for the DR’s rich culture with a virtual celebration where all are welcome!

Tune in on Sunday, August 9th at 3 PM EST as Presidente hosts an online celebration in partnership with Que Lo Que, a traditional Latin dance party created by the legendary APT.78, whose intention is to celebrate Latino culture through its gatherings. Participants will find themselves in attendance with former-New York Yankees legend and Chairman of Presidente, Alex Rodriguez! Activities will include:

  • A live, digital set from LA MEGA’s 97.9FM DJ Aneudy that will air on Presidente’s Instagram channel
  • Chances for fans to win Presidente swag for their attendance throughout the program
  • Including an exclusive line of NY-inspired Presidente T-shirts, hats, bandanas, and Drizly codes

 

Award illustration done by Mina Tocalini of 360 MAGAZINE.

Hispanic Heritage Awards

The Hispanic Heritage Foundation (HHF) announced today that the 33rd Hispanic Heritage Awards, presented by Target for the eight year, will be broadcast on October 6th on PBS stations and stream on PBS.org. The historic program, which was created by the White House in 1988 to commemorate the establishment of Hispanic Heritage Month in America, is among the highest honors by Latinos for Latinos and supported by 40 national Hispanic-serving institutions.   

In keeping with current COVID-19 mitigation guidance and with the safety of participants in mind, the Hispanic Heritage Awards and PBS broadcast will not include a live ceremony but will feature more intimately filmed performances and Honoree segments filmed on location across the United States and Latin America.    

“The Hispanic Heritage Foundation is thrilled to once again partner with Target and PBS to collectively celebrate and share the great promise, accomplishments, and cultural pride of the Latino community through the 2020 Awardees and powerful performances during Hispanic Heritage Month,” said Jose Antonio Tijerino, President and CEO of the Hispanic Heritage Foundation. “More than ever, it’s important to shine the spotlight on the tremendous value Latinos provide this great country we all share, especially during this pandemic which has tragically impacted the Latino community and other communities of color at a higher rate.”    

The 2020 Honorees will be announced over the coming months followed by the performers, hosts, presenters and other sponsors (visit https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C92ZiK5MxAs). 

“Target is excited to be the presenting sponsor of the Hispanic Heritage Awards for the eighth year in a row. We’re proud to be a part of a program that highlights the amazing accomplishments of the Latinx community and the lasting contributions it has had on our country and the world, especially those working on the frontlines during this pandemic,” said Laysha Ward, Target’s Executive Vice President and Chief External Engagement Officer. “We congratulate and thank all of this year’s honorees and we are inspired by their tireless commitment to service of others.” 

“While it would have been great to come together in person, we are delighted to join the Hispanic Heritage Foundation in this virtual celebration of Latino Americans and their extraordinary contributions to our country,” said Paula Kerger, President and CEO of PBS. “Building on our longstanding commitment to diverse stories and storytellers, we look forward to sharing the Hispanic Heritage Awards with our viewers during the sixth broadcast on PBS.” 

The Hispanic Heritage Awards serve as a launch of HHF’s year-round, award-winning programs which inspire, prepare, and connect Latino leaders in the classroom, community, and workforce to meet America’s needs as well as promoting cultural pride.  HHF is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization.  For more information, visit www.hispanicheritage.org.  

Minneapolis-based Target Corporation (NYSE: TGT) serves guests at nearly 1,900 stores and at Target.com. Since 1946, Target has given 5% of its profit to communities, which today equals millions of dollars a week. For the latest store count or more information, visit Target.com/Pressroom. For a behind-the-scenes look at Target, visit Target.com/abullseyeview or follow @TargetNews on Twitter.

PBS, with more than 330 member stations, offers all Americans the opportunity to explore new ideas and new worlds through television and digital content. Each month, PBS reaches over 120 million people through television and 26 million people online, inviting them to experience the worlds of science, history, nature and public affairs; to hear diverse viewpoints; and to take front row seats to world-class drama and performances. PBS’s broad array of programs has been consistently honored by the industry’s most coveted award competitions. Teachers of children from pre-K through 12th grade turn to PBS for digital content and services that help bring classroom lessons to life. Decades of research confirms that PBS’s premier children’s media service, PBS KIDS, helps children build critical literacy, math and social-emotional skills, enabling them to find success in school and life. Delivered through member stations, PBS KIDS offers high-quality educational content on TV— including a 24/7 channel, online at pbskids.org, via an array of mobile apps and in communities across America. More information about PBS is available at www.pbs.org, one of the leading dot-org websites on the internet, or by following PBS on Twitter, Facebook or through our apps for mobile and connected devices. Specific program information and updates for press are available at pbs.org/pressroom or by following PBS Pressroom on Twitter.

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politics, podium, flag, speech

The Census Should Count All People

The Hawkins/Walker Green Party presidential ticket today urged the Census to count every person living in the United States and opposed an order signed by President Trump yesterday to not count undocumented immigrants. Hawkins/Walker described the directive to not include noncitizens as “another disgraceful act of prejudice by President Trump.”

The census has counted both citizens and noncitizens since 1790. It is important for the government to know how many people live in the United States and where they live so it can determine the level of funding for federal programs in each jurisdiction, from roads and bridges to school aid.

The US Constitution in its fifth sentence says that “persons” residing in the states should be counted every 10 years to determine each state’s share of seats in the House of Representatives. The Constitution does not limit the census to citizens. “The Census Bureau should fulfill the requirement of the Constitution, and disobey the unconstitutional directive of President Trump,” urged Green Presidential candidate, Howie Hawkins. Hawkins said “President Trump is once again showing his racism toward immigrants. This has been on display since he first announced for president and has continued throughout his presidency. Trump has built on the legacy of Obama-Biden as the ‘deporters-in-chief’ with a venomous demonization of Latinx people.”

Positive Goya Illustration

Goya Boycott

By Eamonn Burke

A boycott of Goya foods, a major producer of beans and an essential good for many families, has launched after its CEO Robert Unanue praised President Trump in a speech at the White House on Thursday:

“We are all truly blessed … to have a leader like President Trump who is a builder,” said Unanue.

Immediately, many prominent Hispanic figures such as Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez denounced Goya and Unanue, and hinted in a tweet she would boycott the company. Julian Castro, a former Housing and Urban Development Secretary, urged people do to the same despite the prominence of Goya in Latin American homes. The resistance comes from the public as well, as the hashtags #boycottGoya and #Goyaway have trended in recent days. Meanwhile, President Trump took to Twitter saying “I LOVE @GoyaFoods!”

Unanue, however, is not apologizing for endorsing Trump and is labeling the boycott as a “suppression of speech”. He was proud to support Trump, and also to say that Goya would be donating 2 million cans of food to American Food Banks. He also stated that he would be “honored” to be a part of the Hispanic Property Initiative, which was signed by Trump at the event with a goal of expanding “access by Hispanic Americans to educational and economic opportunities.” The CEO also has a extensive history of donating to Republican candidates and initiatives.

“If you’re called by the president of the United States, you’re going to say, ‘No I’m sorry, I’m busy, no thank you?’ I didn’t say that to the Obamas and I didn’t say that to President Trump.” said Unanue in an interview with Fox News on Friday. Republicans like Ted Cruz and Matt Schlapp and publicly defended the CEO while denouncing “cancel culture” on Twitter.

The unwavering support of Unanue is perplexing, when considering Trump’s history against Latinx people. In 2016, his presidential campaign was largely structured on restricting immigrants, especially from Mexico. In one speech he referred to the people coming from Mexico into the U.S. as “rapists.” He has relentlessly tried to end DACA, a program which protects immigrants, and offered little support to Puerto Rico in the midst of hurricane devastation. The Trump administration works closely with ICE and has detained immigrants at the US-Mexico border in concentration camps with inhuman men conditions.

It is also confusing when considering Goya’s history as a company. Goya is currently the largest Hispanic-owned company in the nation, but it began as a small store in Manhattan run by Spanish immigrants

As for President Trump, who is already unpopular with Hispanic voters, it is possible that he sees a reduction in the 26% of Latinx voters who support him.

Mina Tocalini illustration of J BALVIN for 360 MAGAZINE.

Tainy × J Balvin – Agua

Boundary-pushing producer and artist, Tainy, and globally renowned artist J Balvin release “Agua,” the first single off of the official soundtrack from the upcoming animated film The SpongeBob Movie: Sponge On The Run. The song is out on NEON16/Interscope Records and available on all streaming platforms today.

The multiple Latin GRAMMY winning producer collaborated with J Balvin to create a song that captures the true essence of the beloved animated children show’s new feature film. The video which is set to release in the coming weeks, was directed by 36 Grados and filmed using the same cutting-edge animation seen in the film to help further bring to life the infectious beat created by Tainy that perfectly pairs with J Balvin’s signature silky smooth flow. The song further showcases Tainy’s incredibly skillful ability and talent as a producer and artist as he uses SpongeBob’s signature flute sound as the base for the beat of the track. Tainy then adds his unique style of sound to the track, cementing it as a certified summer anthem.

In the lyric video that is accompanying the song release today, we get a glimpse of SpongeBob and his best friend Patrick Star embarking on a journey to the Lost City of Atlantic City as J Balvin’s lyrics take us through the deep sea celebration.

Both Paramount Animation and Nickelodeon partnered with Tainy and Lex Borrero of NEON16 and Interscope Records to help them create a soundtrack that was innovative, bubbly and lively much like the title character of the animated film. The album is executive produced by the award-winning producing duo and was especially curated to help bring the film to life. The soundtrack will feature a strong collection of global artists from across different genres like Tyga, Swae Lee, Lil Mosey, Weezer, Snoop Dogg, The Flaming Lips, Kenny G., Cyndi Lauper and more.