Posts tagged with "NAACP"

Kaelen Felix illustrates WEB DUBOIS FOR 360 MAGAZINE

W.E.B. Du Bois: The Lost and the Found

W.E.B. Du Bois spent many decades fighting to ensure that African Americans could claim their place as full citizens and thereby fulfill the deeply compromised ideals of American democracy. Yet he died in Africa, having apparently given up on the United States.

In 1909, Du Bois was among the founders of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), according to the organization’s website. During his time serving as the director of publicity and research, Du Bois founded The Crisis, a publication that focused on the African American pride and always published works from young members of this community.

After leaving the NAACP in 1934, Du Bois went on to become a voice in the civil rights movement. He was a leader of protests and was a part of the socialist party. In his lifetime, Du Bois wrote two books, The Souls of Black Folk and Black Reconstruction, in addition to his publication The Crisis.

In 1951, Du Bois was indicted as “an unregistered agent of a foreign power,” but was acquitted by a judge according to Britannica

Becoming increasingly radical and being intrigued with the principles of communism, Du Bois left America and moved to Ghana in 1961, according to the History Channels’ online publication. He then became a member of the American Communist Party. 

Poet and assistant professor of philosophy at the University of Massachusetts, Elvira Basevuch, has taken a deeper look at Du Bois’ ideology and analyzed it in her upcoming book, W.E.B Du Bois: The Lost and the Found.

In this book, Elvira Basevich looks at the paradox of a man who wanted to change America but left in defeat by tracing the development of his life and thought and the relevance of his legacy to our our current state. She adeptly analyzes the main concepts that inform Du Bois’ critique of American democracy, such as the color line and double consciousness, before examining how these concepts might inform our understanding of contemporary struggles, from Black Lives Matter to the campaign for reparations for slavery.

She stresses the continuity in Du Bois’ thought, from his early writings to his later embrace of self-segregation and Pan-Africanism, while not shying away from assessing the challenging implications of his later work.

This wonderful book vindicates the power of Du Bois’ thought to help transform a stubbornly unjust world. It is essential reading for racial justice activists as well as students of African American philosophy and political thought.

Du Bois’ ideas and teachings were too radical for the time, but Basevich is taking a closer look at them and finding that many of these teachings a relevant today.

Her book is available for pre-order now and will be released on December 29, 2020.

Rita Azar illustrates article on white militia and violence for 360 MAGAZINE

ARMED WHITE MILITIA VIOLENCE

Leading national racial justice organizational leaders issued a joint statement on armed white militia violence and police camaraderie with militia members following the arrest of a militia member in connection with the killing of two police accountability protesters in Kenosha, Wisconsin.

“Tuesday night, two protesters who were advocating for accountability following the horrific police shooting of Jacob Blake were allegedly shot and killed by a 17-year-old associated with a white militia group. We are outraged by these killings. The ability of a minor to travel from another state at the urging of adult white supremacists organizing on Facebook highlights the corrosive and dangerous convergence of race, police violence, and the presence of these violent groups. That this volatile cocktail was allowed to develop led directly to one of the most violent nights in the city’s history. In light of the fact that the suspect apparently crossed state lines in order to commit this crime, the federal government should launch an investigation to determine whether he was involved in an interstate criminal conspiracy.
“We are equally outraged by videos showing Kenosha Police Department Officers exhibiting camaraderie toward militia members – who were out in violation of the curfew before the shootings — and also seemingly ignoring protesters who tried to identify the shooter in this incident. Police solidarity with white militia members is abhorrent and intolerable – and it represents a highly dangerous threat to the lives and rights of people of color. In addition, the fact that Kenosha Police Chief Daniel Miskinis blamed protestors for the killings is another example of the racially disparate treatment that Americans across the country have been protesting against since May and for decades before. We call on Wisconsin Governor Tony Evers and Attorney General Josh Kaul, to immediately investigate and prosecute these killings, the shooting of Mr. Blake, and the increasingly pervasive issue of armed white militia members confronting and attacking protesters demanding police accountability. They must also demand the immediate removal of Chief Miskinis.

“Finally, turning to Facebook, the prevalence of armed white militia groups organizing on the platform is not new. Facebook must also be held accountable for its inaction while these violent groups have been allowed to grow and organize. Facebook must take immediate steps to ensure that its platform is not used to foment violence and hatred — and to take immediate and comprehensive action to put an end to groups using its services to organize activities that perpetuate racism and cause harm.”
 
The following leaders signed the statement:
 
·       Sherrilyn Ifill, president and director-counsel, NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc.
·       Reverend Al Sharpton, founder and president, National Action Network
·       Melanie L. Campbell, president and CEO, National Coalition on Black Civic Participation, Convener, Black Women’s Roundtable
·       Kristen Clarke, president and executive director, Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law
·       Vanita Gupta, president and CEO, The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights
·       Derrick Johnson, president and CEO, NAACP
·       Marc H. Morial, president and CEO, National Urban League
 
Founded in 1940, the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc. (LDF) is the nation’s first civil and human rights law organization. LDF has been completely separate from the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) since 1957—although LDF was originally founded by the NAACP and shares its commitment to equal rights. LDF’s Thurgood Marshall Institute (TMI) is a multi-disciplinary and collaborative hub within LDF that launches targeted campaigns and undertakes innovative research to shape the civil rights narrative. In media attributions, please refer to us as the NAACP Legal Defense Fund or LDF. Follow LDF and TMI on TwitterInstagram and Facebook.
 
National Action Network is one of the leading civil rights organizations in the Nation with chapters throughout the entire United States. Founded in 1991 by Reverend Al Sharpton, NAN works within the spirit and tradition of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. to promote a modern civil rights agenda that includes the fight for one standard of justice, decency and equal opportunities for all people regardless of race, religion, nationality or gender. For more information go to www.nationalactionnetwork.net.
The National Coalition on Black Civic Participation (NCBCP), founded in 1976, is one of the most active civil rights and social justice organizations in the nation “dedicated to increasing civic engagement, economic and voter empowerment in Black America.” The Black Women’s Roundtable (BWR) is the women and girls empowerment arm of the NCBCP. At the forefront of championing just and equitable public policy on behalf of Black women, BWR promotes their health and wellness, economic security & prosperity, education, and global empowerment as key elements for success. Visit www.ncbcp.org and follow us on Twitter @ncbcp and Instagram @thenationalcoalition.
 
The Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law, a nonpartisan, nonprofit organization, was formed in 1963 at the request of President John F. Kennedy to involve the private bar in providing legal services to address racial discrimination. Now in its 56th year, the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law is continuing its quest to “Move America Toward Justice.” The principal mission of the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law is to secure, through the rule of law, equal justice for all, particularly in the areas of criminal justice, fair housing and community development, economic justice, educational opportunities, and voting rights.
 
The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights is a coalition charged by its diverse membership of more than 220 national organizations to promote and protect the rights of all persons in the United States. The Leadership Conference works toward an America as good as its ideals. For more information on The Leadership Conference and its member organizations, visit www.civilrights.org.
 
Founded in 1909, the NAACP is the nation’s largest and foremost grassroots civil rights organization. The mission of the NAACP is to secure the political, educational, social, and economic equality of rights in order to eliminate race-based discrimination and ensure the health and well-being of all persons. Members throughout the United States and the world are the premier advocates for civil rights and social justice in their communities. You can read more about the NAACP’s work by visiting naacp.org
 
The National Urban League is a historic civil rights organization dedicated to economic empowerment in order to elevate the standard of living in historically underserved urban communities. The National Urban League spearheads the efforts of its 90 local affiliates through the development of programs, public policy research and advocacy, providing direct services that impact and improve the lives of more than 2 million people annually nationwide. Visit www.nul.org and follow us on Twitter and Instagram: @NatUrbanLeague.

Beer illustrated by Mina Tocalini for 360 MAGAZINE.

Black is Beautiful

SLO Brew & Liquid Gravity Brewing Co. have come together to craft a Coconut Coffee Stout in an effort to raise awareness against race-based injustice as a part of the Black is Beautiful initiative. Today the collaboration is going live for presale. Drink well, do good.

Brewed in a 20 BBL batch with 1800 lbs of malt for toasted notes of caramel followed by light additions of CTZ hop to tease a slight bitterness. This deep, rich brew is layered with fresh ground coffee & coconut for an 8% summer stout.

We are incredibly humbled to join up with our friends Liquid Gravity Brewing Co. down the road & hundreds of breweries worldwide to raise awareness for race-based injustice. As part of the Black is Beautiful beer initiative we will be making a collective donation to the NAACP SLO County Branch. Get in on the good stuff.

Available starting 8/5 online and in brewery taprooms.

 SLO Brew Rock Taproom Hours Outdoor Dining (855 Aerovista Place)

Tues. – Thurs. 11:30 AM – 9:00 PM

Fri. – Sat. 11:30 AM – 10:00 PM

Sunday: 11:30 AM – 6:00 PM

 SLO Stills Tasting Room Hours Outdoor Dining (855 Aerovista Place)

Wed. – Thurs. 3:00 PM – 8:00 PM

Fri. – Sat. 12:00 PM – 9:00 PM

Sunday: 12:00 PM – 6:00 PM

 The Carrisa Creekside Dining Hours Outdoor Dining (Downtown, SLO)

Wed. – Thurs. 4:00 PM – 9:00 PM

Fri. – Sat. 12:00 PM – 10:00 PM

Sunday: 12:00 PM – 6:00 PM

 SLO Stills Pop Up Shop Hours (Downtown, SLO)

Wed. – Thurs. 4:00 PM – 9:00 PM

Fri. – Sat. 12:00 PM – 10:00 PM

Sunday: 12:00 PM – 6:00 PM

 Bring Summer Home. Get SLO Brew Craft Beer, Porch Pounder Canned Wine & SLO Stills Small-Batch Whiskey delivered straight to your door.

 Follow Liquid Gravity Brewing Company: Facebook | Instagram | Twitter 

Follow SLO Brew: Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

Facebook Ad Boycott

By Eamonn Burke

The social media platform Facebook is making policy changes after Unilever has removed ads from the site, as well as Twitter. They join a group of corporations such as Honda, Verizon, Ford, Clorox, and Denny’s, who have come together to boycott the site, as called for by the NAACP and the Anti-Defamation League as a way to pressure tech conglomerates to make change. Some companies are pulling ads indefinitely, and some have pledged to pull them for the month of July.

These new policies involve designating posts that are in violation of existing policies but still “newsworthy”. Twitter has already adopted this method, allowing them to label some of President Trump’s tweets as violations. Facebook claims that it allocates a large budget to keeping content safe and removing hate speech using AI that is 90% effective, and also that the company never makes policy changes based on money. However, a group called Stop Hate For Profit, who called for the boycott, want to see more change:

“We have been down this road before with Facebook. They have made apologies in the past. They have taken meager steps after each catastrophe where their platform played a part. But this has to end now.”

Unilever supplied upwards of $42 million dollars of revenue for Facebook in 2019, so it is no doubt that their absence will be damaging. Facebook is also a huge source of profit for the companies themselves, so it is an impactful decision to stopping putting ads on the site. Shares of Facebook and Twitter have already gone down more than 7% as of Friday. Other massive companies like Procter and Gamble have pledged to do the same in the face of discriminatory content.

Rita Azar, 360 Magazine, illustration, corporation

Companies Profiting from BLM

By Eamonn Burke

As the nation grapples with the murders of George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery, and Breonna Taylor, among many others over many years, protests have called for massive police and corporate reform. Changes have already been made, as major companies and institutions have begun to exclude forms of racism and include new reforms and statements. However, as with many corporate sentiments, the genuine nature of these statements is being called into question and exposed as hollow.

It has become a trend for major companies to undertake policies and claim responsibility for social issues, in what is known as “Political Corporate Social Responsibility.” Media is flooded with brands preaching change and pledging to be a part of it. In today’s instant society, however, it is difficult to discern the true motives of these businesses in their support of the BLM movement.

Major companies like Microsoft and Amazon have been actively projecting support for the BLM movement, yet both corporations have shockingly low involvement of black people within their company structure. Intel joined in the trend with a cringey tweet as well.

Fast food companies like Wendy’s and Burger King, and Popeyes have also seemingly been using the movement to boost their reputation using tweets and ads, despite the fact that they thrive on minimum wage workers who are often people of color. The stark insensitivity is reminiscent of Pepsi’s distasteful ad that was pulled amidst the movement in 2017. Some companies, however, didn’t even try to voice support. One such company was Starbucks, who announced that employees were forbidden from wearing BLM merchandise, a policy that has since been reversed. Other food brands such as Quaker Oats are making real changes – the Aunt Jemima brand will be dropped because of it’s racial stereotyping, as well as Uncle Ben’s.

Following a petition signed by more than 5,000 people, Trader Joe’s announced in July that they would be changing the names of their “racist packaging” such as “Trader Ming’s” and “Trader José.” San Francisco High School student Briones Bedell, who started the petition, claimed that “The Trader Joe’s branding is racist because it exoticizes other cultures — it presents ‘Joe’ as the default ‘normal’ and the other characters falling outside of it.”

The company is now going back on that promise, and have says in a new statement that “We disagree that any of these labels are racist,” arguing that they are meant to show appreciation for these cultures. Company spokeswoman Kenya Friend-Daniel originally had accepted the petition, acknowledging that it may have the opposite effect of its intended inclusiveness. Now, however, she says that they will only look into these types of changes from employees, not from petitions online.

The racial revolution in the wake of George Floyd’s death has seen the downfall of other brands and images such as Aunt Jemima and the Washington Redskins, but Trader Joe’s is the first prominent one to resist the “cancel culture.”

What consumers really want, however, is not posts on social media. They want real action and real change. This means companies should “Open Their Purse” and donate to anti-racism organizations. Many companies have, but many have also donated to campaigns for Congress people that are rejected by the NAACP.

The public is skeptical of these statements and promises, and not without reason. The history of major businesses like Bank of America and Goldman Sachs have in the past had to cover up allegations of discrimation, and others fail to include minority members in their top ranks. Other major institutions like the NFL condemned the kneeling for the National Anthem just a few years ago, but is now apologizing and admitting the players were right. The question remains: have sentiments truly changed?

Brands and institutions are recognizing that being anti-racist and pro-BLM is selling more than ever. “Costs Signals,” which are the cost that companies pay to undertake these policy changes, are what should be used for judgement, says UPenn Marketing Professor Cait Lamberton to ABC News. Andre Perry, another ABC correspondent from Brookings Institution, warns that “These statements are a sign of defensiveness more so than an indication that they are proactively working to deconstruct racism in this country.”

For a list of donations made by major companies click here.

Kiana Releases Cover

KIANA LEDÉ RELEASES COVER OF P!NK’S “DEAR MR. PRESIDENT,”

All NET PROCEEDS WILL BE DONATED TO THE NAACP EMPOWERMENT PROGRAMS

Making a much-needed statement, gold-selling Phoenix-born and Los Angeles-based artist Kiana Ledé unveils her cover of the politically charged P!nk classic “Dear Mr. President.” On the track, Kiana adds her own lyrical touch to the second verse to confront the chaos of the moment head-on addressing immigration and more.

Listen to “Dear Mr. President”: HERE

View tweet from Kiana on the track: HERE

Most importantly, Kiana Ledé and Republic Records pledge to donate all net proceeds from the track to the NAACP Empowerment Programs.

“Through all the crying and pleading, all the protesting and donating, I wanted to do something that is therapeutic for me – singing. I came across the song ‘Dear Mr. President’ by P!nk and realized so many of the lyrics are STILL relevant today. This song was originally released 14 years ago. I hope this song drives people to VOTE because Trump is a symbol of racism and we are facing the impending doom of his re-election. In order for us to follow through, he needs to be replaced.

All net proceeds from the song are being donated to the NAACP Empowerment Programs, which fights for social justice, voter participation, quality education and much more,” says Kiana Ledé on the track. “Dear Mr. President,” which is produced by longtime collaborator and GRAMMY nominated songwriter/producer Michael Woods, arrives on the heels of her acclaimed full-length debut, Kiki. The album notably bowed in the Top 5 of the Billboard Top R&B Albums Chart, Top 5 of the Apple Music R&B/Soul Albums Chart, Top 5 of the iTunes R&B/Soul Albums Chart and Top 10 of the Apple Music Overall Albums Chart.

It has impressively gathered over 30 million streams in addition to receiving tastemaker praise from ELLE, Billboard, Highsnobiety, Vibe and many more. She also made history by shooting the entire music video  for the single “Chocolate” feat. Ari Lennox. The visual just cracked 1.3 million views.

Just who is Kiana Ledé? On the one hand, you know her as a fierce and fiery force in R&B responsible for bangers such as the gold-certified “EX,” “Mad At Me” and “Chocolate” feat. Ari Lennox and has received over 1 billion streams globally and praise from Complex, Vibe, Billboard, ROLLACOASTER Magazine and more. On the other hand, you may recognize her from series such as Scream and All About The Washingtons. But, who is she? “KIKI,” she answers. On her aptly titled full-length debut, she reveals every side of herself: the vulnerability, the vitality, the anger, the lust, the loyalty, the joy, the darkness, and the truth as evinced on song.

Long before all of this, the songstress “from South Phoenix with Black, Mexican, Native American, and White ancestry” grew up between divorced parents. She played classical instruments and competed in pageants—but popped wheelies on dirt bikes and got under the hood to fix a car or two. Eventually, an adventurous spirit carried her from Arizona to Los Angeles where she began a journey that comes full circle in 2020. 

Meet KIKI now.

FOLLOW KIANA LEDÉ:

Instagram | Twitter | Facebook

ABOUT REPUBLIC RECORDS:

A division of Universal Music Group, the world’s leading music company, Republic Records is home to an all-star roster of multi-platinum, award-winning legends and superstar artists such as Ariana Grande, Drake, Florence + the Machine, Greta Van Fleet, Hailee Steinfeld, Jack Johnson, James Blake, James Bay, Jessie J, John Mellencamp, Jonas Brothers, Julia Michaels, Kid Cudi, Liam Payne, Lil Wayne, Lorde, Metro Boomin, NAV, Nicki Minaj, Of Monsters and Men, Pearl Jam, Post Malone, Seth MacFarlane, Taylor Swift, The Weeknd, Tïesto and more.

Founded by brothers and chief executives Monte and Avery Lipman, it is also comprised of innovative business ventures, including American Recordings, Boominati Worldwide, Brushfire, Casablanca Records, Cash Money, Lava Records, Monkeywrench, XO, Young Money, among others. Republic also maintains long-standing strategic alliances with Universal Music Latin Entertainment (Karol G) and Hollywood Records (Zendaya).

In addition, Republic has expanded to release high-profile soundtracks for Universal Pictures (Fifty Shades of Grey), Sony Pictures (Spider-Man Into the Spider-Verse), Lionsgate (Zoey’s Extraordinary Playlist) and NBC TV (The Voice), as well as other notable film and television franchises. Extending further into the worlds of film, television, and content, Republic launched Federal Films during 2017 in order to produce movies and series powered by the label’s catalog and artists. Its first production is the Jonas Brothers documentary Chasing Happiness for Amazon Prime Video. 

CNB Donates to NAACP

City National Bank, America’s Premier Private and Business Bank®, today announced that it will donate up to $400,000, including colleague donations and company matching funds, to support the fight for social and racial justice in America.

“As the nation collectively mourns the senseless murder of George Floyd, we are reminded of racism’s deep wound on our country and the harm it continues to inflict,” said City National Bank Chief Executive Officer Kelly Coffey and Chairman Russell Goldsmith in a joint statement. “We must do much more to end the longstanding pain and systemic and economic injustice that communities of color have endured at the hands of oppression and pervasive racism in our society. At City National, we have a long history of supporting our colleagues, clients, and communities, and we recognize that our commitment is more important than ever in this critical moment in our nation’s history.”

Following the acts of racism and violence that recently took the lives of George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor and countless others before them, City National will donate to:

The NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, to help its mission to fight for racial justice and secure a society where all individuals have equal rights without race-based discrimination; and

The Equal Justice Initiative, to support its objectives of ending mass incarceration and excessive punishment in the U.S., challenging racial and economic injustice, and protecting basic human rights for the most vulnerable people in American society.

A portion of the funds will go toward the creation of a matching gifts program for City National colleagues who choose to donate to these organizations.

In addition to City National’s commitment today, the bank’s parent company, Royal Bank of Canada (RBC), previously announced a CAD $1.5 million donation to provide direct support to Black youth, the economic development of Black communities, and social and racial justice reform in North America through organizations including the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund and the Equal Justice Initiative. In Minneapolis, RBC Wealth Management – U.S. donated $250,000 to support rebuilding efforts through a contribution to We Love Lake Street, a fund set up by the Lake Street Council to provide direct support to small businesses and nonprofits.

About City National Bank

With $69.1 billion in assets, City National Bank provides banking, investment, and trust services through locations in Southern California, the San Francisco Bay Area, Nevada, New York City, Nashville, Atlanta, Minneapolis, Washington, D.C. and Miami*. In addition, the company and its investment affiliates manage or administer $76.9 billion in client investment assets.

City National is a subsidiary of Royal Bank of Canada (RBC), one of North America’s leading diversified financial services companies. RBC serves more than 17 million personal, business, public sector and institutional clients through offices in Canada, the United States, and 34 other countries.

Josh Richards Launches Clothing Line

TikTok star Josh Richards is using his influence to advocate for change.

Influencer and TalentX Entertainment co-founder Josh Richards is launching his new line of clothing and accessories: a brand called Buddy’s Hard in partnership with Moby Dick Unlimited. The launch will kick off on Wednesday, June 2nd at 3 p.m. EST.

As a social media creator, Richards is aware that the responsibility he and his peers carry has never been greater – especially during a time such as this. In an effort to use his influence to push for positive change, Richards is offering an exclusive “Buddies Stronger Together” hoodie for the first 72 hours after the kickoff, with 100% of his proceeds from the hoodie sales to be donated to the NAACP.

Richards and the rest of the team at TalentX Entertainment hope that his fans will step up to support equality with a “Buddies Stronger Together” purchase.  “Together we are stronger; together we are unbroken; together we can do anything,” he said. TalentX CEO Warren Lentz profoundly agrees. ”The folks at TalentX are excited to partner with Josh and Moby Dick Unlimited to use his influence for good and fight for equal rights,” he said. “Influencers carry a massive responsibility with the sway (pun intended) they have in society and Josh doesn’t take that lightly!”

“Now is the time for influencer merchandise to make an impact in the world and not just be another revenue stream,” said Moby Dick Unlimited CEO Brandon Fuss-Cheatham. “We are proud to work with TalentX and Josh Richards in implementing this philosophy and spearheading this movement.”

The new shop can be found at shopjoshrichards.com.

COVID-19 × AFRICAN AMERICANS

As race-specific data for COVID-19 cases are published, African American civic and public health leaders are organizing to outline a number of urgent requests to the federal government and influential corporations. As has been widely reported in recent news, it is impossible to ignore the link between the disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on African Americans and the longstanding and continuing economic and health disparities in the U.S. In response, NAATPN, Inc., in collaboration with the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and the Council on Black Health, have drafted a letter detailing immediate actions that need to occur as well as long-term solutions to health justice issues that must be addressed in order to eliminate health disparities.

According to Delmonte Jefferson, executive director for NAATPN, Inc. and convener of the group, the pandemic has exposed the country’s major health inequities in the U.S.

“The root cause of the COVID-19 disparities on African American populations is embedded in our country’s unjust history that devalues African American health and well-being.” He says that it is imperative that the country devises short- and long-term plans to achieve true heath equity.

Shiriki Kumanyika, a research professor at Drexel University and founder of the Council on Black Health, notes: “This would be an unparalleled opportunity for federal, state, and local governments to show leadership—to implement permanent solutions that ensure the health and well-being of all residents—giving particular priority to those disproportionately experiencing pervasive, cumulative forms of social and economic disadvantage and health risks.”

As noted by Derrick Johnson, president and CEO of the NAACP, “Increasingly, the data on COVID-19 underscore why our organizations exist and are joining forces at this time: Now more than ever, Black people are paying the price for our short- and long-term policy failures through compromised health and an early demise. Enough is enough.”

The letter, now signed by more than 25 African American-led organizations, requests that government agencies, corporations and philanthropic organizations develop a coordinated strategy to provide COVID-19 relief for the most affected communities.

Specifically, the letter’s short-term requests include:

  • Mobile COVID-19 testing for underserved communities
  • COBRA coverage for workers losing health insurance due to COVID-19 furloughs
  • Data on race/ethnicity and location for COVID-19 incidences, hospitalizations and deaths
  • A credible strategy to help mitigate the spread of COVID-19 in African American communities

Long-term requests include:

  • Investment in healthcare workers and systems that are culturally sensitive
  • Increased federal minimum wage and the poverty threshold
  • Investment in pre-k and elementary education to include before and after-school care as well as healthy meals

Most organizations signed on to the letter operate specific programs and policy advocacy efforts that address economic and health disparities among African American populations.

To view the letter, visit www.naatpn.org/covidcollective to download or sign the letter.­

NAACP × BET – Covid-19 Virtual Town Hall

NAACP and BET Focuses Second Virtual Town Hall on the Trauma African-Americans are Experiencing Amid COVID-19 Pandemic

The NAACP, in conjunction with BET, will host part two of their four-part virtual town hall series, “Unmasked: COVID-19” on Wednesday, April 15, at 8 PM ET/ 5 PM PT. The hour-long call will focus on naming and addressing the real trauma communities are experiencing at this moment. Panelists will also touch on the severe impact this pandemic has had on the prison and incarcerated population throughout the country.

Callers can participate via interactive toll-free conference call that will stream LIVE on the NAACP’s website. To join via phone, dial (866) 757-0756 and to join the conversation on social media follow @NAACP and @BET.

“Living in this new reality, we not only have to think about how we interact with each other, but we must give special care to our mind, body and soul,” said Derrick Johnson, president and CEO, NAACP. “The dynamic speakers in our second virtual town hall will provide in-depth information on how to cope during times of uncertainty.”

Participants on the call will have the opportunity to hear remarks from Derrick Johnson, president and CEO of the NAACP; Iylana Vanzant, host and executive producer of the award-winning show, Iyanla: Fix My Life; Benny Napoleon, sheriff of Wayne County, Mich.; and Dr. Patrice Harris, president of the American Medical Association.

Each speaker will offer words of encouragement and actions our communities can take to contribute to their well-being during this challenging time.

WHAT: Unmasked: COVID-19 (Part 2)

WHERE: Participant Dial-in: (866) 757 0756

WHEN: Wednesday, April 15, 2020, @  8 PM ET/ 5 PM PT

WHO:

  • Ed Gordon, Journalist
    Derrick Johnson, President and CEO, NAACP
    Iyanla Vanzant, Host and Executive Producer, Iyanla: Fix My Life
    Benny Napoleon, Sheriff, Wayne County, Michigan
    Dr. Patrice Harris, President, American Medical Association

About NAACP

Founded in 1909, the NAACP is the nation’s oldest and largest nonpartisan civil rights organization. Its members throughout the United States and the world are the premier advocates for civil rights in their communities. You can read more about the NAACP’s work and our six “Game Changer” issue areas at naacp.org.

About BET

BET, a subsidiary of ViacomCBS Inc. (NASDAQ: VIACA, VIAC), is the nation’s leading provider of quality entertainment, music, news and public affairs television programming for the African-American audience. The primary BET channel is in 90 million households and can be seen in the United States, Canada, the Caribbean, the United Kingdom, sub-Saharan Africa and France. BET is the dominant African-American consumer brand with a diverse group of business extensions including BET.com, a leading Internet destination for Black entertainment, music, culture, and news; BET HER, a 24-hour entertainment network targeting the African-American Woman; BET Music Networks – BET Jams, BET Soul and BET Gospel; BET Home Entertainment; BET Live, BET’s growing festival business; BET Mobile, which provides ringtones, games and video content for wireless devices; and BET International, which operates BET around the globe.