Posts tagged with "student"

illustration by Mina Tocalini for use by 360 Magazine

DELTA VARIANT PUTS NORMAL BACK-TO-SCHOOL SEASON AT RISK

By: Clara Guthrie

There was a period in the late spring and early summer of this past year in which it seemed America’s COVID-19 struggles were nearing some long-awaited conclusion: the last few moments of breathlessness before a collective sigh of relief. At that time, students and their parents looked forward to a seemingly normal back-to-school season. Yet, the recent rise in the Delta variant has introduced a new wave of doubt.

On August 8 alone, The New York Times reported 36,068 new Covid-19 cases and a seven-day average of 110,360 total cases in the United States. Covid-related deaths are also on the rise, with a seven-day average of 516 deaths. This figure has risen from a weekly average of 188 deaths only one month prior, on July 6. Experts attribute these rising numbers to the highly contagious Delta variant overlaid with low vaccination rates in certain areas across the country. When asked about these trends in mid-July, Dr. Rochelle Walensky, Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), said, “This is becoming a pandemic of the unvaccinated. We are seeing outbreaks of cases in parts of the country that have low vaccination coverage because unvaccinated people are at risk.”

Unfortunately, as the Delta variant continues to run rampant throughout unvaccinated communities, people who are fully vaccinated are also being infected. Although, it is far rarer. These “break-through” cases speak mainly to the wild infectiousness of the Delta variant, coupled with the facts that no vaccine is 100% effective and that our knowledge of how long immunity lasts after vaccination is still quite murky. According to CNBC, however, “break-through” cases still represent fewer than 0.08% of those who have been fully vaccinated in the United States since the start of the year.

With that being said, the Delta variant is impacting the hopes of a normal back-to-school season in two distinct ways. The first, perhaps more obvious way, is that parents and teachers are fearing for students’ health. This fear suggests a potential return to online learning and more strict social distancing and mask mandates enforced within schools.

It is important to note that COVID-19 poses a far lesser threat to young children than to adults; the risk of becoming severely ill from the virus increases for those over the age of 50 and only grows with age. According to the CDC, the risk of serious illness or complications from COVID-19 for children is actually lower than that from the flu. However, children under the age of 12 are not yet eligible for any form of vaccination. This restriction is raising concerns about how susceptible younger age groups are to becoming sick, even if that sickness does not lead to any serious complications.

Thus, many parents and school districts are pursuing a range COVID-19 precautions to ensure the safety of students. Time Magazine shared a story last week of a school board in Des Moines, Iowa that has already decided to offer a virtual learning option for elementary school students. The ability to transition to in-person learning is available whenever the family feels comfortable enough to do so. This move was, in part, forced by the recent ruling of eight states, including Iowa, to ban schools from being able to require masks – despite the CDC’s recommendation that all students should wear masks inside schools, regardless of whether or not they are vaccinated. “Had we been able to follow the CDC recommendations that everyone in school is masked, regardless of their vaccine status—if we were able to mandate that, then I think we’d be having a different conversation here,” Phil Roeder, a spokesperson for Des Moines’ Polk County public schools, said.

Other counties are having similar struggles, even without the imposition from state governments to ban mask mandates within schools. For example, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio announced in May that all online learning would be eliminated come fall, a decision that he has not yet reversed. But many parents are now petitioning for online options for their children as safety concerns continue to rise. One parent, Farah Despeignes, who is the president of the Bronx Parent Leaders Advocacy Group and has two middle-school-aged sons, said, “When you think about the conditions of the schools with old buildings, with not enough ventilation, that are co-located, that are overcrowded—for us, in the Bronx, in underserved communities, it’s not as simple as, ‘Well, let’s just get back to school.’”

In California, options for students are equally limited. According to The Los Angeles Times, the state has done away with “hybrid learning, ”a combination of in-person and online learning. As a result of such, Los Angeles County parents had until August 6 to choose between either solely in-person or online learning for their children. The latter option is expected to take the form of an independent study, rather than the supportive online learning of last school year. On August 6th, L.A. Unified School District reported that only 10,280 of their almost 665,000 students opted for the online option.

The second prominent way in which the Delta variant is affecting back-to-school season is through the shopping behavior of students and their families. Back when the hopes of a normal school year were still high, The National Retail Federation predicted that consumers with children K-12 would spend a record-breaking 37.1 billion dollars this year. Furthermore, it was predicted that back-to-college spending would reach 71 billion dollars. These predictions were due to the excitement associated with a long-awaited return to the classroom after over a year away, when items like lunchboxes and backpacks seemed superfluous.

However, according to a recent poll by First Insight, many consumers are feeling anxious about returning to stores, trying on clothing in dressing rooms and making big purchases due to the risk of the Delta variant. In fact, 56% of respondents said they are actively cutting back their spending at retailers. The CEO of Bath Bed & Beyond, Mark Tritton, told CNBC that their stores have observed people delaying their back-to-school investments, and that peak spending may extend further into September than usual.

As many students return to their classrooms and the Food and Drug Administration continues to work on improving vaccines for individuals under the age of 12, it will become more and more clear how great of a mark Covid-19 has left on the American schooling system and the children within it.

Mariah Pearson via Trice Browning for use by 360 Magazine

Interview with Mariah Pearson

By: Skyler Johnson

On July 5th, 2021, the Revlon Creme of Nature “Legacy to Leadership” scholarship inaugural winners were announced. The scholarship was meant to provide funding to students attending HBCUs, or historically black colleges and universities. I had the privilege of interviewing one of the students who received the scholarship: Mariah Pearson, who’s currently attending North Carolina A&T State University

How important is it for you to attend an HBCU?

It was personally extremely important for me because I feel as though a lot of times, in society, people of color, don’t exactly get the opportunities as other people would and I feel that at my HBCU and at other HBCUs across the country were given those opportunities. We’re given resources to better navigate, better operate in the real world… in corporate America and professional settings. It also provided me with a community of people who have similar backgrounds as me and similar interests as me. It’s awesome to go to one. 

What is your favorite thing about college thus far?

So far my favorite thing about college would probably be the environment, the way my school feels like a family, and how you can meet new people and it doesn’t feel awkward to introduce yourself. [Talking to a stranger at school] kind of feels like you’re talking to someone you’ve known forever. That’s probably my favorite part, just feeling like I’m at home when I’m not at home. 

Briefly, can you go over what you expect to gain out of college? 

Of course to get a degree. And learn how to operate in professional settings, but also just for personal development. I feel that going to college has opened a bunch of doors and there’s a bunch of opportunities for new experiences that you might not get if you don’t go to college. Knowing who I am and what I like, who I want to be, how I want to grow, the direction I want to grow in. I definitely feel that college helps you figure that out really quickly. 

What’re the most important lessons you’ve learned thus far?

There’s a couple. One of them is definitely: always be on your Ps and Qs, because somebody’s always watching, and you don’t know who’s watching or when, but… somebody’s always seeing you. That’s one of them. Another one is always try and surround yourself with people who you want to see yourself as. You can’t become a winner if you’re not in a group of winners. You can’t be a leader if you’re not in a group of leaders. So it’s important that you surround yourself with people who feed into you positively and of course hold you to a standard that you would hold yourself to. I think those are the main lessons that I’ve learned so far, and I’m sure there are plenty more to come. 

What made you want to get into health care?

So I’m going into physical therapy, and when I was first trying to figure out where I was going to go to school and what I was going to go for I… [didn’t] really know… But as an athlete, who had to experience going through physical therapy, I was like, “I kinda like sports, I kinda like helping people, so let’s find a way to mix the two.” And physical therapy is what came up… I later began to grow a love for it through learning how the healthcare system operates, and of course how it treats different people. Because I personally know that being a black woman I’m going to experience a different type of healthcare than anyone else would. Especially since I had family [members] who had gone through physical therapy and had different medical procedures done and they felt that they hadn’t been treated the way they should’ve been, or wanted, to be treated. [Which is why] one of my goals as a health care professional in the future would definitely be to make people feel more comfortable and cared for and appreciated as a patient.

Do you expect to change the world? 

Yes, I do. In some way, shape, or form I will [change the world], because another one of my goals as a physical therapist is to establish a [holistic] health care system. [I would not just] tap into the physical but also into the mental state, [asking] how [a patient’s] feeling, [if they were] eating, [if they were] exercising. I’m going to establish a facility where I take care of the whole person and not just say, “oh you’re sick, here’s some medicine.” Personally I’m not a big fan of medication which is why I chose physical therapy, because you’re essentially healing your own body by yourself. There’s no needles, there’s no medicine. It’s purely you moving your body and [exploring] how movement can essentially create a better lifestyle for you. 

How excited were you when you received the Revlon HBCU scholarship?

I cried, when I found out, I was so… thankful to Creme of Nature for this scholarship. It’s something that I definitely needed at the time. When I went through the process of figuring out what scholarship I was gonna apply for, and what bubble I fit in, with the scholarship world, they popped up and I [was] like, “this is perfect, this is awesome,” because I [could] make a video explaining who I [was] and what I [wanted] to do and what I [was] passionate about… It [was] purely me telling them about how I really feel about where I want to be in life, and my profession… so it was incredible. I cried. I called my mom. I called everybody.

Book illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Education Tips For Children

7 Ways to Ensure Your Child Gets a Good Education

The Oxford Method, a tutoring community, offers tips to help your child be successful in school

Over the last year, during the pandemic, there have been many kids who have struggled academically. This is in part due to the millions who have had to do online learning and find the setup difficult. Whether children are learning online, in person, via classroom, or through a combination of the three, there are things that parents can do to help them be more successful. Knowing what to do can help make a world a difference and reduce the struggling.

“Many parents are aware of the way their kids are struggling with school over this school year,” explains David Florence, professor and founder of The Oxford Method, a community that offers tutoring services around the country. “Rather than let them fall behind, it’s a good idea to take action and do what you can to help them keep up and even pull ahead.”

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, 93% of households with school-age children report that their kids have engaged in some sort of distance learning during the pandemic. They also report that the vast shift in the way kids are learning has also caused digital inequality because some kids don’t have access to computers and/or the Internet. Whether students are learning online or in class, there are things parents can do to help them get a good education.

Here 7 ways to help ensure your child gets a good education:

  1. Sleep. It’s crucial for a child to get enough sleep each night, which will help them to be more focused, as well as improve their behavior, quality of life, and mental and physical health. The American Academy of Pediatrics reports that children ages 6-12 should get 9-12 hours of sleep per night, and teens ages 13-18 should get 8-10 hours of sleep per night.
  2. Teach value. It usually starts at home whether or not a child values an education. Parents who want their kids to get a good education should instill a love of learning in their children and teach them to value the education they are getting.
  3. Get them help. If your child is struggling, you may be able to help them, but there also comes a time when kids need a tutor to step in. A good tutor can make a world of difference in ensuring that a child gets a good education. They can help ensure that students will not fall behind and that they will get the foundation they need to move on in a subject.
  4. Show them how. Oftentimes, kids don’t know how to effectively study for a test or to take notes when they are in class. Take the time to show them how to do it effectively, as well as how to stay organized with their schooling. When students are organized, they are more likely to succeed.
  5. Ask them questions. Be sure to ask your kids how it is going, if they got their homework done, if they need any help, or if there’s anything they need to be more successful. They like to know that you are interested in how they are doing, so it’s good to show an active interest.
  6. Get involved. It’s always a good idea if you can get involved with the school and have good communication with the teacher. That way you will be aware of what is going on and know how to help your child more. Teachers love it when parents take an active interest in their child’s education.
  7. Praise your kids. Help kids to know what they are doing is right or what they are doing is wrong. Praising and encouraging the kids builds their confidence and helps them to succeed as they grow.

“Just about every parent has the ability to help kids succeed with their academics, even if it’s ensuring they have the tools they need to succeed,” added Florence. “We help parents be successful, even those who don’t have the funds to pay for a tutor. Our mission is to help as many students to achieve as we can.”

The Oxford Method has over 100 tutors around the country, covering all subject areas. They offer online tutoring, as well as in-person and in-classroom options. Their tutoring services are available 24 hours per day, 365 days per year. Instructors have a minimum of a bachelor’s degree, with many of them having a master’s degree, Ph.D., and at least four years of teaching experience. The Oxford Method works with their nonprofit, Social Actualization, Inc., by giving them 10% of all profits. The funds are used to provide free computers, high-speed internet, and instruction to underprivileged families in urban and rural America. Plus, 40% of their instructors are PhDs, 40% have a master’s degree, and 20% have only a bachelor’s degree.

The Oxford Method believes that education is the great equalizer and the best gift you can give the next generation. Subject areas include science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM), as well as business, social studies, psychology, English, history, public speaking, study methods, test-taking, and more. To get more information about The Oxford Method, visit the website.

Illustration of models by Rita Azar for 360 Magazine

Advice Every Fashion Student Should Read

Are you about to enter the challenging but very exciting world of fashion school? Are you prepared for what’s ahead as you embark on your design studies? Do you know what to expect during the first year? Don’t worry if not, as we’re about to share some important advice that every fashion student should know. 

Fashion School Is Expensive

The cost of going to college is not cheap. You need to pay fees and you need to have enough money to live comfortably. You don’t want to be scraping by – you want to enjoy your college years and make lifelong memories with the new people in your life. Looking into ways that will give you a bit more breathing room financially is always a good move. 

Is it possible to take on a part time job at the weekends so you have extra cash? Can you refinance your existing student loan with a private lender so you’re left with one monthly repayment? By doing so, you can choose your payment and term and enjoy more flexibility with your monthly cash flow. Have you talked to your parents about how they could help you out? There are lots of options available to make the burden of paying for fashion school a lot more bearable. 

Always Think About Your Portfolio

It’s a good idea to treat every project you complete like it will be part of your final portfolio. Not only will you do your absolute best to produce the best work you can but you’ll also be extra focused and motivated when it comes to meeting deadlines. Follow this simple advice and you’ll leave college with top grades and a huge selection of work samples. 

Stay Up to Date with Trends

Fashion school and keeping on top of new trends go hand in hand. If you really want to excel, don’t be the fashion designer who waits for new trends to arrive before jumping on the bandwagon. Why not be the person who stays ahead of trends – the person who knows what’s coming before everyone else does? The secret to staying ahead is keeping informed. Watch – or attend – fashion week if possible. Follow big stylists on social media. Check your local high-end boutiques for new collections. Spend your spare time studying celebrity stylists. These are all ways to keep your finger on the pulse of new and upcoming trends. 

Learn How to Sew

Do you know how to sew? If not, it’s time to learn. Great fashion designers learn how to sew early on in their careers so they can understand the different fabrics and get used to working with a wide range of threads and materials. To be successful, it’s important to understand the construction of clothing and what’s involved in making a beautiful garment. 

Be Tech-Savvy

Fashion school has not escaped the advancements of technology. It’s now essential for students to understand the different fashion design software platforms that are changing the way designers work. What do you need to focus on in terms of technology? You need to get familiar with 3D printing so you can create 3D models of your designs before production starts. You also need to gain expertise in body scanning, smart tailoring and the world of augmented reality. 

Bottled Beer illustration done by Mina Tocalini of 360 MAGAZINE.

Natty Light – Dorm from Home

As universities across the country announce campus closures to enact social distancing, droves of 21+ college students are facing a harsh reality; the semester they dreamed of won’t be happening. Natural Light knows how crushing this is for our fans, so we’re stepping in to help preserve some of the freedoms of on-campus living. The Dorm From Home initiative awards one lucky 21+ student with a “Nattified” mobile dorm unit. The dorm comes equipped with all the college staples and a space to call their own while they sit out another semester.

21+ college students across America will face hundreds of hours of digital lectures and exams this semester without a sanctuary to relax and step away from their studies. With the college experience hanging in the balance, Natty Light created a solution that delivers the independence of the college experience without ever leaving home.

The Dorm From Home mobile unit will be parked right in your backyard or driveway and comes

equipped with all the college classics:

  • Flat screen TV
  • Heat/AC/Electric
  • Mini fridge
  • Lax volume policies
  • Gaming system
  • Other people optional
  • Chill vibes included
  • A semester’s worth of Natty Light beer
  • money to enjoy responsibly*

“Having to miss a semester on-campus is a devastating feeling for our fans,” said Daniel Blake, Vice President of US Value Brands at Anheuser-Busch. “We could never replace the full experience, but Dorm From Home will give a piece of the college lifestyle back to one lucky fan and more importantly, it’s a reminder to the full Natty community that the college experience is worth celebrating, no matter where you are.”

For the chance to win, fans 21+ can post a photo on social with #DormFromHome and #contest to make the case why they deserve their own space this semester to dorm from home. Natty will select a winner based on the most creative and convincing argument that reflects the Natty Light personality and values.

The winner will receive their decked out mobile home to their doorstep at the start of the fall semester and will be theirs to keep.

No Purchase Necessary. Open to US residents who are 21+ and who are currently enrolled in an accredited college or university in the US or who were enrolled in an accredited college or university in the US within two (2) years prior to the time of entry. Ends 8/18/20. See Official Rules at naturallight.com/dorm-from-home for prize & details. Msg & data rates may apply. Void where prohibited. *Cash equivalent of 2 cases a month for 3 months

Natural Light was introduced in 1977 as Anheuser-Busch’s first reduced-calorie light beer. Currently the sixth best-selling beer in America, Natural Light is brewed with a blend of premium hops and a combination of select grains producing a clean flavor, light body and satisfying refreshment.

For more than 165 years, Anheuser-Busch has carried on a legacy of brewing great-tasting, high-quality beers that have satisfied beer drinkers for generations. Today, we own and operate 23 breweries, 14 distributorships and 23 agricultural and packaging facilities, and have more than 18,000 colleagues across the United States. We are home to several of America’s most recognizable beer brands, including Budweiser, Bud Light, Michelob ULTRA and Stella Artois, as well as a number of regional brands that provide beer drinkers with a choice of the best-tasting craft beers in the industry. From responsible drinking programs and emergency drinking water donations to industry-leading sustainability efforts, we are guided by our unwavering commitment to supporting the communities we call home. 

Follow Natural Light: Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

Follow Anheuser-Busch: Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

Schools Debate Fall Opening

By Eamonn Burke

As the Coronavirus spreads at its fastest pace yet in the United States, schools and colleges are facing the tough question of how to face the fall semester. Education facilities from kindergarten to graduate school have to rethink how classes will be run in person, and if they will be run in person at all.

According to the Federal Government, opening all schools in person is the imperative course of action. President Trump and his Education Secretary Betsy DeVos are practically demanding schools to re-open, as Trump even threatened to cut funding to education if they do not. “We’re very much going to put pressure on governors and everybody else to open the schools—get them open.” Trump said at an event last week. Secretary DeVos backed him, asserting that re-opening schools “should absolutely be the goal.”

However, for public school districts and colleges, the situation is not so clear-cut. California, one of the COVID-19 hotspots in the world, the two largest districts of San Diego and Los Angeles have announced that they will not reopen for in-person instruction. Many districts, such as New York City, are pursuing a more hybrid plan, which involves partial in-person learning in three different models propped by Mayor DeBlasio. The state of New York as a whole is allowing districts to open based on certain criteria. In some cases, such as Nashville, districts have actually had to backpedal and turn over plans to re-open in light of the recent spike in coronavirus cases across the nation.

Colleges, both public and private, face the same dilemma. While some have announced full closure in the fall, such as the State universities in California, others such as Harvard, Princeton, and Georgetown will bring students to campus in a limited manner. Harvard and Princeton will have roughly half of the students on campus for each semester, split by grade, although all classes will remain online. Harvard will not discount their tuition, while Princeton will offer 10% off. Other universities such as Carnegie Mellon are offering more flexibility, allowing students to choose which semester to come back and offering some classes with both a remote and in-person option.

Another complicating factor in decisions for colleges are the new restrictions on international students put in place by ICE under Trumps administration. These rules, stating that international students who have only online classes must go back to their country, have caused more than 200 universities to sue the Trump administration, following in suit of Harvard and MIT. These rules were dropped quickly after facing the wide opposition.

book, reading, Vaughn Lowery, 360 Magazine

ASCAP Announces HBCU Internship Program

ASCAP, the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers, announced the launch of a new paid internship program for students enrolled in historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) in the U.S. This summer, the PRO will offer five HBCU students the opportunity to join ASCAP’s team to gain real-world experience in the music industry.

Howard University (Washington, DC), Clark Atlanta University (Atlanta, GA), Morehouse College (Atlanta, GA), and Bennett College (Greensboro, NC) will be initial partners in the program, which will run through July and August. Interns will work remotely, alongside ASCAP professionals in their field of interest.

ASCAP plans to continue and expand the initiative moving forward, offering paid internships to HBCU students each summer.

“We have a responsibility to seek to nurture talent and empower the next generation of Black leaders in the music business, just as we do on the creative side,” said ASCAP Senior Vice President, Rhythm & Soul Nicole George-Middleton. “Our goal is to provide experience within ASCAP and to help our interns connect with the larger industry as they pursue their careers.”

ASCAP CEO Elizabeth Matthews added, “This program is a natural extension of ASCAP’s ongoing work to create and evolve a culture of inclusion and belonging that reflects and serves the incredible diversity of our ASCAP membership. By creating a new pipeline for college students to gain music industry work experience, we hope to provide meaningful mentorships and opportunities to new generations of Black leaders who will influence the future of the music business.”

“Bennett College is thrilled to be a part of the inaugural class of ASCAP’s HBCU internship program. ASCAP will provide our students with invaluable, real-world experience and expand their understanding of the music business. We are looking forward to this partnership and what the future holds for our talented students,” said Yolande Johnson, Bennett College Director of Donor Relations & Stewardship / Interim Coordinator for Career Services.

“Some of the most meaningful education takes place outside of a traditional classroom, and we are excited to have our students learn from top executives in the music industry. ASCAP is a global leader in entertainment and this internship opportunity is priceless,” added Cafabian Heard, Creative & Marketing Services Specialist University Relations, External & Community Affairs, Clark Atlanta University.

Students selected for the ASCAP HBCU internship program will have the opportunity to work within the following departments: Marketing & Communications/Events; Membership (Film & TV, R&S/Urban, Country, Pop/Rock, Symphonic/Concert and Latin); Data Strategy; International Affairs; Finance; Licensing; and Global Technology Solutions. In addition, interns will have access to ASCAP employee perks, such as Wellness Events, Employee Jam Sessions, and Online Learning tools.

Applications are available through each of the participating college and university career services offices. The deadline for submission is Monday, June 29 and internships are expected to begin the second week of July.

Learn more about ASCAP and stay in touch at www.ascap.com or on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook.

360 Magazine

Top 3 Reasons To Become an Educator

These days, a quality education is key to every student’s future job prospects, socioeconomic mobility and professional success. If you love helping others, are patient and have a knack for breaking things down in an easy-to-understand way, you may want to consider becoming an educator. You’re probably already familiar with a few of the perks of going into teaching, like getting summers off or having creative control over your classroom and teaching style. However, there are some other great perks that you might not have thought about. If you’re thinking of continuing your education first to become as well-prepared for your future career as possible, click here. To learn more about the top three reasons you should consider a career in education, read on.

1. It’s Great for Family Life

If you’re the parent of young children looking for a career that will fit into your family life but also bring professional fulfillment, look no further than a teaching career. While many teachers will tell you that even after the final school bell rings, you may have to bring grading or lesson planning home, being on the same daily schedule as your children is a big advantage. After all, you’ll be on spring break and summer vacation when they are, and you won’t have to hire babysitters to look after them until you get off work at your 9 to 5. For family work-life balance, going into education is a great option!

2. You Can Work Anywhere

While different states may have different educational and licensing requirements, teachers are in demand in just about every city across the country. This means that if you decide to become an educator, you get to pick where you want to live and will be sure to find job opportunities in the locality of your choosing. If you like the idea of having opportunities everywhere and not being restricted to living in only one metro area for the rest of your career, the versatility of going into education could be a great fit for you!

3. You Help Shape Students’ Academic Success

As any former student is well aware, success in school doesn’t just mean access to quality materials – it means having a great teacher as well. As the head of your own classroom, you have the potential to help your students exceed learning outcomes, get interested in new material and get motivated for future success. A good teacher helps students pass standardized tests; a great teacher helps students develop critical thinking skills that will serve them for years to come. If you’re driven by a desire to help foster creative thinking and practical skills in your students, you’ve got what it takes to make a big impact on your students’ academic performance not just in this school year, but potentially for the future as well. After all, a great experience in your classroom could change their entire outlook on academics and shape their future trajectory!
Education is essential for shaping the next generation, and working as an educator comes with a surprising roster of perks. If you’re invested in molding tomorrow’s citizens, teaching could be the perfect career for you.

360 Magazine, Ahmaud Arbery, Politics

So You Want a Career in Journalism?

Journalism is an exciting, fast-paced, and interesting career where no two days are the same. Journalists can work for newspapers, TV stations, websites, magazines and radio stations. Most of the time, the best way to get into a career as a journalist is to earn a relevant degree, although you might be able to get into the field through an apprenticeship. If you’ve decided that a career in journalism is a good fit for you, here’s the experience and qualifications you’ll need to beat the competition. 

Qualifications:

There are two common routes into journalism, which include earning an undergraduate journalism degree, or taking an undergraduate degree in a different subject, followed by a master’s degree in journalism. You can search journalism courses at University Compare; a website where you can look at all the different degree options available, where to study them, and the differences between them. When you choose where to do your degree from this list, make sure that you opt for a course that is NCTJ (National Council for the Training of Journalists) accredited if you want to eventually work for a news organisation based in the UK. You can also choose a degree with an area of specialisation, such as newspaper journalism, multimedia journalism, or broadcast journalism. 

Blogging:

While studying for your degree in journalism, using your spare time to start a blog can be a great way to get relevant experience in your career and make valuable connections that will help you when looking for work in the future. A strong blog and a large Twitter following will help you get noticed by potential employers who are looking for new hires that have a solid understanding of online journalism. And, many postgraduate degree courses will expect applicants to have blogging experience and an active Twitter account with a large following, so this will be extremely helpful if you want to go on to get a master’s in journalism in the future. 

Choosing the Right University:

Most universities in the UK will offer a course in journalism, but not all of them are created equal. Along with making sure that you are only applying to NCTJ accredited courses, you might want to consider other accreditations, such as the BJTC (Broadcast Journalism Training Council) if you are considering a career in radio journalism. You should also look at the facilities, reputation, teaching staff, course content, and where journalism graduates from a particular university go on to study further or work. Bear in mind that journalism graduates who have a wide range of skills tend to have more options in the job market, so it’s worth considering a course that teaches extra skills such as data journalism, financial reporting, or video production. 

Getting Work Experience:

While there will be plenty of opportunities for you to get valuable work experience as you study, the experience that matters the most is that you get after graduating. Typically, your first job will be working as a junior reporter, covering any stories that are allocated to you. Generally, these jobs are long-term contracts rather than short-term, which is great if you’re looking for a position with plenty of security, which isn’t always the case when working in the media. However, starting salaries are low, so you might want to consider freelancing for more than one news organisation, something that will become more accessible to you as you build up your experience and contacts. 

Working as a journalist is a very exciting career choice. Finding the right university and course to study, however, is just the beginning; start focusing on building your network and experience as early as possible. 

Nicholas Johnson × Princeton

After 274 years, Princeton names Nicholas Johnson as their first Black Valedictorian. Before the Canadian heads off to MIT for grad school, both Michelle Obama and Oprah congratulate him via social media for his recent accomplishments.

(Photo by Lisa Festa)