Posts tagged with "HBCU"

Scholarships via 360 magazine by 360 Magazine

Travis Scott’s Cactus Jack Foundation Awards $1 Million to 100 Black College students

Travis Scott’s Waymon Webster Scholarships, Now in Their Second Year, Ensures Black Students Experiencing Last-Minute Financial Adversity Graduated From College – A Foundational Component of Scott’s Project HEAL Effort, Announced Earlier This Year.

Family Effort: Scholarship is Named for Travis Scott’s Grandfather, an HBCU Educator, and Spearheaded by Scott’s Sister, Jordan Webster – Who Graduated From Howard University Herself This Past Week.

Travis Scott’s Cactus Jack Foundation announced that it has awarded $1 million in scholarships for students at Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) to 100 members of the graduating class of 2022. With Scott’s support, the Waymon Webster Scholarship Fund granted $10,000 scholarships to seniors who have reached academic excellence (averaging 3.5 or higher GPA) but have faced the all-too-common last-minute challenge of financial adversity in the second semester of their senior year. The scholarships will bring 100 students over the finish line, diploma in hand. This is the second year that Scott has supported HBCUs and represents a tenfold increase.  

The scholarship is named after Waymon Webster to honor his lifetime of dedication to academic excellence for Black students. This year’s recipients include graduating seniors from 38 HBCUs, including Alabama A&M University, Central State University, Florida A&M University, Jackson State University, Morehouse College, Texas Southern University, Grambling State University, Xavier University of Louisiana, and Prairie View A&M University – Scott’s grandfather’s alma mater where he also served as an educator. Standout recipients include:

  1. Nisha Encarnacion, a graduate from Florida A&M University from St. Croix, US Virgin Islands, received a degree in Pharmacy. While supporting her mother and caring for her daughter throughout college, Nisha paid her own way to achieve her dream. View her thank you here.
  2. Chisom Okwor, a computer science graduate from Fisk University passionate about the technology industry, specifically the inclusive and improvement of representation in the tech space. Chisom’s goal is to use technology to transform developing countries in Africa. View her thank you here.
  3. Jordan Massey, a mass communications graduate with a concentration in broadcast journalism from North Carolina Central University, has incurred personal debt to achieve his goal of graduating college and entering the field of communications. View his thank you here.

Travis Scott said: “Excellence abounds in every Black household, but too often opportunity does not – and Black students are left behind or counted out. So that’s what my family and I set out to change. We congratulate all 100 scholarship recipients this year. I know we will see great things from them – and we are already looking forward to increasing our work next year.” 

Jordan Webster, Project Manager for the Cactus Jack Foundation’s Waymon Webster Scholarship Fund, a recent Howard University graduate, and sister to Travis Scott, said: “Last week, I received my own diploma from Howard University. I know personally how deeply important my grandfather’s academic legacy at HBCUs is to my entire family – to Travis, as well as my twin brother Josh who is at Prairie View A&M University – and now, to 100 people that Travis has been able to help out at a tough time. It means the world to me to be able to work with my brother as he creates hope and makes a real difference for our peers and their families.” 

Marc Morial, President and CEO of the National Urban League, said: “Black students are less than half as likely to graduate from college as white students, and financial pressure is the primary reason. We applaud Travis Scott and the Cactus Jack Foundation for investing in the next generation and congratulate the 100 Waymon Webster Scholarship recipients on their graduation.”

Daniel Moss, Executive Director of the HBCU Foundation, said: “In a warm and tremendously thoughtful gesture, Mr. Scott has made a lifelong impact on the 100 Waymon Webster Scholarship recipients. To have now eased, even slightly, the financial burden on these deserving HBCU graduates, Mr. Scott has set into motion a kind of investment that will pay infinite dividends into our communities for decades to come.” 

Health clipboard graphic via Rita Azar for use by 360 MAGAZINE

Propel × BDHEA

The Propel Center, the global HBCU innovation and learning hub intended to level the playing field and open greater doors of opportunity for their students, announced the creation and launch of its Propel-BDHEA internships, a national program focused on select HBCU and other African American students interested in pursuing medical and related healthcare careers.

The internship partnership will reimagine health equity and advance the goal of the Black Directors Health Equity Agenda (BDHEA) to foster collaboration among top health systems. BDHEA programs address the social determinants of health, provide best practices, ensure equitable access to care and advocate for long-term, meaningful healthcare policies impacting Black people and other communities of color. BDHEA unites healthcare leaders in efforts to diversify their organizations and achieve long-term health equity. INROADS, Inc. will execute the program.

According to the Association of American Medical Colleges, the U.S. will have up to 122,000 unfilled posts for physicians by 2032. This skills shortage in the medical profession is even more alarming as it relates to future healthcare professionals of color: Only 7.3% of those enrolled in medical schools in 2020 identified as Black or African American. “The Propel-BDHEA internship program addresses the urgent need to recruit and train Black healthcare professionals and to give them pathways to leadership in our nation’s top healthcare organizations,” said Michele Richardson, BDHEA board member and executive sponsor. “HBCU students are an incredible source of talent who can help bring quality care to under-resourced urban and rural areas, improving access to care and patient outcomes. The intensive Propel-BDHEA program cultivates the leadership skills that will magnify their impact on healthcare organizations and communities of color.” 

“We recognize that representation must be more reflective of the populations being served to bring about real, long term systemic change addressing these health disparities,” Propel Chief Development Officer Julie Sills Molock states, adding that “increasing the numbers of Black physicians is not only about diversity and inclusion; it’s also about establishing greater patient access to doctors with whom they can confide in, connect with culturally, trust and build a better overall patient-provider rapport. This ultimately leads to more preventive care and healthier African American communities, but it starts with initiatives like this collaborative internship with our phenomenal partners.”

INROADS has a proven, 50-year history of preparing young people from underrepresented communities for success in business and STEM careers,” shared Forest T. Harper, Jr., president and CEO of INROADS, Inc. “We know well that career disparities start with a lack of internship opportunities for African American students—with only six percent of paid internships going to them. We’re committed to our exciting new collaboration with Propel and BDHEA to address these disparities and are especially pleased to be a channel for providing the resources and expertise to execute this invaluable initiative. Our goal here is clear: To prepare and convert more African American students into healthcare professionals who can excel and make an impact in the communities they serve.”

With the guidance of INROADS, Propel and BDHEA will secure a total of 100 students for the internships, which are open to collegians and will serve as a unique opportunity for immersion, focused clinical study, leadership access and exposure that the partners believe will accelerate early talent development and help advance the nation’s diverse medical pool and workforce of tomorrow.

The selected interns will engage in innovative, work-based learning experiences, research opportunities with R&D-focused institutions, augmented academic coursework and mentoring. These future healthcare professionals will additionally benefit from unprecedented access to Propel, BDHEA and INROADS’ corporate partners and senior advisors, as well as select medical schools in collaboration with the Atlanta University Center Data Science Initiative (AUC) and specific HBCU medical and pre-med programs, while working on emerging medical health technology projects. 

Propel and BDHEA’s joint vision and commitment to health equity will ensure that all HBCU students have the access and ability necessary to achieve their full healthcare career potential. The partners emphasize that the most effective pathway toward eliminating persistent health disparities mandates leveraging data-informed strategies to help create a society where neither race nor poverty determines health or overall life outcomes.

Prime areas of focus for the new national internship program will include infant and maternal health, internal medicine, preventive and health equity, clinical algorithms, data science, telemedicine and remote patient monitoring, app development, cardiovascular disease, infectious diseases and more. To apply or find out more, interested students may click HERE. The application period is currently open, and all applications are due by May 1, 2022. The selected interns will be announced and matched to internships in May of 2022. Employers willing to sponsor interns may contact the BDHEA HERE.

About the Propel Center

Supported by founding partners Apple and Southern Company, the Propel Center is a first-of-its-kind innovation and learning hub for the entire HBCU community that will serve as a catalytic epicenter of learning, providing students with the knowledge, skills, tools and resources necessary to transform the nation’s talent pipeline and workforce. Through a robust virtual platform, on-campus activities at partner institutions and a physical campus located in the Atlanta University Center, Propel will offer innovative curricula and unprecedented leadership opportunities to HBCUs across the nation in an effort to produce the next generation of capable and conscientious Black leaders.

Netta Walker via Sarah Krick for use by 360 Magazine

Interview with Netta Walker

All-American: Homecoming, spinoff series to The CW’s hit sports drama All American, recently aired the first episodes. Up-and-coming actress Netta Walker plays a large role in the series. She talked with 360 about the role, her life, and her career as an actress.  You can follow her on Instagram and Twitter, and you can find her biography HERE.

1. What was your upbringing like?

I grew up on Westside in Jacksonville, Florida with 3 older brothers (all 10 years plus older than me). We were military kids—my dad was in the Navy, he met my mom in Manila when they were basically teenagers. My mother moved to the states when she married my dad and brought all of her Cebuan/Tacloban culture with her to Jax. Culture, family, and tradition were wildly important in our house. Our Christmas meals consisted of crab boils, squid adobo, greens, lumpia, baked beans, sometimes chicken feet if we could afford it. We didn’t have much money, so on weekends my mom would set up a booth at the Romona Flea Market and we’d sell whatever she could make. At one point she was hand-making dresses for child pageants and had me walking around Wal-Marts with her while she handed out her business cards. It’s wild because my parents really taught us how to hustle and made sure we knew that culture, practical life skills, and intellect were the only things that couldn’t be taken from us. I attended two historically black schools in the area for both middle and high school. My middle school, James Weldon Johnson, was on an HBCU campus (Edward Waters University) at the time. Every morning we sang Lift Every Voice and Sing, and during PE we watched the University have marching band and majorette practice on the field next to us. My high school, Stanton College Preparatory, was the first school made for black students in Florida. Both were highly competitive academic magnet schools in all-black neighborhoods with black women principles—I got WILDLY lucky. My parents were very serious about my education, and my dad made sure I knew the importance of academics in southern black culture. He was one of the first black students sent to an all-white school in Jacksonville when white folk threw bricks at him for simply pursuing an education. He prepped me for a world that wasn’t guaranteed to be kind to me, he taught me that I’d have to work 3 times as hard to get where I wanted to and that I could never slip up. My mom was on the road to being an Olympic swimmer for the Philippines and was a model in Japan, but when she got pregnant pretty young she took to the life of raising us and making sure we would want for nothing. She taught me that love is what keeps us all connected, and that so long as I lead with love I won’t regret my life. I was raised by fighters.

2. What is your relationship with Chicago, the city you worked and lived in?

Chicago is the city that made me the artist I am today. I can’t praise it enough. I always saw Chicago as the place artists go to get better at their craft, because lord knows we don’t go there to make money or get famous. The love people carry for their craft there is outstanding. I’d tell any young person aspiring to be an actor to go to Chicago and study. Go to Steppenwolf or The Gift and see the greats do the work up close and personal, and then decide if this is the field for you. I’d never felt so compelled to be an artist until I moved there and got to see the work the artists there create. It’s hands down one of my favorite cities in the world and I plan to rep it as mine for the rest of my life.

3. Who are your biggest influences?

My family. My parents showed me that the world wasn’t always going to be kind to me, but in spite of whatever it threw at me that I could still do anything I put my mind to. My dad encouraged me to remember how smart I actually am and to never back down from what’s right. He was the biggest influence in my life hands down. I live every day for him, in hopes of making him proud. My mom taught me how to live in love and solely move in love, she is truly my heart, I’d do anything for her. My brothers are the coolest men I’ve ever met, for real. My brother Eric is 10 years and 2 days older than me, so I’ve been trying to be him since I was 4. I dress like him to this day and watch only the anime he tells me to. My brother Anthony has inspired me by standing in his truth his whole life, I never would’ve learned how to trust and love myself without him. My oldest brother AJ showed me that we can make life whatever we dream of making it. My family has shaped every facet of who I am today and I love them all so deeply for it, as much as they get on my nerves.

4. Why did you decide to become an actress?

I had an incredible high school theater teacher, Shirley Sacks Kirby, who saw potential in me and was the first person to seriously encourage me to pursue a career in acting. She made me feel like I was actually good at something, and I never felt that way before. I was content in fading into the background and leaving my emotions to the side in my everyday life, but in theater, I was allowed to express all my pent-up emotions. She told my mom to put me in dance classes and voice lessons and monologue coachings, she helped me write and submit all of my college theater applications and put together all of my auditions. She shouted words of affirmations at me when I felt insecure and told me that I was special and talented when I felt like I wasn’t ever going to be good enough. She was my theater mom, and I owe my career to her.

5. You’ve been an actor for several years. What has been your favorite role?

My favorite role is always the next role, honestly. I love the challenges of diving into a new person, figuring them out, and falling in love with them—and exploring new characters feels like falling in love. But strictly speaking, Ophelia in Hamlet (at The Gift Theater directed by Monty Cole) may have been the most cathartic and challenging. My father had just passed that summer and playing a woman who loses herself in the grief of her father was really visceral and scary, but that excited me. Monty is also one of my favorite directors to exist, The Gift is my artistic home, and Shakespeare was how I started acting—so that role meant an indescribable amount to me.

6. What is your favorite part about being in All-American: Homecoming?

It feels like I’m participating in history. These stories, it’s an honor. The characters and their relationships feel monumental to me simply because we’re at an HBCU and representing culture.

7. Tell us a little bit about your character on the show?

Keisha is trouble, there’s no doubt about it. She’s a very strong and intelligent woman who isn’t afraid to stand on all ten toes and say “This is who I am, this is what I believe, and I’ll fight you if you have a problem”. She’s a pre-med major with an intense passion for dancing and a deep love for those she allows into her life. She’s the type to give you the shirt off her back—but also tell you how you can get your own shirt so we don’t have to do this again. She hits very close to home. I adore her.

8. On your Instagram, it’s clear you’re a big fan of Japanese anime. What are your favorite shows/movies?

Ah man, there are so many good ones. In terms of classics, Trigun hands down, it gives me hope and serves the retro style and storyline I adore. Inuyasha was my first anime crush, so Yashahime has also been nostalgic and sweet. My big brother Eric introduced me to Demon Slayer because he thought Nezuko reminded him of me so that show holds a lot of sentiment (my brother honestly is the reason I watch anime at all). Of course Attack on Titan and Sword Art Online, they both make me terribly anxious but I can’t stop watching them. The Boondocks isn’t Japanese but it makes me laugh like nothing else, it feels like an intersection of culture for me. Guilty pleasure watch is fully Ouran High Host Club, don’t judge me on that, I’m a romantic!

9. What’s your dream role?

I think my dream role is whatever thing is next. Getting to act is already such a dream, but I’m always dreaming about what story I get to tell next. There isn’t a definitive narrative to the dreams, but I do love playing characters who would never be in the same room together.

10. What’s next for Netta Walker?

We’re gonna see! Hopefully, I can scam my way into some exciting movies or into some provoking plays in New York. I’ve dreamed of being on Broadway for as long as I’ve wanted to an actor, so fingers crossed that happens! I never know what’s next honestly, my career has lowkey felt like a fever dream. But I’m so excited to see what the future holds.

College Student via 360 Magazine

Propel Student Impact Scholarships

The Propel Center, the global HBCU technology and learning hub, announced the launch of its Propel Student Impact Scholarships, with support from Apple and Southern Company. The new scholarship program, directed at HBCU students who are interested in pursuing careers in entrepreneurship, arts & entertainment, agri-tech, social justice, and health, is open to rising sophomores, juniors, seniors, and graduate students alike.

Propel Center will donate a total of 100 $10,000 scholarship awards to the winners, an investment that the Center believes will help to transform the nation’s talent pipeline and workforce. The Student Impact Scholarship winners will also have the unique opportunity to participate in work-based learning opportunities with Propel Center’s corporate partners.

“We at Propel are committed to not only building the ultimate Black talent pipeline but also to supporting and sustaining the ever-changing global and diverse workforce experience,” said Dr. Charles J. Gibbs, president of the Propel Center HBCU Consortium. “I am honored and humbled that through this first-of-its-kind scholarship program, and true to our mission, we’re also able to open broader career pathways for our so richly deserving HBCU students,” he continues.

“At Apple, we believe education is a powerful force for equity, and we’re thrilled to help create new opportunities for HBCU students to blaze trails in their academic and professional pursuits,” said Lisa Jackson, Apple’s vice president of environment, policy, and social Initiatives. “All students should have access to pursue their life’s dreams, and this scholarship program will provide a strong foundation for the next generation as they lead us into a bold, innovative future.”

“We are proud to help open greater doors of opportunity for HBCU students,” said Chris Womack, chairman and CEO of Georgia Power.  “We must equip students with the support and resources they need today so they can be the change agents we need tomorrow.”

To apply for the 2022 Propel Student Impact Scholarships, students must complete an online application and may also submit a self-created video or infographic describing how their interest in entrepreneurship, the arts & entertainment, agri-tech, social justice, or health aligns with the Propel Center’s mission.

Applicants are encouraged to share their video or infographic submission on a social media platform and tag Propel Center. All video submissions should also be shared via Instagram, TikTok, Facebook, and YouTube, while infographics should be shared on the applicant’s Pinterest, Facebook, or Twitter channels.

Upon posting their video or infographic, each student applicant must also upload a copy of their posting with their application. To apply or find out more, interested students may visit the Propel Center website HERE. The application period is open now, and all submissions are due by March 14, 2022. The scholarship winners will be announced on March 23, 2022.

About Propel Center

Supported by founding partners Apple and Southern Company, the Propel Center is a first-of-its-kind innovation and learning hub for the entire HBCU community that will serve as a catalytic epicenter of learning, providing students with the knowledge, skills, tools, and resources necessary to transform the nation’s talent pipeline and workforce. Through a robust virtual platform, on-campus activities at partner institutions, and a physical campus located in the Atlanta University Center, Propel will bring innovative curricula and unprecedented leadership opportunities to produce the next generation of Black leaders.

BLM graphic via Mina Tocalini for us by 360 MAGAZINE

HBCU Cultural Heritage Stewardship

Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) have been an integral part of our educational system in the United States. Originally being founded in the 1830s, HBCUs cultivate an environment that was long sought after to ensure educational equality. This nations HBCUs are full of the rich history of African American activism, and their campuses also stand as pioneering pieces of landscaping and architecture.

This is precisely why on February 28, the National Trust’s African American Cultural Heritage Action Fund declared they would be awarding over $650,000 in grant awards to five HBCUs across the country in part with their HBCU Cultural Heritage Stewardship Initiative.

While each HBCU embodies symbolisms of African American brilliance and triumph, the programming guarantees that each campus will collect resources to protect and sustain the historical campuses. These grants aim to preserve and revitalize landmark pieces that grace each HBCU, and to promote leadership on each respective campus.

Two differing forms of grants entail the initiative; the first being a $150,000 grant aiming to expand campus-wide cultural stewardship plans, and the second as a $60,000 developmental grant that will conserve a specific milestone building on or associated with an HBCU campus.

Each grant has the intention to enhance plans to improve and sustain varying architectural campus facilities. Launched through the National Trust’s Action Fund in 2020, the program allies with The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, National Endowment for Humanities, Ford Foundation, The JPB Foundation, J.M. Kaplan Fund and The Executive Leadership Council.

The initiative set in place today entails $3.2 million set forth to the HBCUs grants, seeking influence from the Trust’s extensive years of practice to generate proposals of refurbishment and maintenance at each college or university. The National Trust’s Action Fund links with 13 HBCUs and has financed 6 campus and 7 singular-developing projects modern day.

Brent Leggs, Senior Vice President and Executive Director of the African American Cultural Heritage Action Fund at the National Trust spoke on the impact that these grants would permit, stating, “These grants are significant in light of the recent threat to HBCU campuses. Preservation is the strategic counterpoint to centuries of erasure, and it underscores the critical nature of the African American contribution to our nation.

“Without the doctors, lawyers, engineers and other professionals HCBUs have produced, the American story would not be the same.  The Action Fund’s work to preserve the legacies of intellect, activism, and enlightenment on these campuses will inspire future generations of all Americans to believe that, despite the challenge, they too can overcome.”

The following HBCU recipients include:

  • Florida A&M University (Tallahassee, Florida) aiming to produce stewardship projects across their 422-acre campus (1887)
  • Johnson C. Smith University (Charlotte, North Carolina) to create a conservation strategy for its Historic Quad (1867)
  • Rust College (Holly Springs, Mississippi) aiming to produce stewardship projects across their campus (1866)
  • Shaw University (Raleigh, North Carolina) aiming to produce stewardship projects across their 65-acre campus (1865); and
  • Voorhees College (Denmark, South Carolina) aiming to produce stewardship projects across their 380-acre campus (1897).

Shaw University President Dr. Paulette Dillard spoke on their excitement to be apart of the Trust’s recipients this year, stating, “The Shaw University community expresses its sincerest appreciation to the National Trust for Historic Preservation for awarding the campus a $150,000 planning grant to assist our efforts in preserving African American history.

“From educating the former enslaved to graduating some of the first African American doctors to helping ignite the civil rights movement, the legacy of Shaw University is woven into the fabric of American history. Preserving the treasures of our historic buildings extends the powerful narrative that describes the indelible contributions of this university.”

The planning grant, too, entails that all HBCU beneficiaries gain access to a paid student professional growing opportunity; one student from each individual campus will work with a team of architects, engineers and consultants to grow their campus. This funding comes from the Initiative and grows the field of African American preservationists.

Florida A&M President Dr. Larry Robinson spoke on the behalf of their campus, stating, “Florida A&M University is the third oldest campus in the State University System of Florida. We appreciate the support of the National Trust for Historic Preservation to assist the University in furthering preservation of landmark buildings on our campus.

The planning grant will allow the faculty, staff, and students across the disciplines of architecture, engineering and the humanities to collaborate in ways that highlight the national impact of Johnathan C. Gibbs, Lucy Moten and Andrew Carnegie and the buildings named in their honor. They also will help preserve the history of the Civil Rights Movement on our campus where iconic figures like Booker T. Washington, Mary McLeod Bethune, Marian Anderson and others changed American history.”

Instrument illustration by Ivory Rowen for 360 Magazine

NBOTB: A Salute to the Battle

Webber Marketing (WM), creators of the National Battle of the Bands (NBOTB), releases a new documentary film titled: National Battle of the Bands: A Salute to the Battle. The film is presented by Pepsi Zero Sugar and will air throughout February in honor of Black History Month.

The new film captures the essence and showcases the spirit of the HBCU band battle, highlighting both the field and stand performances, and features Bethune Cookman University, Marching Wildcats; Langston University, “Marching Pride” Band; North Carolina A&T State University, The Blue and Gold Marching Machine; Norfolk State University, The Spartan “Legion” Marching Band; Southern University, Human Jukebox; Jackson State University, The Sonic Boom of the South; Talladega College, Great Tornado Band, and Tennessee State University, Aristocrat of Bands.

“A Salute to the Battle is a documentary film that brings the action, energy and pageantry of the ‘Battle’ performance to viewers, in an up close and personal perspective, right into comfort of their homes where they can experience the action with their friends and family,” says Derek Webber, Executive Producer & CEO of Webber Marketing. “There is so much pride and prestige that accompanies the HBCU band experience and the long legacy of trailblazers who paved the way for HBCU bands to exist. We are honored to play a part in continuing the celebration and sharing of their stories with the masses through our films and events.”

The eight Historical Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) marching bands appearing in the film participated in the 2021 NBOTB in Houston, Texas. The goal of the documentary is to continue amplifying the importance and impact of the National Battle of the Bands event, the participating bands, and its members and the HBCU community at large.

“At Pepsi, we’ve committed to supporting HBCUs year-round and I’m honored to help shine a light on these talented marching bands with this new documentary release,” said Chauncey Hamlett, VP and CMO of PepsiCo Beverages North America (South Division). “These bands are part of the driving force in the celebrated HBCU culture, bringing the energy, hype, and history to every game.”

The historical significance of HBCU bands is sown into the fabric of society. HBCU marching bands continue to be front and center at some of the biggest moments in history; filling the air with their unified sound while marching proudly and dancing unapologetically in celebration of their ancestors who paved the way for their rhythm to be on display for all to see, hear and feel.

For more information about the NBOTB and its “A Salute to the Battle” documentary film, click HERE and stay updated on social media on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

About the National Battle of the Bands

The event’s mission is to enhance the exposure of Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and their marching bands, the roles they play in educating aspiring musicians and developing our future leaders. Event organizers have generated more than $700,000 in scholarships for the participating colleges and universities.

protest illustration by Alison Christensen for 360 Magazine

BAI Chair on Bomb Threats

The Chair of the Black AIDS Institute Grazell Howard released a statement regarding the bomb threats that have recently been made to HBCUs, or historically black colleges and universities. More than a dozen threats were made to schools such as Howard University, Southern University, Morgan State University, as well as many others. The police are still investigating who issued these claims and are suggesting that these crimes may be related. Here is what Howard had to say: 

“As an alumni of two prestigious Historically Black Colleges and Universities, I’m horrified to learn of the heinous threats of violence that are putting students at HBCUs under siege. The Black AIDS Institute condemns these acts. It is abhorrent that on the first day of Black History Month, more than 13 HBCUs had to lock down their campuses and postpone classes because of bomb threats. While no explosives have been found, law enforcement at the highest levels must step in and ensure that our students and communities are safe.

Domestic terrorism targeting the African American community speaks to the stain of America’s history and the current crisis of race relations in our country. We must treat Racism like the public health epidemic that it is. Many states, cities and counties have done just that, and we applaud these efforts. But we need elected officials in every state to do the same. We also need swift action from the federal government to investigate and punish those responsible for these vile acts.  

For our part, BAI will continue to fight against racism, sexism, xenophobia, transphobia, and the stigmas that threaten our communities. We will stand shoulder to shoulder to lift up students at HBCUs and throughout all of our communities and we will continue the important work of fighting for voting rights, social justice, education, and health equity for communities of color that have been under siege for far too long.”

Film artwork via Heather Skovlund for use by 360 MAGAZINE

THE CW NETWORKS DEBUTS “MARCH”

From the CW Network comes the brand-new documentary series MARCH, that navigates through the journey of competitive HBCU band culture. MARCH directly follows the lives of varying band members and leaders that are a part of the Marching Storm, Prairie View A&M University’s Marching Band.

The docu-series comes in eight parts, illustrating the efforts that the members put in behind the scenes to ensure success, and how they juggle their college life and academics with their commitment to the marching band. MARCH airs on Monday, January 25 (8:00-9:00 pm ET/PT) and then it moves to its regularly scheduled programming of Sunday nights beginning on February 26 (9:00-10:00 pm ET/PT), after ALL AMERICAN and ALL AMERICAN: HOMECOMING take place on Monday nights.

The new series MARCH highlights the stories of diverse and gifted college students that attend Prairie View A&M University. Whether they’re drummers in the marching band or dancers on the flag team, they all have one thing in common; they work hard at their craft, and they juggle the responsibilities of college on top of their musical endeavors. While delving into personal stories from individuals and staff associated with the 300-person marching band, MARCH also studies the rich legacy and history of Prairie View A&M, emphasizing the importance of the Marching Storm band has had on that powerful story. The series follows along the journey that they must go through to become the top ranked HBCU band in the nation. Performances include a captivating homecoming show with Texas A&M and Southern University.

From Stage 13, MARCH is executively produced by Cheryl Horner McDonough, Jamail Shelton, Shari Scorca and Marcel Fuentes.

About Prairie View A&M University

Serving as the second-oldest public institution of higher education in the state of Texas, Prairie View A&M University has instituted importance on individuality and self-expression. With an array of programs for engineers, nurses and educators, PVAMU has fitting baccalaureate, master or doctor degree through eight colleges and schools. PVAMU prides themselves on having top-tier mentors that are available to guide and advise their students towards their dreams. For more information on PVAMU, visit www.pvamu.edu.

Art Basel Gif by Reb Czukoski for use by 360 Magazine

Basquiat × Art Basel

Fat Joe, French Montana, Busta Rhymes, and D-Nice all hit the Triller × The Bishop Gallery physical and digital curated experience during Miami’s Art Basel for the historic first-ever live NFT auction of rare photos of Jean-Michel Basquiat, a legendary neo-expressionist artist, by photographers Alexis Adler and Al Diaz.

Our Friend Jean NFT Auction, was an exclusive event of art, music along with a live NFT auction experience. For the first time, an incredible selection of NFTs featuring rare and personal photos of Basquiat were available on the Triller marketplace, a trailblazing AI-powered global platform, with exclusive previews and purchase opportunities onsite. The Bishop Gallery chose the Triller NFT marketplace because the Triller platform has been specifically engineered to minimize the minting process’s computing costs and complexities to reduce the carbon footprint effects and provide accessibility for creators looking to monetize through NFT sales.

The photos of Basquiat being introduced to the blockchain, gave the world a chance to own a piece of the man that made the art movement of the early 80s New York City so electric. The blowout event featured performances from hip hop royalty.

Fat Joe first took the stage to perform and welcomed Stevenson A. Dunn, Jr. from The Bishop Gallery to introduce the first ever seen NFT drop, which included four rare photos of Basquiat. Next, Busta Rhymes came out to perform and lastly, French Montana performed a set while DJ D-Nice spun the entire night.

Next up after Art Basel, Triller x The Bishop Gallery in partnership with NYX Professional Makeup will present the “Our Friend, Jean-HBCU Tour,” and exhibition that will embark on a tour to eight HBCU (Historically Black Colleges/Universities) schools. The tour will kick off in early 2022 and land in eight cities, where Adler will appear to share the works from the Alexis Adler Archive, featuring works from Basquiat and potential art donations to the schools. Together, Triller, Bishop Gallery, and NYX Pm, have artistry for all that has been at the core, and strive to bring accessibility to the arts and self-expression to younger generations.

Mariah Pearson via Trice Browning for use by 360 Magazine

Interview with Mariah Pearson

By: Skyler Johnson

On July 5th, 2021, the Revlon Creme of Nature “Legacy to Leadership” scholarship inaugural winners were announced. The scholarship was meant to provide funding to students attending HBCUs, or historically black colleges and universities. I had the privilege of interviewing one of the students who received the scholarship: Mariah Pearson, who’s currently attending North Carolina A&T State University

How important is it for you to attend an HBCU?

It was personally extremely important for me because I feel as though a lot of times, in society, people of color, don’t exactly get the opportunities as other people would and I feel that at my HBCU and at other HBCUs across the country were given those opportunities. We’re given resources to better navigate, better operate in the real world… in corporate America and professional settings. It also provided me with a community of people who have similar backgrounds as me and similar interests as me. It’s awesome to go to one. 

What is your favorite thing about college thus far?

So far my favorite thing about college would probably be the environment, the way my school feels like a family, and how you can meet new people and it doesn’t feel awkward to introduce yourself. [Talking to a stranger at school] kind of feels like you’re talking to someone you’ve known forever. That’s probably my favorite part, just feeling like I’m at home when I’m not at home. 

Briefly, can you go over what you expect to gain out of college? 

Of course to get a degree. And learn how to operate in professional settings, but also just for personal development. I feel that going to college has opened a bunch of doors and there’s a bunch of opportunities for new experiences that you might not get if you don’t go to college. Knowing who I am and what I like, who I want to be, how I want to grow, the direction I want to grow in. I definitely feel that college helps you figure that out really quickly. 

What’re the most important lessons you’ve learned thus far?

There’s a couple. One of them is definitely: always be on your Ps and Qs, because somebody’s always watching, and you don’t know who’s watching or when, but… somebody’s always seeing you. That’s one of them. Another one is always try and surround yourself with people who you want to see yourself as. You can’t become a winner if you’re not in a group of winners. You can’t be a leader if you’re not in a group of leaders. So it’s important that you surround yourself with people who feed into you positively and of course hold you to a standard that you would hold yourself to. I think those are the main lessons that I’ve learned so far, and I’m sure there are plenty more to come. 

What made you want to get into health care?

So I’m going into physical therapy, and when I was first trying to figure out where I was going to go to school and what I was going to go for I… [didn’t] really know… But as an athlete, who had to experience going through physical therapy, I was like, “I kinda like sports, I kinda like helping people, so let’s find a way to mix the two.” And physical therapy is what came up… I later began to grow a love for it through learning how the healthcare system operates, and of course how it treats different people. Because I personally know that being a black woman I’m going to experience a different type of healthcare than anyone else would. Especially since I had family [members] who had gone through physical therapy and had different medical procedures done and they felt that they hadn’t been treated the way they should’ve been, or wanted, to be treated. [Which is why] one of my goals as a health care professional in the future would definitely be to make people feel more comfortable and cared for and appreciated as a patient.

Do you expect to change the world? 

Yes, I do. In some way, shape, or form I will [change the world], because another one of my goals as a physical therapist is to establish a [holistic] health care system. [I would not just] tap into the physical but also into the mental state, [asking] how [a patient’s] feeling, [if they were] eating, [if they were] exercising. I’m going to establish a facility where I take care of the whole person and not just say, “oh you’re sick, here’s some medicine.” Personally I’m not a big fan of medication which is why I chose physical therapy, because you’re essentially healing your own body by yourself. There’s no needles, there’s no medicine. It’s purely you moving your body and [exploring] how movement can essentially create a better lifestyle for you. 

How excited were you when you received the Revlon HBCU scholarship?

I cried, when I found out, I was so… thankful to Creme of Nature for this scholarship. It’s something that I definitely needed at the time. When I went through the process of figuring out what scholarship I was gonna apply for, and what bubble I fit in, with the scholarship world, they popped up and I [was] like, “this is perfect, this is awesome,” because I [could] make a video explaining who I [was] and what I [wanted] to do and what I [was] passionate about… It [was] purely me telling them about how I really feel about where I want to be in life, and my profession… so it was incredible. I cried. I called my mom. I called everybody.