Posts tagged with "musician"

Teddy Swims Album Image

Teddy Swims – “My Bad”

Newly minted Artist To Watch” by Rolling Stone, ace Atlanta singer/songwriter Teddy Swims is back with his first new single and music video of 2021 entitled “My Bad” today. Get it HERE and watch the video HERE.

Once again, his rich vocals take center stage on the track, simmering with soul, spirit, and swagger. In the accompanying music video, he steps into the squared circle as wrestler “Magic Dirty.” 

About the song, he said, “We wrote this song about my fear of commitment. The video was a real dream come true, and I was able to set foot in an actual ring for the first time in my life. I hope people enjoy watching this as much as we enjoyed making it!” 

It’s a big day for Teddy. In addition to the single dropping, he makes his national television debut on NBC’s The Kelly Clarkson Show where he’ll perform “My Bad.” 

Teddy recently appeared on the latest episode of Allen Stone’s “Live At The Lodge” on Stone’s YouTube channel. The two teamed up to cover the Hall & Oats classic “Sara Smile. Watch it HERE. Teddy will also appear on Allen’s special Valentine’s Day virtual concert on February 12th.

To cap off a breakthrough 2020, Teddy enlisted Country star Thomas Rhett to feature on a new version of “Broke.Inciting critical applause, Billboard described it as “Guaranteed to make you smile and tap your toes at the same time. A winning combination.The original “Broke”—Teddy’s second original release—earned raves from the likes of Idolator, Flaunt, and American Songwriter, the latter of which praised Teddy’s “honest, emotional” sentiments. Music critic Bob Lefsetz was similarly wowed by “Broke,” writing, “I’d say it’s a one listen smash, but that’s not an accurate description, IT’S A FIFTEEN SECOND SMASH!”).  Teddy got his start by posting covers on YouTube out of his bedroom. His bold voice immediately resonated as he impressively attracted an audience of 1.7 million through a steady stream of both hilarious and heartfelt moments.

About Teddy Swims

Teddy Swims contains multitudes. It’s right there in his name— “Swims” is an acronym for “Someone Who Isn’t Me Sometimes,” and it’s a kind of shorthand for everything he stands for. There’s the fact that his voice sounds cozy and rich over any of the many genres he loves to mix up, from the pop and soul most have heard, on to gospel, hip-hop, and hard rock. But it’s even bigger than the Atlanta singer and songwriter’s rich baritone. To Teddy, the concept goes beyond his art, it means empathy, connection, using music to serve a greater good, and staying true to your people—in his case, a core group of about a dozen buds, bandmates, producers, and other various visionaries who knew him well before he became Teddy Swims.

“I’m too hard on myself,” says Teddy, though you wouldn’t know it from his bright, boisterous presence in his songs and videos. “I’m always in my head. You gotta have the guy behind you who says, ‘Man, this is great!’ Well, I’ve got 12 of those guys, and they’re the best people I know.” 

Today, of course, Teddy has a following of millions who’ve gravitated to him on the strength of his funk-laced originals and unexpected covers (like his version of Shania Twain’s “You’re Still the One,” which Twain herself has praised). But getting here has been a wild journey. The man born Jaten Dimsdale grew up in Georgia, a preacher’s grandson with a powerful voice of his own. He played football and a handful of roles in high school musicals, but it was a particularly active time in Atlanta’s metal, punk, and rap scenes—music called to him. Teddy being Teddy though, it was all of the music. Taking his place behind the mic in a handful of acts, he rapped, screamed, and even cooed cover songs at wedding receptions. By 2018, he was in multiple bands including a progressive jam crew called Elefvnts.  

By 2019, Teddy was out of a job and a home, crashing with his dad while hoping for a lifeline. He unwittingly made one for himself when, on a whim, he shared a video of him singing Michael Jackson’s “Rock With You” on YouTube. “It was the 10-year anniversary of his death,” Teddy recalls, “and we just thought we’d pay homage. Within a few days, it was going crazy.” As it turns out, that clip was Teddy’s first step in making his way from broke to “Broke.” More covers followed—spanning Marvin Gaye to Billie Eilish—showcasing his talent, humor, style, and ease in the studio, and garnering more and more fans in the process. Teddy upgraded his situation, but not in the way most burgeoning stars would. That core team of his have been with him night and day ever since, quite literally. They live in the same house; they share the same dreams. 

“I wasn’t willing to give up the people around me who keep me sane and safe,” Teddy says. “We figured if we all put our heads together and focused on this, we wouldn’t need anybody else.”

But Teddy knows there’s always room for more under his roof. After signing to Warner Records in early 2020, he released his first original song—the frisky, funked-up “Picky”—and took off on a sold-out cross-country headlining tour. Then came “Broke,” a raucous clap-along anthem about the joys of (finally) making and spending mad cash, produced by Julian Bunetta (One Direction) and reworked version featuring Grammy-nominated superstar Thomas Rhett.  The tracks and their accompanying videos comprise a glorious celebration of excess that’s plenty justified by all of the reverent nods to James Brown and Teddy’s goofily sweet sense of humor. “Girl, whatchu want? Go pick it out,” he sings slyly. “My wallet lookin’ bigger than my belly now.” 

And for all his talk about pop-star excess, Teddy is a man who makes every cent count. After releasing his timely cover of Marvin Gaye’s “What’s Going On?” in June, he donated all royalties to the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund. He also pays his crew members a salary, plus bought his Dad a new truck. All of which is to say: he puts his money where his mouth is, and wears his heart on his sleeve. As for what’s next, Teddy’s expanded his family to include folks like Dallas Davidson (Blake Shelton, Luke Bryan), Dave Cobb (Brandi Carlile, John Prine), and Boy Matthews (Keith Urban, Duke Dumont). And he’s counting down the days until the world is able to hear the wide-ranging sound he’s crafting: “Everything from straight hip-hop to R&B to ’80s metal,” he says. Sure, that doesn’t help us predict what Teddy Swims is going to do next, but if there’s one thing his moniker doesn’t quite convey, it’s that no matter what or how or who he’s singing, Teddy is always Teddy—and bringing all his influences and experiences and inspirations into glorious harmony is exactly what Teddy does best.

QxA Davis Mallory

By Vaughn Lowery and Hannah DiPilato

Davis Mallory from MTV’s The Real World, discusses his struggle with alcoholism as well as how far he has come in his career. 

360 Magazine recently had the opportunity to sit down with Davis Mallory, a contestant from The Real World on MTV. He is now pursuing a music career while educating others about alcoholism. As an openly gay Christian, he hoped to share his story with others as a television personality as well as a musician. 

What was it like being on MTV’s The Real World Season 18? Any regrets? Do you still stay in contact with other cast members?

I was a senior in college, 21-years-old, when I auditioned for and was cast on MTV’s 18th season of the Real World, located in Denver Colorado. I was a fan of the show and had just come out of the closet to my classmates that summer. I felt that I had an interesting story to tell – being a Christian and openly gay was not something I had not seen on TV before – and I wanted to prove you could be both, while also showcasing a more masculine image of homosexuality than was often shown on TV.

Immediately after the show ended I flew around to colleges in the USA discussing and often debating Biblical professors in front of a student body; dissecting Bible verses and their interpretations on homosexuality. My grandfather James Davis Mallory JR (whom I’m named after) is a Christian author and psychiatrist – and so I was raised very orthodox – Southern Baptist. I found this time to be very rewarding and something I’m proud of – to date I still receive messages from viewers of the show expressing their gratitude for my story on The Real World.

I of course have regrets during my time on the show – I think most people who have done that show in their 20s will tell you they regret things they did or said. We were all heavily fed alcohol which created chaos, confusion, fights and hookups. I’m still close with several cast members, two of them live in Nashville so I see them most often. Tori Hall, who was on Road Rules and married Brad Fiorenza (I attended their wedding) and Brooke Labarbera, who was on my season of the Real World are two people I remain close with and I spent much of this summer 2020 with both of them!

What led up to you having an issue with drugs and alcohol? How’s life after sobriety? Are there any triggers that make it difficult to remain sober?

When I was younger (before trying alcohol) my mother told me to NEVER drink, instead of teaching me how to drink. This was because my parent’s divorce was caused in part by my father’s alcoholism. When I went off to college, I got drunk for the first time and I quickly progressed into blacking out when I drank. I would sometimes wake up the next morning and hearing stories from my friends about stupid things I said or did the night before. I tried to get that under control by lowering the amount of alcohol I drank and by not drinking hard alcohol.

I went through many chapters of my life taking breaks from drinking and reducing my alcohol intake. My father has now been completely sober for over a decade and his example is a big inspiration in my own decision to completely quit drinking. I’ve now been sober for 4 years. After reaching my 1-year mark of sobriety I had a big regret – that I hadn’t quit earlier. I felt so much better – I looked so much better and I just wished I had fully quit earlier in my life.

Thankfully, perhaps due to God or just growing up, I have ZERO temptation to drink anymore. I’m constantly reminded why I quit when I see other people’s struggles with alcohol. I have seen people wheeled off in an ambulance with alcohol poisoning, I’ve had close friends die from alcohol poisoning, a friend’s mother recently did; another close friend died from an overdose of drugs mixed with fentanyl recently. These everyday reminders keep me sober.

I really wish our society didn’t glorify drinking in movies/commercials/music, because the downfall from alcohol is not being taught to children: accidentally death, liver disease, the fighting it causes, relationships ruined, horrible, absent or addicted parents, job losses, physical damage it does to our bodies and faces are never shown in these alcohol commercials.

What was it like growing up with an uncle who had access to major recording artists like Wynonna Judd? Did that experience help shape you into the artist you are today? If so, how?

My uncle Chaz managed pop artist Amy Grant for many years and still manages Christian recording artist Michael W. Smith. My uncle John Mallory wrote songs for artists Wynonna Judd, Sixpence None the Richer, Ty Herndon and more. I  grew up in the music industry, attending a lot of these artist’s concerts and meeting them – I spent summers on Amy Grant’s farm in Nashville – I was a huge fan of her and Michael W. Smith.

As a kid I dreamt of being a singer and wanted to have careers like theirs – my positive message songs “Faith,” “Not That Far Away” “Lost” and “Somebody’s Watching” are examples of songs influenced by Amy & Michael’s music. I did not expect to become a songwriter. How songs were written was a mystery as a kid – I knew singers sang them but didn’t know how they were created. When I started out on this journey to becoming a recording artist I had to watch and learn from others in numerous songwriting sessions until I really got the hang of doing it myself.

During your first year in Nashville, one of your former cast members (Diem Brown) passed away from cancer. How did their loss impact your life at the time?

Diem Brown passed away in 2014 – I moved to Nashville at the end end of 2013 – so I had just started my journey into songwriting. My first original released song is titled “Beautiful Girl’s (Diem’s Song)”, a song I wrote about Diem with award-winning songwriters Ben Goldsmith and Tori Tullier. The song debuted in People Magazine, where Diem was a news reporter and received press in E! News, US Weekly and more outlets.

Diem and I grew up in nearby parts of Georgia (I’m from Marietta, she’s from Roswell – just 15 min away) although we did not meet until we did the show. Diem was a sorority sister with my mother’s best friend’s daughter, Carly Hartwick, who first introduced us over email prior to our meeting in person for the first time when Diem and I did an MTV Challenge together: The Duel II in New Zealand.

Diem and I gave a school speech together where she shared wisdom on pursuing one’s career goals by interviewing those with the same job, Diem becoming a News Anchor where she met her idol Katie Couric to ask questions on how to get to Katie’s place in life. Diem’s speech really inspired me as I chased after my own career dreams in music, so when she lost her battle to cancer I was deeply saddened and wrote the song to memorialize her through music. Her sisters’ often use the song on the anniversary of her death, which I’m always touched to see.

You grew up in Atlanta but now reside in Nashville. Do you prefer one city over the other? If so why?

I was born in Atlanta and raised in a suburb of Atlanta called Marietta. After attending college in Florida at Stetson University, I returned to Atlanta for 2 years before moving to NYC. I have not lived in Atlanta since 2009; however, I return every year to see my family who still live there. It’s changed a lot, the movie industry was not there when I left, and in my song titled “Atlanta,” the first song on my upcoming album Little Victory, I talk about my journey from Atlanta to New York and now Nashville with a longing for my hometown and noticing how much the city has changed.

I moved to Nashville to pursue a career in music, hearing it was a land full of songwriters. The things I really like about Nashville are the people and culture here. There are really great moralistic people here and I am thankful for that as it’s a safe great place to live. Nashville is like going to college in the music industry – people in all stages of their careers are here and many are willing to collaborate. I would not be where I am today if not for Nashville.

What are some of your musical inspirations? Can you name a few people that have inspired you or who continue to inspire you?

Aside from mainstream pop artists like Britney Spears, George Michael, NSYNC, Michael Jackson, Robyn, Prince, Mariah Carey, the real-life connections that have influenced my career include Parson James (vocalist on Kygo’s “Stole the Show”) who is one of the first people I wrote music with. We met in NYC in 2013, I followed him to Los Angeles to write with him and moved to Nashville prompted by advice from his then-manager who thought I sounded like a Country artist.

Roger Murrah (BMI Songwriter of the Decade and writer of several Country music #1s) is one of the first people I met when I moved to Nashville. At the time I was still learning how to write songs, so I watched him work in several sessions and I began to understand how to write the way he did.

Scot Sax (Grammy-winning songwriter for Tim McGraw/Faith Hill’s “Like We Never Loved At All”) is another person who was very influential on my songwriting journey – he taught me how the B52s recorded “Love Shack” in a go-as-you-flow style recording their ideas on the spot to build the song.

Aside from these few names, I have been in over 300 songwriting sessions, and I’ve traveled writing music in Europe (Berlin, Stockholm, Copenhagen, Malmo, London, Amsterdam), New York and Los Angeles. Everyone along the way has taught me something, a new trick or technique to writing music or producing music and I’m thankful for everyone who has worked with me.

As a songwriter, how do you come up with themes? Is your music based on an isolated experience or a chapter of your life?

I keep an ongoing note on my phone called Songwriting Ideas so that whenever I get an idea for a song I write it down there. I then bring these ideas into songwriting sessions to get something started. Sometimes I get a melody (occasionally during a dream) and record these on my phone, using it as another tool to get songs started.

In 2018 music publicist, Lyndie Wenner asked me what my most popular social media posts were – to which I replied: shirtless photos of myself. So she told me I needed to write a song called “Shirtless” and I did, releasing that song in 2019. This conversation with Lyndie changed the way I wrote songs. Before I was writing broader subjects, and after I began to write more about the things I saw my audience interested in. I still observe that the things I write about center around one of 4 themes: 1. God and my faith; 2. Love lost of found; 3. Partying and dancing, of 4. Overcoming addictions.

Another influential person in my songwriting career is PollyAnna (Dutch pop/EDM vocalist, songwriter of Paris Hilton’s new song “I Blame You”). I spent a summer writing with her in Nashville, Los Angeles and Berlin and  I observed her taking random phrases we said in conversations and writing them down for future songwriting materials. I now do the same, whenever something unusual is said in a conversation. PollyAnna and I wrote a song together in Berlin called “Without You, I Feel Good”, which has now been signed to Soave Records, produced by a DJ named Nexeri, and coming out on February 26, 2021.

What words of wisdom would you offer an emerging artist who is trying to break into the business?

The words “If you build it they will come” from the great baseball movie Field of Dreams, is a motto that holds a strong place in my mind regarding my strategy to release music and gradually having people discover your work. I have a business model of writing songs and selling them to DJ/producers and I think this is a great move for up-and-coming singers to build a name for themselves.

My first job after college (post-Real World) was a sales job that required reaching out to 100 potential customers every day with the expectation that between 1-10 would buy something – I now use this strategy in my music career in so many facets and find the same results.

Is there anything you would like to speak about that we didn’t already touch on? What can your fans look forward to?

2020 was set to have me perform in Germany, Boston, Chicago, Palm Springs, North Carolina but the shows were of course canceled due to the pandemic. I look forward to getting back to touring though and to meet more people who have been asking when I will be in their city. I have been spending the last year working on new music with DJs, finally releasing the sophomore album that I have been alluding to and even developing an idea for a third project of which some of the songs are ready 🙂

Little Victory is an upcoming single/video that you’re pushing. It’s an extremely inspirational piece of work about someone feeling like a fish out of water. What prompted such a piece?

I wrote “Little Victory” after returning from Israel where I had met and was at the time long-distance dating Israeli singer-songwriter Elhay Cohen, the song idea came from my co-writer: female Canadian producer and songwriter Robyn Dell’Unto. December 2020 French DJ RetroVision released a version of this song on Don Diablo’s record label Hexagon and the original version is going on my forthcoming album of the same name.

Retrovision, Davis Mallory – Little Victory 

Little Victory Music Video 

Little Victory single 

Pre-Save for the album Little Victory

Here is a private SoundCloud tracklisting for the “Little Victory” album:

  1. Atlanta –a song I wrote about my hometown, my journey to NYC and Nashville to pursue music – with nostalgia for Atlanta – the city where I had my first heartbreak and how much the city has changed since I left (it’s now a film industry).
  2. Ain’t Afraid – features a big name in the EDM industry Luma (Seven Lions, Nurko, Zack Martino) – who I co-wrote the song with – it’s about not being afraid to fall in love
  3. Little Victory– co-written with and produced by female Canadian artist Robyn Dell’Unto – a remix of this song made by French artist RetroVision released on Don Diablo’s label Hexagon. “Little Victory” is about a summer romance with my Israeli ex who I met after I opened for Eurovision winner Netta who told me I had to visit Israel.
  4. Fire Signs – features Miss Audrey the Katy Perry-inspired Best Pop Artist at the Nashville Industry Music Awards, I wrote this song in Sweden about zodiac chemistry compatibility – I’m a Leo and Miss Audrey an Aries, we’re both Fire Signs.
  5. Shirtless– this is a new Countrified mix of the song that aired on MTV’s War of the Worlds and became the theme song for men’s swimwear line: Poolboy
  6. Heavy – features an all LGBTQ identifying cast – with vocalist Blake Leider and rapper Daisha McBride – discusses why relationships have to be so heavy, produced by Danish Aren Anderson and Ukrainian Depdramez.
  7. Can You Tell Me?– produced by Canadian artist BLEM and written in Berlin with Vincent Stefansson and Valentin Glage – “Can You Tell Me?” is about being ghosted. Where does all the love go in this modern era when two people separate and the romance suddenly dies.
  8. Say You Hate Me– written in Sweden the same week as “Fire Signs” “Shirtless” and previously released single “Jane Fonda” – “Say You Hate Me” is a very Britney Spears/NSYNC-style Swedish pop song co-written with and produced by Magnus Funemyr about a relationship that has grown stale.
  9. Sink or Swim – with references to Madonna, Beyonce’s “hot sauce,” and Whitney Houston’s “receipts” – “Sink or Swim” is about a cheating partner and the end of a relationship, produced by Option A. Music video coming by Russian filmmaker Dmitry Zhitov.
  10. Forget You– co-written with Nashville female EDM vocalists Notelle & Luma, produced by artist Swiss DJ FENOX – “Forget You” is about the end of a relationship and having a hard time letting go of the memories.
  11. Broken Dreams– this unreleased version by Ukrainian producer Depdramez – was co-written with pop artist Drew Schueler – tells the story of all the hard work artists put into chasing their dreams of stardom.
  12. Faith – written in 2020 at the start of this pandemic with American Idol contestant Madeline Finn, “Faith” is an uplifting anthem giving hope for all to not lose their faith in these trying times, produced by Austrian producer Jakob Koller.

The music video for Can You Tell Me?” is scheduled to release on 2/19/2021

ALESSANDRO LANI

Lani Alessandro, guitar player from Italy has been working with some impressive names in the music business including platinum selling artist NIKKOLE, Grammy nominated producer Leon Sylver III and Ghostface Killah and Puff Daddy producer K-Def.

Alessandro moved to Los Angeles in 2018 to study electric guitar at the world famous Musicians Institute in Hollywood Boulevard. The school’s alumni include Red Hot Chili Pepper’s drummer Chad Smith and Bon Jovi’s guitar player and producer John Shanks. After his graduation he has begun running an intense activity as a session player, playing in other artists’ records.

In September he has been noticed by Leon Sylver III ex member of the funk family group “The Sylvers” then Grammy nominated producer who has offered him the opportunity to work with NIKKOLE. NIKKOLE is a platinum selling singer who has reached once the top ten and once the top 20 of Billboard Dance Music Charts.

Alessandro has also started a collaboration with K-Def, producer who has worked with a lot of great hip-hop artists (such as Puff Daddy) and has other collaboration to come. Alessandro has also developed a relationship with Koch Amps and is in the process of filming a promo video for the Studiotone XL head.

Before moving to Los Angeles Alessandro worked with his guitar instructor Fabrizio Zoffoli forming an acoustic trio. Magacustica won the prize for best lyrics at the Live Song Contest in Traversetolo which led them to open for famous Italian pop singer Federica Carta.

Follow Lani on Facebook, Instagram, Youtube and on his website.

Headshot of Lumane for 360 Magazine

Rising Star, Lumane

Switzerland native Lumane is not your typical pop artist. Much of her inspiration stems from her mother playing “Moonlight Sonata” by Beethoven on the piano when she was just a toddler. At four-years-old, Lumane put her foot forward to be like her mom learning to play different instruments throughout the years to come. In the mix of that was learning to use her vocal gift in hopes of expressing her creative side.

Lumane had the opportunity to audition her talents at the age of 13 in front of superstar judges in Germany on a show called “Das Supertalent”, which is similar to America’s Got Talent. She sang her heart out only to be left with no invitation back. Lumane was determined to grow. Years later with thousands of hours put into vocal lessons and practice, she auditioned for The Voice in Switzerland making her way through 3 rounds. This progress wasn’t enough for Lumane. 

Lumane did not give up. With the support of her family, she pushed further to achieve her dreams. She bought a plane ticket to New York to continue her studies in the city that never sleeps. While being in school 6 days a week to study Musical Theatre and Acting for Film & TV she continued writing and producing her own songs on the side. After finishing the two-year program she realized that songwriting and pop music was her true passion, not musical theatre. This lead her to audition for the Berklee College of Music in Boston and started her studies there only a couple of months later. Being surrounded by like-minded musicians was exactly the inspiration Lumane needed. After only two semesters at Berklee, an opportunity to finally take the first steps in using her talents to professionally create and record her first set of songs presented itself. 

She packed her bags, returned her apartment keys, bought a plane ticket to Nashville, TN to start actively working on her dream instead of just learning about it in class and books. Lumane finished her degree from Berklee online while writing songs with award-winning producers and writers. This first true experience in the music industry left her thirsty for more.

In her music, Lumane wants to tell her story and experiences – moving to a different continent at 18 years young by herself, being an immigrant in the US and meeting the love of her life, as well as empower people to stand up for themselves and for what they believe is right. All of this comes wrapped in powerful vocals and beautiful melodies, accompanied by explosive beats and heartbreaking piano parts.

Lumane worked with a Grammy-nominated producer on songs like “Taboo”, “Letters”, and “White Lies” which are three recent releases from this electro-pop artist. Her next song titled “Poison” is a story we all have – the feeling you get when you find the right person for you after only meeting toxic people and seeing right through them. Sounds like a good song, right? You can hear for yourself on all streaming platforms.

music Ivory Rowen illustration for 360 Magazine.

5 Strategies for Success as an Independent Artist

Being an independent artist is not easy. You have to handle most of the work yourself, and usually, pay for everything out of your own pocket. However, this also means that you can fully express your artistic vision and won’t be forced into engagements.

This is a great option for those who want to be artists for a living without becoming a commodity. This is also a good option for those who feel like they might have an audience already and don’t need to have a machine behind them, allowing them to bypass the middlemen and get better percentages. But to get there, you have to have a clear roadmap and strategy. Let’s take a look at a few strategies independent artists can use to become successful.

Network

This is probably one of the most important skills you’ll need to master as a new independent artist. And, unfortunately, this is an aspect many neglect. The music business is very much about who you know, and the more people you know, the more opportunities you might open yourself up to. Also, you never know who the right connection could be. It could be a shop or restaurant owner that would like you to perform at a certain event or a student friend of yours that wants you to perform at a party. These are all the types of interactions that could allow you to get the little bit of initial traction that you need. If you’re good enough, word will start to spread about you. The rest is about you being consistent with your efforts and cultivating your audience.

Start from the Bottom

If you want to make yourself known, you will have to be ready to work yourself up from the bottom, even if it means busking. You’d be surprised at how many major artists either started or were discovered while busking. Also, there’s the chance that you could end up on YouTube, and people love discovering obscure talent online. If you look on YouTube, there are plenty of videos of buskers getting millions of views, and if your talent is exceptional, you will get some attention. The best outcome here will be organic and inexpensive.

Work with the Right People

You also have to make sure that you have the right people in your corner. You will need to find yourself an accountant, a manager, a lawyer, and a road manager. The road manager will be essential for organizing logistics on the ground while the manager will be finding gigs and other opportunities for you. Working with a booking agency will also help.

Subsequently, you need to have good staff with you in the studio. Some artists will regularly rotate their sound engineers, but it’s also good to have a relationship with someone who understands your vision and wants to work with you. You want them to like your music too. This way they’ll be more involved in the project and will make more inspired recommendations.

It would also be a good time to start looking at studios. If you want something that will be easy to book and will have everything you need to start recording, we suggest you explore Pirate.com. They have studios in some of the world’s greatest cities, like their Hamburg recording studio or those in New York and Los Angeles. They offer affordable rates and give you a lot of free space to work. This is a great place for any indie act or group.

Hire Someone for Promotion

It would also be a good idea if you hired someone instead of trying to handle all the promotion yourself. Yes, you can interact with your fans on social media, but it would be better if you concentrated on the musical side and let a professional team work on the rest. You can hire someone to manage your social media for you; however, make sure that they sound in-character so that the voice can stay on brand. And, while much of the marketing is done online nowadays, you can’t neglect other traditional options. A professional could help you purchase media space, for instance, or help you gauge if the price would be worth it in terms of exposure.

Give and You Shall Receive

Giving material for free is also one of the best ways to get an audience. Even if it’s a free EP, know that it could pay back in the end. Just because the project was free, doesn’t mean that you can’t make money with it on the back end with performances or licensing, for instance.

These are all strategies that you can use to market yourself as an independent act and thrive in the industry without the backing of a major label. Understand that it’s still a business at the end of the day, and you’ll have to treat it as such if you want to be able to make a living from your art.

The Young Bombs Show curtsey of MacKenzie Reynolds

YOUNG BOMBS “WRONG SIDE OF LOVE” VIDEO

Today, Young Bombs shared the official video for their wistful, country-tinged single featuring three-time GRAMMY Award winner Darius Rucker called “Wrong Side of Love.” The song, described by ABC News Radio as “a brooding ode to a doomed love story, set to a catchy and dance-able beat,” has racked up over one million global streams since its release.

Directed by Conan Jurek Karpinski and produced by Andrew Dixon, the amusing clip sees the Canadian duo embark on a journey to see their favorite country superstar—none other than the legendary Darius Rucker—in concert. With a few fellow quirky Rucker fans in tow, Martin and Tristan set their sights on Nashville only to find that the Canadian border has been closed. It’s only fitting that what would follow this disastrous road trip is a dance party in the wilderness with Bigfoot—who happens to be just as big of a Rucker fan as Young Bombs themselves. View the video HERE.

Built around Rucker’s honeyed croon, “Wrong Side of Love” is the final single from the duo’s debut EP, The Young Bombs Show, also out now on Astralwerks. Listen to the song HERE and the EP HERE. The set gathers a string of singles that have established the duo as among the dance-pop world’s most vibrant and versatile producers, including the openhearted “Better Day” with Aloe Blacc and the swooning, optimistic “Starry Eyes.”

“Wrong Side of Love” shows off Young Bombs at their most emotional, lending a textured arrangement to Rucker’s poignant pining for a lover who’s fallen “right back in somebody else’s arms.” The song starts with roiling pianos and other homey instrumentation that might feel familiar to fans of Rucker’s country singles, but from there the song soars. Rucker moves beyond his pain into anthemic whoa-ohs as the track ascends into a synthy daydream.

It’s a different look for the duo, but “Wrong Side of Love” is a brilliant capstone to the run of singles that make up The Young Bombs Show. Young Bombs first came to widespread acclaim as esteemed remixers, sharing upwards of 50 beloved reworks of tracks for artists like Nick Jonas, Selena Gomez, Lady Gaga, and Billie Eilish, among others. Since 2019, they’ve applied the same lively production to their own original tracks, which has resulted in the colorful singles on their new EP, spanning from heavenly bangers like “Starry Eyes” to more sensitive, stirring tracks like the Robinson-featuring “High Road.” As these songs have traveled, so has the duo. In recent years, they’ve played Lollapalooza, Ultra, Firefly Music Festival, and the Billboard Hot 100 Festival. They’ve also shared the stage with dance music luminaries like the Chainsmokers, Alesso, Galantis, and Diplo.

The Young Bombs Show tracklist:

  1. Wrong Side Of Love (feat. Darius Rucker)
  2. Better Day (feat. Aloe Blacc)
  3. Loyal (feat. GiGi)
  4. Don’t Let Them
  5. Starry Eyes
  6. High Road (feat. Robinson)

About Young Bombs:

In 2019, Young Bombs make the bold leap from sought-after remixers to artists. That leap remains driven by a personal and creative chemistry forged way back in the Vancouver high school where they became best friends. With nearly 100 million streams in four years, the duo of Martin and Tristan cooked up 53 remixes by 2018. Along the way, they lent their talents to everyone from Nick Jonas, Selena Gomez, and Lady Gaga to Billie Eilish, Alessia Cara, Post Malone, Khalid, and Bazzi.

In addition, they attracted the support of Tiësto, Kygo, and Don Diablo. Simultaneously, they graced the stages of blockbuster festivals such as Lollapalooza, Ultra, Firefly Music Festival, and the Billboard Hot 100 Festival. Not to mention, Young Bombs supported The Chainsmokers, Galantis, Diplo, and Alesso on tour around the globe and launched a coveted residency at Drai’s Beachclub in Vancouver. The upbeat and undeniable anthem “Starry Eyes,” their debut Astralwerks single, introduced a musicianship-centric style reliant on real instrumentation and genre-less creativity, shining a bright light on the future.

About Darius Rucker:

Rucker first achieved multi-Platinum status in the music industry as lead singer and rhythm guitarist of the GRAMMY Award-winning band Hootie & the Blowfish. Since releasing his first Country album in 2008, he’s earned a whole new legion of fans with four No. 1 albums on the Billboard Country chart, including RIAA Platinum-certified Learn to Live and True Believers, plus nine No. 1 singles at Country radio. In 2014, Rucker won his third career GRAMMY Award for Best Solo Country Performance with his 8x Platinum version of Old Crow Medicine Show’s “Wagon Wheel.” His latest single, “Beers And Sunshine,” was written via a Zoom session earlier this year and calls for slowing down to enjoy the simple things in life when the world feels out of control.

As a lifelong philanthropist, Rucker is a constant supporter of the MUSC Children’s Hospital in his hometown of Charleston, South Carolina. He has also raised millions of dollars for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital through his annual Darius & Friends benefit concert and golf tournament, as well as for more than 200 charitable causes supporting public education and junior golf programs in South Carolina through the Hootie & the Blowfish Foundation. Rucker spent 2019 on the road with his Hootie & the Blowfish bandmates for the Group Therapy Tour as they celebrated the 25th anniversary of generation-defining smash Cracked Rear View in addition to the November 1 release of Imperfect Circle, their first album in nearly 15 years.

For more information, visit www.dariusrucker.com and follow on social media @DariusRucker.

guitar, rock, strum, tabs, strings

How Women Can Overcome Music Industry Challenges

By Deborah Fairchild

If someone were to ask me how I managed to thrive in a male-dominated industry and rise to the position of president at VEVA Sound – and how other young women could similarly succeed – here would be my response:

For me, it has always been about focusing on the work and knowing that if you just do that, everything else will take care of itself. When something needs to happen, just get it done. 

Get it done even if it seems like a menial task. Get it done even if there’s no immediate reward being dangled in front of you. And get it done even if there is no clear indication that what you’re doing will result in a promotion, a raise, or other good things happening somewhere down the road.

Putting in the time and effort doesn’t necessarily guarantee success in the music industry (and likely not in any industry). But success can’t happen without that time and effort.

This approach to the working world goes all the way back to my first studio internship. Whatever task was placed before me and needed to be accomplished, I would do it – right down to the unfulfilling but necessary job of cleaning the toilets. (And yes, I actually cleaned toilets. The music industry isn’t always a glamorous world.)

I think that I knew, even at a young age, that if I just kept my attention on the work at hand, and concentrated on what I was doing versus what everyone else was doing, success would find me.

That proved to be true, and this approach continues to pay dividends for me to this day – and maybe could do the same for young women who are probably much like I was several years back, cultivating dreams and ambitions.

In my case, I always loved music and I also had a technical mind. It was a matter of taking those two things and mixing them together, which is why I got my degree in audio engineering. Once I finished college, working as an archival engineer gave me a steady income and allowed me to be around music all day. The rest is history.

Of course, all of this still leaves the question of whether it Is more difficult for a woman than a man to achieve success in the music industry. Certainly, women are underrepresented in our industry, as they are in many others. To give you an idea of that underrepresentation, a study released in 2019 by the USC Annenberg Inclusion Initiative looked at 700 popular songs. What that study found was that women accounted for only 21.7% of artists, 12.5% of songwriters, and 2.7% of producers. 

I also can report that over the years I have encountered situations where a man could do or say one thing, but I know it would be unacceptable for me to do or say the same thing.

So, yes, a young woman with ambitions to enter our industry will face challenges, but those challenges shouldn’t deter you. 

After all, the music business is hard for everyone – male or female. Breaking in is tough. Then navigating the business once you’re in is difficult. Finally, it can be extraordinarily challenging to continue to succeed in the business over time, even after you’ve had your initial success. 

The key is to set aside any negative thoughts about all those challenges and focus on what you can control. Be determined to do the work and strive to learn everything you can from everyone you can. 

People are fond of saying, “It’s not what you know, it’s who you know.” That’s true only to a degree. Who you know may bring opportunities initially, but what you know gives you staying power in this business. 

Ultimately, knowledge and determination have been the two most important factors in my success. They can be for others as well.

About Deborah Fairchild

Deborah Fairchild, president of VEVA Sound (www.vevasound.com), started her career with the company as an archival engineer in 2004. In the past 16 years, she has risen to lead the company in all facets of the business. She has grown VEVA into a global entity servicing major labels in North America and Europe, establishing offices in New York, Los Angeles, and London in addition to the company’s headquarters in Nashville. Fairchild has kept VEVA at the forefront of technology and continues to evolve and adapt VEVA’s services and technology to assist the needs of their extensive client base. She advises many label executives, producers, engineers and artists seeking archival and asset management solutions. 

Jarry Lee Q×A

360 MAGAZINE was lucky enough to sit down with Jarry Lee, a model, actress, musician and influencer from the UK. Lee has over 700,000 followers on Instagram, 30,000 TikTok followers and more than 700,000 Spotify streams.

She has also been seen in VOGUE Italia, POPSUGAR, Mic, Elite Daily, NY Daily News, AM New York, Women Fitness Magazine, Cliché Magazine, The New York Times, Thrive Global and more. She will also be featured in two upcoming books, “Tell Her She Can’t” by Kelly Lewis and “The Little Things” by Oliver Charles.

Authority Magazine named her one of 2020’s “Inspirational Women in Hollywood” while StarCentral Magazine called Lee a “rising star to watch in 2020.” You can click right here to see everywhere she has been featured.

360: How did you find a creative outlet in journalism?

Jarry Lee: I’ve always loved writing (everything from poetry to screenplays), and it was my childhood dream to write professionally. I feel lucky that I was able to do so as a paid, full-time job and that I was able to pitch and take on stories I was personally interested in. Writing is a cathartic process for me.

360: What was the biggest hurdle transitioning from writing for BuzzFeed to being in front of the camera?

Jarry Lee: I didn’t have much prior experience beyond taking some acting classes in the past in school and performing in a playwriting festival in prep school that I wrote for, so I did dozens of test shoots with photographers to practice and learn my best angles and posing. Speaking on camera felt natural, but I had to learn how to pose more naturally.

360: How has your experience in telling stories as a journalist and analyzing stories as the Deputy Books Editor helped you to tell the stories of others as an actress and model?

Jarry Lee: It has definitely helped me with more easily imagining the inner lives and motivations of my characters. Every time I interviewed sources for an in-depth piece, I felt that I gained insight into how other people’s minds worked. When I was writing a feature about Instagram in 2017, for example, I interviewed over 30 individuals and a few businesses, and their stories were really fascinating and completely changed my understanding of how people interact with social media.

360: How has being an influencer and online personality changed through the pandemic?

Jarry Lee: There are almost no in-person events, so in that aspect it’s become less interactive, but there are also more people online since everyone’s bored indoors. I’ve adapted to become a lot more self-sufficient — I rarely work with outside photographers anymore and instead have learned to shoot myself. Earlier this year I bought professional lighting and photography equipment, and recently even purchased a green screen! I’ve really enjoyed honing my video production and editing skills this year. Maybe that’s one small silver lining to the pandemic.

360: What is your favorite platform for creating content and why?

Jarry Lee: I love Instagram for being so curated and aesthetic-focused, but Twitter is my favorite platform for sharing thoughts and seeing others’ (as well as for really silly memes). I originally joined Twitter in 2009, way before I joined Instagram (in 2013).

360: How does your time as a model help you as an actress?

Jarry Lee: I think acting helps more with modeling than vice versa, but becoming more comfortable on-camera as a model has definitely helped me act more naturally, as well. Both require drawing your inner emotions out, onto your facial expressions and how you hold yourself generally.

360: How do you use your platform and large reach to influence ideas and actions of your audience?

Jarry Lee: Three topics I try to bring more awareness to via my platform are: Asian representation in entertainment, bisexual/LGBTQ+ representation and anxiety/mental health. All three are still not spoken about enough, so I think it’s important to share my experiences with my audience. I still frequently receive messages about how I came out as bisexual on the Netflix show “Dating Around,” for example, and it has really resonated with some of my followers when I’ve shared my past experiences with panic attacks and anxiety. I try to show the behind-the-scenes of my entertainment career, in part because there were very few Asian public figures in the entertainment industry when I was growing up. I hope that my non-traditional career path inspires others to take a risk and pursue their passions.

You can learn more about Jarry Lee by clicking right here. You can also follow her on Instagram, Twitter, TikTok, Facebook and Spotify.

Q – Alone

Q IS A ONE-MAN BAND IN THE NEW “ALONE” VISUAL, FROM HIS FORTHCOMING EP THE SHAVE EXPERIMENT 

WATCH HERE. LISTEN TO “ALONE” HERE.

After debuting “Take Me Where Your Heart Is,” his first single from his upcoming EP set to release 12/11 with Columbia Records, Q is returning on a slightly darker and sophisticated note in the new “Alone” visual. Watch HERE. Showing his self-taught knack for musicianship, Q glides through various performance setups playing all the instruments present, simultaneously displaying his emotional state in the Loris Ruisser directed visual. Says Q of the song “it was something I wrote at a time where I actually felt alone. I remember later feeling really bad about that, because I wasn’t really, and I think I’d want people to listen to it and get that same feeling from it. That they aren’t really alone.” With “Alone,” Q is finding the peace in solitude.

Eighth Blackbird Presents: The Chicago Artists Workshop – J. Ivy

Eighth Blackbird Presents: The Chicago Artists Workshop (CAW) live stream concert series rounds out 2020 with J. Ivy, 7 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 8. The award-winning poet, artist, musician, author and actor will perform work from his newest album “Catching Dreams,” a blend of poetry and music. Limited in-person seating for the concert is available. For more information click HERE.

“Catching Dreams” is Ivy’s fourth studio album and, in Ivy’s own words, was created “to serve as another reminder of the love we were put here to learn, share, and grow from.” Ivy recently finished co-writing and co-producing, singer-song-writer, Tarrey Torae’s upcoming album, “Thanks for the Love,” and co-wrote the new song, “Freedom Ride” with GRAMMY Award-nominated House Music legend, DJ Terry Hunter, also by Torae.

Ivy is Poet Laureate for the famed visual artist Ernie Barnes’ Foundation and widely known for being the “Poet” featured on Kanye West’s GRAMMY-winning album “The College Dropout,” on the song “Never Let Me Down,” along with Hip-Hop icon Jay-Z. Early in his career, Ivy was featured on three seasons of HBO’s “Russell Simmons presents Def Poetry.” Since then, his work has been featured everywhere from commercials to classrooms. From hosting and performing at conferences for Deepak Chopra to penning and performing a poem for the NBA Hall of Fame Legend Michael Jordan, Ivy has used his unique style of poetry to navigate the art form to arenas of all facets.

Over the years Ivy’s work has earned him Peabody, Clio, Telly awards.  Ivy poetically narrated, acted, and starred in two B.E.T. documentaries, “Muhammad Ali: The People’s Champ” and “Martin: The Legacy of a King,” for which he won a 2020 NAACP Image Award. Ivy has done voice-over work for dozens of commercials and is author of three books. His latest, “Dear Father: Breaking the Cycle of Pain.” In July of 2020, J. Ivy wrote and narrated Beyoncé’s “Black Is King” promo for the “Return of the NBA.”

Tickets

The 7 p.m., Dec. 8 concert featuring J. Ivy will be staged at the Eighth Blackbird production facility located at 4045 N. Rockwell St. This live streamed ticketed event also features limited in-person seating. Tickets: $20, but options include choosing a price as well contributing as a supporter. For tickets and more information click HERE.

About CAW

“Eighth Blackbird Presents: The Chicago Artists Workshop” (CAW) live concert series debuted in Fall 2020, and is presented in three parts across the 2020-2021 performance season. Part 1 included live streamed concerts featuring Karim Sulayman (Oct. 20), Rebecca Rego: “Songs for Cleaning Women” (Nov. 11) and Justin Roberts with Anna Steinhoff: “Wild Life,” (Nov. 18), and continues with two more concerts: “An Evening with Xuan,” (Dec. 1) and a live streamed concert featuring Image Award-winning poet, artist, musician, author and actor J. Ivy (Dec. 8). Part 2 is scheduled for winter 2021, and will be announced Dec. 15, 2020. Part 3 will be announced in March 2021. Artists/dates/times are subject to change. For tickets or more information click HERE. CAW is made possible in part with support from the National Endowment for the Arts.

About Eighth Blackbird

Eighth Blackbird is “one of the smartest, most dynamic contemporary classical ensembles on the planet” (Chicago Tribune). Launched in 1996 by six committed Oberlin Conservatory undergraduates, this Chicago-based super-group has earned its status as “a brand-name…defined by adventure, vibrancy and quality…” (Detroit Free Press).

Eighth Blackbird has since evolved from ensemble to institution, currently realizing its mission through five initiatives: Eighth Blackbird, the award-winning sextet; Blackbird IV, a piano/percussion duo featuring founding members Lisa Kaplan and Matthew Duvall; the Blackbird Creative Lab, the organization’s mentoring arm; Blackbird Productions, a designation for wide-ranging creative projects; and the Chicago Artists Workshop, a streaming platform created to support artists.

Recent achievements include a fourth GRAMMY Award, the inaugural Chamber Music America Visionary Award, an Ensemble of the Year Award from Musical America, and the prestigious MacArthur Award for Creative and Effective Institutions. In 2017, the company launched the Blackbird Creative Lab,poet

a tuition-free summer training program, alumni network, and career support platform for emerging professionals focused on cutting edge musicianship, dynamic performance aesthetic, and savvy entrepreneurship.

Set to celebrate its 25th Anniversary in 2021, Eighth Blackbird continues to fuel the modern canon it helped engine with hundreds of commissioned and premiered works by dozens of composers including Viet Cuong, Pamela Z, Bryce Dessner, Jennifer Higdon, Amy Beth Kirsten, David Lang, Andy Akiho, Missy Mazzoli, Nico Muhly, and Steve Reich, whose commissioned work, Double Sextet, went on to win the Pulitzer Prize (2009). A long-term relationship with Chicago’s Cedille Records has produced ten acclaimed recordings and four impressive GRAMMY Awards for Best Small Ensemble/Chamber Music Performance. Eighth Blackbird’s most recent album, “Singing in the Dead of Night” by Lang, Julia Wolfe, and Michael Gordon, was released by Cedille in June 2020.

The group’s latest venture is the inaugural 2020–2021 Chicago Artists Workshop, a full season presenting 24 online concerts with a stellar lineup of featured artists as well as a residency program offering studio space and technical support to area artists. For more information about Eighth Blackbird click HERE and visit them on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter #eighthblackbird.