Posts tagged with "tyler perry"

Photo of Tasha Smith courtesy of True Public Relations for use by 360 Magazine

Tasha Smith Directs Fox Pilot

Tasha Smith Tapped as Director for Pilot Episode of Upcoming FOX Series “Our Kind of People” From Producers Karin Gist and Lee Daniels 

Multihyphenate actress, director, producer and coach, Tasha Smith, has been brought on to direct the pilot and second episode of the upcoming Fox drama, “Our Kind of People,” inspired by the book by Laurence Otis Graham and produced by Karin Gist (Star, Mixed-ish) and Lee Daniels (Star, Empire.)  

Magic is something you create, and Showrunner Karin Gist has given new life to the special story that is Our Kind of People,” says Smith. “I am honored and thrilled to bring Karin’s work to life alongside Executive Producer Lee Daniels, who is a wonderful producer and mentor to me.” 

Tasha has been taking the helm as director of several television projects including the upcoming Stars series, “Black Mafia Family,” where she also serves as Executive Producer, directing the pilot along with multiple episodes. She has also worked as director on top-rated series such as ABC’s “Big Sky,” Stars hit drama “P-Valley,” several episodes of Fox’s “911,” and The CW’s “Black Lightning.” Her work as an actress and acting coach have served as the foundation for her understanding and vision of what it takes to tell a story not only in front of the camera, but also behind it.  

Tasha’s work as an acting coach, through her TSAW Actor’s Workshop, has been utilized by numerous luminaries including Mary J. Blige (for her Oscar nominated performance in Mudbound) and most recently with Andra Day on her Golden Globe winning and Oscar nominated performance as Billie Holiday in Hulu’s feature film, The United States vs. Billie Holiday. 

Tasha is represented by Sherry Marsh (Marsh Entertainment,) Verve Talent & Literary Agency, and Darrell Miller (Fox Rothschild, LLP.)  

About Tasha Smith

Tasha Smith is a multifaceted actress and director whose work brings style and intensity to the projects she works on, whether in front of or behind the camera. From her roles as “Carol” on Fox’s hit drama Empire, “Brenda” in Netflix’s Running Out of Time, to her critically acclaimed portrayal of the drug-addicted “Ronnie Boyce” in HBO’s Emmy Award winning mini-series The Corner, Tasha embodies her characters and gives them life.

Tasha’s memorable portrayal of “Angela” in Why Did I Get Married? and its sequel Why Did I Get Married, Too? sparked the creation of the spin-off series For Better or Worse on OWN, for which she earned an NAACP Image Award nomination for “Outstanding Actress in a Comedy Series.” Other feature credits include Lionsgate films Addicted and Daddy’s Little Girls (opposite Idris Elba), Sony’s Jumping the Broom, and Universal’s romantic comedy Couples Retreat, among others.

Most recently, Tasha has directed episodes of 9-1-1 for Fox, Black Lightning for The CW, the Untitled Tracy Oliver project for Amazon, Star on Fox, P-Valley on Starz, Tales on BET, as well as her directorial debut feature film for TV1 titled When Love Kills, which was nominated for a NAACP Award.

Tasha Smith’s infectious optimism and enthusiasm command attention in her professional and private lives. She takes time to share her inspirational life story through motivational speaking and mentoring emerging actors through the Tasha Smith Actors Workshop (TSAW).

Make sure to follow Tasha on her Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook

Meghan Markle and Oprah Winfrey article Photo by Harpo Productions/Joe Pugliese via Getty Images for 360 Magazine

Harry and Meghan’s Oprah Interview Was One for the Royal History Books

Kelly Faircloth

In 1995, the BBC documentary program Panorama aired a sensational interview with Diana, Princess of Wales, in which she uttered the immortal line, “Well, there were three of us in this marriage, so it was a bit crowded.” The fallout for the monarchy and Diana herself was immense. That interview now looks like a friendly round of Carpool Karaoke with James Corden in comparison to the primetime special event that was Oprah Winfrey’s interview with Harry and Meghan, the Duke and Duchess of Sussex.

In the course of the two-hour program, Meghan and Harry lodged bombshell after bombshell, guided all the while by an absolutely legendary interviewer at the very top of her game. The interview was just getting started when Meghan replied to longstanding rumors that she and Kate had had a blowup over the bridesmaids’ dresses in the runup to Meghan’s wedding—by confirming that it had indeed happened and saying that, contrary to the stories circulating, Kate had actually made Meghan cry. She insisted that she didn’t want to share the details because Kate had apologized and she’d forgiven her, but said it was an important turning point in their relationship with the institution, which didn’t refute the story.

This was a theme Meghan returned to over and over again: the lack of support from the institution. “Not only was I not being protected,” she said, “but that they were willing to lie to protect other members of the family, but they weren’t willing to tell the truth to protect me and my husband.” And she was still just getting warmed up.

One of the most shocking moments came when Meghan talked about the depths of the depression she was suffering while pregnant with Archie, under intense media scrutiny and facing a barrage of criticism. She said she was struggling to the point of having suicidal thoughts: “I just didn’t want to be alive anymore. And that was a very clear and real and frightening constant thought.” Even worse, she added that she approached a senior member of the family about getting care for her depression, and was told it “wouldn’t be good for the institution.” She didn’t have her car keys or her passport, at that point, and—as she pointed out—couldn’t exactly call an Uber. It’s worth noting, here, that “mental health” is supposed to be a big philanthropic cause for the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, who recently did a virtual appearance to promote a mental health hotline.

She said she then went to HR—“in my old job there was a union,” she noted—but they couldn’t help her because she wasn’t on staff, she said. (Sounds like the only thing everybody can agree on inside the Palace is that their HR department isn’t much use at all!)

Some of the most radioactive allegations were—unsurprisingly—about race. Meghan said that a family member at one point raised the issue to Harry of just how dark their child’s skin would be; when Harry joined the interview, he refused to divulge just who, exactly, had said it. Meghan also suggested that their children’s race was a factor in their not receiving titles (which aren’t automatic for the monarch’s great-grandchildren and have to be granted); her main concern, she said, was that Archie—the first royal with a biracial mother, at the center of a publicity storm—therefore wouldn’t automatically have security protection. Not a great series of revelations for a royal family that would like to continue their connection with the very diverse Commonwealth.

Elsewhere in the interview, Harry said that his father at one point stopped taking his calls during the negotiations over their potentially leaving the ranks of working royals. He was surprisingly frank about his family, in fact: “I’m acutely aware of where my family stand and how scared they are of the tabloids turning on them,” Harry said, adding that he had been “trapped within the institution like the rest of my family are,” specifically his father and his brother, and that he has compassion for them. He said that currently he and William are giving each other “space,” and that there’s a lot of healing to be done in his relationship with Charles. He also revealed that his family cut him off financially, including his security. Apparently, Tyler Perry stepped in and offered them not just a place to stay in the U.S. while they figured out their housing situation, but also covered their security.

The couple also revealed that they were actually married three days before their highly public wedding in a private ceremony with the Archbishop of Canterbury; that they’re having a daughter; and that they’ve started keeping chickens.

The interview generally did a good job of shredding the princess mythos; Meghan painted a picture of being cooped up inside her home, unable to leave because she was already “overexposed,” basically living on lockdown before anybody had ever heard of covid. At one point, she compared it to The Little Mermaid, in which Ariel literally gives up her voice upon falling in love with the prince. But she closed out the interview by saying their story was “greater than any fairy tale.”

Tyler Perry’s “Sistas” Season 2

360 MAGAZINE had the chance to sit down with the cast of BET’s hit show “Sistas,” which comes from mastermind Tyler Perry, to discuss the second season of the show.

The second season premiered Oct. 14 with a special two-episode event. You can see the third episode of the season on BET Wednesday, and you can catch up on the first season on BET.

Friendship and relationship drama are center stage in this show about four women in the middle of the Atlanta dating scene. Is Mr. Right out there in 2020?

360: What are you most excited about with your characters in season two?

Novi Brown (Sabrina): The drama. I’m just excited to see how far Tyler’s going to take these ladies, and one of my acting teachers says, “Crisis shows character.” We saw Andi in a crisis right when season one ended. Is she still on the road? What is she doing? What is Danni doing? Is Karen over there with Zac because people are dying around them? It’s getting really crazy. Then we have the whole situation with Calvin and Sabrina. Then there’s Olonzo and Maurice. I just feel like you guys should definitely expect every seed that was planted to start budding and cultivating on its own, but you can’t direct how it’s going to be. This is Tyler’s show. We just show up. That’s all we’re going to do. We just want to entertain you guys.

Crystal Hayslett (Fatima): I’m more excited because you actually get to learn who Fatima is. You get to learn more about her. You get to see a lot of different layers she has. Season one, you don’t really get to see that. All you see is that she’s a “ride-or-die” for Andi. This season she continues to do that, but it’s so much more to Fatima.

Trinity Whiteside (Preston): I’m just excited about Preston’s growth. I think with Preston being a mid-season reveal last season, we didn’t get to get into a lot of background as far as Preston individually. I think in this season you get to see a little bit more of him as an individual.

Kevin Walton (Aaron): I’m excited to see more of Aaron in a different kind of space. Season one was plenty of drama in things that were around him. I feel like he gets associated with that space as if he is that. With the opportunity in season two, you get to know him a little bit more beyond just that drama. I’m excited for people to get to see that and see how they respond. Right now everyone is like, “Red flag, Aaron! Questions! Questions! Red flag!” Soften it up for him, please. I’m excited to see that happen.

Devale Ellis (Zac): I’m excited for the evolution. Zac is not going to be the same person he was in season one. Typically that’s what happens in television. Season one to season two you see an evolution of the characters, but I’m excited for people to see where Zac goes in the season.

Anthony Dalton (Calvin): I’m excited to see the interaction with new characters coming in, especially with my character and some of the other characters on the show and the new dynamics that come with that.

Brian Jordan Jr. (Maurice): I’m most excited that people get to see more of Maurice this season and more into his personal life and not just him as an auxiliary to other people but really a deep delve into his life. I’m so excited about that.

360: How does the show’s balance of comedy and drama reflect real life relationships and real life itself?

Mignon (Danni): Life isn’t all anything. Things come to pass, right? Nothing is permanent, except for what you decide to hold dear, and I think comedy and drama being balanced is only necessary for authentic storytelling.

Crystal Hayslett: I think it hits spot on. In life, there’s a balance to everything, and Tyler, with his writing and the way he wrote everything, is the perfect balance and the perfect depiction of what real life is.

Trinity Whiteside: I think, in life, much like with the show, you take the good with the bad. You get the comedy with the drama, and those are two things that I believe drive the show and what has fans from different walks of life enjoying the show.

Kevin Walton: Funny is money. When people laugh, it kind of holds up that heart space, and we do that in general, and we do that in life. When you have comedy and drama dance like that, it is that space where you know where things hit home, and you can find ways to laugh about it and create more humor. Like Crystal said, TP does that beautifully in that space. I think it mirrors life in that way.

Anthony Dalton: I feel that it’s just the human condition. There’s pain. There’s sorrow. There’s laughter, especially amongst the black community. It resonates with the fans, and that’s why we got a season two, and that’s why our numbers are the way they are.

Brian Jordan Jr.: I feel like there are so many situations on this show that are just crazy, and I have been written in with comedic things that happen right in the middle of them. Personally, I’m a person who deals with sorrow, deals with trauma, with comedy. It’s something I’ve done my entire life. People look for joy in those types of situations, and laughter is the way we heal. Especially black people, I feel, we heal from laughter. Laughter is healing for us. I feel that it would not be an adequate depiction of the black experience if you didn’t have humor, so I think it’s perfect.

Devale Ellis: I would have to agree with Brian. I feel like we laugh sometimes to hide our pain, and Zac, in particular, was not supposed to be a super comedic character, but in order to bring some humanity to who Zac is and what he’s been dealing with, dealing with recidivism and some of the choices he made, I decided to make him a little bit funny because I wanted people to root for Zac. If you look at Zac in season one, it was hard to root for him because he made some really poor decisions, and I felt like if he was funny, it would allow Zac to be likable. He’s a charming guy. Even though he’s a little bit doltish and he makes some poor decisions, he’s not an evil guy, so for me, the comedy brings a humanity to my character.

360: The cast has made a point to say they want viewers to see themselves and people they know in this show. What has the fan reception been like, and what work is still left to do in season two and going forward?

KJ Smith (Andi): I think that, from the feedback I see, they do see themselves. They see themselves in each of our characters. We are multi-faceted, diverse human beings, and we all have different layers. I even see myself in all of us, so I think that what we’re doing is translating what it looks like to be a single, black female in this time and space, and I think people can really relate to that.

Crystal Hayseltt: People love that Fatima rides so hard for Andi, but in season one, they didn’t like the way that Andi treated Fatima. They were like, “She’s going for you. Why are you so mean to her?” Going into this season, you see more of a friendship and a bond built, which is beautiful. The fans are in for a treat for sure.

Trinity Whiteside: With Preston, I think it shows that a man can love a woman for who she is, despite how she feels or the insecurities she may have. There are people out there who love you just the way you are, and they don’t need you to change or be something other than simply who you are.

Kevin Whiteside: I feel like the fan receptivity drives the show in that space and in the relatability of those situations. As crazy as these things can be, it isn’t far-fetched from things that happen on a daily basis and in every day life. That’s where TP draws his inspiration from for these stories. That relatability is one of the successes of the show. It lands for people. When we get to, as people and the character, see, like the Twitter feeds and people’s responses, you’re seeing the things that land and people’s struggles and connectedness. They’re like, “Why would you do that? Don’t do that!” Then people go, “Damn, I’ve done that.” You see that, and I feel like that space is so important for the show because that’s what keeps people engaged. You see the drama, you want it to change, you know where you’ve done that and you’re just hoping someone makes a different decision. I think that’s huge, and I see the way that strikes a chord with our fans and is what makes them so awesome. It’s like they’re right there with you and emotionally engaged and calling us out.

Devale Ellis: I think this room here is a perfect example. We’re three of the six men on the show who represent the black men on the show, and we’re all different versions of black manhood, which I think is so important because now you have different versions of black men being represented on television for the first time. Everybody’s not a criminal. Everyone’s not gay. Everyone’s not toxic a masculine man. Everyone’s not super heterosexual. There are so many different versions of black masculinity, and I think it’s good for TV, and it’s good for us as a culture.

Brian Jordan Jr.: I think that we just continue to live and learn and be open to learning. For anybody who is creating content, anybody who is acting, there are so many different types of people in the world and so many different types of black people. There’s a quote they use on Boomerang that’s also on BET, and they say, “There’s not only one way to be black.” I think that when you continue to explore the different types of black men, different types of black women, different sexualities, different socioeconomic backgrounds and things people feel and breathe and experience, you continue to open your mind to learn, and you can always display them on television and make sure everyone is seen. The growth continues when you continue to learn.

Anthony Dalton: There’s not one way to be anything. I think that this show shows that there’s not one way to be a man. There’s not one way to be a woman. We all deal with certain things, and if we have conversations about them and try to get a dialogue and have an understanding, I feel like we’ll progress.

360: How has Tyler Perry helped get the show off the ground and get it rolling the way it is now?

Novi Brown: Besides the fact that he is Tyler Perry, he became who is is because he built it on his faith. There are so many years that he got so many noes, and I’m sure even until now some people still doubt what he’s capable of. Mignon says it all the time. He’s a maverick. He’s a leader. He’s a pioneer. He’s a person who really just shows us you can do whatever you want to do. That’s what I really, really love about our boss. It’s the best class in the world.

Mignon: We told him he should do a MasterClass. It doesn’t even have to be about filmmaking. It could just be “How to direct the course of your own life.”

Crystal Hayslett: It’s amazing. Working with him is fun. We really get to play. I love when he throws lines at me. He’s like, “Ooh, say this. Say that.” It’s a lot of fun, and there are moments where I’m laughing so hard. Then I’m trying to hold it all together because he’s so funny. At the same time, he’s so supportive. As soon as you finish he’s like, “Yes, you killed it!” He’s so supportive and makes you feel really good about your work.

Trinity Whiteside: People don’t realize how much fun we have in between takes. Tyler Perry isn’t “on-screen funny.” Tyler Perry is funny all the time. Just to have that kind of feeling around you all the time, the looseness, the comfort, it makes it easier for everyone, especially as an actor, to be able to be loose and to be free.

Kevin Walton: There’s this air of dedication in him because you see what he’s amassed and the work that he does, and there’s that space of working with him where you want to contribute to that dedication, work ethic and him pouring his heart in. Then there’s the lightness. He’s just funny, and there’s all these moments that happen outside of shooting where you’ll laugh, and you’ll play with it, then you have to get yourself together an go, “Alright. Let’s get the scene.” He’s personable, so it’s a really dope atmosphere to play with, then it also demands that you bring more, especially at the rate he shoots. It’s a really comprehensive experience when we reflect on it. Working with him is really cool. There’s that demand, discipline and his dedication, then the fun and lightness of it because he likes to crack jokes and mess around, and we get to have that fun, too.

Anthony Dalton: It’s monumental, putting that Tyler Perry stamp on this show. Him doing the Viacom deal and everything gets us into a bigger market, and it allows everyone to see themselves on this show. Tyler Perry is an icon, and to be in same presence as him, and to be a part of a successful show that he’s the head of is monumental, and it just means that the sky is the limit for, not only Tyler Perry, but for us and anybody else who walks through those doors.

Devale Ellis: For me I think it’s, one, being an example. He completely obliterated this idea of the gatekeeper mentality. Tyler Perry bulldozed his way into Hollywood his own way. He didn’t follow anyone’s rules. He didn’t go along with anyone’s ideas of who he should be in order to make it, and now he owns the largest studio in all of Hollywood. He’s one of the most paid and most celebrated producers and directors in all of Hollywood, and people continue to support his projects, so he’s an example. Also, he’s smart enough to understand that he has to change with the times. This show is a different type of Tyler Perry. We saw a lot of his Bible Belt content where he was speaking to the older generations, but now this is more of a millennial or Gen Z type of show. You have younger people getting introduced, which is crazy to me, to Tyler Perry for the first time. When you have teenagers saying, “Oh, I didn’t realize that he also did these types of TV shows,” it shows that you can have longevity if you stay with your people, you continue to research what’s going on and you keep your feet ten toes down to what’s going on in the world. Him being an example and using his following to help us push our numbers means a lot, and I’m proud to be a part of it.

Brian Jordan Jr.: Tyler Perry did something that no one else was able to do. He created a genre of media as a playwright first. People never really call him that, but he’s a playwright first. He created a style of television and film that included and showed a people who had been forgotten in Hollywood. In this time where we are observing the disparities in African-American people, I think that Tyler Perry is revolutionary with the things that he has created to serve the people who had been forgotten since the beginning of time, purposely. I think that is something that should be praised an always observed. Nobody else can do it. Nobody else has done it. He has created, and also cornered, this genre, and it’s something people will always be loyal to because he is the author of it, and that is revolutionary to me.

360: What does it mean when he is actually on set, laughing at the jokes and tying in emotionally with the show?

Mignon: He’s there every day. He directs every episode. It’s him.

KJ Smith: He’s hands-on creatively in all facets. It’s at his studio. He’s the writer, the producer and the director, so he’s on-set with us every moment of every day. If Andi doesn’t have any scenes, I can go back to my trailer. I can go back to my space. He’s there regardless. He’s there most times before people get there and after people leave, so he’s extremely hands-on, and I think his dedication and work ethic is shown in the things that he’s been able to do for so many people and employing so many people. Changing the film industry, changing the city of Atlanta as a whole. He’s an incredible human being. I love Tyler. He’s just great.

To learn more about BET’s “Sistas,” you can click right here.

Vaughn Hebron QxA

The Oval,” the hit BET show from Tyler Perry, will return to homes for its second season in Oct., and Vaughn Hebron is front and center.

Playing Barry, a man whose daughter was kidnapped by his ex-girlfriend, Hebron finds himself in the middle of a show about an interracial family living in the White House. Perfect on the outside but full of lies on the inside, the family brings some of the best drama to television.

Hebron was born in Baltimore and attended Pennsylvania’s Lafayette College on a Division 1 football scholarship. At Lafayette College, he joined Omega Psi Phi Fraternity and eventually graduated with a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Economics and Business and minor in Africana Studies.

He began a career in pharmaceuticals but eventually moved to Los Angeles to pursue acting. Early on he booked commercials, and he’ll appear in the Will Smith-led “King Richard” in 2021.

Hebron answered a few questions for 360 MAGAZINE regarding “The Oval,” the entertainment industry and his future.

360: Tell us about “The Oval” and your character and what we can look forward to in season 2.

Hebron: “The Oval” is a Tyler Perry soap, set in the White House, that centers around the First Family and their staff. Well, at least it did in the first season. The series has expanded and plunged into the personal and dramatic lives of each individual and is now a whirlwind of dramatics and juicy story lines. I play Barry Hallsen on the show, the son of the White House Head Butler. Barry is a young man in his early 20s trying to establish himself while providing for his daughter, Callie. In the first season, he faces extreme challenges in and out of the White House, namely having his daughter kidnapped by his baby mother, Ruth, who is part of a vicious cult. The first season follows his journey to finding his daughter and the many problems he creates for himself in doing so. What viewers can look forward to in the second season is Barry getting closer to finding his daughter but also getting closer to the imminent danger that surrounds her.

360: Before you became an actor, you were in pharmaceutical sales. How was the transition, and are you excited about the career change?

Hebron: The transition was a big adjustment, going from a steady, regular paycheck and working every day to not knowing when the next time I’ll be working but still getting paid for it. Basically, I had to start all over from square one and figure things out each step of the way. It was intimidating and uncertain, but it’s also been very fulfilling. It feels like I am being driven by something that I never felt in my corporate career: a new sense of purpose. The unknowingness was both scary and exciting.

360: What has been your biggest challenge thus far in the industry?

Hebron: Coming from a corporate background, I was used to a lot of structure. There were always deadlines, expectations that would be met, structured and upkept working conditions, and if there were any questions, someone there to help. There’s almost none of that in the industry. There are no set timelines on when we book jobs, no set path on how to be successful and reach a certain level in your career and no formal performance evaluations. Even asking for help could be just as bad as not asking for help. The biggest challenge for me was adjusting to this space of having to completely trust in the process and letting God take the wheel. I had to surrender to the journey and have faith that the things I was doing were going to work out the way they were meant to. I really had to believe that everything would happen for a reason. It was a complete mindset shift; a completely different life. I still struggle with it at times.

360: Where do you see your career in 5 years? 10 years?

Hebron: Well, one of the first lessons I learned in this industry is that you can’t put a timeline on things. At all. They could happen way sooner, or way later than you think, so just be open and ready when the time comes. My ultimate goal in this industry is to become an A-list storyteller. That’s the level I want to be at. However, storytelling comes in many different forms. Obviously acting is the main form of storytelling that I’m doing right now, but I’ve also written and pitched TV shows and see myself dabbing in that. I also see myself directing and producing one day as well. Additionally, I have a lot of ideas outside of the industry for my fitness and business, and of course I want to have a family one day.

360: Do you have any future projects that you’re allowed to talk about?

Hebron: Yes, I will be in the upcoming feature film “King Richard” starring Will Smith, as one of the main antagonists, hitting theaters Nov. 2021. We are working a couple other projects that are under wrap right now.

To learn more about Hebron, you can click right here.

You can also follow Hebron on Instagram and Twitter.

Tyler Perry illustrated for 360 magazine by Rita Azar

TYLER PERRY SITCOMS

Watch and share the official trailer here

“TYLER PERRY’S HOUSE OF PAYNE” and “TYLER PERRY’S ASSISTED LIVING” will premiere on BET Wednesday, September 2nd at 9 PM ET and 10 PM ET, respectively. Two half-hour episodes will air for each show.

“TYLER PERRY’S HOUSE OF PAYNE,” returning for its seventh season, is a hilarious comedy about retired fire chief Curtis Payne (LaVan Davis) and his lovely wife Ella (Cassi Davis Patton) that picks up five years later, as they continue to navigate the problems of life with their quirky modern-day family.

“TYLER PERRY’S HOUSE OF PAYNE” stars LaVan Davis as Curtis Payne, Cassi Davis Patton as Ella Payne, Lance Gross as Calvin Payne, Demetria McKinney as Janine Payne, China Anne McClain as Jazmine Payne, Keshia Knight Pulliam as Miranda and Allen Payne as CJ Payne.

In the new sitcom “TYLER PERRY’S ASSISTED LIVING,” Jeremy (Na’im Lynn), a patriarch of a young family with teenage children, loses his job and decides to move to the backwoods of Georgia to help his crazy grandfather.  Grandpa Vinny (J. Anthony Brown) has foolishly purchased a terribly run-down home for the elderly and he is in way over his head, but comedy ensues as Mr. Brown (David Mann) and Cora (Tamela Mann) show up at the right time as needy investors.

“TYLER PERRY’S ASSISTED LIVING” stars David Mann as Mr. Brown, Tamela Mann as Cora, J. Anthony Brown as Vinny, Na’im Lynn as Jeremy, Courtney Nichole as Leah, Tayler Buck as Sandra and Alex Henderson as Phillip.

For more information on “TYLER PERRY’S ASSISTED LIVING” click here.

For more information on “TYLER PERRY’S HOUSE OF PAYNE” click here

“TYLER PERRY’S HOUSE OF PAYNE” and “TYLER PERRY’S ASSISTED LIVING” are executive produced, written, and directed by Tyler Perry. Michelle Sneed serves as Executive Producer of both series for Tyler Perry Studios.

JOSEPH LOWERY, BARACK OBAMA, MEDAL OF FREEDOM, VAUGHN LOWERY, 360 MAGAZINE

REMEMBERING JOSEPH LOWERY

“When black will not be asked to get in back; when brown can stick around; when yellow will be mellow; when the red man can get ahead, man; and when white will embrace what is right.” – Joseph Lowery

Former Co-Founder/President of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), Rev. Dr. Joseph Echols Lowery, transitioned on Friday, March 27, 2020 at 10pm at the age of 98. He was one of the last remaining leaders of the Civil Rights Movement.

Dr. Lowery has assumed and executed a broad and diverse series of roles over the span of his eight decades: leader, pastor/preacher, servant, father, husband, freedom fighter and advocate. FOX 5 Atlanta pays tribute to Lowery HERE.

In 1997,he was dubbed the ‘Dean of the Civil Rights Movement’ upon receipt of the NAACP’s Lifetime Achievement Award. On January 20, 2009, in his inimitable style; Dr. Lowery delivered the Benediction on the occasion of President Obama’s inauguration as the 44th President of the United States. On August 12, 2009 when President Barack Obama awarded him the nation’s highest civilian honor: The Presidential Medal of Freedom, in recognition of his lifelong commitment to the nonviolent struggle for the causes of justice, human rights, economic equality, voting rights, peace and human dignity.

Born in Huntsville, Alabama, on October 6th, 1921, Rev. Dr. Lowery’s legacy of service and struggle is long and rich. His genesis as a Civil Rights advocate dates to the early 1950s where, in Mobile, Alabama he headed the Alabama Civic Affairs Association; the organization which led the movement to desegregate buses and public accommodations. In 1957, with friend and colleague, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. he was a Co-founder of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), where served in an array of leadership positions, including: Vice President (1957-67); Chairman of the Board (1967-77); and as President and Chief Executive Officer from (1977-1998).

In 1961, he was one of four Alabama pastors whose property was seized by the Alabama Courts in an historic, precedent setting libel suit, Sullivan v. NY Times, Abernathy, Lowery, Shuttlesworth, & Seay, because of their civil rights work.The United States Supreme Court vindicated the ministers in a landmark ruling which remains an important element in the protections afforded the free speech rights of the press, and of citizens advocating and protesting for justice and societal change.

In March of 1965, he was chosen by Dr. King to chair the Delegation delivering the demands of the Selma-to-Montgomery March George Wallace, the Governor of Alabama.  As the world witnessed, Wallace ordered the marchers beaten in the incident that came to be known as “Bloody Sunday”, which ultimately led to enactment of the Voting Rights Act.

Throughout his career, Rev. Dr. Lowery’s commitment to human rights and social justice exists on a global scale. His work resulted in the desegregation of Nashville, Tennessee schools, presenting Nelson Mandela with the Martin Luther King Jr. Human Rights Award following his release from prison in 1990, leading a peace delegation to Lebanon and nations in Central America to seek justice by nonviolent means, and securing millions of dollars in contracts for minority businesses in the Southern region of the United States.

His efforts also emphasize the need to uplift and empower historically disenfranchised communities. Ranging from supporting the families affected by the Atlanta “Missing and Murdered Children Crisis” through setting up funds with Citizen Trust Bank, demanding election reform and economic justice as Convener of the Georgia Coalition for the People’s Agenda (GCPA), to advocating for the rights of Black farmers discriminated against by the Department of Agriculture – Rev. Dr. Joseph Lowery remains committed to cultivating the Beloved Community and reminds us to “turn TO each other not ON each other!” Ebony Magazine, in recognizing Rev. Dr. Lowery as one of the nation’s “15 Greatest Black Preachers,” described him as the “consummate voice of biblical social relevancy, a focused prophetic voice, speaking truth to power,” and his strong dedication to faith and inclusion is evident in all of his work.

Joseph Lowery had 5 children from 2 separate marriages.

•Most notable speech can be watched HERE.

Remarks at Coretta Scott King’s funeral.

•His legacy continues with the Lowery Institute.

•According to CNN Lowery was a founder of the SCLC.

BBC remembers Lowery.

Mentioned in The Guardian.

Civil Rights Icon Dies at 98 – NBC News.

•As seen on NPR.

Essence Magazine Instagram Post.

The Shade Room Instagram Post.

Tyler Perry Remembers.

Jamie Foxx Commemorates.

Barack Obama Pays Respect.

OWN Network Tribute

Lowery was laid to rest on Saturday, April 4th which is the same day MLK was assassinated.

Joe Biden Acknowledges.

Official Statement from The Family of Reverend Doctor Joseph E. Lowery

Our entire family is humbled and blessed by the overwhelming outpouring of love and support that has come from around the globe. We thank you for loving our father, Dr. Joseph E. Lowery, and for your continuous prayers during this time.

In lieu of flowers, cards or food, donations may be made to The Joseph & Evelyn Lowery Institute for Justice & Human Rights. Dr. Lowery’s life was driven by a sense of obligation to our global community and desire to champion love over hate; inclusion over exclusion. The Lowery Institute was founded in 2002 to further Dr. Lowery’s legacy of promoting non-violent advocacy among future generations.

Donations can be sent to The Joseph & Evelyn Lowery Institute, P.O. Box 92801, Atlanta, GA 30314, or made on-line by clicking here.

Aligning with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s guidelines on COVID-19 prevention and social distancing, plans are underway for a private family service. A public memorial will be held in late summer or early fall.

Thank you,

The Lowery Family

John Schneider Departs ‘Dancing with the Stars’

Actor and chart-topping country music artist John Schneider was eliminated from Dancing with the Stars on Monday night, after seven weeks of competition. Schneider and pro dance partner Emma Slater received their highest score (25 out of 30) of the season but failed to survive the season’s first double elimination.

“This has been the most amazing experience and I wouldn’t change it for the world,” said Schneider, who has juggled the show’s grueling rehearsal schedule with live concerts, fan events and filming for his current series, Tyler Perry’s The Haves and the Have Nots on OWN (Oprah Winfrey Network) — the #1 primetime series on cable on Tuesday nights.

In addition to his extensive acting career, which includes the iconic roles of “Bo Duke” on The Dukes of Hazzard and “Jonathan Kent” on Smallville, Schneider is also a celebrated country music artist with 10 albums to his credits and 4 #1 singles on the Billboard Country chart. This year, he launched an ambitious 52-song project, The Odyssey, releasing a song a week throughout 2018. A new greatest hits project is also expected before the end of the year.

For the latest news and exclusive John Schneider content, download the free John Schneider app or visit the official website at www.JohnSchneiderStudios.com.

TV ONE’S WHEN LOVE KILLS STARRING LIL MAMA × LANCE GROSS

TV ONE’S ORIGINAL FILM, WHEN LOVE KILLS: THE FALICIA BLAKELY STORY, SCHEDULED TO PREMIERE MONDAY AUG. 28 AT 9 P.M. ET 


Directed  by  Tasha  Smith,  the  project stars  Niatia  ‘Lil’  Mama’  Kirkland,  Lance  Gross, and  Tami  Roman  in  a  true  crime  thriller  ripped  from  the  headlines WASHINGTON D.C.  – TV  One’s  latest  original  film,  When  Love  Kills:  The  Falicia Blakely  Story,  will  premiere  Monday,  August  28  at  9  pm  EST.  The  film  marks  the feature-length  directorial  debut  for  Tasha  Smith  (For  Better  Or  Worse,  Empire) and  stars  Niatia  “Lil’  Mama”  Kirkland,  Lance  Gross,  and  Tami  Roman,  with special  appearances  from  Big  Freedia,  Lil  Zane,  and  Floyd  Mayweather. 

The project  is  the  network’s  first original  movie  inspired  by  an  episode  of  TV  One’s original  true  crime  series,  For  My  Man. When Love Kills:  The  Falicia  Blakely  Story  tells  the  tragic  story  of  Falicia  Blakely, a  teen  mom from  Atlanta  who  grows  up  in  the  fast-lane.  When  she  becomes  an exotic  dancer,  she  attracts  the  attention  of  local  pimp  and  predator,  Dino.  His empty  promises  of  a  life  together  turn  Falicia  into  a  pawn  in  his  dangerous games;  and  she’s  forced  to  prove  her  love  for  him  at  the  expense  of  innocent lives. “I  totally  did  not  see  myself  playing  an  exotic  dancer,  but  it  was  so  much  more to  the  story,”  says  Niatia  “Lil’  Mama”  Kirkland  of  taking  on  the  role.  “I  pulled from  the  truth  of  women  all  around  the  world  who  have  been  victims  and  not known  that  they  were  victims  of  society.  This  is  what’s  so  amazing  about  acting –  allowing  myself  to  be  as  vulnerable  as  I  would  be  in  that  moment,  just  to actually  live  through  the  character  and  become  Falicia.  I  want  to  do  her  justice, and  so  I  tapped  into  truth  to  tell  her  story.” In  playing  Dino,  a  modern  day  Dr.  Jekyll  and  Mr.  Hyde  who  uses  Falicia’s  desire to  be  loved  for  his  gain,  Gross  says  he  had  to  “dive  all  the  way  in.” “This  is  a  role  nobody’s  ever  seen  me  in  –  they’re  used  to  me  being  the  nice  guy,” says  the  actor,  who  is  known  for  his  roles  in  Tyler  Perry’s  House  of  Pain  and Temptation.  ”I  want  the  audience  to  know  that  you  really  have  to  be  conscious of  the  decisions  that  you  make,  because  there’s  consequences  that  come  along with  it.”   Tami  Roman  portrays  Stacey,  Falicia’s  alcoholic  mother  who  has  jumped  in  and out  of  her  daughter’s  life,  exposing  her  to  too  much  too  soon.

Roman  said  she  had  to  reflect  back deeply  into  her  own  relationship  with  her mother  as  a  teenager  in  order  to  understand  how  to  play  the  character. “At  the  age  of  13  [my  mother]  sent  me  to  live  with  my  grandmother.  By  15  she came  to  get  me,  and  at  that  point  we  became  best  friends  because  she  had finally  gotten  herself  together,”  she  recalls.  “And  I  think  that  is  where  I  tried  to become  my  mom  [in  this  role].” Each  actor  transforms  into  their  characters  under  the  directorial  leadership  of Tasha  Smith,  whose  goal  was  to  challenge  each  actor  to  dig  deep  to  relate  to their  character,  while  creating  a  suspenseful,  high-stakes  drama  on  screen.  In addition  to  directing  and  producing,  Smith  is  a  multifaceted  actress  whose  work brings  style  and  intensity  to  the  subjects  she  plays  on  the  big  and  small  screens. “I  feel  like  it’s  my  calling  to  inspire  other  actors  to  pursue  their  purpose  in  the heart,  and  that’s  why  to  have  the  opportunity  to  direct  and  to  work  with  actors on  that  level  –  I  love  it.  I’m  in  heaven,”  says  Smith  on  stepping  behind  the camera  for  the  first  time. When  Love  Kills:  The  Falicia  Blakely  Story  is  written  by  industry  veteran  Cas Sigers-Beedles,  who  previously  wrote  and  executive  produced  the  TV  One movies  Welcome  to  the  Family  and  Girlfriends  Getaway  1  & 2.    

The  film  is produced  for  TV  One  by  Eric  Tomosunas,  Keith  Neal  and  James  Seppelfrick  of Swirl  Films.  For  TV  One,  Tia  A.  Smith  is  Sr.  Director  of  Original  Programming  & Production  and  Executive  in  Charge  of  Production;  Donyell  McCullough  is  Senior Director  of  Talent  &  Casting;  Robyn  Greene-Arrington  is  VP  of  Original Programming,  and  D’Angela  Proctor  is  Head  of  Original  Programming  and Production. For  more  information  about  TV  One’s  upcoming  programming,  including original  movies,  visit  the  network’s  companion  website  at  www.tvone.tv .  

TV  One viewers  can  also  join  the  conversation  by  connecting  via  social  media  on  Twitter Instagram and  Facebook (@tvonetv)  using  the  hash  tag  #REPRESENT.

📸  by Tyren Redd 👗 by Michael Mann

Lil Mama, Tasha Smith, Lance Gross

Jamison Harris, Tyren Redd, Jonta Harris – 360 MAGAZINE

Lil Mama’s Style Team: Michael Mann × Tyler Jacob

JD McCrary

JD McCrary is taking the world by storm, He previously appeared on NBC’s Little Big Shots where he became a viral sensation after performing a Michael Jackson cover. McCrary can be seen starring as Kenny on Tyler Perry’s new OWN episodic series “The Paynes.” JD  is also excited to have the opportunity to work with Dr. Dre, appearing in Apple Music’s first feature show, VITAL SIGNS with DR. DRE. 

 

JD has appeared in numerous commercials, and on television as Young Ernie in Disney’s KC Undercover. He most recently wrapped on roles on TV Land’s TEACHERS and Showtime’s I’M DYING UP HERE. MTV compared JD to Michael Jackson and Fader Magazine wrote about him as well. In other articles, he has been hailed as the “New King of Pop!” Singing, beatboxing and rapping, JD is rapidly gaining more exposure and praise for both his own music and covers.