Posts tagged with "CNBC"

Cynthia Rowley sunglasses at GLAM slam during NYFW via 360 MAGAZINE

How sports influence fashion

Sports and fashion in the 21st century can be said to be one and the same thing, sometimes it’s even impossible to think them apart. What can we say when there’s also a trend for betting! And if you’re also into this trend, then visit this website: https://bookmaker-ratings.com/. Here you’ll find a lot of tips and the latest news, bookmaker reviews and other useful information.

You might be surprised, but some of our everyday things were invented for sport.

What things came into fashion through sport

As early as the 19th century, fashion was influenced by sport. Many elements of sportsmen’s clothing were later incorporated into people’s wardrobes. For example, clothing attributes such as tailcoats, top hats, breeches and gloves came into fashion through equestrian sports, which became popular at the end of the 19th century.

The first Wimbledon tournament was held in Great Britain in 1887. At that time, women played in long dresses and hats. But when tennis player Suzanne Lenglen took to the court in the 1920s wearing a pleated skirt just below the knee, a headscarf and a short-sleeved top, she sparked a real revolution not only in tennis but also in fashion. And 10 years later, the French tennis player Rene Lacoste founded his own company for the production of tennis shirts. Today, it’s a brand with a worldwide reputation, producing clothing, shoes and accessories.

Many garments also come from sports. Leggings, for example, come from yoga, jumpsuits from winter sports and T-shirts from wrestling.

Sporty style in high fashion and everyday life

In the XX century, an active lifestyle demanded appropriate clothing and many manufacturers began to rethink fashion trends. The first of the fashion designers to turn to sporty style was Coco Chanel. “I invented the tracksuit for myself; not because other women did sport, but because I did,” Chanel told her friend.

The fashion designer loved various sports – golf, skiing, sailing, hunting, equestrian sports – and was also well versed in sports fashion. In 1913, she launched a collection of sportswear for women that allowed them to move freely. The collection impressed other fashion designers who then began to pay special attention to sports style. Today, sports collections are available in almost all fashion houses in the world.

In footwear, the fashion for sneakers began in 1921 when Converse launched a special line of Chuck Taylor All-Star basketball shoes. The basketball player became a brand ambassador. He was already wearing “Converse” in 1917, when the line was simply called All-Star, but thanks to his ideas and his involvement in the advertising campaign, not only athletes but people all over the world started wearing sneakers.

How athletes can influence the popularity of fashion

Most brands gain their popularity through advertising contracts with celebrities. Today, for example, almost all famous athletes have contracts with fashion houses and major manufacturers of clothes and shoes. An army of fans worth millions is ready to buy the collections promoted by athletes, which significantly increases the brands’ revenues.

One of the most successful examples is the contract between basketball player Michael Jordan and Nike, which they signed in 1984. Nike lured Jordan with a large sum of $500,000 per year. This resulted in the Air Jordan trainers, which are still popular today and earned the former basketball player more than 1 billion dollars.

ILLUSTRATION BY NICOLE SALAZAR FOR USE BY 360 MAGAZINE

Top Stories – March

As we head towards another month is 2022, it seems as though this year will be quite eventful. Below are the top news stories for the final winter month!

Ukraine Huminitarian Crisis

The war in Ukraine is no longer just a story about a conflict between nations. It’s having an immediate impact on millions of people, creating multitudes of refugees, which in turn is creating a worldwide humanitarian crisis. It’s having an impact on global food insecurity since Ukraine produces a significant share of wheat supplies for other countries. While across the border, Russia also produces a large number of food experts, which are not inhibited by sanctions against the invading country.

Oil and gas experts from Russia are hanging in the balance as the West considers a ban on those imports. Financial institutions have sanctioned Russia, and the financial system in Ukraine has been impacted, causing a major economic disruption in that region of the world. The supply chain for goods from these countries and through them is being disrupted as a result of the violence. How can the West address and overcome all of these disruptions while taking a hard line against Russia’s aggression?

Ukraine Further Pushes No-Fly Zone

Ukraine’s defense ministry released a video of an edited hypothetical attack on Paris that would occur as a result of the Russian invasion of Ukraine. The ministry warned that this attack would be possible if a no-fly zone weren’t issued to prevent aerial attacks. The footage showed bombs going off near the Eiffel Tower.

Ukraine has called for a no-fly zone and other preventative measures in order to prevent Russia from overtaking more areas of the world. Many Ukrainian and global officials see the attacks against Ukraine as an unjust overtaking of territory. They consider Russia’s defense of the war as an attempt to prevent Ukrainian aggression as doctored. Others have suggested that the war is partially stemmed in history with Russia considering Ukraine and Russia to be the one and the same, as well as making note of Ukraine’s conveniently located Black Sea ports.

NATO has thus far been against a no-fly zone as that might invite Russian aggression towards NATO territories.

Jussie Smollett Sentencing

Actor Jussie Smollett was sentenced to 150 days in jail (around 5 months) and 30 months of parole after his 2017 scandal in which he lied to police officers about an attack that occurred against him. He was found to have paid for the attack to occur against him.

Smollett’s final comments before being taken away have been the result of much controversy. Smollett stated, “Your honor, I respect you and I respect your decision, but I did not do this and I am not suicidal. If anything happens to me when I go in there, I did not do it to myself, and you must all know that.” Many have found this statement humorous, including actor 50 Cent, who joked that he would say the same thing if he were to appear in front of a judge again.

Ryan Coogler Detained

Film director Ryan Coogler, known for 2018’s Black Panther, was briefly detained in January at a Bank of America in Atlanta, Georgia. Coogler’s medical assistant asked to be paid in cash, thus the director wrote a note suggesting the money should be counted discreetly given it was an amount over $10,000. 

However, despite Coogler not being visibly armed, officers arrived and pulled guns out on the director, who appeared visibly confused yet nonetheless complied with their orders. He was handcuffed and escorted to a police vehicle, but released moments later once his identity had been confirmed.

Senate Confirmation Hearings

As Justice Steve Breyer left his position as Supreme Court Judge, President Biden appointed Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson, who is now being confirmed by the Senate. Senator Ted Cruz (R-TX) asked the judge about critical race theory, because Brown serves on the board of a school district with curriculum including critical race theory.

Senator John Cornyn (R-TX) made a false statement suggesting Brown referred to President George W. Bush and former Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld as “war criminals.” Sen. Dick Durbin (D-IL) later corrected him.

illustration by Mina Tocalini for use by 360 Magazine

DELTA VARIANT PUTS NORMAL BACK-TO-SCHOOL SEASON AT RISK

By: Clara Guthrie

There was a period in the late spring and early summer of this past year in which it seemed America’s COVID-19 struggles were nearing some long-awaited conclusion: the last few moments of breathlessness before a collective sigh of relief. At that time, students and their parents looked forward to a seemingly normal back-to-school season. Yet, the recent rise in the Delta variant has introduced a new wave of doubt.

On August 8 alone, The New York Times reported 36,068 new Covid-19 cases and a seven-day average of 110,360 total cases in the United States. Covid-related deaths are also on the rise, with a seven-day average of 516 deaths. This figure has risen from a weekly average of 188 deaths only one month prior, on July 6. Experts attribute these rising numbers to the highly contagious Delta variant overlaid with low vaccination rates in certain areas across the country. When asked about these trends in mid-July, Dr. Rochelle Walensky, Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), said, “This is becoming a pandemic of the unvaccinated. We are seeing outbreaks of cases in parts of the country that have low vaccination coverage because unvaccinated people are at risk.”

Unfortunately, as the Delta variant continues to run rampant throughout unvaccinated communities, people who are fully vaccinated are also being infected. Although, it is far rarer. These “break-through” cases speak mainly to the wild infectiousness of the Delta variant, coupled with the facts that no vaccine is 100% effective and that our knowledge of how long immunity lasts after vaccination is still quite murky. According to CNBC, however, “break-through” cases still represent fewer than 0.08% of those who have been fully vaccinated in the United States since the start of the year.

With that being said, the Delta variant is impacting the hopes of a normal back-to-school season in two distinct ways. The first, perhaps more obvious way, is that parents and teachers are fearing for students’ health. This fear suggests a potential return to online learning and more strict social distancing and mask mandates enforced within schools.

It is important to note that COVID-19 poses a far lesser threat to young children than to adults; the risk of becoming severely ill from the virus increases for those over the age of 50 and only grows with age. According to the CDC, the risk of serious illness or complications from COVID-19 for children is actually lower than that from the flu. However, children under the age of 12 are not yet eligible for any form of vaccination. This restriction is raising concerns about how susceptible younger age groups are to becoming sick, even if that sickness does not lead to any serious complications.

Thus, many parents and school districts are pursuing a range COVID-19 precautions to ensure the safety of students. Time Magazine shared a story last week of a school board in Des Moines, Iowa that has already decided to offer a virtual learning option for elementary school students. The ability to transition to in-person learning is available whenever the family feels comfortable enough to do so. This move was, in part, forced by the recent ruling of eight states, including Iowa, to ban schools from being able to require masks – despite the CDC’s recommendation that all students should wear masks inside schools, regardless of whether or not they are vaccinated. “Had we been able to follow the CDC recommendations that everyone in school is masked, regardless of their vaccine status—if we were able to mandate that, then I think we’d be having a different conversation here,” Phil Roeder, a spokesperson for Des Moines’ Polk County public schools, said.

Other counties are having similar struggles, even without the imposition from state governments to ban mask mandates within schools. For example, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio announced in May that all online learning would be eliminated come fall, a decision that he has not yet reversed. But many parents are now petitioning for online options for their children as safety concerns continue to rise. One parent, Farah Despeignes, who is the president of the Bronx Parent Leaders Advocacy Group and has two middle-school-aged sons, said, “When you think about the conditions of the schools with old buildings, with not enough ventilation, that are co-located, that are overcrowded—for us, in the Bronx, in underserved communities, it’s not as simple as, ‘Well, let’s just get back to school.’”

In California, options for students are equally limited. According to The Los Angeles Times, the state has done away with “hybrid learning, ”a combination of in-person and online learning. As a result of such, Los Angeles County parents had until August 6 to choose between either solely in-person or online learning for their children. The latter option is expected to take the form of an independent study, rather than the supportive online learning of last school year. On August 6th, L.A. Unified School District reported that only 10,280 of their almost 665,000 students opted for the online option.

The second prominent way in which the Delta variant is affecting back-to-school season is through the shopping behavior of students and their families. Back when the hopes of a normal school year were still high, The National Retail Federation predicted that consumers with children K-12 would spend a record-breaking 37.1 billion dollars this year. Furthermore, it was predicted that back-to-college spending would reach 71 billion dollars. These predictions were due to the excitement associated with a long-awaited return to the classroom after over a year away, when items like lunchboxes and backpacks seemed superfluous.

However, according to a recent poll by First Insight, many consumers are feeling anxious about returning to stores, trying on clothing in dressing rooms and making big purchases due to the risk of the Delta variant. In fact, 56% of respondents said they are actively cutting back their spending at retailers. The CEO of Bath Bed & Beyond, Mark Tritton, told CNBC that their stores have observed people delaying their back-to-school investments, and that peak spending may extend further into September than usual.

As many students return to their classrooms and the Food and Drug Administration continues to work on improving vaccines for individuals under the age of 12, it will become more and more clear how great of a mark Covid-19 has left on the American schooling system and the children within it.

Rainbow Washing + Slacktivism During Pride Month for use by 360 Magazine

RAINBOW WASHING + SLACKTIVISM DURING PRIDE MONTH

By: Clara Guthrie

June is Pride Month, although many Americans may be more familiar with it as the month where big corporations drench their logos, merchandise and window displays in rainbow colors. This predictable phenomenon has been coined as “rainbow washing”—the act of using rainbow imagery to effectively advertise and signal allyship to a more diverse audience of consumers, with little genuine support of the LGBTQ+ community behind it.

The heart of the controversy surrounding rainbow washing and businesses’ celebrations of Pride Month lies in inconsistency. Many big-name brands—ranging from Bloomingdale’s to Amazon—brandish themselves in rainbow flags for the 30 glorious days of June, but then fall seemingly silent on LGBTQ+ issues for the remaining 12 months of the year. There is something about this kind of activism that is inherently performative. Sadly, this half-hearted performance almost makes sense when one considers that, according to LGBT Capital, the LGBTQ+ community holds roughly 3.9 trillion dollars of purchasing power globally. Rainbow washing during Pride Month is an effective capitalist strategy to garner more profit, while also looking like you care.

Let’s first consider McDonald’s as an example (among countless others) of this inconsistency…

According to Forbes, for Pride Month this year, McDonald’s has formed an unlikely alliance with Revry, “the world’s first global queer streaming network.” Their content is curated for the LGBTQ+ community and is boundlessly inclusive, highlighting both queer characters and queer content creators. The unlikely collaboration between a mega-fast food joint and a queer streaming platform has taken the form of a variety show, “House of Pride,” which is sponsored by McDonald’s and streamed via Revry. The show premiered June 6th, and you can watch it HERE.

This partnership is revolutionary and undeniably exciting; however, McDonald’s is not quite unified when it comes to its actions towards and support of the LGBTQ+ community. According to Business Insider, the fast food corporation has its own political action committee (PAC) through which it donates money to a wide array of politicians’ campaigns in the hopes of eventually influencing how these bipartisan lawmakers vote on issues that have a more direct impact on McDonald’s business (like working wages). Thus, McDonald’s has donations on opposing sides of key issues, LGBTQ+ rights being one of them. Most recently, McDonald’s PAC—and the PACs of other big corporations, including aforementioned Amazon—had a portion of their donations operating behind Republican representatives in the House who voted against the Equality Act, a bill with an overarching goal to protect LGBTQ+ Americans from discrimination. Between 2019 and 2020, according to the same Business Insider article, “McDonald’s PAC donated a total of $213,000 to lawmakers who voted against the bill.” These donations have very real repercussions in the world of legislation and in the intimate worlds of LGBTQ+ individuals who are consistently at risk of discrimination in their everyday lives. A sparkly new partnership with a queer streaming service may be more attractive and easily marketable, but it has far less real-world impact. 

This fact is especially true when one takes into account the rates of workplace discrimination and harassment against LGBTQ+ employees. CNBC recently reported on a survey of working LGBTQ+ individuals conducted by Linkedin in which “25% of respondents [said] they have been intentionally denied career advancement opportunities (such as promotions and raises) because of their identity.” Another 31% of people from the study said they have been the target of “blatant discrimination and microaggressions in the workplace.” So while businesses may change their logo to the colors of the rainbow for the month of June, current legislation and inner-company culture is ignoring the lived experiences of queer workers.

Other examples of rainbow washing and inconsistent activism include J.Crew’s new “Love First” merchandise campaign—from which only 50% of the proceeds are going to an LGBTQ+ organization, PFLAG—and Nike’s “BETRUE” campaign. As with the McDonald’s case study, these Pride efforts are not to be singularly praised or criticized; they are far too complicated for that sort of a response.

In support of these campaigns, one could argue that heightening queer visibility by emblazing shirts and sneakers with rainbow logos and then donating at lease some proceeds to organizations that support LGBTQ+ individuals is doing some good. Going even further, many companies are using Pride Month and their colorful campaigns to amplify queer voices, which is another positive outcome. For example, J.Crew asked a handful of queer individuals “what it means to support and be supported in their community,” and then published their answers and photos online. Similarly, fast fashion company H&M recently launched their “Beyond the Rainbow” campaign, an interactive web app on which people can scan any rainbow flag to read others’ or share their own Pride stories.

On the other side of the coin, however, one could point to the lack of action taken by these companies outside of the month of June or the lazy “slacktivism” that their Pride campaigns promote. Slacktivism is the practice of supporting a social movement or cause but in a way that requires little commitment or effort. An example of slacktivism would be posting a graphic expressing protest or dissent on social media, without any further action taken. Within the context of Pride Month, slacktivism takes the form of companies commodifying the rainbow flag and mass-producing rainbow gear which then consumers can easily buy and feel validated as an ally to the LGBTQ+ community. What these efforts lack is follow-through: supporting LGBTQ+ organizations, amplifying and showcasing queer creators and models and workers, lobbying for protective legislation, and informing consumers on the true meaning of Pride, all year long.

Kaelen Felix illustrates a political article for 360 MAGAZINE

Black Male Leaders x Biden

USA Today reported Monday that Black male leaders penned an open letter to presidential candidate Joe Biden to say that he will lose the election if he does not select a Black woman as his running mate.

According to USA Today, the letter came from more than 100 activists, leaders, preachers and celebrities. Some candidates on an unofficial shortlist of possible VPs include Sen. Kamala Harris, Rep. Karen Bass and Susan Rice, the former Ambassador to the United Nations and National Security Advisor during Barack Obama‘s presidency.

The letter also expressed concern that Black women were being unfairly criticized as potential running mates for Biden. USA Today mentions a POLITICO report that said Sen. Chris Dodd criticized Sen. Harris for comments on Biden’s voting record regarding civil rights. The article also mentions a CNBC report saying Biden allies found Harris to be too focused on becoming president herself to hold the vice presidential office.

Signees of the letter included Sean “Diddy” Combs, Charlamagne Tha God and civil rights lawyer Benjamin Crump, who represented George Floyd’s family.

“We don’t want to choose between the lesser of two evils, and we don’t want to vote for the devil we know versus the devil we don’t because we are tired of voting for devils,” the letter said.

The New York Times reported Monday that Biden’s VP selection committee has been disbanded and that the only thing left was a decision from Biden, also calling the pick “imminent.”

The New York Times also said Biden’s campaign has a virtual event planned to introduce the vice presidential candidate, and the event is sponsored by Women for Biden.

politics, podium, flag, speech

COVID-19 Fed Policy

By Dennis Notchick, CFP

The United States is mired in its worst unemployment since The Great Depression of 90 years ago. Indeed, COVID-19 has stunted our once-robust economy in many ways.

But at the same time, there is this curious occurrence: Equity valuations in the S&P 500 and Nasdaq have hit an all-time high How does that happen with some of the worst economic conditions in our nation’s history?

One of the main reasons: Much of the money dispensed by the Federal Reserve during the pandemic isn’t trickling down to consumers and labor markets, but rather, it’s being reinvested in financial assets, inflating their value. This fresh injection of capital into the money supply can often lead to hyper-inflation for healthcare, housing, and other essential goods that are needed to sustain life. As an example, a recent report from the Employee Benefit Research Institute (EBRI) found a senior couple could need as much $325,000 to have a 90% chance of covering their out-of-pocket costs including Medicare premiums and prescription drugs.

The horrific economic effects of the pandemic have pushed the Federal Reserve to spend trillions of dollars since April in many different ways. They also used the playbook from the Great Financial Crisis and Great Recession of 2008 – low/zero interest rates in the corporate credit market – hoping that these rates would stimulate corporate spending, and in turn, spark employment.

But the forbidding economic environment in which we’re living renders that approach ineffective. Why? Ask yourself: Given the precipitous drop in consumer demand during the pandemic, why would corporations spend to produce goods and services if most customers are more likely to stay home?

So regardless of the amount of money the government prints to subsidize corporate credit markets, little if any corporate spending is on new employment. Instead, many businesses are stashing cash accumulated from government-subsidized bond offerings. This in turn paints a long road back to full employment, essential for the growth of GDP.

What does all of this mean as you are planning for your retirement in the midst of this uncertain time? It means you need to know how to minimize COVID-19’s impact on your retirement savings.

Given these factors, it’s all the more important for those near retirement or in retirement to consider these steps:

  • Update return expectations for bonds. The Federal Reserve has made it clear they will support credit markets with zero interest rate policies to 2022 and beyond.  Most investors in retirement have don’t have all of their assets in stocks, but say 50% stocks and 50% bonds.  If half of the portfolio has a lower return expectation, the total return of the portfolio may not be enough to keep up with inflation and the cost of living. Since many retirees are living well into their 80s and 90s, it’s important to revisit the stock-to-bond ratio to ensure you are giving yourself the best chance to keep up with the ever-rising costs of life over your retirement.
  • Diversify your stock portfolio. Adding new stocks to your portfolio for companies that haven’t been hurt by COVID-19 could help you adjust to market changes. The work-from-home movement was already underway, COVID 19 just accelerated it and there are many companies that are positioned well to take advantage.
  • Plan for higher taxes. With the trillions of dollars of national debt issued this year and moving forward to help stabilize the economy, most tax planners are preparing for higher tax rates in the future. It is critical to take advantage of the low tax rates now to reduce your taxes in the future.  While we can’t control the return of our investments, we can control the taxes.  Perhaps a small tax bill now will keep you from a large tax bill later.
  • Stay invested. Many portfolios got hammered in the first couple of months of the pandemic. But despite the uncertainty and volatility of these times, it’s advisable for pre-retirees to stay invested inequities. Staying invested is usually wise because history shows equity investments will recover in time, however it is more important now than ever to know what you own.
  • Review and re-evaluate. Current circumstances necessitate reviewing your entire retirement plan. Work with your financial advisor to adjust where needed. A job loss or other reasons for less income means you’ll fall behind on the savings rate you expected, and that could mean possibly delaying retirement. Spending less or working longer can help you recover some of the pandemic-related losses. As circumstances change, revisit your plan.

The pandemic may affect or push back the retirement plans you made several years ago, but take comfort in the money you’ve saved and know that you can regain some control of your plan with patience, careful thought, and wise action.

About Dennis Notchick, CFP®

Dennis Notchick, a certified financial planner for Stratos Wealth Advisors (www.dn.stratoswealthadvisors.com), has been serving high net-worth families and business owners since 2008. A certified financial planner since 2010, Notchick has worked with many well-respected firms on Wall Street and provides consulting on investment management, retirement planning, and holistic financial planning. He’s been published or mentioned in numerous online financial publications, including The Wall Street Journal, CNBC, and TheStreet.

Investment advice offered through Stratos Wealth Advisors, LLC, a Registered Investment Advisor. Financial services offered through Stratos Wealth Advisors LLC (“Stratos”), a Registered Investment Advisory Firm. The presentation of these topics is for general information only and is not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual. The information also does not intend to make an offer or solicitation for the sale or purchase of any product or security. Investments involve risk and unless otherwise stated, are not guaranteed. Be sure to first consult with a qualified financial adviser and/or tax professional before implementing any strategy discussed here.

Coronavirus Vaccine – Dr. Jeremy M. Levin

A story in USA Today this morning asks whether a coronavirus vaccine could repair the pharma industry’s reputation despite drug price increases. Dr. Jeremy M. Levin, an iconic biotech thought-leader who first introduced immuno oncology to the world 10 years ago, is quoted:

“The pandemic ‘has driven the public eye onto what the biotech industry does, which is change the dynamic of a disease,’ said Jeremy Levin, chairman of BIO and author of the recently published book Biotechnology in the Time of COVID-19: Commentaries from the Front Line. “In the noise that came from the bad actors, we basically lost sight of the essence of what the biotech is all about, which is patients and innovation.”

Here are some additional thoughts from Dr. Levin’s on developing a vaccine and the road forward:

What can you (and the biotech industry) tell the American people that they haven’t already heard? Unless we are able to get a handle on COVID-19, we as a society as a whole are at great risk. There has never been a greater risk from a transmissible disease to our nation, and the world at large.

There is incredible pressure to expedite a COVID-19 vaccine, even if it hasn’t been tested in the way it needs to be tested.

What are the risks/rewards? The risks of rushing a vaccine are  considerable, and the FDA will be acutely aware of this when making an approval. I expect there will be extraordinary diligence from the FDA, as well as from each company producing a vaccine. Despite this, the risk of not developing a vaccine are nearly unimaginable.

How long is the typical timeline for vaccine development? A typical timeline for vaccine development is at least a decade, but many variables go into this. This article in the NY Times is a useful explainer.

Dr. Levin is available for interviews on COVID-19 and other biotech topics. He is currently CEO and Chairman of OVID Therapeutics, Inc., and Chair of the global Biotechnology Innovation Organization (BIO). In 2018 Dr. Levin was named “one of the most influential figures in biopharmaceutical industry” by FierceBiotech, and one of the top three biotechnology CEOs in 2020 by The Healthcare Technology Report. See him interviewed HERE on CNBC.

New Possible Pandemic

By Eamonn Burke

As the coronavirus continues to ravage the United States and the entire world, new concerns have sprung up over another virus with roots in China.

The flu virus is a newer strain of H1N1, a highly contagious and deadly disease that swept the world in 2009 and became a seasonal illness. This new strain, called G4 EA H1N1, first cropped up in 2016 among pig farms in China. It can and has spread to humans through the respiratory system without causing harm, but scientists are warning of the viruses pandemic potential.

Dr. Anthony Fauci says that the virus is not an “immediate threat” but rather “something we need to keep our eye on just the way we did with in 2009 with the emergence of the swine flu.” He has compared the characteristics of the virus as similar to the swine flu as well as the Spanish flu that killed between 30-50 million people.

Although the virus right now does not seem to have deadly or highly transmissible traits, what it does show is “reassortment capabilities” that suggest that it could become a major problem quickly, and one that needs to be controlled urgently. While President Trump falsely asserts that the coronavirus is fading, scientists worry about how the nation would cope with another pandemic on our hands.

New Possible Pandemic

By Eamonn Burke

As the coronavirus continues to ravage the United States and the entire world, new concerns have sprung up over another virus with roots in China.

The flu virus is a newer strain of H1N1, a highly contagious and deadly disease that swept the world in 2009 and became a seasonal illness. This new strain, called G4 EA H1N1, first cropped up in 2016 among pig farms in China. It can and has spread to humans through the respiratory system without causing harm, but scientists are warning of the viruses pandemic potential.

Dr. Anthony Fauci says that the virus is not an “immediate threat” but rather “something we need to keep our eye on just the way we did with in 2009 with the emergence of the swine flu.” He has compared the characteristics of the virus as similar to the swine flu as well as the Spanish flu that killed between 30-50 million people.

Although the virus right now does not seem to have deadly or highly transmissible traits, what it does show is “reassortment capabilities” that suggest that it could become a major problem quickly, and one that needs to be controlled urgently. While President Trump falsely asserts that the coronavirus is fading, scientists worry about how the nation would cope with another pandemic on our hands.

360 Magazine, Allison Christensen

WHO x Rare Asymptomatic COVID-19 Spread

By Jason Tayer x Emmet McGeown

The Coronavirus remains very present and contagious around the country and world. However, as expert organizations, such as the World Health Organization (WHO), find new ground-breaking data, knowledge about the nature of the virus and how it spreads advances.

According to CNBC, Dr. Maria Van Kerkhove admits that the previously widely believed notion of the virus spreading between and from asymptomatic carriers has lost traction. Instead, Maria claims that it’s “very rare” for virus transmission to take place among asymptomatic patients based on contact tracing and secondary transmission analysis data. Maria’s news briefing at the UN agency’s Geneva headquarters can be found HERE. The New York Post also adds that narrowing in and focusing on all isolating and quarantining all of the symptomatic cases could result in much fewer transmission rates.

However, as of Tuesday, following widespread skepticism from global healthcare officials, the head of WHO’s diseases and zoonosis unit, Dr. Maria Van Kerkhove, has walked back statements that she made during a Monday press conference. After an influx of criticism, she clarified that it’s “misunderstanding to state that asymptomatic transmission globally is very rare,” instead claiming that she was referring to a “small subset of studies.” Van Kerkhove acknowledges that much is unknown and that there exist models, which estimate that around 40% of transmissions are due to asymptomatic individuals.

With this recent news and many cities beginning to enter new phases of reopening, it may seem feasible to allow asymptomatic people to reopen and participate in various public businesses and services. AMNY expands on the example of NYC, where they are now in phase 1 of reopening. Even with this phase of reopening underway, the Department of Health has found that there have not been significant spikes in COVID-19-like cases in emergency rooms.

Regardless of the scrambling by the WHO to refine its oratory or the Department of Health observing no significant spikes in cases, there is no doubt that isolation and social distancing are slowing the spread of the virus. Indeed, it is possible that “asymptomatic” individuals can, in fact, be pre-symptomatic or simply be experiencing a very “mild disease.” This muddies the waters to such an extent that taking precautions seems to be the only logical corollary of the medical community’s ongoing attempt at total comprehension of the virus. Dr. William Schaffner, a Vanderbilt University professor and longtime adviser to the CDC says, “I thought they [WHO] were getting very prissy and trying to slice the salami very fine.” He, like many other medical experts, believes that whether asymptomatic, pre-symptomatic, or mildly symptomatic, people should be wearing masks, washing their hands, staying away from large crowds and social distancing when possible.

Such perspectives echo the findings of a study, published in the scientific journal Nature, which suggest that the emergency lockdown procedures of six countries, ranging from Iran to the US, have prevented more than 500 million coronavirus infections across all six nations.

This leaves one wondering whether or not the accelerated re-openings of hotspots like Las Vegas casinos where, last year, guests outnumbered residents 20 to 1 are wise. Yet, with the risk of a mental health crisis and a hemorrhaging global economy, many are supportive of dismantling protective measures. However, we must dispel the false dichotomy that we must choose between complete lockdown and a restless revival or normal life. One only ought to look at Turkey where the government ordered only the young and elderly to remain at home while everyone else, except consumer-facing businesses, never ceased working. According to The Economist, “the vulnerable escaped the worst of the pandemic while those infected, mostly working-age adults, generally recovered.”

Irrespective of which approach the states decide to embark upon, the fact still remains that over 7 million people have been affected and the virus continues to spread.