Posts tagged with "college"

ESPN MOST-VIEWED COLLEGE FOOTBALL

ESPN Delivers Its Most-Viewed College Football Kickoff Weekend Since 2016 – Notre Dame/Ohio State Scores 10.5 Million Viewers on ABC

ESPN networks registered its best kickoff weekend since 2016 and second best since 2009. Across ABC, ESPN, ESPN2 and ESPNU, 17 games accounted for nearly 82 percent of all college football viewing this weekend across linear networks. A dozen of those 17 games recorded more than a million viewers and nine were above two million viewers.

ABC and ESPN Score Record Viewership

ABC and ESPN aired the top five games of Week 1 across P2+ and P18-49 viewers, and the 17 games across Nielsen-measured networks during Labor Day Weekend averaged 2.9 million viewers in Week 1. On Saturday, the combined audience across ABC and ESPN in primetime was 13.4 million viewers.

ABC and ESPN each aired their best Kickoff Weekends in six years. ABC’s quartet of games averaged 7.1 million viewers, up 12 percent from 2021 and ABC’s second most-viewed Kickoff Weekend on record behind only 2016. ESPN’s seven games averaged 2.7 million viewers, up 69 percent over 2021.

Primetime Play Produces Powerful Audience Figures

Notre Dame at Ohio State, arguably one of the most highly anticipated matchups of the season, recorded 10.5 million viewers on ABC Saturday Night Football Presented by Capital One (7:30 p.m. ET), up 16 percent from last year’s Clemson vs. Georgia showdown and becoming the network’s most-viewed regular season game since FSU vs. Alabama (2017). 10.5 million is the second largest audience for a Week 1 Saturday game on record.

Sunday’s Allstate Louisiana Kickoff featuring Florida State and LSU drew 7.6 million viewers, ranking as the third best Opening Week Sunday game on record. Monday’s all-ACC clash between Clemson and Georgia Tech at the Chick-fil-A Kickoff scored 4.9 million viewers, the most-watched weekday game on ESPN in three seasons and up 57 percent over 2021.

Announced earlier in the week, the Backyard Brawl between West Virginia and Pittsburgh registered 3.15 million viewers, the most-watched ESPN Thursday game since 2017.

GameDay Goes Big and ABC Afternoon Action Shines in Week 1
Saturday also saw viewership victories with both College GameDay Built by The Home Depot and the Chick-fil-A Kickoff featuring defending national champion Georgia and Pac-12 powerhouse Oregon. GameDay notched 2.1 million viewers Saturday morning on ESPN and ESPNU, up 13 percent over 2021 and going down as GameDay‘s most-watched pre-November episode since 2016. The afternoon ABC showdown between the Dawgs and the Ducks registered 6.2 million viewers to become Week 1’s most-watched ABC 3:30 p.m. game since 2017.

A Final Week 1 Look – By The Numbers

  • Total minutes streamed of live college football games was up nine percent over 2021 in Week 1
  • From Thursday to Monday, unique visitors to college football digital content were up 8% and total CFB video starts were up 15% from 2021’s comparable Week 1 period
  • 26 million unique visitors consumed college football digital content throughout Week 1
  • From noon to 11 p.m. on Saturday, approximately 9.5 million viewers were watching college football in the average minute across ESPN platforms, including ABC, ESPN, ESPN2, ESPNU and the ESPN App.

ESPN Networks – Top Ten Most-Viewed Week 1 Matchups

Date

Game

P2+ Viewers

Network

Sat, Sep 3

No. 2 Ohio State def. No. 5 Notre Dame, 21-10

10.5 million

ABC

Sun, Sep 4

FSU def. LSU, 24-23

7.6 million

ABC

Sat, Sep 3

No. 3 Georgia def. No. 11 Oregon, 49-3

6.2 million

ABC

Mon, Sep 5

No. 4 Clemson def. Georgia Tech, 41-10

4.9 million

ESPN

Sat, Sep 3

No. 8 Michigan def. Colorado State, 51-7

4 million

ABC

Thu, Sep 1

No. 17 Pittsburgh def. West Virginia, 38-31

3.2 million

ESPN

Sat, Sep 3

Florida def. No. 7 Utah, 29-26

3 million

ESPN

Sat, Sep 3

No. 19 Arkansas def. No. 23 Cincinnati, 31-24

2.9 million

ESPN

Sat, Sep 3

No. 13 NC State def. ECU, 21-20

2 million

ESPN

Fri, Sep 2

No. 15 Michigan State def. Western Michigan, 35-13

1.3 million

ESPN2

College Student via 360 Magazine

Law School at LLS

Thinking about transitioning from journalism to law? Consider the JD Evening Program at Loyola Law School. The No. 1 evening program in the West, it will be rebooted in fall 2022 to a hybrid schedule requiring a regular on-campus commitment of just one night a week (Mondays).

Loyola Law School has long been a place where reporters from an array of news outlets, including the Associated Press and CNN, have transitioned from newsroom to courtroom. That is no surprise, given its location in downtown Los Angeles, support of journalists in the form of programs like the annual Journalist Law School, and faculty members who hail from the newsroom (including Sam Pillsbury, who went from newspaper reporter to federal prosecutor before becoming a professor).

The reinvented program leverages the law school’s 100+ year history as a leader in the part-time JD field with remote instruction cultivated through the pre-pandemic launch of its innovative online graduate tax program. Learn more about Loyola and how the new format of its legendary JD Evening program puts a law degree within reach for those with even the busiest of schedules. Download your copy of the digital brochure.

In the brochure, you will find helpful information about the rebooted JD Evening program. Start planning your application to LLS and learn more about unique learning and networking opportunities.

Also, feel free to reach out to their team directly. Admissions representatives are delighted to share their personal experiences consulting with prospective students on how to build a successful application and plan for law school. Make an appointment to speak with an Admissions counselor or visit during chat hours.

BLM graphic via Mina Tocalini for us by 360 MAGAZINE

HBCU Cultural Heritage Stewardship

Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) have been an integral part of our educational system in the United States. Originally being founded in the 1830s, HBCUs cultivate an environment that was long sought after to ensure educational equality. This nations HBCUs are full of the rich history of African American activism, and their campuses also stand as pioneering pieces of landscaping and architecture.

This is precisely why on February 28, the National Trust’s African American Cultural Heritage Action Fund declared they would be awarding over $650,000 in grant awards to five HBCUs across the country in part with their HBCU Cultural Heritage Stewardship Initiative.

While each HBCU embodies symbolisms of African American brilliance and triumph, the programming guarantees that each campus will collect resources to protect and sustain the historical campuses. These grants aim to preserve and revitalize landmark pieces that grace each HBCU, and to promote leadership on each respective campus.

Two differing forms of grants entail the initiative; the first being a $150,000 grant aiming to expand campus-wide cultural stewardship plans, and the second as a $60,000 developmental grant that will conserve a specific milestone building on or associated with an HBCU campus.

Each grant has the intention to enhance plans to improve and sustain varying architectural campus facilities. Launched through the National Trust’s Action Fund in 2020, the program allies with The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, National Endowment for Humanities, Ford Foundation, The JPB Foundation, J.M. Kaplan Fund and The Executive Leadership Council.

The initiative set in place today entails $3.2 million set forth to the HBCUs grants, seeking influence from the Trust’s extensive years of practice to generate proposals of refurbishment and maintenance at each college or university. The National Trust’s Action Fund links with 13 HBCUs and has financed 6 campus and 7 singular-developing projects modern day.

Brent Leggs, Senior Vice President and Executive Director of the African American Cultural Heritage Action Fund at the National Trust spoke on the impact that these grants would permit, stating, “These grants are significant in light of the recent threat to HBCU campuses. Preservation is the strategic counterpoint to centuries of erasure, and it underscores the critical nature of the African American contribution to our nation.

“Without the doctors, lawyers, engineers and other professionals HCBUs have produced, the American story would not be the same.  The Action Fund’s work to preserve the legacies of intellect, activism, and enlightenment on these campuses will inspire future generations of all Americans to believe that, despite the challenge, they too can overcome.”

The following HBCU recipients include:

  • Florida A&M University (Tallahassee, Florida) aiming to produce stewardship projects across their 422-acre campus (1887)
  • Johnson C. Smith University (Charlotte, North Carolina) to create a conservation strategy for its Historic Quad (1867)
  • Rust College (Holly Springs, Mississippi) aiming to produce stewardship projects across their campus (1866)
  • Shaw University (Raleigh, North Carolina) aiming to produce stewardship projects across their 65-acre campus (1865); and
  • Voorhees College (Denmark, South Carolina) aiming to produce stewardship projects across their 380-acre campus (1897).

Shaw University President Dr. Paulette Dillard spoke on their excitement to be apart of the Trust’s recipients this year, stating, “The Shaw University community expresses its sincerest appreciation to the National Trust for Historic Preservation for awarding the campus a $150,000 planning grant to assist our efforts in preserving African American history.

“From educating the former enslaved to graduating some of the first African American doctors to helping ignite the civil rights movement, the legacy of Shaw University is woven into the fabric of American history. Preserving the treasures of our historic buildings extends the powerful narrative that describes the indelible contributions of this university.”

The planning grant, too, entails that all HBCU beneficiaries gain access to a paid student professional growing opportunity; one student from each individual campus will work with a team of architects, engineers and consultants to grow their campus. This funding comes from the Initiative and grows the field of African American preservationists.

Florida A&M President Dr. Larry Robinson spoke on the behalf of their campus, stating, “Florida A&M University is the third oldest campus in the State University System of Florida. We appreciate the support of the National Trust for Historic Preservation to assist the University in furthering preservation of landmark buildings on our campus.

The planning grant will allow the faculty, staff, and students across the disciplines of architecture, engineering and the humanities to collaborate in ways that highlight the national impact of Johnathan C. Gibbs, Lucy Moten and Andrew Carnegie and the buildings named in their honor. They also will help preserve the history of the Civil Rights Movement on our campus where iconic figures like Booker T. Washington, Mary McLeod Bethune, Marian Anderson and others changed American history.”

Mina Tocalini illustration for mental health article inside 360 magazine

College Mental Health Webinar

College students are facing a serious mental health crisis, driven in part by the pandemic.  After nearly two years of remote schooling, restricted gatherings, and constant Covid testing, many students are anxious, socially isolated, depressed—and are overwhelming campus mental health centers.

According to a nationwide survey of college students conducted by the Healthy Minds Network and the American College Health Association, the pandemic has intensified a decade-long trend of increased rates of depression, anxiety, substance misuse, and serious thoughts of suicide.  

An expert panel of psychologists will examine what is causing this crisis, what is being done, and tips on how to identify the symptoms of depression and anxiety and how students and their families can find the support they need to build resiliency to lead a mentally healthy college experience. The webinar is free and open to the public.  

The Moderator

M. Dolores Cimini, PhD: Director, Center for Behavioral Health Promotion and Applied Research, University at Albany-SUNY, and Director of the nationally recognized Middle Earth Peer Assistance Program, Dr. Cimini has led comprehensive efforts in research-to-practice translation at the University at Albany for the past 30 years with over $910 million in support from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), U.S. Department of Education, U.S. Department of Justice, and New York State Office of Addiction Services and Supports. The screening and brief intervention program developed by Dr. Cimini (the STEPS Comprehensive Alcohol Screening and Brief Intervention Program) has earned 13 national awards for best practices and innovation in behavioral health care. Dr. Cimini has co-edited two books, including a volume focused on college student health and well-being entitled Promoting Behavioral Health and Reducing Risk Among College Students: A Comprehensive Approach (2018)

The Panel

Amie Haas, PhD: Dr. Haas is a professor at Palo Alto University in the Department of Psychology with a specialization in college student substance abuse issues. Her research focuses on the identification of high-risk drinking and drug use practices in college students and the development of targeted interventions using a harm reduction model. She worked in collaboration with Santa Clara University for several years developing new programs for alcohol prevention and education and has consulted with other universities to guide campus prevention programming. Her work focuses on behaviors like pregaming (i.e., drinking before students go out to consume alcohol at a function), co-occurring cannabis and alcohol use, overdoses, and factors related to alcohol-induced blackout and sexual risk-taking. In her career, she has received funding through NIDA and the U.S. Department of Education.    

Donna Sheperis, PhD, LPC, NCC, ACS, CCMHC: A board Certified Tele-Mental Health Provider, she is a professor and associate chair of PAU’s Department of Counseling In addition, Dr. Sheperis is Director of the PAU eClinic which partners with college success agencies to provide mental health support to their students. Sheperis has 30 years of experience in clinical mental health counseling settings. Her work focuses on tele-mental health, internet interventions, technology & mental health, and adult mental health. She is past president of the Association for Assessment and Research in Counseling and on the Ethics Appeals Committee for the American Counseling Association.

Predair Robinson, PhD: Director of Academic Satellites, UC Davis Student Health and Counseling Services, Dr. Robinson is a clinical psychologist who directs the counseling and outreach services for eight academic satellites for UC Davis community students; this includes the four undergraduate dean’s offices, Veterinary Medicine, School of Medicine, School of Nursing, and Graduate Studies. In addition to managing programming, development, and personnel, he supervises and trains counseling staff, doctoral interns, and postdoctoral residents and provides short-term therapy and crisis intervention services for students. Prior to joining UC Davis, he served as Interim Director of the Sexual and Gender Identities Clinic (SGIC), a specialty training clinic affiliated with Palo Alto University. In this role, he provided clinical supervision to second-year doctoral trainees who treated LGBTQ+ folks in the Bay Area.  

About Palo Alto University (PAU)

PAU is a private, non-profit university located in the heart of Northern California’s Silicon Valley It’s dedicated to addressing pressing and emerging issues in the fields of psychology and counseling that meet the needs of today’s diverse society. PAU offers undergraduate and graduate programs that are led by faculty who make significant contributions in their field. Online, hybrid, and residential program options are available. PAU is accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC).  PAU’s doctoral programs are accredited by the American Psychological Association (APA) and its master’s in counseling programs by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling & Related Educational Programs (CACREP). 

Instrument illustration by Ivory Rowen for 360 Magazine

NBOTB: A Salute to the Battle

Webber Marketing (WM), creators of the National Battle of the Bands (NBOTB), releases a new documentary film titled: National Battle of the Bands: A Salute to the Battle. The film is presented by Pepsi Zero Sugar and will air throughout February in honor of Black History Month.

The new film captures the essence and showcases the spirit of the HBCU band battle, highlighting both the field and stand performances, and features Bethune Cookman University, Marching Wildcats; Langston University, “Marching Pride” Band; North Carolina A&T State University, The Blue and Gold Marching Machine; Norfolk State University, The Spartan “Legion” Marching Band; Southern University, Human Jukebox; Jackson State University, The Sonic Boom of the South; Talladega College, Great Tornado Band, and Tennessee State University, Aristocrat of Bands.

“A Salute to the Battle is a documentary film that brings the action, energy and pageantry of the ‘Battle’ performance to viewers, in an up close and personal perspective, right into comfort of their homes where they can experience the action with their friends and family,” says Derek Webber, Executive Producer & CEO of Webber Marketing. “There is so much pride and prestige that accompanies the HBCU band experience and the long legacy of trailblazers who paved the way for HBCU bands to exist. We are honored to play a part in continuing the celebration and sharing of their stories with the masses through our films and events.”

The eight Historical Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) marching bands appearing in the film participated in the 2021 NBOTB in Houston, Texas. The goal of the documentary is to continue amplifying the importance and impact of the National Battle of the Bands event, the participating bands, and its members and the HBCU community at large.

“At Pepsi, we’ve committed to supporting HBCUs year-round and I’m honored to help shine a light on these talented marching bands with this new documentary release,” said Chauncey Hamlett, VP and CMO of PepsiCo Beverages North America (South Division). “These bands are part of the driving force in the celebrated HBCU culture, bringing the energy, hype, and history to every game.”

The historical significance of HBCU bands is sown into the fabric of society. HBCU marching bands continue to be front and center at some of the biggest moments in history; filling the air with their unified sound while marching proudly and dancing unapologetically in celebration of their ancestors who paved the way for their rhythm to be on display for all to see, hear and feel.

For more information about the NBOTB and its “A Salute to the Battle” documentary film, click HERE and stay updated on social media on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

About the National Battle of the Bands

The event’s mission is to enhance the exposure of Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and their marching bands, the roles they play in educating aspiring musicians and developing our future leaders. Event organizers have generated more than $700,000 in scholarships for the participating colleges and universities.

Ten Tips for College Students to Take Care of Their Health This Semester

Taking care of yourself in college is challenging. Students balance the pressures of school, work, and a social life, all while trying to make decisions about their future careers. With all of these pressures, it’s no wonder that poor mental health and burnout are common. 

However, students can fight burnout and protect their health by developing a set of simple, healthy habits. Here are 10 ways that college students can take care of their health this semester. 

  1. Plan to Sleep

American culture vastly underestimates the importance of sleep and its impact on productivity. Without proper rest, your body and brain will start to have trouble functioning. Although every person is different, the human body is wired to work on a cycle where sleep is very important to wakefulness. 

Most adults need 7-9 hours of sleep each night. If you’re serious about getting enough sleep, make sure you create a bedtime routine that allows you to turn the lights off when you actually need to. There is always something else to do, but you won’t have the energy you need for tomorrow without a good night’s rest. 

  1. Move Your Body

By the time they reach college, the typical American student is used to sitting still for long periods of time each day. However, the human body does not respond well to long periods of inactivity – it was made to move. One of the best things you can do for your physical and mental health is to get active. 

Sign up for a group exercise class or workout with YouTube in your dorm. Even doing jumping jacks or push-ups for five minutes can help you get your blood moving and refocus on your homework. Two of the most basic needs your body has are movement and rest, and meeting these needs will make it much easier for you to reduce stress and stay healthy.  

  1. Watch Out for SAD

During the spring semester, more students are likely to experience symptoms of depression. There’s less sunshine, students aren’t spending much time outside, and they’re already tired and stressed from the fall semester. During these darker months, it’s especially important to care for your mental health. 

Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) describes the way winter conditions can cause seasonal symptoms of depression. Thankfully, there are several things you can do to combat these feelings. Taking vitamin D, investing in a sunlight therapy lamp, and exercising may all help to reduce symptoms so you can finish the semester strong. 

  1. Outsmart Stress

Before “stress” was used to describe feelings of anxiety, it meant to put pressure on something. Constant stress puts pressure on your mind and body, weakening your immune system and making you feel sick. It’s important to find ways to reduce stress in your daily life to keep yourself healthy. 

Start by identifying what causes you stress. For college students, stressors could include getting poor grades, uncertainty over the future, low finances, and relationship challenges. Confronting the issues that are causing you anxiety can help. For instance, talking through an ongoing conflict with a friend or making a financial plan for the semester can reduce your levels of daily stress. 

  1. Eat Whole Foods

Every article out there about health for college students mentions eating well. While it may get repetitive, consuming whole foods and drinking plenty of water are two of the best ways to invest in your health this semester. The typical American diet – full of processed carbs and sugar – is a disaster waiting to happen for your health. 

Proper nutrition improves sleep, memory, focus, and your ability to respond well to stress. The food you eat is the fuel you’re giving your body to run on. Especially in college, you need this fuel to be top-notch. Although you shouldn’t rely on too much caffeine for energy, coffee in moderation can be a good source of antioxidants

  1. Build Friendships

Prolonged isolation is incredibly damaging to your physical and mental health. People need connection, so taking the time to build friendships is an investment in your health. Time spent with friends can help you unwind from school and refocus on what matters most in your life. 

College is an ideal time to build friendships and connect deeply with others. You are surrounded by people your age who are facing the same challenges you are. Students can support each other during this phase of life by promoting healthy habits and offering emotional support. 

  1. Work Through Your Thoughts

Taking care of yourself physically will go far toward supporting your health. However, many students are carrying such a large load of stress and anxiety that these foundational steps may not be enough. If you are practicing self-care but find that you’re still overwhelmed, it may be time to focus more closely on your mind and emotions. 

Studies have shown that people who journal are better able to process their thoughts and find peace in challenging situations. Meditating on healthy ideas can also help you keep worry at bay. You should never feel embarrassed about talking to a certified counselor or therapist – this is one of the best investments you can make in yourself. 

  1. Enjoy Fun Hobbies

Hobbies are another way to take care of your health this semester. A hobby can be something as simple as baking every Friday night or something as complicated as running a YouTube channel on the side. The important thing is that you find an activity outside of school that brings you joy. 

After you leave college, hobbies are a part of your daily routine that you can take with you. They can make the transition from school to adult life easier, and they offer stress relief. Hobbies improve productivity and may even give you insight into your future career path. Although they may feel like a guilty pleasure, they are well worth your time. 

  1. Focus on Giving

Looking outside yourself and giving to others can also increase your mental and physical wellbeing. Volunteering and donating to worthy causes are two ways you can incorporate giving into your weekly schedule. However, there are many meaningful ways you can support the people around you each day. 

Calling your parents, sending a stressed friend a card, and driving another student to the grocery store are all ways to give back. Even smiling has been shown to have powerful health benefits. Practicing kindness can raise your spirits if you feel low and encourage those around you.  

  1. Celebrate Everyday Moments

Because it can be hard to slow down during college, one strategy is to make the most of small moments. For instance, you can take time to notice nature and the weather while you’re walking between classes. You can also plan small moments of enjoyment throughout the day, like stretching for ten minutes in the morning or drinking tea while the sun goes down. 

Celebrating the everyday is sometimes called “romanticizing your life.” This is based on the idea that you’ll find what you’re looking for – whether that’s more stress or a moment of peace. College students in particular can benefit from taking deliberate moments to slow down and remember to enjoy their day. 

Health Is a Priority

Caring for your health is important, especially for students who are experiencing high levels of stress at college. Investing in your health will keep you focused, emotionally stable, and ready for whatever curveballs college life throws at you. 

Follow these 10 tips to stay healthy and make the most of your college years. Feeling good is worth the extra effort, and every step you take matters. You’ve got this!

Film artwork via Heather Skovlund for use by 360 MAGAZINE

THE CW NETWORKS DEBUTS “MARCH”

From the CW Network comes the brand-new documentary series MARCH, that navigates through the journey of competitive HBCU band culture. MARCH directly follows the lives of varying band members and leaders that are a part of the Marching Storm, Prairie View A&M University’s Marching Band.

The docu-series comes in eight parts, illustrating the efforts that the members put in behind the scenes to ensure success, and how they juggle their college life and academics with their commitment to the marching band. MARCH airs on Monday, January 25 (8:00-9:00 pm ET/PT) and then it moves to its regularly scheduled programming of Sunday nights beginning on February 26 (9:00-10:00 pm ET/PT), after ALL AMERICAN and ALL AMERICAN: HOMECOMING take place on Monday nights.

The new series MARCH highlights the stories of diverse and gifted college students that attend Prairie View A&M University. Whether they’re drummers in the marching band or dancers on the flag team, they all have one thing in common; they work hard at their craft, and they juggle the responsibilities of college on top of their musical endeavors. While delving into personal stories from individuals and staff associated with the 300-person marching band, MARCH also studies the rich legacy and history of Prairie View A&M, emphasizing the importance of the Marching Storm band has had on that powerful story. The series follows along the journey that they must go through to become the top ranked HBCU band in the nation. Performances include a captivating homecoming show with Texas A&M and Southern University.

From Stage 13, MARCH is executively produced by Cheryl Horner McDonough, Jamail Shelton, Shari Scorca and Marcel Fuentes.

About Prairie View A&M University

Serving as the second-oldest public institution of higher education in the state of Texas, Prairie View A&M University has instituted importance on individuality and self-expression. With an array of programs for engineers, nurses and educators, PVAMU has fitting baccalaureate, master or doctor degree through eight colleges and schools. PVAMU prides themselves on having top-tier mentors that are available to guide and advise their students towards their dreams. For more information on PVAMU, visit www.pvamu.edu.

MLWXBF chapter 4 illustration via Alison Christenson for use by 360 Magazine

Ivy League BLM Courses

By: Emily Bunn

Ivy League Schools to Begin Teaching “Black Lives Matter” Courses

Proving their commitment to diversity and understanding, several Ivy League colleges will begin offering courses on the Black Lives Matter Movement. Whereas other Ivy League schools, such as Cornell, have created Africana Departments that focus on the centrality of Africa and the African Diaspora to the modern world, BlackLivesMatter classes are situated in a specific cultural moment. Though, of course, the Black Lives Matter falls under the umbrella of contemporary African history, it is positioned in a more concentrated, modern application. Princeton and Dartmouth are the two first schools to begin accrediting this intersectional coursework. While Princeton most recently enacted their BLM coursework, Dartmouth has been pioneering this change since 2015.

Dartmouth’s Black Lives Matter course discusses topics such as The Ivory Tower, understanding St. Louis and its racial history, race and class, racial violence, and systemic and unconscious racism, among other topics. Part of Dartmouth’s course description reads, “though the academy can never lay claim to social movements, this course seeks in part to answer the call of students and young activists around the country to take the opportunity to raise questions about, offer studied reflection upon, and allocate dedicated institutional space to the failures of democracy, capitalism, and leadership and to make #BlackLivesMatter. Developed through a group effort, this course brings to bear collective thinking, teaching, research, and focus on questions around race, structural inequality, and violence.” The course is taught by a wide variety of professors from different academic disciplines and social backgrounds. Taught for ten weeks by close to 20 different professors, Dartmouth’s Black Lives Matter coursework stands as a comprehensive example of a cross-disciplinary concentration that recognizes and situates history in a contemporary, American context.

Princeton’s #BlackLivesMatter class looks to examine the “historical roots and growth of the Black Lives Matter social movement,” and is “committed to resisting, unveiling, and undoing histories of state sanctioned violence against Black and Brown bodies.” Princeton’s #BlackLivesMatter’s course description reads as such: “This seminar traces the historical roots and growth of the Black Lives Matter social movement in the United States and comparative global contexts. The movement and course are committed to resisting, unveiling, and undoing histories of state sanctioned violence against Black and Brown bodies. The course seeks to document the forms of dispossession that Black Americans face and offers a critical examination of the prison industrial complex, police brutality, urban poverty, and white supremacy in the US.” The course’ sample reading list includes selections from Angela Davis, Claudia Rankin, and Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor.

Princeton’s course will be taught by Professor Hanna Garth, who has previously taught “Race and Racisms,” “Postcolonial and Decolonial Theory,” and “Theories of Social Justice.” Garth’s self-defined interest in “the ways in which people struggle to overcome structural violence” and past experience has well-prepared her for teaching this class. Garth remarks, “All of my research, teaching, and mentoring is designed around my commitment to feminist methodologies and critical race theory.”

While some have aggressively asserted that Princeton’s course readings are from a former communist party leader who once made it on the FBI’s Most Wanted List, their negativity further highlights the necessity of this course. While these assertions may be true, it is telling that certain critics commonly overlook the individual’s many (more recent) accomplishments. The author in question is Angela Davis – a revered, respected, and well-educated civil rights activist, philosopher, academic, and author. By painting Davis as an unpatriotic, dangerous criminal, it distracts from the important lessons that are to be learned from this influential leader. Similarly, Fox News’ article on Princeton’s new course links their mention of the “Black Lives Matter” movement not to an explanation of what the movement is, but instead to a page on US protests. As opposed to creating an educational resource for what the BLM Movement is, conservative critics are quick to jump to claims of Black violence and riots.

Especially in 2021, as the United States grapples with the fight for racial and civil justice, discussions surround race, policing, prison reform, and politics are more pertinent than ever. It is absolutely essential that our nation’s college students are exposed to critical race theory and critical thinking. By shielding America’s youth from the necessary history of this country – which is still being experienced today – we are only putting them in a position of increased vulnerability and ignorance. Knowledge is power and educating oneself on society’s issues is the only way to efficient work towards progressive social change. Hopefully, as the most prestigious academic institutions begin to model examples of intersectional and anti-racist coursework, other colleges and universities will soon follow suit.

LSU × Alabama Record Ratings

ESPN networks had one of their strongest overall weekends of the 2021 college football season, as ESPN and ESPN2 both aired their most-watched games in years during Week 10. Fueling the year-over-year growth were two compelling Southeastern Conference showdowns – LSU and Alabama on ESPN, and Tennessee at Kentucky on ESPN2. Overall, ABC, ESPN and ESPN2 were all up significantly from Week 10 in both 2019 and 2020.

The most-watched game of the weekend on ESPN networks was LSU at Alabama (7 p.m. ET, ESPN), averaging 5 million viewers – the most-viewed college football game on cable this year. The primetime presentation was the top game in Week 10 among key male and adult demos (18-34, 18-49, 25-54). The audience was up 18 percent from the same matchup in 2020 and peaked with 6 million viewers from 10-10:15 p.m. in the final minutes of the game.

Tennessee at Kentucky (7 p.m., ESPN2) averaged 1.5 million viewers, ESPN2’s most-viewed game in more than three years (Auburn at Mississippi State, Oct. 6, 2018). ESPN2 also registered a strong showing with Friday night’s Virginia Tech at Boston College matchup (7:30 p.m., ESPN2), notching 1.2 million viewers. Season-to-date, ESPN and ESPN2 are well ahead of the pack as the top two most-viewed college football cable networks, with ESPN2 up 20 percent from 2019 and up 97 percent from 2020.

ABC’s top game on Saturday was Purdue’s upset of Big Ten rival Michigan State (3:30 p.m.), which scored 4.4 million viewers and was the top game of the late afternoon window.

ESPN Networks Own Saturday Primetime
In the average minute, 9 million viewers and 2.8 million P18-49 viewers were watching college football on ESPN networks. The audience peaked with nearly 10 million viewers from 8:15-8:30 p.m. ESPN networks had the top two college football games in primetime, and ESPN and ABC ranked as the top 2 networks from 8-11 p.m. among all viewers. Among P18-49 viewers, ESPN, ABC and ESPN2 ranked as three of the top four networks in primetime Saturday.

CFB Viewership Sees Exponential Year-Over-Year Growth
Viewership across ABC, ESPN and ESPN2 is up at least double digits from Week 10 in 2020 and 2019. ABC aired its most-viewed Week 10 since 2016 and was up 59 percent from the same week in 2020 and 13 percent from 2019. ESPN was up triple digits from both 2020 (136 percent) and 2019 (103 percent), while ESPN2 had above-average audiences in nearly every window and was up 135 percent from the same week in 2020 and up 27 percent from 2019.