Posts tagged with "europe"

Nothing But Thieves Releases New Single – “Impossible”

Southend five-piece Nothing But Thieves have announced the release of new single Impossible, which is available now. The song follows recent singles Is Everybody Going Crazy? and Real Love Song and is taken from their forthcoming third album Moral Panic. They have also announced a huge UK, Ireland and European tour for Autumn 2021, including a headline show at London’s The O2.

THEIR NEW ALBUM, MORAL PANIC, WILL BE RELEASED ON OCTOBER 23RD.

LISTEN: IMPOSSIBLE

Nothing But Thieves are no strangers to powerful anthems, and with Impossible, they’ve written another vast soundscape. Produced by Mike Crossey (The 1975, Arctic Monkeys and Wolf Alice), Impossible is an exuberant track opening with raw emotion before launching into a huge chorus full of elated melody and affecting lyrics of hope and passion. The band says,

“In a way ‘Impossible’ is the complete antithesis of everything else on the album, which has a lot of anxiety and confusion about what’s happening on this planet. This became the opposite, zooming into one person’s head, just being lifted up and transported by a feeling of possibility and hope. It was a moment of relief that both we and the album needed.”

Recent single Real Love Song was included as Annie Mac’s Hottest Record in the World before being added to the B List on Radio 1 and has already achieved 3.5 million streams worldwide. Richly anthemic and wildly grandiose, it builds triumphantly with a hymn-like euphoric melody alongside singer Conor’s poignant almost operatic vocals. Amidst mesmerising animations and a gritty performance from the band themselves, the Basak Erol directed video showcases the dreamlike story of three characters seeking love in the wrong places.

Remaining on the Radio 1 Playlist for 8 weeks, as one of the longest running tracks on their playlist, Is Everybody Going Crazy? was the band’s biggest Airplay hit to date, achieving almost 12 million streams worldwide and welcomed the exciting return of Nothing But Thieves. A gritty dark rock song, lyrically it discusses a fractured, barely recognisable civilisation and desire for escapism, which proved curiously relevant to the world right now.

Real Love Song, Is Everybody Going Crazy? and recent release Unperson is the band’s first new music since their 2018 EPWhat Did You Think When You Made Me This Way, their 2017 acclaimed album Broken Machine, which charted at #2 in the UK album chart, and their debut self-titled album Nothing But Thieves. Their third album Moral Panic will be released on 23rdOctober, with the pre-orders now live here and Unperson available as an instant grat.

The past few years have been quite a ride for Nothing But Thieves. Amassing over 700,000 album sales and 750 million streams so far, they have built up a loyal and wide following for their impactful alt rock sound, cementing themselves as one of the best current rock bands in the world. Selling 150,000 tickets on their last album campaign, which included a sold-out show at London’s Alexandra Palace and selling out their entire worldwide Broken Machine headline tour, their success has been global.

The band have performed on TV shows such as The Late Late Show With James Corden and Jimmy Kimmel Live!, after their debut became the bestselling debut from a UK rock band in the US in 2015 and played packed out international shows from Poland to Amsterdam, where they headlined an arena to 6,000 fans. After intimately debuting new songs at Tufnell Park Dome earlier recently for a BRITs/War Child gig, they were set to tour internationally earlier this year, including a show to 6,500 people at Moscow Adrenaline Stadium.

They have now announced a brand new UK, Ireland and European tour for Autumn 2021, including their biggest ever headline London show at O2 Arena. Tickets go on sale on Friday 18th September at 9am, with pre-sale tickets available from Wednesday 16thSeptember at 9am for all pre-orders of ‘Moral Panic’. Full dates are as follows:

September 2021

Thurs 30th         Dublin                Olympia

October 2021

Sat 2nd                Belfast               Ulster Hall

Wed 6th              Plymouth          Pavillions

Thurs 7th            Cardiff                Motorpoint Arena

Fri 8th                  London              O2 Arena

Sun 10th             Birmingham     O2 Academy

Mon 11th           Glasgow            Barrowland

Thurs 14th         Manchester     O2 Victoria Warehouse

Sat 16th              Nottingham     Motorpoint Arena

Mon 18th           Barcelona         Razzamataz 2

Wed 20th           Paris                   Casino de Paris

Sun 24th             Wiesbaden       Schlachtohof

Tues 26th           Leizig                 Täubchenthal

Thurs 28th Berlin Columbiahalle

November 2021

Tues 2nd             Munich              Tonhalle

Wed 3rd             Milan                 Fabrique

Fri 5th                  Zurich                 Halle 622

Sat 6th                 Luxembourg    Atelier

Mon 8th              Copenhagen    Amager Bio

Tues 9th              Stockholm        Fryhuset

Thurs 11th         Köln                    Palladium

Fri 12th               Amsterdam      Ziggo Dome

Nothing But Thieves are Conor Mason (vocals, guitars), Joe Langridge-Brown (guitars), Dominic Craik (guitars, keyboard), Philip Blake (bass guitar) and James Price (drums).

To Watch/Listen to “Impossible”:

https://nbthiev.es/impossible

To Pre-Order Moral Panic:

http://nbthiev.es/moralpanic

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COVID Mask Care illustration by Mina Tocalini

Study Shows State-By-State Reopenings Exacerbate COVID

As Summer vacations end in Europe and in the United States and students return to college campuses and primary schools worldwide, fresh waves of COVID infections are causing renewed restrictions after loosening in the Spring and Summer. However, a new study shows that this uncoordinated opening, closing, and reopening of states and counties, is making the COVID problem worse in the U.S., according to the authors of a new study released today. Using methods from their previous work, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, MIT PhD student Michael Zhao and Sinan Aral, Director of the MIT Initiative on the Digital Economy and author of the upcoming book The Hype Machine, have released the first comprehensive study of the impact of state-by-state re-openings on the COVID pandemic, spanning January to July, 2020 with surprising and troubling results.

After studying combined data on the mobility of over 22 million mobile devices, daily data on state-level closure and reopening policies and social media connections among 220 million Facebook users, the team found that reimposing local social distancing or shelter-in-place orders after reopening may be far less effective than policy makers would hope.

In fact, such closures may actually be counterproductive as they encourage those in locked down regions to flee to reopened regions, potentially causing new hotspots to emerge. This analysis demonstrates that travel spillovers are not only systematic and predictable, but also large and meaningful.

Arizona was one of the first states to open businesses, but in late June, bars, gyms, movie theaters, and water parks were shut down for 30 days as the state became one of the virus’s new hot spots. One month after dine-in restaurants, bars, and gyms were allowed to reopen in California, Governor Gavin Newsom made the country’s most aggressive reopening reversal amid his state’s spike in COVID-19 cases, shuttering all indoor dining, bars, zoos, and museums in the state. Similar reversals have occurred in Colorado, Florida, Louisiana, Michigan, New Mexico, Oregon, Texas, West Virginia among other states.

“We’ve seen a patchwork of flip-flopping state policies across the country,” says Sinan Aral, the senior author of the study. “The problem is that, when they are uncoordinated, state re-openings and even closures create massive travel spillovers that are spreading the virus across state borders. If we continue to pursue ad hoc policies across state and regional borders, we’re going to have a difficult time controlling this virus, reopening our economy or even sending our kids back to school.”

The new study showed that while closures directly reduced mobility by 5-6%, re-openings returned mobility to pre-pandemic levels. Once all of a state’s peer states (in travel or social media influence) locked down, focal county mobility in that state dropped by an additional 15-20% but increased by 19-32% once peer states reopened. “State policies have effects far beyond their borders,” says Aral. “We desperately need coordination if we are to control this virus.”

When an origin county was subject to a statewide shelter-in-place order, travel to counties yet to impose lockdowns increased by 52-65%. If the origin had reopened, but the destination was still closed, travel to destination counties was suppressed by 9-17% for nearby counties and 21-27% for distant counties. But when a destination reopened while an origin was still closed, people from the closed origins flooded into the destination by 11-12% from nearby counties and 24% from distant counties. “People flee closures and flood into newly reopened states,” says Aral, “we can’t avoid the travel spillovers caused by our ad hoc policies.”

These findings highlight the urgent need to coordinate COVID-19 reopenings across regions and the risks created by ad hoc local shutdowns and reopenings. In addition, the results highlight the importance of taking spillover effects seriously when formulating national policy and for national and local policies to coordinate across regions where spillovers are strong.

5-Star Hotel Hassler Roma Reopens

Rome’s legendary Hotel Hassler Roma reopens on September 1, the last continental European hotel represented by WEILL to reopen in the wake of Covid-19 closings.

Founded in 1893 at the top of the city’s landmark Spanish Steps, the Hassler has been owned and run by the Wirth family for five generations. Roberto Wirth has run the hotel since 1982, and his twin children Robertino and Veruschka are now being groomed to be part of the management team. The Hassler opened Europe’s first-hotel-rooftop restaurant in 1955, and its Michelin-starred Imàgo restaurant reopened to Romans and visitors in June 2020. Il Palazzetto, the Hassler’s adjacent boutique hotel whose terrace fronts the Spanish Steps, reopened on the first of June.

WEILL CLIENTS’ (EUROPE, AFRICA, ISRAEL) OPENING STATUS AS OF SEPTEMBER 1, 2020

COVID-19 PROCEDURES

Each and every hotel has instituted sweeping safety, hygiene and social-distancing protocols in keeping with or surpassing those required by local health authorities.
For more specific procedures regarding Covid-19, click HERE.

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Hotel illustration done by Mina Tocalini of 360 MAGAZINE.

Exceptional Chefs at Green Pearls Hotels

Green Pearls hotels can be found all around the globe, with each destination and venue offering uniquely unforgettable experiences. One of the greatest features among the Green Pearls hotels are the exceptional chefs. Below, are some of are favorites.

The Smiling Gecko Project’s The Farmhouse

The Vietnam War and the Khmer Rouge’s reign of terror destroyed large parts of Cambodia’s infrastructure and the population still suffers from poverty and hunger. But, the Smiling Gecko Project enables families to help themselves following the devastation that many Cambodian people face. With the Smiling Gecko, projects have been defined based on four pillars of education, agriculture, handcrafts/production and tourism/gastronomy to aid in the fight against poverty.

The Farmhouse and restaurant are the perfect example of Smiling Gecko project. Built in 2015, the idea was to accommodate tourists and students involved in the project. The Farmhouse offers a sustainable training and employment place for local residents and offers secure jobs with humane working conditions. They are able to earn a living and sustainably support themselves and their families.

One of the success stories of the project is that of chef Mariya Un Noun.

“I garnish my food with love,” says the 30-year-old chef. Her story begins in the slums of Phnom Penh in Cambodia. After only being able to attend 3 years of school growing up, Mariya Un Noun now works as the Executive Chef at the Smiling Gecko Farmhouse.

The mother of two children came to Smiling Gecko in 2014, where she quickly attracted attention with her passion and talent for cooking. Since the opening of the Farmhouse Smiling Gecko restaurant in 2015, Mariya has played a crucial role in the development of the menu. The young Cambodian interprets local specialties in her own creative way.  A partnership with The Farmhouse gives young European chefs the opportunity to work with Mariya in the farmhouse and to bring the soul of Cambodian cuisine to the world.

Dolomites’ Hotel Paradiso Pure.Living

On the other side of the world, in the newly opened 100% holistic vegetarian Hotel Paradiso located on the Seiser Alm, another chef surprises her guests with creativity and skill.

Opened in July 2020 after extensive renovations, Paradiso Pure.Living is the first vegetarian and sustainable hotel on the Seiser Alm, the largest high alpine pasture in Europe which is nestled in the middle of the Dolomites.

The concept is based on the vision of a healthy and sustainable lifestyle. It is the owners’ wish to inspire guests to take ideas home with them and integrate them into their everyday life. The 100% vegetarian cuisine offers a delicious, natural variety and at the same time contributes to the environment. This vision comes to life with chef Federica Scolta.

Born in Abruzzo in 1982, Scolta’s path leads her through Italy after studying international relations. She gained her first experiences in simple Trattorias, but her talent and passion led her to well-known starred restaurants, where she continued to develop her passion and skills.

 “Being vegetarian is a choice for life, it means becoming aware that what we eat is transformed into energy to support our body, soul and spirit.”

At the Hotel Paradiso Pure.Living, Federica, as a chef, follows a 100% vegetarian approach in the knowledge that this concept promotes personal health while reducing the carbon footprint in our fragile environment.

Top 5 European Countries That Offer Freelance Visas

An increasing number of Americans are seeking options for better living—long-term—beyond the U.S. borders, however to earn a living while away requires something beyond a tourist visa. A new report from International Living explores the top five European countries that offer the best freelance visas.

“If you’ve paid attention to headlines in recent weeks, you’ll have likely seen all the many stories about Americans wanting to escape the US Covid crisis,” says Jeff D. Opdyke, editor of The Savvy Retiree, a publication of International Living. “Stories on how to seek second passports. Stories on countries where Americans are increasingly seeking information on emigration. Stories on certain countries and Caribbean islands aiming to attract Americans for a year abroad.

“What’s often missing amid all these many words is the story of how to live abroad for longer than a year without having to spending $100,000 or more buying a passport. For the fact is, a number of countries, particularly in Europe, offer ‘freelance’ visas specifically aimed at those who want to live and work in a particular country for the long haul.

“This report addresses that. Because, frankly, that’s often the quickest and easiest way for the average American to gain permission to live and work legally in Europe.

“Only a limited handful of European countries offer freelance visas. In most countries, you’ll need a job offer from a local firm, or you’ll need to work for a multinational will local operations that transfers you into a particular country. For most of us, that’s not an option. Instead, we have to look to countries that specifically welcome the independent, freelance worker.”

The report explores the five best countries to consider in Europe:

Czech Republic

“I chose to pursue a freelance life two years ago in Prague, one of Europe’s most comfortable and picturesque cities, after careful consideration of other European destinations,” says Opdyke. “Primary among those reasons is the fact that the Czech Republic offers what’s known locally as a Zivno, widely regarded as one of the best freelance-worker options in Europe.

This isn’t a visa, and it not specifically targeted at foreigners. Instead, the Zivno is effectively a national registry of independent workers, whether they’re native-born Czechs or foreigners with long-term residence status. As such, applicants will need a long-residence visa to pair with the Zivno.

“But assuming you have marketable skills in something that allows you to earn income online or even locally – as, say, a language teacher,” says Opdyke, “you will likely obtain your Zivno and with that it is easier to qualify for a one-year, long-term residence visa, a stamp in your passport. Then, assuming you play by Czech rules (pay your taxes and the mandatory health and social security insurance – combined, about $200 a month, minimum), you’ll apply for and receive a biometric, long-term residence card good for two years and renewable for another two. After five years, you can apply for permanent residence/citizenship, if that appeals to you. (Note: Because the Czech Republic is part of the European Union, its passport is one of the five best in the world.)”

Prague, the capital, is a wonderful city to call home—folks are close to so much in terms of weekend getaways or longer trips. The lifestyle is relaxing. The city is eye-candy pretty much everywhere you go. And the food is great. A couple can live the good life there on a budget of $1,900 a month.

Germany

“Here, you want the Freiberufler, Germany’s self-employment visa,” reports Opdyke. “It’s not terribly difficult to obtain, so long as you jump through various paperwork hoops that exist – and Germany has lots of paperwork hoops, including revenue plans, letters of intent or contracts from potential or existing clients, and various other documents.”

Folks will also need to prove income sufficiency, which generally means at least €5,000 (just over $5,900) in a (preferably) German bank account.

Freiberufler is good for six months to three years, depending on the application, and it’s renewable. The primary challenge is that an applicant will (probably) need to prove he or she has German freelance clients. Once armed with the Freiberufler, should a freelancer ultimately want permanent residence in Germany, it’s possible to apply after eight years.

Germany offers an excellent standard of living, with good infrastructure and quality healthcare. However, Germany’s cost of living tends to be higher than the European Union average. A monthly budget for a couple living in a suburban area, close to Munich, runs $3,610 to $4,160.

Spain

The autónomo is what freelancers pursue in the land of sangria.

“The process, while not especially difficult, can be lengthy – taking upwards of six months to complete, which means a 90-day tourist visa for the Schengen Zone (of which Spain is a member) will often expire before you receive your autónomo,” advises Opdyke. “So, you need to plan for that by completing as much of the process as you can outside of Spain. Conversely, as your 90-day limit approaches you can hop across to a non-Schengen country such as Ireland or the UK for a few weeks or months to stop your Schengen clock from winding down.”

The autónomo is identical to the Czech Zivno in that it’s good for one year. An applicant can apply for two, two-year extensions, and after five years of surviving on tapas, then, apply for permanent residency/citizenship if he or she wishes to remain in Spain as a naturalized citizen eligible for an EU passport.

Granada, overlooked by the snow-capped peaks of the majestic Sierra Nevada, is a timeless city of many layers, many people, and many stories. The city is quickly gaining ground as a top choice in Spain—the climate and weather of Granada justify why so many peoples have sought to be here. And the nearly 500-year-old University of Granada plays a major role in the city’s youthful vibe. Here a couple can live well on a monthly budget of $2,476.

Portugal

This is, perhaps, the easiest freelance/self-employed visa to pursue in the EU, which makes it quite popular for those seeking a visa that allows for both long-term residence and permission to earn a living in Europe.

There are two options:

1) residence visa for independent work (working locally for Portuguese clients as a contract employee);

2) residence visa for entrepreneur work (essentially the digital nomad stuff collecting clients from around the world).

“Under Portugal’s ‘non-habitual residency’ program,” says Opdyke, “income generated outside of Portugal for certain types of ‘high-value’ activities is eligible for a tax exemption, meaning you pay no local taxes (you will still owe self-employment taxes to the States, and, potentially, personal income taxes, depending on how much money you earn living abroad).

Permanent residency/citizenship rules in Portugal follow the Spanish and Czech model in that you can apply after five years.

Porto, the second-largest metropolitan area in Portugal after Lisbon, is an increasingly popular city amongst digital nomads. Porto is a living, breathing picture-postcard of European charm, with plenty to see and do. There’s a proverbial banquet of exciting activities, from historic city walks to wine tastings across the river in Vila Nova de Gaia’s wine caves. But best of all, it’s good value. A couple can live well here on a monthly budget of $1,550.

France

“France’s entrepreneur/profession libérale visa is similar to Portugal in terms of ease of attainment,” says Opdyke. “It’s an ideal way for Francophiles to gain legal permission to live and work in France.

“You need to demonstrate that you can fend for yourself financially by proving you earn at least the French legal minimum wage (about €1,540 per month, or $1,800). Beyond that, there are typical documents and whatnot that are necessary for the application, but nothing particularly difficult.”

And despite widespread misconceptions about cost of living in France, outside of Paris the country is a pretty affordable place to call home.

Given its ideal placement along the French Riviera, the coastal city of Toulon in southeastern France provides an idyllic lifestyle for residents and short-term visitors. Away from the hustle-and-bustle of big “resort” towns like Nice, Cannes, and St. Tropez, unassuming Toulon lies a bit off the radar. A couple can live well here on a monthly budget of $1,986 to $2,228.

The full report, including information on a bonus country, The Netherlands, can be found, here: 5 Best Freelance Visas in Europe

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Sunset illustration done by Mina Tocalini of 360 MAGAZINE.

7 Most Amazing Travel Destinations in Europe

With most of Europe now opening back up to tourists and travelers after the impact of COVID-19, many of us are starting to think about planning an upcoming European adventure. If you are thinking of going on vacation and want to visit Europe this year after months of uncertainty in quarantine and lockdown, the good news is that most countries on this continent have managed to get control of the coronavirus and are safe to visit once again. Here are some of the top destinations in Europe that can’t be missed. 

Portugal:

Portugal is a vibrant, diverse country with so much to see and do that it can feel like you have visited several different countries during your time there. With so much to see and do you will struggle to decide whether you want to enjoy a fun and adventurous city break in magical Porto or explore the sandy beaches and traditional resorts of Albufeira in the Algarve. Or, with trains in Portugal that run regularly, connect the country and can easily be booked online, why not travel to various different Portuguese destinations – don’t restrict yourself to just one place. 

Scotland:

With vibrant cities like Glasgow and Edinburgh and rolling countryside including picturesque views in untouched rural areas like on the Isle of Skye, Scotland is the perfect choice for anybody who is looking to visit Europe. While much of Scotland is still in lockdown due to COVID-19 compared to the rest of the UK and Europe, this might be a destination that you want to plan your travel to further in the future – but it will be worth the wait. Get starting putting your trip together with this Scotland trip planner

Spain:

There’s a reason that Spain is the most popular destination in Europe for tourists. This gorgeous county has just the right combination of cities, villages, and beaches and there really is something for everybody. You can explore the architecture and art in Barcelona, delve into history in Madrid or Seville, or party on the beach in Ibiza or Tenerife – the choice is yours! While Spain was particularly hard-hit by the coronavirus, it is now recovering and ready to welcome visitors once again. 

Italy:

Italy is thought by many to be one of the most beautiful countries in Europe and indeed in the world. This gorgeous country has a lot to offer, from amazing city breaks in Rome, Florence, Milan or Venice to adventures in the countryside with stunning vineyards and gorgeous beaches to explore. No matter where you go, you will certainly be met with some of the best hospitality that you have ever experienced, not to mention the amazing food and wine in this country that is second-to-none. 

France:

Home to Paris, the City of Love, if you are looking for a romantic and intimate getaway with somebody special after the pandemic, there’s no better choice than France. And, since this country is closely bordered with several others in Europe, you can easily get there from destinations in Spain, Portugal, Germany, The Netherlands, and even the UK, with the Eurail train that travels along a tunnel under the English Channel. Whether you’re looking for a vibrant city break exploring the big attractions like the Lourve and Eiffel Tower in Paris or want a more relaxed vacation with summer vibes in Marseilles, there’s something here for every type of traveler. 

Malta:

This European island might be small but it certainly has a lot to offer. Visit Malta for the sand, sea, and some of the most delicious food that you will ever taste. And, there is plenty of gorgeous scenery to enjoy; head to Comino for some of the clearest, bluest sea water you will have ever seen or head into the mountains to explore and enjoy a horseback riding adventure. When it comes to things to do, there’s certainly no shortage of activities that you can enjoy amidst the stunning backdrop from quad biking to gun range shooting, or simply sipping a cocktail on the beach. 

Greek Islands:

Last but not least, the Greek islands offer some of the most unparalleled beauty in Europe with white, sandy beaches, clear blue seas, and traditional white-domed churches. Santorini is well-known for being one of the most gorgeous of the Greek islands to visit and is very popular with weddings, but the other options including Corfu, Crete, Paphos, and Thessaloniki are all stunning choices for anybody who is looking for a relaxing vacation surrounded with beautiful nature. 

Bingo illustration by Rita Azar

The Health Effects of Playing Bingo

Bingo has come a long way since its inception, particularly with regards to the way the game is played in modern society.

Although bingo has its roots back in the 1500s, it wasn’t until the 20th century that it truly crossed over into mainstream consciousness.

It became popular in the United Kingdom during the 1950s, most notably amongst the working classes in northern towns and cities.

Bingo suffered a decline in popularity towards the end of the last century, but the creation of the internet sparked a resurgence that has continued up to the present day.

A little-known fact about bingo is that it also has numerous health benefits, so read on as we take a look at why this is the case.

Bingo is an Inclusive Activity

Whether you play at a land-based venue or online bingo on the internet, bingo is a game that be enjoyed by everyone.

It is really easy to learn and doesn’t require much in the way of skill – just buy some cards and hope that your luck is in.

Although previously thought to be the sole preserve of the working classes, modern bingo is a thoroughly inclusive activity.

Players can enjoy bingo regardless of which societal group you may align yourself with, making it one of the best forms of entertainment.

Bingo Stimulates the Brain 

Studies have shown that bingo helps to reinforce key skills such as concentration and memory – a factor that is tremendously useful for people of all ages.

It can improve both hand-eye coordination and reflexes as you strive to mark off the numbers on your card as they are called.

Maintaining an active brain is hugely important as people grow older and bingo provides a non-challenging way to achieve that.

Whereas some games like chess can be difficult to get to grips with, the simplicity of bingo is the key to its enduring popularity.

Seniors and Bingo

Maintaining good cognitive abilities is important for everyone, but it is a particularly pertinent point amongst older people.

In addition to the previously mentioned boosts for concentration and memory, research has also shown that playing games can help stave off the onset of dementia.

Bingo can be adapted to help in this respect, with larger cards, brighter colours and playing in smaller groups amongst the ways that it can be modified.

The health benefits of bingo for seniors should not be underestimated and highlights why it used to improve their quality of life.

Bingo Improves Health & Wellbeing

Bingo not only boosts cognitive abilities, but it also has the power to improve a person’s emotional and physical health.

Regardless of where you play the game, bingo has a social element attached to that means you can interact with other people.

It’s a great way to spend time with family, meet-up with existing friends or even forge new friendships with like-minded individuals.

Maintaining strong social connections has been proven to help people of all ages live more fulfilling lives, further showcasing bingo’s positive health attributes.

Bingo & Health in the Future

The future of bingo looks to be in safe hands, with a new generation of people latching onto the many benefits the game has to offer.

Innovative events like Bongo’s Bingo, Reggae Bingo and Dab & Drag Bingo are helping to attract an entirely different demographic to the game.

All of the points relating to inclusivity, cognitive benefits and improvements to health & wellbeing still apply, with the ‘fun’ element to these new versions clear for everyone to see.

Whether played in person or online, bingo looks well placed to continue being beneficial to health for many years to come.

Train illustration

Boom: The Fourth Saxon State Exhibition

On Saturday, July 11th, the Fourth Saxon State Exhibition called Boom will open to celebrate 500 years of Saxony’s industrial heritage. The substantial website allows you to also virtually enjoy Saxony’s amazing tribute to its high-quality global brands and industrial culture.

The southwestern region of Saxony was one of the first and most important centers of European industrialization. To this day, Saxons’ self-image still rests on the triad of natural beauty, cultural wealth and a broad industrial base. It is the success of these brands and Saxony’s entrepreneurialism that has allowed Saxony to build its extraordinary musical, artistic and architectural culture.

From July 11 to the end of this year, the Audi Building in Zwickau will host the central exhibition of the Fourth Saxon State Exhibition, Boom, while six other cities in the region will host additional and important parts of the exhibition, including the AutoBoom in the August Horch Museum in Zwickau; the Machine Boom in the Chemnitz Industrial Museum; the Railway Boom in the Chemnitz-Hilbersdorf Railway (outdoors); the Coal Boom in the Mining Museum in the Ore Mountains; the Textile Boom in the Cloth Factory in the Gebr Pfau Grimmitschau in Grimmitschau; and the Silver Boom in the Research and Teaching Mine in Freiberg.

These six topics are fleshed out in important locations where that “Boom” was most evident.

  • Auto Boom. is located in the August Horch Museum in Zwickau, which is next to the central exhibition in the Audi Building. The Horch museum is where the first models from major global automotive brands, including Horch and Audi, rolled off the assembly and Zwickau later was the birthplace of the legendary Trabant. August Horch was the founder of the company that would become Audi.
  • Machine Boom. is located in the Chemnitz Industrial Museum, where machines (such as the filigree clockwork at Glashütte to the high-tech machine center) have been designed and produced for more than 200 years.
  • Railway Boom. is on the site of the Schauplatz Eisenbahn (Railway Museum Chemnitz-Hilbersdorf) where you can see the industrial networking of people, raw materials and products in an open-air museum between historic steam and diesel locomotives in the sooty atmosphere of a roundhouse.
  • Coal Boom. is shown in the mining museum in Oelsnitz / Erzgebirg or the Ore Mountains where the coal industry, which was fundamental for the economic development of south-west Saxony, takes a look into the future of energy supply.
  • Textile Boom. is located in the originally preserved cloth factory Gebr Pfau in Crimmitschau. The machines and looms, some of which are 100 years old, are presented in a factory that has not changed since the doors were closed.
  • Silver Boom. is located in the research and teaching mine, Silver mine Freiberg, and provides deep insights into the history of ore mining and shows what role current scientific research plays in resource technologies.

In addition to these six geographic locations, the central exhibition in the Audi Building presents Saxony’s 500-year industrial booms in six time periods.It tells of an eventful history of the hard-working people of an early industrialized region with historical documents, objects, technical devices, photographs and through films and valuable works of art and spectacular media installations. The first period of the five hundred years of industrial culture was the Silver Rush (1470-1813) when the discover of silver in the Ore Mountains set off a clamor for mining not only of silver but also tin and copper. It was an unprecedented boom and attracted people from all over Europe. Augustus the Strong used this incredible wealth to build up the coffers of his state, buy art and collect treasures from around the world to build Dresden into one of Europe’s glittering capitals of art and architecture.

The second period from 1763 to 1914 was the emergence of the textile industry and mechanical engineering which drove development in Saxony and around the world. In 1914, Saxony was the most industrialized state in the entire German Reich. There was a third period from 1831 to 1914 when there was a rapid development in technology, science and machines. The fourth period from the eve of WWI to the end of WWII is marked by groundbreaking inventions and unprecedented, industrially shaped and organized violence.

The fifth period from 1945 to 1995 includes the industrial culture of East Germany and the Trabant is a symbol of the East German economic system. It
focuses on the working world and everyday life of people up to the political turn as well as the breaks and opportunities and structural changes that the fall of the wall brought about. The final period from 2020 to the future is all about what is to come and the future of technology in Saxony. Positive developments are emerging from Saxony’s keen entrepreneurial spirit, innovations based on research and knowledge and the ability to constantly change.

It is appropriate that the Saxon state has chosen the Audi Building in Zwickau as the place for the central exhibition as this was an assembly hall of Auto Union AG from 1938. The Auto Union was the coming together of four independent Saxon car manufacturers: Audi, DKW, Horch and Wanderer. Audi’s logo of four interlocking rings represents these original four members of the Auto Union. Audi is actually a Latin derivation of Horch’s name which means hark or Audi in Latin.

The Audi Building as well as the museum for Horch in Zwickau are a worthy one hour and fifteen-minute drive from Leipzig or Dresden. Even if you cannot visit in person in 2020, the museums in each of the towns will always be there and there is a book on the exhibition that you can order online.

Learn more about Boom here.

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360 Magazine, Wheelchair

‘UZ Leuven’ Minipacemakers

On Thursday May 28th, the Belgian university hospital UZ Leuven implanted a new type of wireless minipacemaker in a patient. This was a first in Europe. The new generation of minipacemakers allows two times as many patients to qualify, in comparison with the first generation.

The Micra pacemaker is a wireless minipacemaker that has been used in UZ Leuven since 2015. Surgery for such a small pacemaker is a lot less invasive than for a normal pacemaker. The device is placed in the heart via a small incision in the groin. The minipacemaker is invisible to the patient and in the first generation of the device, researchers found that the number of complications could be reduced with 63 percent.

Helping more patients

So far, the minipacemaker could only be used in 16 percent of the patient requiring a pacemaker. “The first generation of the device only measured the heart activity in one ventricle of the heart. Patients that needed to have the heart activity in the atrium measured as well, did not qualify. With this new type of pacemaker, we can also treat patients with a complete interruption of the heart activity between the ventricle and the atrium”, according to dr. Christophe Garweg, cardiologist in UZ Leuven.

With the new generation of the Micra pacemaker, up to 40 percent of the patients could qualify. Dr. Garweg: “The new pacemaker can also measure heart activity in the atrium and as such coordinate the electrical activity between atrium and ventricle. This restores the normal heart rhythm and improves the patient’s quality of life. The minipacemaker operates more or less like a conventional pacemaker, which is implanted under the skin and connected to the heart with two leads.”

First implants

UZ Leuven was actively involved in the development of the new pacemaker. At the moment the new type of pacemaker is only used in the context of clinical trials. At a later time, its use will be extended. In the meantime, the new pacemaker has been implanted in two patients. Both procedures went according to plan, and both patients are doing well.

A revolution for the pacemaker

The development of the wireless pacemaker in 2009 was a big revolution in the history of the pacemaker. It was the first big step forward since the clinical introduction of the pacemaker in the sixties. Worldwide, 35,000 Micra-systems have been implanted. UZ Leuven started with implanting the minipacemakers as the first Belgian hospital in 2015. In the meantime, for Belgium UZ Leuven is the hospital with the most expertise in Micra’s, in Europe it is in the top 5. In Belgium, the technology is not yet reimbursed so for now UZ Leuven finances the device for the patient with its own means.

Pacemaker and bradycardia

A pacemaker is required when a patient’s heart rhythm is too low (bradycardia) and medication is no longer sufficient. It stops the heart from pumping enough oxygenated blood through the body. Patients experience difficulty during physical exercise: they faint, tire quickly, and run out of breath more quickly. A pacemaker replaces the heart’s natural rhythm thanks to electrical impulses.

video game, 360 Magazine, Vaughn Lowery, gamers

Growing Gamer Population

Data acquired by Finbold.com shows that 35% of the current global population comprises gamers. According to the data, as of April 2020, the gaming population stood at 2.7 billion people. Read below for all of the gamer facts you need.

The Asia Pacific region leads with 1,506 million gamers accounting for 55% of the entire gaming population. Europe, Middle East, and Africa region are second with 758 million people emerging as gamers.

Latin America comes third with 259 million gamers accounting for 9% of the global gaming population. North America comes last with 203 million gamers or 7% of the gaming population.

Finbold.com’s research also overviewed the projected revenue from the gaming sector in 2020. This year, the sector is expected to generate $159.3 billion in revenue with mobile accounting for 48% at $77.2 billion. Under mobile games revenue, gamers on tablets will spend $13.7 billion accounting for 9% of the entire revenue generated. Smartphone games whose revenue is projected to stand at $63.6 billion accounts for 40% of the global revenue.

Elsewhere, game consoles are set to generate the second-highest revenue in 2020 at $45.2 billion or 28% of the global tally. PC games will account for 23% of the global revenue cumulatively at $36.9 billion. Under PC games boxed and downloaded games will attract $33.9 billion or 21% of the total revenue while browser PC gamers will spend approximately $3.08 billion or 9% of the total revenue to be generated in 2020.

The gaming population exploded in the first quarter of 2020 thanks to various factors. According to the Finbold.com report, “The estimated revenue from 2020’s gaming sector is high considering that with the coronavirus pandemic, gaming has offered an escape route for those in lockdown.”

Moving forward, factors like competitions and penetration of smartphones globally will drive the growth of the gaming sector.

Read the full story with statistics here.