Posts tagged with "college"

WEEK FOUR OF ESPN COLLEGE FOOTBALL

  • Saturday Night Football on ABC Ranks as College Football’s Most-Viewed Franchise, Averaging 6.5 Million Viewers
  • ABC, ESPN and ESPN2 Air Most-Viewed Week 4 Since 2017
  • Best Saturday Quadruple-Header on ESPN Since 2018

ESPN networks saw several viewership gains during Week 4 of the college football season, including the third straight Saturday of ESPN and ABC winning the night in primetime, ranking as the most-viewed networks across all genres among all viewers and key adult demos. Additionally, ABC’s Saturday Night Football Presented by Capital One is the most-watched college football franchise heading into Week 5, averaging nearly 6.5 million viewers.

Saturday’s SNF matchup between West Virginia and Oklahoma was the second-most-viewed game across all networks in Week 4 with 4,502,000 average viewers, peaking with 6,273,000 viewers in the final moments of the game.

Week 4 gave ESPN one of its best viewership weeks in recent seasons, and ABC, ESPN and ESPN2 all aired their most-viewed Week 4 slates since 2017.

ESPN boasted its most-viewed Saturday quadruple-header since November 10, 2018, averaging 2,185,000 viewers in Week 4. LSU-Mississippi State was the most-viewed noon ET game on cable this year with 1,791,000 average viewers. Clemson-NC State (2,185,000 average viewers) was the most-viewed 3:30 p.m. game on cable this year and peaked with 4.5 million viewers in overtime.

Under the lights, Tennessee-Florida (3,282,000 average viewers) in primetime on ESPN was the second-most-viewed game on any cable network this year, while Arizona-Oregon (1,656,000 average viewers) was the most-viewed late-night game on any network this year.

College GameDay Built by The Home Depot registered 1,581,000 average viewers, winning Saturday morning from the Windy City with more than two million viewers in the final hour.

illustration by Samantha Miduri for use by 360 Magazine

Auburn × Penn State Reach 7.6 Millions Viewers

Auburn-Penn State Registers 7.6 Million Viewers for ABC’s Saturday Night Football, ABC/ESPN Win the Night in Week 3

Auburn/Penn State registered 7.6M average viewers, the second-most-viewed Week 3 matchup

ABC has aired three of the top five games of the 2021 season

Nearly 11M average viewers watching CFB in primetime across ESPN networks on Saturday

ESPN boasts top two games on cable

ABC and ESPN continued to see multi-year viewership highs in Week 3 of the season, highlighted by Saturday night’s primetime matchup between then-No. 22 Auburn and then-No. 10 Penn State.

ABC’s Saturday Night Football Presented by Capital One averaged 7,606,000 viewers, the second-most-watched Week 3 game across all networks and fifth-best game of the year. ABC has aired three of the top five most-watched games of the year, and only once in the past decade (2016) have five games surpassed the 7.5 million viewers mark in the first three weeks of the season. The 7.6 million viewers is one of the five best September game audiences on ABC since the start of the 2018 season.

The matchup between the Tigers and the Nittany Lions peaked from 10:45 – 11 p.m. ET with 8.9 million viewers in the closing minutes of the game. This was the most-viewed Week 3 game on ABC since 2011 and the audience was up more than 100% from Saturday Night Football in 2020’s Week 3 (Miami/Louisville) and Week 3 in 2019 (Clemson/Syracuse). Driven by this game, ABC for the day was up +43 percent from 2019’s Week 3.

ESPN networks once again owned primetime as the top two networks among all key male and adult demos from 8 – 11 p.m. During that window, ABC, ESPN, ESPN2 and ESPNU had a combined average minute audience of 10.7 million viewers.

Across the entire sport, 9.4 billion minutes were watched across all networks, up +12% from Week 2 and the most-viewed Week 3 since 2016.

ESPN Boasts Top Two Games on Cable in Week 3
ESPN notched the top two games on cable for Week 3, including South Carolina/Georgia (2,548,000 viewers) in primetime on Saturday, and Friday night’s UCF/Louisville matchup (1,881,000), which was up +8 percent from the 2019 Friday doubleheader (North Carolina/Wake Forest and Washington State/Houston).

College GameDay Built by The Home Depot Has Banner Day

ESPN’s College GameDay Built by The Home Depot (9 a.m. – noon) had a high-powered weekend in Happy Valley, with the three-hour show averaging 1,910,000 viewers, which ranks as the most-viewed College GameDay since Rivalry Week in 2019. The audience was up +84 percent from Week 3 in 2020 (Louisville) and +7 percent from Week 3 in 2019 (Ames).

Saturday’s show ranks as the best Week 3 airing of the show since 2016 and the final hour (11 a.m. – noon) averaged 2,425,500 viewers, the best final hour since the 2019 season.

 

Corolla Cross

2022 Corolla Cross: Just Right! Feels Right!  

By: Conan Zhang, Armon Hayes × Vaughn Lowery

Toyota has announced its first-ever 2022 Corolla Cross, it is designed with everyday capability and Inspiring design. Toyota Motor Corporation invited 360 Magazine to fly with Delta Comfort+ to their National Press Preview in Texas. The Preview was organized thoughtfully, providing a Covid-friendly environment along with a video and photography team on-site available. The event was held at the LINE hotel, and they offered our team a comprehensive test drive on their prototype of the car.

THE LINE AUSTIN

On the three-day lifestyle trip, our team was provided with refined accommodation. We got reception and dinner by the lakeside at Kristen’s Kish’s Arlo Grey, and after party drinks in the open air at P6. 

The room that we stayed in was designed for comfort. The King bed was set aside by the minibar that allowed us to satisfy our cravings day and night; the walls are decorated with custom artwork by emerging local artists and the mini library indoor was decked with vintage books about the city. Bath products by American Medicinal Arts were offered, a modern domestic urban brand. This is the place for both indoors and outdoors types alike. Just right, feels right.

Overview

The prestigious Corolla is the best-buy sedan in the world. Therefore, it has become a signature of Toyota. Borrowing Corolla’s wind, the new models will certainly help sales. Sure enough, recently, Toyota’s 2022 Corolla Cross is the chosen one. This might sound like the cross-border or cross-country version of Corolla, but it is not. This is an SUV that has nothing to do with Corolla itself.

Performance

Corolla Cross is based on Toyota’s new global platform TNGA-C, equipped with Toyota’s latest rear torsion beam suspension, which will provide greater stability and comfort to the body.

Equipped with a 2.0L 4-cyl naturally aspirated engine and with continuously variable transmission(CVT), it has 169 horsepower and 150 lb.-ft torque. There is 1500lb towing capacity, which means it has the capability to carry a jet ski or kayak for a weekend getaway. Additionally, it brags an outstanding fuel economy at 32 mpg in the city and 33 mpg on the highway. 

Design

Corolla Cross has nothing to do with Corolla, inheriting the exaggerated looking Toyota SUVs. The inverted trapezoidal honeycomb mouth is connected to the slender LED headlights, which gives people a sense of aggressiveness.

The side of the car body shows strong muscles vividly through the shaping of light and shadows. The front and rear waistlines sharply surround its characteristic; the wheel eyebrow guards well show the off-road feel of an SUV. While the heavy bottom guard plate at the rear is still reminding the customer that this is still an accountable SUV. The XLE version is equipped with 18-inch Alloy Wheels with Black-Painted Machined-Finish along with reflectors set up on both sides, it is perfectly presenting the sporty posture of this car.

Technology

Corolla Cross will give you a familiar visual when you step inside the car. It is indicative of Corolla heritage. Suspended central console, LCD instrument display, rear air outlet, etc. It is very crucial for modern drivers to have an outstanding sound system, and Toyota offers the Audio Plus with JBL® 9-speaker system add on for $1,465. Technology will accompany every trip with this car, Apple CarPlay®, Android Auto™, and Amazon Alexa has become a standard configuration. They are all representative works of Japanese practicality and simplicity.

Safety 

The new car is equipped with Toyota’s latest Safety Sense system, which includes functions such as collision warning and blind spot monitoring. 9 airbags are installed into the system and configurations include lane departure alert with Steering Assist, lane tracing assist (LTA),road sign assist (RSA), and also full-speed range dynamic radar cruise control. Safety always comes first, and Corolla Cross cares about you.

Additional Features & Price 

  • The luggage space volume can reach 26.5 cu.ft.space, which has good storage properties.
  • Dual-zone air conditioning and rear seat vents are features of Corolla Cross.
  • The designer of this car added 20 icons hidden within the cross to brand his work 
  • The price is starting at $22195 for the base model of Corolla Cross L FWD  and at this price range there is Honda CR-V,Nissan Rogue Sport, VW Taos and also Toyota C-HR. Compared with these competitors, the all new Corolla Cross is more fuel efficient and friendly for family usage.

2022 Corolla Cross Pricing*

Grade

FWD

AWD

Corolla Cross L

$22,195

$23,495

Corolla Cross LE

$24,545

$25,845

Corolla Cross XLE

$26,325

$27,625

Corolla Cross is a perfect match for stylish Gen Z drivers – college students, young white-collars, and junior managers. At $25,000, this vehicle will give you not only practicability but also lifestyle. With the funky design and remarkable performance, this car will make you just right under the spotlight of your peers and feels right on every ride!  

Pre-order NOW!

Watch us on YouTube.

photo by Vaughn Lowery for use by 360 Magazine
photo by Vaughn Lowery for use by 360 Magazine
photo by Vaughn Lowery for use by 360 Magazine
photo by Vaughn Lowery for use by 360 Magazine
photo by Vaughn Lowery for use by 360 Magazine
photo by Vaughn Lowery for use by 360 Magazine
Toyota Cross XLE for se by 360 Magazine
Toyota Cross XLE for se by 360 Magazine
Toyota Cross XLE for se by 360 Magazine
photo by Vaughn Lowery for use by 360 Magazine
photo by Vaughn Lowery for use by 360 Magazine
Image by Ivory Nguyen for use by 360 Magazine

Top Ten Things to Know When Moving into Your First Apartment

By: Skyler Johnson

Moving into your first apartment can be a very stressful experience. From taking care of your electricity bill to installing Wi-Fi, there’s a lot to consider. Here are the top ten things to know.

  1. Be Aware of Space

This doesn’t just mean measuring your couch, it also means knowing which outlets are connected to a switch and how much closet space you have. Knowing where to plug in a lamp should be one of the first things you need to understand, as it can make life much easier down the road in terms of the arrangement of furniture and electronics. Keeping track of where each closet is can also allow for a serious consolidation of space. Find ways to maximize your closet space HERE.

  1. Make a Grocery List

While this may seem like it’s self-explanatory, it’s not something you ever want to forget, especially if you’re hungry. Chances are you’re not going to remember all the ingredients to a certain dish or dishes you’re making. Making this list should be something you do once or twice a week to make sure you don’t take more trips to the grocery store than you need.

  1. Choose Your Meal Plan Carefully

Going grocery shopping is something you’ll have to do every week and making a list of meals is essential. However, ingredients can be expensive if you’re not choosing correctly. Therefore, it’s important to only buy products you’re going to use at least twice. That way, you can save money in terms of how much you buy. If you’re buying zucchini, make sure to use it both for a fried zucchini and a pasta with zucchini and pesto. If you have the money, but not the time to shop, check out Instacart, where you can have someone go shopping for you.

  1. Keep the Lights Off

Remember, you have an electricity bill now. Make sure not to keep the lights on for too long or that bill will start to seriously increase. Make sure to turn off all lights when leaving the apartment, but make leave a light on when using a phone or laptop, as that’s been proven to deteriorate your eyesight.

  1. Keep Organized

Keeping organized might be something you’re already semi-aware of, but you’re operating on a much larger scale now. Putting shoes in their proper place and keeping brooms and mops in a closet or contained area can help you in the long run especially when doing chores. Having to scrounge through all your belongings to find a simple thing is a mild inconvenience when it happens one time in your room or dorm, but it becomes more of an issue when everything you have becomes lost.

  1. Remember to Get Fresh Air

With your apartment, unlike with your dorm or house, you don’t have to do much moving around for long periods. The kitchen is right there and doesn’t require as much walking as in a house. Nevertheless, it is good to get out of the house at least once a day. Social isolation can lead to depression.

  1. Magnets, Tupperware, and Air Freshener

These are all things you might not think you need, but you will. Magnets are great for your fridge. They can be used to hang up notes, grocery lists, and even hand towels. Plus, they make great decorations. Tupperware is good for storing food, which will become necessary. It’s always good to have leftovers, especially for busy study/work nights. Even for the nose blind, an air freshener is great for kitchen smells which will permeate a small space.

  1. Know how to do Laundry

Most apartment complexes have some form of a laundry room, and it’s important to know where yours is located, and more importantly how much it costs. You don’t want to be stuck with a lot of clothes to be washed without know how to wash them. Some laundry machines are more intuitive than others. For example, some may use Shine, a platform that allows for easy mobile payments for laundry. You can find out if your complex uses one by checking if there’s a baby blue sticker on the machine.

  1. Don’t Be Afraid to Make Cooking Mistakes

Cooking is one of the many things that are unique to moving into your first apartment, and while you may liken yourself to be a chef, try doing it every night. Food preparation mistakes are common but can also be great learning experiences. Either way, there’s always take-out if your food is inedible.

  1. Give yourself Space

When first moving into your apartment, you will have to deal with a lot of anxiety from living on your own. It’s not an easy transition, and you shouldn’t expect it to be. If you can, take a few days off from working to transition into your new space and get used to your environment. You won’t regret it.

Heather Skovlund computer illustration for use by 360 Magazine

CSR In The Digital Age: With 360 Magazine

By: Kai Yeo

“We’re all connected through culture. Basically, we all must learn to adapt. We learn more through traveling and seeing more. When you’re in a different environment, everybody must love and laugh and dance. I don’t need to know your language. But companies need to focus on connecting everyone through love, not war.” – Vaughn Lowery

Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) has been around for years, with its’ roots being found as early as the 18th Century. In my CSR research assignment before, I wrote that “the key idea of CSR is for companies to pursue pro-social objectives and promote volunteerism among employees (such as through donating to charity and participating in volunteer work), as well as by minimizing environmental externalities.” As an international student trying to find my career path in the United States, I find that company CSR is one of the first few things I look for when finding a suitable company to work with: how genuine they are and how much they care for their employees. The process of researching and writing my essay on CSR in the modern day and CSR within my internship site provided me with the valuable opportunity not only to learn about an important business topic, but also allowed me to develop a better understanding of what it is.

For my CSR Interview, I got the opportunity to speak on the phone with my supervisor Vaughn Lowery. His career started from “humble beginnings in Detroit to a full scholarship in Cornell University under the ILR program. From there, he became active in modeling, acting, and producing screenplays.” Now, Vaughn is the publisher and founder of leading fashion and lifestyle magazine, 360 Magazine, which is also my internship site. His job involves fostering relationships within the community and being an editorial director that curates and oversees content for all columns of the magazine. The position also entails making sure that Apple News, LinkedIn, Twitter, and all other news sites are updated. As a pop culture and design magazine, it is important to constantly be up to date with relevant content and breaking news. Being a quarterly publication, 360 is also working on their summer magazine issue. Vaughn mentions that with COVID making everything digital, the team has been working on expanding the business: creating a self-publishing division, developing e-commerce, getting sponsors, and most importantly, waiting for things to start opening back up.

With a background in studying business and company culture, Vaughn says that his education helped him design a company culture that made sense, “Transparency, cool kids, intelligence. I wanted a space for comfort regardless of race, age, and religion. Education was not the answer to my business but a part of the process to help with preparing for my magazine. The most important thing is life experiences, there are no books on it.” Vaughn emphasizes sending people in his company for events and communicating with clientele because “you can’t speak about things you don’t know.” COVID has made jobs in the media a little more mundane, but he’s excited about things opening back up and is hopeful for the future. Without in-person experiences, it is hard to understand the inner workings of media companies with everything being digitally produced.

Vaughn defines Corporate Social Responsibility at 360 Magazine as “having an environment that is inviting and inclusive, especially showcasing inclusivity.” As a magazine that promotes culture and lifestyle, it is important that everyone he works with is aware of what is going on in the world that we live in and what is happening with minority populations. He speaks about being the only African American in a lot of his school and work experiences, and he created 360 with the ideal of having more minorities and women working in his company: “We all live in the same world… and some people don’t know that. But we need representation and for people to see us. It’s not on us to educate them, but it’s on us to speak up.” 360 avidly speaks up for diversity (#metoo) and openly supports nonprofit organizations.

When asked about how veritable he thinks big companies are with CSR movements, he says that they’re doing it for a myriad of reasons. Companies get away with more stuff as a corporation, “But the responsibility is about being genuine. The board of directors and Zoom calls and the whole spiel. If they’re trying to just make money, revenue principals are not true to themselves. 360 was founded on real culture. The diversity is important. It is what it is.”

“Your company diversity is a reflection of the world, we’ve been doing this since the start of 360, we’ve been ahead of the trend.” The magazine has always featured drag queens, people who are transgender, and minorities, “This is very important when doing events and stuff, it’s a big family. We have less than 50 people. And it’s important for our clients to know that we have each other and rely on each other. That we know how to respect one another and appreciate each other, despite all odds.” Vaughn believes that diversity and inclusion of people of color has always been important, and he emphasizes that 360 will keep pushing these agendas and morals as long as he’s the head of the company. I see this in his effort to get everyone together (even if it is just on Zoom for now) to celebrate big articles, book releases, sponsorships, and so on.

As I type this interview essay, I find two key points to really reflect on: 1) assumptions about company morale and 2) why diversity is so important to me.

1) I think back on everyone else I’ve spoken to during my time as an intern here with 360, and I find that these core values that Vaughn spoke about with me are reflected in all the conversations I’ve had with him and other employees. Coming from a very structured, patriarchal Asian background, I came into this internship thinking that it would be like all my previous experiences (they talk of diversity, but it’s never really executed once you’re a part of it – school projects, internships, part-time jobs, and so on). However, no one in the company has been curt or condescending when speaking with me, and they truly mean it when they point out mistakes and gently correct me. Maybe it is because of the way I was brought up, or the environment I was most familiar in, but these good intentions had me on my toes for the first couple weeks I was here, and I’m honestly still getting used to it.

2) With the rise of Asian hate crimes in the past year, I find myself turning very reclusive and immediately trying to find fault with people when something brushes me the wrong way (though sometimes it really is a racist comment or remark). It’s been difficult having to correct people when they say my name wrong or trying to explain my culture when these simple things can so easily be looked up online. I’ve been very lucky growing up well-traveled and seeing different parts of the world, and I understand that not everyone has that privilege, but how far does “I don’t know” get you in the digital age? I need to work in a company where people are willing to learn and grow new perspectives, and I see this quality in Vaughn too as he speaks about his loneliness as the only African American in his industry when he was first starting out.

After 45 minutes of talking about diversity and the whole CSR conversation winding down, Vaughn tells me to keep doing what I love, “Understanding the industry through work experiences is how you’ll get in. It’s constantly changing.” He talks about learning to forecast and foreshadow and having connections at arms’ reach. By the end of our conversation, I felt that I learnt a lot and could have a clearer vision of what I wanted out of this internship. I’ve had the opportunities to go for company events (for brands including Lillet, Chinese Laundry, Rockstar Original, etc.), though I would really like to be able to go to a CSR event in the near future to promote these same values that I share with 360 Magazine.

To read more about Vaughn Lowery, please visit his Wikipedia and IMBD.

illustration by Mina Tocalini for use by 360 Magazine

DELTA VARIANT PUTS NORMAL BACK-TO-SCHOOL SEASON AT RISK

By: Clara Guthrie

There was a period in the late spring and early summer of this past year in which it seemed America’s COVID-19 struggles were nearing some long-awaited conclusion: the last few moments of breathlessness before a collective sigh of relief. At that time, students and their parents looked forward to a seemingly normal back-to-school season. Yet, the recent rise in the Delta variant has introduced a new wave of doubt.

On August 8 alone, The New York Times reported 36,068 new Covid-19 cases and a seven-day average of 110,360 total cases in the United States. Covid-related deaths are also on the rise, with a seven-day average of 516 deaths. This figure has risen from a weekly average of 188 deaths only one month prior, on July 6. Experts attribute these rising numbers to the highly contagious Delta variant overlaid with low vaccination rates in certain areas across the country. When asked about these trends in mid-July, Dr. Rochelle Walensky, Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), said, “This is becoming a pandemic of the unvaccinated. We are seeing outbreaks of cases in parts of the country that have low vaccination coverage because unvaccinated people are at risk.”

Unfortunately, as the Delta variant continues to run rampant throughout unvaccinated communities, people who are fully vaccinated are also being infected. Although, it is far rarer. These “break-through” cases speak mainly to the wild infectiousness of the Delta variant, coupled with the facts that no vaccine is 100% effective and that our knowledge of how long immunity lasts after vaccination is still quite murky. According to CNBC, however, “break-through” cases still represent fewer than 0.08% of those who have been fully vaccinated in the United States since the start of the year.

With that being said, the Delta variant is impacting the hopes of a normal back-to-school season in two distinct ways. The first, perhaps more obvious way, is that parents and teachers are fearing for students’ health. This fear suggests a potential return to online learning and more strict social distancing and mask mandates enforced within schools.

It is important to note that COVID-19 poses a far lesser threat to young children than to adults; the risk of becoming severely ill from the virus increases for those over the age of 50 and only grows with age. According to the CDC, the risk of serious illness or complications from COVID-19 for children is actually lower than that from the flu. However, children under the age of 12 are not yet eligible for any form of vaccination. This restriction is raising concerns about how susceptible younger age groups are to becoming sick, even if that sickness does not lead to any serious complications.

Thus, many parents and school districts are pursuing a range COVID-19 precautions to ensure the safety of students. Time Magazine shared a story last week of a school board in Des Moines, Iowa that has already decided to offer a virtual learning option for elementary school students. The ability to transition to in-person learning is available whenever the family feels comfortable enough to do so. This move was, in part, forced by the recent ruling of eight states, including Iowa, to ban schools from being able to require masks – despite the CDC’s recommendation that all students should wear masks inside schools, regardless of whether or not they are vaccinated. “Had we been able to follow the CDC recommendations that everyone in school is masked, regardless of their vaccine status—if we were able to mandate that, then I think we’d be having a different conversation here,” Phil Roeder, a spokesperson for Des Moines’ Polk County public schools, said.

Other counties are having similar struggles, even without the imposition from state governments to ban mask mandates within schools. For example, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio announced in May that all online learning would be eliminated come fall, a decision that he has not yet reversed. But many parents are now petitioning for online options for their children as safety concerns continue to rise. One parent, Farah Despeignes, who is the president of the Bronx Parent Leaders Advocacy Group and has two middle-school-aged sons, said, “When you think about the conditions of the schools with old buildings, with not enough ventilation, that are co-located, that are overcrowded—for us, in the Bronx, in underserved communities, it’s not as simple as, ‘Well, let’s just get back to school.’”

In California, options for students are equally limited. According to The Los Angeles Times, the state has done away with “hybrid learning, ”a combination of in-person and online learning. As a result of such, Los Angeles County parents had until August 6 to choose between either solely in-person or online learning for their children. The latter option is expected to take the form of an independent study, rather than the supportive online learning of last school year. On August 6th, L.A. Unified School District reported that only 10,280 of their almost 665,000 students opted for the online option.

The second prominent way in which the Delta variant is affecting back-to-school season is through the shopping behavior of students and their families. Back when the hopes of a normal school year were still high, The National Retail Federation predicted that consumers with children K-12 would spend a record-breaking 37.1 billion dollars this year. Furthermore, it was predicted that back-to-college spending would reach 71 billion dollars. These predictions were due to the excitement associated with a long-awaited return to the classroom after over a year away, when items like lunchboxes and backpacks seemed superfluous.

However, according to a recent poll by First Insight, many consumers are feeling anxious about returning to stores, trying on clothing in dressing rooms and making big purchases due to the risk of the Delta variant. In fact, 56% of respondents said they are actively cutting back their spending at retailers. The CEO of Bath Bed & Beyond, Mark Tritton, told CNBC that their stores have observed people delaying their back-to-school investments, and that peak spending may extend further into September than usual.

As many students return to their classrooms and the Food and Drug Administration continues to work on improving vaccines for individuals under the age of 12, it will become more and more clear how great of a mark Covid-19 has left on the American schooling system and the children within it.

MLWXBF chapter 4 illustration via Alison Christenson for use by 360 Magazine

Ivy League BLM Courses

By: Emily Bunn

Ivy League Schools to Begin Teaching “Black Lives Matter” Courses

Proving their commitment to diversity and understanding, several Ivy League colleges will begin offering courses on the Black Lives Matter Movement. Whereas other Ivy League schools, such as Cornell, have created Africana Departments that focus on the centrality of Africa and the African Diaspora to the modern world, BlackLivesMatter classes are situated in a specific cultural moment. Though, of course, the Black Lives Matter falls under the umbrella of contemporary African history, it is positioned in a more concentrated, modern application. Princeton and Dartmouth are the two first schools to begin accrediting this intersectional coursework. While Princeton most recently enacted their BLM coursework, Dartmouth has been pioneering this change since 2015.

Dartmouth’s Black Lives Matter course discusses topics such as The Ivory Tower, understanding St. Louis and its racial history, race and class, racial violence, and systemic and unconscious racism, among other topics. Part of Dartmouth’s course description reads, “though the academy can never lay claim to social movements, this course seeks in part to answer the call of students and young activists around the country to take the opportunity to raise questions about, offer studied reflection upon, and allocate dedicated institutional space to the failures of democracy, capitalism, and leadership and to make #BlackLivesMatter. Developed through a group effort, this course brings to bear collective thinking, teaching, research, and focus on questions around race, structural inequality, and violence.” The course is taught by a wide variety of professors from different academic disciplines and social backgrounds. Taught for ten weeks by close to 20 different professors, Dartmouth’s Black Lives Matter coursework stands as a comprehensive example of a cross-disciplinary concentration that recognizes and situates history in a contemporary, American context.

Princeton’s #BlackLivesMatter class looks to examine the “historical roots and growth of the Black Lives Matter social movement,” and is “committed to resisting, unveiling, and undoing histories of state sanctioned violence against Black and Brown bodies.” Princeton’s #BlackLivesMatter’s course description reads as such: “This seminar traces the historical roots and growth of the Black Lives Matter social movement in the United States and comparative global contexts. The movement and course are committed to resisting, unveiling, and undoing histories of state sanctioned violence against Black and Brown bodies. The course seeks to document the forms of dispossession that Black Americans face and offers a critical examination of the prison industrial complex, police brutality, urban poverty, and white supremacy in the US.” The course’ sample reading list includes selections from Angela Davis, Claudia Rankin, and Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor.

Princeton’s course will be taught by Professor Hanna Garth, who has previously taught “Race and Racisms,” “Postcolonial and Decolonial Theory,” and “Theories of Social Justice.” Garth’s self-defined interest in “the ways in which people struggle to overcome structural violence” and past experience has well-prepared her for teaching this class. Garth remarks, “All of my research, teaching, and mentoring is designed around my commitment to feminist methodologies and critical race theory.”

While some have aggressively asserted that Princeton’s course readings are from a former communist party leader who once made it on the FBI’s Most Wanted List, their negativity further highlights the necessity of this course. While these assertions may be true, it is telling that certain critics commonly overlook the individual’s many (more recent) accomplishments. The author in question is Angela Davis – a revered, respected, and well-educated civil rights activist, philosopher, academic, and author. By painting Davis as an unpatriotic, dangerous criminal, it distracts from the important lessons that are to be learned from this influential leader. Similarly, Fox News’ article on Princeton’s new course links their mention of the “Black Lives Matter” movement not to an explanation of what the movement is, but instead to a page on US protests. As opposed to creating an educational resource for what the BLM Movement is, conservative critics are quick to jump to claims of Black violence and riots.

Especially in 2021, as the United States grapples with the fight for racial and civil justice, discussions surround race, policing, prison reform, and politics are more pertinent than ever. It is absolutely essential that our nation’s college students are exposed to critical race theory and critical thinking. By shielding America’s youth from the necessary history of this country – which is still being experienced today – we are only putting them in a position of increased vulnerability and ignorance. Knowledge is power and educating oneself on society’s issues is the only way to efficient work towards progressive social change. Hopefully, as the most prestigious academic institutions begin to model examples of intersectional and anti-racist coursework, other colleges and universities will soon follow suit.

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College Student illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Independence University Closure and Investigation

By: Emily Bunn × Heather Reibsamen

In the wake of the weekend, Independence University is suddenly closing, causing panic and confusion for its student body and the federal government. Still, as of Wednesday morning, the University’s website hasn’t been updated to publicly broadcast the closing. Independence University’s website’s owner, The Center for Excellence in Higher Education, has not been updated either. The Center for Excellence in Higher Education owns three other colleges that are also in the process of closing. Now, the university looks to push its students to new colleges, raising suspicion about the reason for the closure.

Independence University is chiefly focusing on relocating its student body to Miami International University of Art & Design or Georgia’s South University. Students additionally have the option of stopping their schooling and requesting a return of their federal student loans. However, upon looking into the transfer plans, the Education Department said that Independence University’s “students are being pressured to transfer,” and that the arrangement is “unusual.” Students are worried about credit transfer, falling behind in classes, and the impact of relocation.

One Independence University student – who had been working to get her Bachelor of Science in the college’s Web Design and Development program, Dianne Eveler, expressed frustration about the scandal:

“The most I can say about these tragic findings is this.  Finding only a few days before you are expected to graduate was disheartening.  Also, the terrifying item was to see the hard work you put into place disappear in a moment with no warning, no idea this was happening.

For the most part, the College lacks empathy because many of the faculty were given very little notice or lost their job that day. We have no support in who to contact, or in my case, am I getting my degree.

The truth be told, I went into my Student Portal before I lost access and saw my credits of 180 go to zero, and a new graduation date appear. I’m so scared I lost my degree. I was working so hard to get a perfect 4.0 to have that work lost.  I have learned a valuable lesson, do more research in a college, and never ever do an online learning program again.”

Furthermore, this isn’t the first time that Independence University has been federally scrutinized. The Federal Student Aid chief operation officer, Richard Cordray, commented that the university chose to shut down to avoid the findings of the earlier examination. In 2020, the Center for Excellence in Higher Education has been discovered to be in connection to fraud by the Colorado Government. Independence University had then been placed on a monitoring list and had government restrictions placed on the college’s receival of taxpayer money. Due to the impending pressure on students to transfer, federal employees warranted that a more in-depth investigating is required regarding the university’s reason for shutting down.

The accreditor for Independence University reports that it’s approval of the college had ended in April, as the school failed to maintain acceptable graduation and employment rates among students. This end of accreditation also resulted in the loss of federal money to the University.

In a statement to USA Today, Cordray explained, “We have already emailed students to help them understand they do not have to be rushed into accepting a transfer to another school of CEHE’s choosing.” In spite of the college’s sudden closure, the Federal Student Aid chief operation officer cautions students to not make any hasty decisions. Under President Biden’s administration, the Education Department is “more willing to exercise its regulatory oversight” reports USA Today.

As uprooted students scrabble to find answers, they’ve had to resort to asking their fellow peers, college administration, and the U.S. Department of Education. Heather Reibsamen, who had been working to get her Bachelor of Science in the college’s Graphic Design program, explained how the tragic situation unfolded for her:

“The last week has been a whirlwind of emotions. Since the announcement that the school was closing, students have scrambled to figure out what their options were. We were sent a form with a few choices: transfer to a “teach-out” school or lose everything we have worked for, to put it bluntly. Initially, I thought everything would work out since I only had a few credits left until I graduate. However, I was met with disappointment and more unknowns. The “approved” teach-out school is Miami International University of Art & Design. I attended the meetings I was told to attend and was unfortunately met with the news that this school does not teach in my state. I was told I needed to find my own college to transfer to and would potentially have to pay out of pocket due to my student loans being tied up with Independence University. Many students were faced with this. Many students are not able to graduate on time because of this.

No one was prepared. No one was warned. We scrambled to get our last assignments in hoping they would count towards the credits we had been working on. There are students that were supposed to graduate last Sunday, however, they have been met with uncertainty. No one knows if the credits we have worked so hard to complete will transfer over. There are employees that have been employed through IU for years that were let go at just a moment’s notice.

I immediately began the search for a school that was accredited and not-for-profit. I reached out to Southern New Hampshire University to see what options I would have if I transferred to their school. I was greeted with understanding and encouragement. Many colleges are learning about the dilemma with Independence University and are seeing the wrongdoings towards the students and staff. SNHU has been every bit of encouraging and supportive during this transition. I consider myself one of the lucky ones so far. I found a school that is regionally accredited and is geared towards the success of the students. I am hopeful for a smooth transition.

Independence University has left the students and staff in complete confusion, and we are all struggling to make sense of it all. We have hope that everything will work out and fear of what still may come.”

Finally, on Wednesday, the college’s closure was announced to students via email. This delayed response highlights how a University can operate in complete disarray, with its students completely unaware of the behind-the-scenes scandal.

Mariah Pearson via Trice Browning for use by 360 Magazine

Interview with Mariah Pearson

By: Skyler Johnson

On July 5th, 2021, the Revlon Creme of Nature “Legacy to Leadership” scholarship inaugural winners were announced. The scholarship was meant to provide funding to students attending HBCUs, or historically black colleges and universities. I had the privilege of interviewing one of the students who received the scholarship: Mariah Pearson, who’s currently attending North Carolina A&T State University

How important is it for you to attend an HBCU?

It was personally extremely important for me because I feel as though a lot of times, in society, people of color, don’t exactly get the opportunities as other people would and I feel that at my HBCU and at other HBCUs across the country were given those opportunities. We’re given resources to better navigate, better operate in the real world… in corporate America and professional settings. It also provided me with a community of people who have similar backgrounds as me and similar interests as me. It’s awesome to go to one. 

What is your favorite thing about college thus far?

So far my favorite thing about college would probably be the environment, the way my school feels like a family, and how you can meet new people and it doesn’t feel awkward to introduce yourself. [Talking to a stranger at school] kind of feels like you’re talking to someone you’ve known forever. That’s probably my favorite part, just feeling like I’m at home when I’m not at home. 

Briefly, can you go over what you expect to gain out of college? 

Of course to get a degree. And learn how to operate in professional settings, but also just for personal development. I feel that going to college has opened a bunch of doors and there’s a bunch of opportunities for new experiences that you might not get if you don’t go to college. Knowing who I am and what I like, who I want to be, how I want to grow, the direction I want to grow in. I definitely feel that college helps you figure that out really quickly. 

What’re the most important lessons you’ve learned thus far?

There’s a couple. One of them is definitely: always be on your Ps and Qs, because somebody’s always watching, and you don’t know who’s watching or when, but… somebody’s always seeing you. That’s one of them. Another one is always try and surround yourself with people who you want to see yourself as. You can’t become a winner if you’re not in a group of winners. You can’t be a leader if you’re not in a group of leaders. So it’s important that you surround yourself with people who feed into you positively and of course hold you to a standard that you would hold yourself to. I think those are the main lessons that I’ve learned so far, and I’m sure there are plenty more to come. 

What made you want to get into health care?

So I’m going into physical therapy, and when I was first trying to figure out where I was going to go to school and what I was going to go for I… [didn’t] really know… But as an athlete, who had to experience going through physical therapy, I was like, “I kinda like sports, I kinda like helping people, so let’s find a way to mix the two.” And physical therapy is what came up… I later began to grow a love for it through learning how the healthcare system operates, and of course how it treats different people. Because I personally know that being a black woman I’m going to experience a different type of healthcare than anyone else would. Especially since I had family [members] who had gone through physical therapy and had different medical procedures done and they felt that they hadn’t been treated the way they should’ve been, or wanted, to be treated. [Which is why] one of my goals as a health care professional in the future would definitely be to make people feel more comfortable and cared for and appreciated as a patient.

Do you expect to change the world? 

Yes, I do. In some way, shape, or form I will [change the world], because another one of my goals as a physical therapist is to establish a [holistic] health care system. [I would not just] tap into the physical but also into the mental state, [asking] how [a patient’s] feeling, [if they were] eating, [if they were] exercising. I’m going to establish a facility where I take care of the whole person and not just say, “oh you’re sick, here’s some medicine.” Personally I’m not a big fan of medication which is why I chose physical therapy, because you’re essentially healing your own body by yourself. There’s no needles, there’s no medicine. It’s purely you moving your body and [exploring] how movement can essentially create a better lifestyle for you. 

How excited were you when you received the Revlon HBCU scholarship?

I cried, when I found out, I was so… thankful to Creme of Nature for this scholarship. It’s something that I definitely needed at the time. When I went through the process of figuring out what scholarship I was gonna apply for, and what bubble I fit in, with the scholarship world, they popped up and I [was] like, “this is perfect, this is awesome,” because I [could] make a video explaining who I [was] and what I [wanted] to do and what I [was] passionate about… It [was] purely me telling them about how I really feel about where I want to be in life, and my profession… so it was incredible. I cried. I called my mom. I called everybody.