Posts tagged with "Mexican"

Top Latinx Influencers

360 Magazine is highlighting the top Latinx influencers within pop culture. 

By: Carly Cohen

 

Demi Lovato:  Demi Lovato is a well-known singer, songwriter, actress, and producer. Her early acting shows such as Camp Rock and Sonny with a Chance both were huge Disney programs. Demi dealt with addiction but has spoken about it and has made it very public after her overdose in 2018. She has thrived to do better and push her career and doing so has made her an inspiration to the public eye. 

Neymar: Neymar (Neymar da Silva Santos Júnior) is a Brazilian professional soccer player for Paris Saint-Germain. He is known as one of the best players in the world and has a massive following on Instagram with nearly 150 million. Neymar has competed with the title against Messi on ‘who is better.’ 

Jennifer Lopez: Jennifer Lopez is and always has been a huge American actress, singer, and dancer. She is engaged to the famous baseball player, Alex Rodriguez, and has two charming children. She has a following of 143 million on Instagram and is always staying up to date on the latest trends. Jennifer very recently came out with a new makeup line called JLo Beauty that has gotten great feedback from. 

Lele Pons: Lele Pons is the new face of the “ideal celebrity.” Influencers have taken over and Lele is one of many. She is available on platforms such as Youtube, Spotify, Instagram, etc. She consistently is showing her following vision in her personal life. For being somewhat new to the influencer world, she has a following of 43.5 million on Instagram. Lele has opened up about her battle with OCD, ADHD, and Tourette syndrome in a documentary posted on her YouTube channel called The Secret Life of Lele Pons.

Lejuan James:  Lejuan is a comedian and an influencer on Youtube. In 2019 he released his book called Definitely Hispanic which is a comedy and heartfelt book about Lejuan himself. The book walks the readers through Lejuan growing up Hispanic in the US. On his YouTube channel, he creates skits and small clips to express his enthusiastic personality. 

Camila Cabello: Camila Cabello is originally known for being a part of the girl group Fifth Harmony which was created on the  X Factor in 2012. When Camila strayed away from the group she created her songs and sang her music that wowed millions of people. Currently, she is recognized for being partners with the other musically talented, Shawn Mendes. Her socials show the raw, heartfelt women she is. Recently, she has shared many posts regarding her beliefs and what she stands for. She is using her platform to express and show social issues, politics, and pushes her viewers to make a difference in the world. 

Yuya: Yuya (Marind Castrejón Castañeda) is a YouTube star. Her content subsists of beauty tutorials, her authentic daily life, and her style inspiration. Her social media captures alluring photography of herself, styles, food, and a simple day in her life. Yuya has been featured on multiple Mexican television and also on Vogue.  

Bethany Mota: Bethany Mota is known as the Youtube star who raised us all. She started on Youtube sharing content relating to fashion advice, hauls, DIYs, and so much more. She continues to post on Youtube and other socials but has done a great job staying up to date on current trends involving fashion, lifestyle, and content. Bethany strained away from her usual content and was featured on Dancing with the Stars Season 19

Dulce Candy: Dulce Candy is a beauty and fashion vlogger. She has two channels on Youtube, one focuses on tutorial videos while the other focuses on her everyday life. Her socials consist of true and authentic life, have an influencer but also has a mother. 

Selena Gomez: Selena Gomez is one of many talents. She is a singer, an actress, and a producer. Recently she has also become an entrepreneur because of her new skincare brand RareBeauty which is based around mental health. Selena always uses her platforms for inspiring messages and spreading awareness which is why she has always had such a good look to the public eye. 

Leo Messi: Leo Messi is a professional football player for FC Barcelona. He is known as being the world’s wealthiest football player. His socials consist of ads, his family, and his life as a professional football player. An interesting fact about Leo is that he sticks to five key foods – water, olive oil, whole grains, fresh fruit, and fresh vegetables. 

German Garmendia: German is a content creator who targets comedy. He shares content on his authentic daily life. German is now signed to WME talent agency

Maiah Ocando: Maiah is an express and an internet star. She has a background in Fashion Design and shares storytimes, makeup tutorials, and fashion advice on her youtube channel with 735k Subscribers. An interesting fact about Maiah is that she is the host of a web show on YouTube called Visto Bueno and is also a writer of a book called Visto Bueno.

Kathy Cano-Murillo:  Kathy Cano-Murillo is a creative genius! She is an author, and an artist and has created an award-winning brand called CraftyChica. CraftyChica is a space to express ingenuity. It consists of Latino crafts, activities, recipes and so much more. It is the perfect place to express oneself creatively. 

Jorge Narvaez: Jorge is a full-time creator and speaker. He posts content relating to his work and especially relating to his family. He is a first-generation high school and college grad. 

Andrea Espada: Andrea is best known for her modeling, an influencer, and a popular television star. She is always posting content that relates to workout tips and her adorable baby. Her Instagram is exciting and authentic to who she is. Andrea had her baby, Ferran in a past relationship, not with her current spouse. 

Salice Rose: Salice is an Instagram and video star. Her videos always focus on comedy and are super entertaining to watch. She has recently become popular on Tik Tok and has reached a following of 16.8 million. Salice is known for speaking her mind and posting exactly what she wants. She is a rising star. 

Ana Alvarado: Ana is also known as LipStickFables. She is beloved on socials such as youtube and Instagram. She is famous for her captivating and up-to-date videos. Ana gives an understanding of her Honduran life. 

Tiffany Garcia: Tiffany is best known for her gaming videos on her youtube channel IHasCupquake. She talks about different games and gives feedback and reactions to her viewers. She is visionary and has a joyous personality. Tiffany has been nominated such as Shorty Awards for Best in Gaming and Teen Choice for gaming. She is a big deal in the gaming community. 

Nicole Guerriero: Nicole is a fashion influencer with a following of 1.9 million on Instagram. She is always posting insight on her life, adept makeup looks, and outfits of the days. She is one of the original YouTubers in the beauty community. 

JLo illustration by Kaelen Felix for 360 Magazine

Healthcare Equity article illustrated by Rita Azar for 360 MAGAZINE

The Importance of Education for Advancing Healthcare Equity

By: Maria Hernandez, Ph.D.

If you’ve been tracking the nation’s progress in the fight against Covid-19, physicians and public health officials of color have been highlighting the need for health equity in the national dialogue. As the data on mortality rates becomes clearer, there is no mistake that the pandemic is impacting African American and Latino communities to a much greater extent. Current mortality rates for Blacks and Latinos is almost 2.8 times that of whites suggesting significant health inequities exist. The discussion about why these inequities are taking place has been less clear and even less clear is how to address this reality.

The key may be in educating healthcare providers about the root cause of these inequities and empowering patients that access healthcare systems.

Health inequities are the differences in health outcomes due to unfair conditions or factors that different populations may face. These factors can include access to quality care, inadequate housing, lack of access to quality food, poverty and systemic racism. Public health researchers and healthcare providers have known about health inequities in the US for over 40 years and the research about what to do point to a confluence of factors that center on economic, educational and social change. Even before the pandemic, Native American and Black women are 2.5 times more likely to die in childbirth than Whites. Women are under diagnosed for heart disease.

Research points to the presence of unconscious and systemic bias as well as a lack of culturally competent care.

https://www.cbpp.org/research/poverty-and-inequality/tracking-the-covid-19-recessions-effects-on-food-housing-andThe pandemic exacerbated the impact of these factors in profound ways. If we look at the fact that essential front line workers–cashiers, bus drivers, food service providers, healthcare workers, postal carriers, warehouse workers, receptionists–have high concentrations of Black and Latino workers, it becomes much easier to understand why so many victims of Covid-19 are from these communities. And if we also explore the role poverty plays in the pandemic, we know that crowded housing conditions where social distancing is not possible has been a factor. The reality is that low income, hourly workers are not able to do their jobs remotely using telecommuting or video conferencing. Many of these workers also experience a harder time finding personal protective equipment that can be a burden for tight household budgets.

The pandemic has set the stage for profound changes in healthcare and its about time.

Two important responses that have emerged in the nation’s healthcare systems is an awareness that physicians, nurses and other caretakers must accept that–like all other human beings–they suffer from unconscious biases. It’s those snap judgements about a person’s race, ethnicity, age, ability, and socioeconomic status that enter into each encounter which can influence the recommended course of care. Those biases can be positive or negative but we all make those associations. The pandemic has accelerated the

extent to which hospitals are seeking training for front line staff and providers in order to reduce the likelihood of these biases and provide more culturally competent care.

These programs include an awareness of how bias impacts the experiences of patients and what may be important factors to consider in working with different populations. Culturally competent care encourages staff to look at how the patient may be experiencing their illness and what their own understanding of how to improve their health. It means taking into account the patients cultural of reference and listening to their unique needs.

Another response is the effort hospitals are making to partner with community clinics, faith based organizations and community organizations to win the trust of patients. This was present before the pandemic, but it has taken on a new sense of urgency as vaccine adoption rates have faltered in Black and Brown communities. Since the implementation of the Affordable Care Act, not for profit hospitals which are the majority of facilities in the US have been asked to report what community benefits they provide to address known community needs.

Despite all of these approaches for improved healthcare services for diverse patients, it will take years before all health systems are aligned on their approach to advance health equity.

The most vulnerable patients need quality care now.

A visit to the doctor—even on-line—may require some key steps to ensure the best care is made available. Three steps that can make a big difference for patient visits. First, bring an advocate with you–a family member or friend who will join you in your visit and support your being heard or to help you ask the right questions. You’ll have to give them permission to be with you given privacy rules in healthcare but it’s worth it. Having a trusted advocate can be a big relief if there’s a lot of options to explore or if there’s different treatment steps involved. There’s a growing field of professional Patient Advocates — sometimes called Patient Navigators that help individuals with navigating treatment options, getting insurance payments, and arranging for home health care if needed. Your health may rely on having someone who understands the complexity of healthcare systems to support you.

Next, review the information your physician provides about the condition or illness and the medicines you may be asked to take. Ask your doctor what information you most need to understand for your treatment or what to do to support your health. Most physicians will provide information on a condition or point you to a reputable website for more information like the Mayo Clinic Review what your physician provides to be informed about the options and treatments presented.

Last, communicate with your care team throughout the course of your treatment or care. If you are struggling with side effects in your treatment or symptoms worsen, call your doctor or the nurse practitioner assigned to your care. Take an active role–with your advocate–to look at options for continued treatment. Poor communication with your physician can put you at greater risk for poor health outcomes. During these challenging days, preparing for each time you visit your physician can set the stage for you to receive the very best care available

About the author -Maria Hernandez, Ph.D., President and COO of Impact4Health is a thought leader in health equity and pay for success initiatives designed to address the upstream social determinants of health among vulnerable populations.  Maria currently leads the Alameda County Pay for Success Asthma Initiative which is testing the feasibility of reducing asthma-related emergencies using health education and proven home-based environmental interventions for children.  

Celebrate with Mercadito

In honor of Mexican Independence Day and National Guacamole Day, which both fall on Wednesday, September 16, Mercadito, known for its authentic Mexican cuisine, delicious tequila and mezcal-based specialty cocktails and voted a top Mexican restaurant in Chicago, is celebrating with a week-long special menu available from Monday, September 14 – Sunday, September 20. Mercadito’s limited-time menu includes Chile en Nogada, a traditional dish originating from Puebla comprised of poblano pepper, pork picadillo, walnut sauce and pomegranate, Pozole Rojo, a traditional pork and hominy stew with guajillo chile, Pomegranate Guacamole with avocado, habanero, mint and pomegranate seeds, and a Guacamole Flight, which includes tastes of Mercadito’s traditional guacamole, toreado guacamole and the pomegranate guacamole for $18. Perfect for pairing, each day of the week will feature a different Tequila and Mezcal Flight, featuring three one-ounce pours of various agave spirits for $15. Mercadito is currently open for indoor and patio dining in Chicago’s River North neighborhood at 108 W. Kinzie and also offers takeout and delivery.

Pink Beasts

NEIGHBORHOOD COMMISSION 2019: PINK BEASTS BY FERNANDO LAPOSSE

The Design District has chosen London based Mexican designer Fernando Laposse for the 2019 Neighborhood Commission. The installation will consist of strands of pink sisal tassels suspended through the trees guiding visitors to discover a collection of pink hairy sloths hanging from ropes, trees and arches. In collaboration with textile designer Angela Damman, the installation will also incorporate ten sculptural hammocks which will hang on metal structures and directly on palm trees for public use. The mesmerizing pink landscape of Pink Beasts is achieved by dying the sisal fibers with natural dyes made from cochineals, tiny parasitic insects native to central Mexico which grow on the Opuntia cactus. Producing the world’s brightest natural red dye, the cochineals used in Pink Beasts are from an organic farm in the mountains of Oaxaca and handmade by a community of Mayan women weavers of Sacabah, Yucatán, including the production, cleaning and dying of the sisal. By interacting with Pink Beasts, visitors can be reminded that there are still sustainable and organic ways of achieving vibrant color. Moreover, Pink Beasts showcases the versatility of Fernando Laposse’s work. 

Zedd, Chipotle, Las Vegas, 360 MAGAZINE, Universal Music

Chipotle × Zedd

Chipotle teamed up with GRAMMY Award winning artist, DJ, producer ZEDD to surprise fans with a special edition “Good Thing” burrito yesterday at Life is Beautiful in Las Vegas.

Chipotle created the “Good Thing” burrito ahead of the release of Zedd’s new single “Good Thing” which features Kehlani and will be released this Friday, September 27.

Refinery29’s Style Out There

WATCH NOW: EPISODE FOUR OF REFINERY29’s ORIGINAL SERIES

Style Out There

Style Out There, Refinery29’s award-winning video series is back with the fourth episode of season 3. With over 26 million views, host and journalist Connie Wang digs into the way clothing has given women a way to speak out, look within, and identify the forces that limit their potential. Through these stories, Wang discovers the powerful way fashion illuminates social and political issues, ranging from the connection between sexy clothing and sexual assault to instances when cultural appropriation can actually be both useful and productive.

Episode Four of Style Out There is Now Available on Refinery29.com

In episode four, Connie Wang explores the all-female teams in the equestrian sport Escaramuza, which is a treasured Mexican tradition melding riding, fashion, and national identity. But for the athletes living in America, there’s an added vulnerability in literally wearing their Mexican pride on their sleeves.  

Episode Four Highlights

On Making Women Confident

“I say it’s contributed because practicing Charrería, and more in the United States, it magnifies and gives you a confidence as a Mexican to be able to open all the doors, remove all the barriers and not fear anything.” – Frine, Coach, Real De Valle

On Escaramuza Telling a Story from the Past

“Charging through the arena like true warriors Las Coronelas De Illinois are poised, powerful and in control. As I watch them spin in layers of crinoline Vision of Adelitas from centuries ago it occurs to me that, today, this sport and its pageantry really tells a story about the grace and bravery of these women who dedicate their lives to it.”

“On top of their horses, in these dresses, Escaramuza like Mireya are proudly announcing who they are and where they belong.” – Connie Wang, Host

On the Dress Being a Symbol of Pride

“Ever since the elections,  I do feel that wearing the Escaramuza dress is more than just  wearing team gear it’s more like sending a message and proving that I am proud of being Mexican-American .” – Mireya, Las Coronelas De Illinois

Style Out There will premiere new episodes every week on Refinery29’s YouTube channel, exploring Japanese Cholas subculture in Nagoya, the rise of Afrofuturism across the globe, the American Escaramuzas, and Jamaica’s dancehall queens.

Please let us know if you are able to share this with your readers or if you would like to speak with Connie about the series or the reporting.

About Refinery29

Refinery29 is the leading media and entertainment company focused on women. Through a variety of lifestyle stories, original video programming, social, shareable content, and live experiences, Refinery29 provides its audience with the inspiration and tools to discover and pursue a more independent, stylish, and informed life. Please visit www.refinery29.com/en-us, www.refinery29.com/en-ca, www.refinery29.uk and www.refinery29.de for more information and to browse content.

Mojo Nomad Central

Mojo Nomad Central – a ground-breaking concept designed to turn the traditional hotel model on its head- will open this September on Queens Road Central in the heart of Hong Kong. The property is the second to open from the Mojo Nomad brand, Hong Kong’s first hotel concept with shared working spaces, and a member of the Ovolo Hotels group.

“Following the unprecedented success of Mojo Nomad Aberdeen, on the western shore of Hong Kong Island, we’re excited to unveil a second Mojo Nomad property in Hong Kong, this time in the city’s bustling Central District,” says Girish Jhunjhnuwala, the visionary behind the Mojo Nomad concept, and founder & CEO of Ovolo Hotels. The edgy, design-driven concept draws on the hotelier’s desire to make a difference. “We are giving modern travelers access to a multi-use space where they can be productive, collaborate, seek adventure and experience new things,” continued Girish.

The first of its kind in the region, the Mojo Nomad concept combines a mix of designer rooms, from private to accommodation options for families, groups and friends, paving the way for a new type of value-driven design hospitality. Mojo Nomad’s communal spaces encourage guests to connect with new people and ideas, tapping into a thriving demographic of explorers and addressing the changing demands of the ever-evolving traveler.

The new Mojo Nomad Central offers a total of 56 guest rooms ranging from size S to XL; two of the property’s rooms will offer shared accommodations. Adhering to the brand’s commitment to integrating the latest in technology and design, each room is equipped with multiple USB and traditional plug sockets, as well as international adapters. Shared rooms are fitted with individual televisions and Bluetooth headphone capabilities, as well. A flexible-use space on the property’s second floor will offer a refreshment bar and shared kitchen with additional working and lounge areas. On the third floor, the gym offers TRX equipment, punching bags, yoga mats and more.

A two-story Mexican eatery, Te Quiero Mucho, will serve share-style plates and margaritas alongside a broad selection of artisanal tequilas. The bar, which also serves as the hotel’s reception desk, is decked out with eye-catching neon.

“Our inspirational new hotel collection is designed for those seeking a better way of living. At Mojo Nomad, guests are able to unite around common interests and enjoy a unique style of community living, which values openness and collaboration without compromise. Whether your stay be long or short, you’ll be a part of our community,” concluded Girish.

For more information about Mojo Nomad, visit www.mojonomad.com. For more information about the Ovolo Hotels group, visit www.ovolohotels.com.

ABOUT OVOLO HOTELS

Ovolo Hotels is an independent hospitality company that owns and operates a collection of individually designed hotels. Founded in 2002, the company now runs four hotels in Hong Kong and six hotels in Australia, including in Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane and Canberra. Ovolo also recently launched a new brand, Mojo Nomad, in Aberdeen Harbour, Hong Kong. Mojo Nomad is a cohabitation concept for global nomads that combines travel, lifestyle and community at its core and will be entering the Australian market in the near future.

ABOUT MOJO NOMAD

Established in 2017, Mojo Nomad is a community for global travelers who seek a new way of living. The brand’s vision is to establish a global brand that will consistently go beyond traditional hospitality concepts which allows residents to live, work and travel in an effortless home-feel environment. The Mojo Nomad micro-living hotel concept offers collaborative and fun environments that expose its residents to new people, new ideas and new experiences. Mojo Nomad strives to encourage residents to be active creators and unite them around a common interest to share space, resources, and activities, ultimately inspiring them to contribute creatively and intellectually to the world around them.

DaniLeigh

When the end of Summer hits, the desire to rewind time kicks in, reliving every magical moment from the season’s past. It’s a vibe that newcomer DaniLeigh has managed to encapsulate in her debut EP Summer With Friends, coming soon. The 22-year-old singing and dancing phenomenon cut her teeth in the business when she directed a music video for her late mentor, Prince. She enhanced her buzz with back-to-back jams “Play” (featuring Kap G) and “Lurkin’”, and is here to continue her mission of making music that both sounds and feels good.

The South Florida native had music in her blood, singing from a young age. As an early teen, DaniLeigh recorded YouTube covers of songs like Musiq Soulchild’s “So Beautiful,” though she wasn’t quite ready for the big time. “I was really shy,” she admits, “and I didn’t realize the unique sound of my voice until later on.” It wasn’t until a few years later when she moved to Los Angeles at 16 that DaniLeigh began harnessing her craft. In LA she found her footing in the music industry, starting with dancing. “I was dancing in music videos, commercials, you name it,” she recalls. “From there, I met a lot of producers onset and just networked.” Singing became the secret weapon, as DaniLeigh would reveal her chops and be invited to studios for recording sessions. However, a life-changing encounter with the legendary Prince would be the real catalyst.

After learning of DaniLeigh’s talents as a dancer (through a one-minute video clip), the Purple One reached out to have her direct his video for “Breakfast Can Wait” at just 18 years old. The video hit worldwide, appearing on networks like MTV, BET, and REVOLT. Prince ultimately took DaniLeigh under his wing, mentoring her budding singing career. His untimely death in 2016 left a void in DaniLeigh’s life, though his presence is still felt as DaniLeigh’s star is only getting brighter.

“Play” truly kicked things off. The high-energy single is described by DaniLeigh as an empowering anthem for women. “It’s a bold statement,” she says of the cut, which carries a message of “making a play” in all areas of life. “I’m a very positive person and this song I feel can help motivate people to put in that work,” she says. Bringing Kap G (who is of Mexican descent) into the fold as a feature was her way of uniting more Latinos in music, as DaniLeigh’s Dominican heritage is evident in both her style and sound. The single “Lurkin’” immediately followed, as a slick nod to social those stalkers who don’t congratulate moves, yet look on from the social media sidelines. The song even made its way to the HBO hit series Insecure. The stage is now set for DaniLeigh to show the diverse angles of her talent on a grander scale.

Aptly titled Summer With Friends, the upcoming EP sums up DaniLeigh’s past few months, which she lightheartedly describes as “just having fun and working.” The relatable nature of the project brings forth the aforementioned singles, along with feel good songs that channel the young artist’s inspirations including Aaliyah, Missy Elliott, and Drake while showing her ability to fuse hip-hop and R&B with poppier electronic-driven vibes. Songs like “Questions” playfully target those relationship interrogation sessions (Where were you? Who were you with?), while “Ex” is a self-explanatory track about the now-single artist’s previous romance. “He got one song,” she jokes. Other cuts like the infectious “On” and “All I Know” show DaniLeigh’s versatility within the pop-urban landscape, while “All Day” highlights her Dominican roots. “That’s a bachata beat underneath [the production],” she proudly points out. “The time right now is in alignment, showing that things are going the right way.” As DaniLeigh unveils her debut Summer With Friends and the projects that follow, she maintains her goal of positive music, though has one wish involving one important angel by her side. “I always say I wish Prince was here to see all of this happening with me right now,” she says. “It’s okay though. I know he’s watching.”

Origins of Frozen Margarita

A Dallas restaurant owner blended tequila, ice and automation. America has been hungover ever since.

Source: Smithsonian.com

The way Mariano Martinez tells it, accounts of the margarita’s beginnings should be taken with a grain of salt—and a wedge of lime. Martinez is the creator of what is arguably the 20th century’s most epochal invention—the frozen margarita machine—and, at the age of 73, the Dallas restaurateur is an indisputable authority on the cocktail in the salt-rimmed glass.

The origin stories date to the ’30s and tend to feature a Mexican showgirl or a Texas socialite and a bartender determined to impress her. One of Martinez’s favorites involves a teenage dancer named Margarita Carmen Cansino who performed at nightclubs in Tijuana. “After Margarita got a contract from a Hollywood studio, she changed her name to Rita Hayworth,” he says. “Supposedly, the drink was named in her honor.”

When it comes to margarita lore, about the only thing for certain is that on May 11, 1971, Martinez pulled the lever on a repurposed soft-serve ice cream dispenser and filled a glass with a coil of pale green sherbet—history’s first prefab frozen margarita. The beverage was teeth-chatteringly cold with a proper tequila face-slap. Happy hour (and hangovers) would never be the same.

By adapting mass-production methods to blender drinks, Martinez elevated the frozen margarita from a border-cantina curiosity to America’s most popular cocktail. The innovation forever changed the Tex-Mex restaurant business (placing bars front and center) and triggered the craze for Tex-Mex food.

Befitting a musician who once recorded three versions of “La Bamba” on an EP titled Lotta Bamba, the convivial Martinez has a fresh, boyish manner and a beaming smile. He grew up in East Dallas, where at age 9 he started bussing tables at El Charo, his father’s Mexican eatery. “The customers were mostly Anglos who often had no idea what tequila was,” he recalls. “They’d show up with a souvenir bottle a friend had brought back from a vacation in Mexico, and ask my dad, ‘What do we do with this?’”

Though at the time liquor couldn’t be sold by the drink in Texas restaurants, the elder Martinez occasionally would whip up frozen margaritas in a blender for his patrons. (Introduced at a 1937 restaurant show in Chicago and bankrolled by bandleader Fred Waring, the humble Waring Blendor revolutionized bar drinks.) The elder Martinez used a recipe gleaned while working at a San Antonio speak-easy in 1938: ice, triple sec, hand-muddled limes and 100 percent blue agave tequila. The secret ingredient was a splash of simple syrup.

In 1970 an amendment to the state constitution made liquor by the drink legal, in cities or counties when approved in local-option elections. Shortly after Dallas voted yes, the younger Martinez launched Mariano’s Mexican Cuisine in a shopping center near the campus of Southern Methodist University. On opening night, the amiable owner appeared in a bandido costume. And customers, serenaded by a mariachi band, were encouraged to order margaritas made from the old family recipe. Libations were poured faster than you could say “One more round.” The second night wasn’t quite as successful: A barfly cornered Martinez and asked, “Do you know how to make frozen margaritas?”

“Oh, sure, sir, the best,” he answered.

“Well, you’d better speak to your bartender. The ones he’s making are terrible.”

As it turned out, the barman was so overwhelmed by the sheer volume of margarita orders that he was tossing ingredients into the blender without measuring them. Tired of slicing limes, he threatened to quit and return to his former job at a Steak and Ale, where the most complicated cocktail was a bourbon and Coke. “I saw my dream evaporating,” Martinez says. “I thought, ‘My restaurant will go bust and I’ve screwed up Dad’s formula.’”

The next morning while making a pit stop at a 7-Eleven, Martinez had a eureka moment: “For better consistency, I’d premix margaritas in a Slurpee machine. All the bartender had to do was open the spigot.’” But 7-Eleven’s parent company refused to sell him the contraption. “Besides,” Martinez was told, “everyone knows alcohol won’t freeze.”

Instead of wasting away in Margaritaville, he bought a secondhand soft-serve ice cream machine and tinkered with Dad’s recipe. Diluting the solution with water made the booze taste too weak, but adding sugar produced a uniform slush. Martinez had struck gold. “Cuervo Gold!” he cracks. The sweet, viscous hooch was such a hit that when Bob Hope performed at SMU in the ’70s, he joked about the margarita he’d just ordered at Mariano’s: “I won’t say how big it was, but the glass they serve it in had a diving board on it. And they salt the edge of the glass with a paint roller.”

Martinez’s original machine cranked out ’ritas for a decade before sputtering to a halt. Though he never received a patent or trademark for the device, it has a place in his heart and, since 2005, in the Smithsonian National Museum of American History. “The credit belongs to heritage and technology,” he says. “The golden ratio was two parts of the past and one of the present.”

Origins of Frozen Margarita

A Dallas restaurant owner blended tequila, ice and automation. America has been hungover ever since.

Source: Smithsonian.com

The way Mariano Martinez tells it, accounts of the margarita’s beginnings should be taken with a grain of salt—and a wedge of lime. Martinez is the creator of what is arguably the 20th century’s most epochal invention—the frozen margarita machine—and, at the age of 73, the Dallas restaurateur is an indisputable authority on the cocktail in the salt-rimmed glass.

The origin stories date to the ’30s and tend to feature a Mexican showgirl or a Texas socialite and a bartender determined to impress her. One of Martinez’s favorites involves a teenage dancer named Margarita Carmen Cansino who performed at nightclubs in Tijuana. “After Margarita got a contract from a Hollywood studio, she changed her name to Rita Hayworth,” he says. “Supposedly, the drink was named in her honor.”

When it comes to margarita lore, about the only thing for certain is that on May 11, 1971, Martinez pulled the lever on a repurposed soft-serve ice cream dispenser and filled a glass with a coil of pale green sherbet—history’s first prefab frozen margarita. The beverage was teeth-chatteringly cold with a proper tequila face-slap. Happy hour (and hangovers) would never be the same.

By adapting mass-production methods to blender drinks, Martinez elevated the frozen margarita from a border-cantina curiosity to America’s most popular cocktail. The innovation forever changed the Tex-Mex restaurant business (placing bars front and center) and triggered the craze for Tex-Mex food.

Befitting a musician who once recorded three versions of “La Bamba” on an EP titled Lotta Bamba, the convivial Martinez has a fresh, boyish manner and a beaming smile. He grew up in East Dallas, where at age 9 he started bussing tables at El Charo, his father’s Mexican eatery. “The customers were mostly Anglos who often had no idea what tequila was,” he recalls. “They’d show up with a souvenir bottle a friend had brought back from a vacation in Mexico, and ask my dad, ‘What do we do with this?’”

Though at the time liquor couldn’t be sold by the drink in Texas restaurants, the elder Martinez occasionally would whip up frozen margaritas in a blender for his patrons. (Introduced at a 1937 restaurant show in Chicago and bankrolled by bandleader Fred Waring, the humble Waring Blendor revolutionized bar drinks.) The elder Martinez used a recipe gleaned while working at a San Antonio speak-easy in 1938: ice, triple sec, hand-muddled limes and 100 percent blue agave tequila. The secret ingredient was a splash of simple syrup.

In 1970 an amendment to the state constitution made liquor by the drink legal, in cities or counties when approved in local-option elections. Shortly after Dallas voted yes, the younger Martinez launched Mariano’s Mexican Cuisine in a shopping center near the campus of Southern Methodist University. On opening night, the amiable owner appeared in a bandido costume. And customers, serenaded by a mariachi band, were encouraged to order margaritas made from the old family recipe. Libations were poured faster than you could say “One more round.” The second night wasn’t quite as successful: A barfly cornered Martinez and asked, “Do you know how to make frozen margaritas?”

“Oh, sure, sir, the best,” he answered.

“Well, you’d better speak to your bartender. The ones he’s making are terrible.”

As it turned out, the barman was so overwhelmed by the sheer volume of margarita orders that he was tossing ingredients into the blender without measuring them. Tired of slicing limes, he threatened to quit and return to his former job at a Steak and Ale, where the most complicated cocktail was a bourbon and Coke. “I saw my dream evaporating,” Martinez says. “I thought, ‘My restaurant will go bust and I’ve screwed up Dad’s formula.’”

The next morning while making a pit stop at a 7-Eleven, Martinez had a eureka moment: “For better consistency, I’d premix margaritas in a Slurpee machine. All the bartender had to do was open the spigot.’” But 7-Eleven’s parent company refused to sell him the contraption. “Besides,” Martinez was told, “everyone knows alcohol won’t freeze.”

Instead of wasting away in Margaritaville, he bought a secondhand soft-serve ice cream machine and tinkered with Dad’s recipe. Diluting the solution with water made the booze taste too weak, but adding sugar produced a uniform slush. Martinez had struck gold. “Cuervo Gold!” he cracks. The sweet, viscous hooch was such a hit that when Bob Hope performed at SMU in the ’70s, he joked about the margarita he’d just ordered at Mariano’s: “I won’t say how big it was, but the glass they serve it in had a diving board on it. And they salt the edge of the glass with a paint roller.”

Martinez’s original machine cranked out ’ritas for a decade before sputtering to a halt. Though he never received a patent or trademark for the device, it has a place in his heart and, since 2005, in the Smithsonian National Museum of American History. “The credit belongs to heritage and technology,” he says. “The golden ratio was two parts of the past and one of the present.”