Posts tagged with "education"

Travel graphic via Samantha Miduri for use by 360 Magazine

2023 ZEITZ MOCAA × UNIVERSITY OF THE WESTERN CAPE MUSEUM

The 2023 Zeitz MOCAA & University of the Western Cape (UWC) Museum Fellowship Programme call for applications officially opens on 15 June 2022.

This call marks the second iteration of the year-long programme, developed to educate a new generation of art and museum professionals from Africa. With the aim to foster the growth of curatorial practice and advance scholarship on contemporary art discourse from the continent, the programme offers fellows exposure to museum practice facilitated by Zeitz MOCAA senior staff and is underpinned by rigorous academic scholarship at UWC’s Department of History and Centre for Humanities Research (CHR). 

“We are pleased to once again be collaborating with the University of the Western Cape on this incredible initiative to educate the next generation of exhibition makers and curatorial thinkers. We remain committed to merging scholarship on contemporary art production and circulation from Africa and its diaspora and hope to contribute to a new group of skilled professionals looking to work within museums, galleries, art centres, private and public collection management, biennials, art publishing, festivals, universities and more,” says Koyo Kouoh, Executive Director and Chief Curator at Zeitz MOCAA

During the 12-month Museum Fellowship Programme, fellows will engage in discourse around contemporary art, curatorial practice, art education, conservation, heritage and museology from Africa and the African diaspora. They will study and work with both institutions towards an accredited BA Honours qualification. This includes enrolling in courses on historiography, curatorship, museums, heritage and public history at UWC’s Department of History as well as obtaining work experience at Zeitz MOCAA in the Curatorial, Collections & Exhibition Management, Art Education and Institutional Advancement departments. Successful fellows will actively contribute to the research, planning, execution and management of museum projects, ranging from exhibitions, publishing and public programming to art education and fundraising.

“It is fitting that applications for the 2023 Zeitz MOCAA & University of the Western Cape (UWC) Museum Fellowship Programme opens one day before South Africa’s Youth Day on 16 June and during Youth Month. Our aim is to continue promoting narratives that are important to the building of artistic and curatorial communities and this feeds directly into the South African government’s goals of developing plans for a more effective arts and culture curriculum and supporting income and funding models for arts and culture initiatives,” says Rory Bester, Associate Professor in the Department of History at UWC.

The Fellowship begins in January 2023 and is open to individuals who are citizens of an African country. It covers the costs of tuition, accommodation, basic health insurance and a monthly stipend. Travel to South Africa and visa costs are not included. 

Applications for the 2023 programme close on 15 July 2022 and successful applicants will be contacted directly by 5 September 2022. Only the first 150 applications received will be considered for review.

For more information and to apply, visit zeitzmocaa.museum

Zeitz MOCAA and the University of the Western Cape (UWC) celebrate diversity in all its forms, including gender, ethnicity and sexual orientation. 

The Zeitz MOCAA & University of the Western Cape (UWC) Museum Fellowship Programme is supported by Zeitz MOCAA, the University of the Western Cape, AKO Foundation and Africa No Filter.

Back to School Samantha Miduri via 360 Magazine by 360 Magazine

Chicago Architecture Center

The CAC’s annual festival connecting kids to architecture and engineering makes successful return to in person with theme ‘Access to Experts’

he Chicago Architecture Center’s annual Engineering Fest is back in person Saturday, May 28 between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. The award-winning Center in the heart of downtown will host over 600 Chicagoland kids ages 8-14 for a day of discovery, building and learning through unique hands-on activities. This year’s theme is Access to Experts, with a focus on the changing climate and the responsibility of engineers and architects in this conversation in partnership with the CAC’s largest exhibition in its history Energy Revolution. The two floors of the CAC will have exhibits where kids can meet engineers and explore how architecture and engineering partner to create the cities we know and love.

“Engineering Fest is one of the most exciting events of the year at the CAC since we’re able to connect kids in Chicagoland to experts in fields they’re interested in. We hope it inspires them to think big and decide this is something they will go into in the future,” says COO and Interim CEO Juanna Blackwell.

Industry professionals will be on hand to engage with children, answer their questions and inspire kids to think big. The goal is to introduce young attendees to the various facets of engineering, ultimately providing a bridge to the field that outlines career pathways kids might not have otherwise known about. The festival will have no shortage of entertaining and educational opportunities for kids. Continuing the program’s emphasis on creating greener cities, children will be able to build their own wind turbines using household materials while learning about the importance of carbon-neutral energy sources and many other exciting ways to engage.

“When families think of the Chicago Architecture Center, skyscrapers might come to mind before the profession of engineering. However, each year our education team creates a festival centered around innovation and advancements in the field to help illustrate the science behind the walls of our most recognizable structures,” says Angela Esposito, Director of Education and Experience at the CAC.

Find out more about Engineering Fest and register at architecture.org.

About the Chicago Architecture Center

The Chicago Architecture Center (CAC) is a nonprofit organization founded in 1966, dedicated to inspiring people to discover why design matters. A national leader in architecture and design education, the CAC offers tours, programs, exhibitions and more that are part of a dynamic journey of lifelong learning.

The CAC’s riverfront location opened in 2018 in the heart of the city, where Michigan Avenue meets the Chicago River. It features nearly 10,000 square feet of exhibition space with views of a century of iconic skyscrapers.

Through partnerships with schools and youth-serving organizations, the CAC reaches approximately 30,000 K-12 students annually, while teacher workshops provide educators with tools and resources they need to advance STEM curricula in their classrooms. Committed to serving under-represented communities in construction, engineering and design professions, the CAC offers many of its education programs—and all of its programs for teens—at no cost to participants. CAC programs for adults and members include talks with acclaimed authors and practicing architects, in-depth presentations on issues and trends in urbanism and classes unlocking subjects related to the built environment

Proceeds from programs, tours and the CAC Design Store, as well as from grants, sponsorships and donations, support the Center’s educational mission. Visit architecture.org to learn more and follow @chiarchitecture and #chiarchitecture on social media.

Why Professionalism Is Important in Every Age – from School to Work

Skill alone does not make you impactful at work, school, or life as a whole. You need qualities that will help you inspire and impress others and fulfill your role to the best of your ability. One such quality is professionalism. 

Professionalism definition is consistently achieving visible and invisible high standards regardless of the role or profession. In other words, it is how you accomplish a task and not just about the task you do. It is about your approach to a role and not how prestigious the position is. Professionalism means you hold yourself accountable to maintain a high standard in assigned tasks. 

In our world today, the way you work, complete assignments, carry yourself, and the attitude you communicate to others create an impression. Although many of us would want to think we are professionals, bridging the gap between our personal and professional values is not the easiest. In this article, we will discuss how to be a professional in every sphere in our life. 

How professionalism influences learning 

Imagine you come to class late and turn in an essay assignment on the last day of submission as a student. But somehow, you always end up with one of the best scores. Are you brilliant? Yes. Are you professional? No. 

Professionalism in school is not a checklist of things you want to achieve. Say, for example, get the highest grade. Instead, the concept is a way of living that cuts across your communication, appearance, manner, approaches, skills, approach, and willingness to improve. 

Professionalism requires that you identify the importance of your role and what you must do. This way, you can act in the most acceptable way. Imagine you need to turn in a 100 points paper sample to demonstrate your level of comprehension in the classroom. The best way to reach professionalism papers is to submit the assignment on time and ensure it does not contain any form of plagiarism, cheating, and academic dishonesty. 

The punishment for cheating or plagiarism varies in severity depending on the rules of the college. So, you should do your best to check your written work for grammatical errors, typos, and related mistakes. Then, you will package it in the best possible way and submit it to your lecturer. A student with this type of consciousness knows there is no room for late submission or a mediocre mentality. Here are ways you can mark yourself as a professional. 

● Display competence: match your abilities with the requirement of any role to produce exceptional results. 

● Update your knowledge: Strive for mastery in your field by always adding to what you know. Even if you won’t need it, the confidence from your knowledge will ultimately help you succeed. 

● Stay conscious: set high standards for yourself to show that you care about your education. Also, hold yourself accountable for your actions and words. 

● Show integrity: don’t compromise your value as a student when things get tough. Instead, show that you are true to your word so that everyone can see you as genuine. Honesty will align your belief and your behavior. 

● Respect everyone: professionalism is not trying to impress anyone. Distinguish yourself as a role model with good manners by taking the needs of others into account. 

 Why professionalism at work 

There are only a few things that employers value more than employees who display professionalism while they fulfill their duties. You will come off as reliable and credible. Professionalism is performed in a context. That means it requires you to identify what is vital and necessary for each role. 

In organizations, you will work with people with different levels of knowledge, personalities, and background. Also, there will be levels of hierarchy and status. Therefore, a professional must see himself and his role in the contexts of organization, department, and team. This means you must respect the organization’s hierarchy and structure. 

A professional obeys codes of conduct, policies, and ethics when at work. However, you must ask for clarifications, especially in places that contrast your personal values. More importantly, you must always pay attention to detail, commit to upholding agreed values and practices and show respect. Below are how to be a professional in every sphere in our life

Values 

Again, professionalism is about how you do the work and not about the work. So, you don’t do things because you are told to do. The best way to get results at an organizational level is to let your professional values mix with intrinsic motivations. They include: 

● Sincerity, patience, honesty, integrity 

● Equality, respect, trust, discretion, and justice. 

● Hard work, balance, dedication, commitment, and perseverance. 

Willingness 

You must be willing to perform a task at the highest standard. For effectiveness, you should be open to learning and developing in a particular role. After gaining mastery, you must present yourself as confident without being arrogant. A professional is open to constructive criticism so that he can learn from his mistakes. Not only your mistakes, but you should learn from others as well. 

Professionalism is the willingness to do a bit extra by taking creative initiative. You should also display a willingness to see from different perspectives to yours and accept feedback to improve. Ask for help and listen to the advice. Also, learn to work individually and as a team. 

Behavior 

As a professional, you must set boundaries through your conduct and behavior. This means keeping your personal problems out of your work life. Also, you must be able to calmly make decisions and deal with problems. Unlike others and how they are behaving, a professional must maintain professional standards. Stay flexible, versatile, and collaborate with others rather than compete to show yourself a worthy professional. 

Conclusion 

The importance of professionalism at every stage of our life embodies a commitment to continual development. Therefore, you must seek to improve your competence and knowledge to gain a deeper insight into how things work around you. An awareness and acceptance of your weaknesses and strengths will help you grow and evolve into any role. 

Fathers via 360 Magazine by 360 Magazine

Single Dad’s Survival Tips

Dads’ Resource Center helps single dads navigate Father’s Day

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, there are around 2 million single father’s in the country. Due to the way that the family court, county and social service systems operate fathers are often not allowed to spend as much time with their children as they would like following a separation or divorce. This includes Father’s Day.

“Father’s Day can be brutally painful for noncustodial fathers”, said Dads’ Resource Center Executive Director Jeffrey Steiner. “Many do not even get the opportunity to be with their children for Father’s Day. For those that do, it can be bittersweet as they are able to cherish some time with their sons and daughters, while also being reminded of all that they are missing out on and how unnecessary and hurtful the custody battle is to them and their children.”

It is not unusual for a noncustodial father to be unable to spend time with his children on Father’s Day. It can take a very long time to even have the opportunity to revise a standing custody order, and there can be provisions that counter act one another. An order that sets aside Father’s Day for the dad can be over ridden by a provision giving each parent a week of summer vacation if the mother schedules her vacation the week of Father’s Day. Courts are also reluctant to enforce violations of custody orders by mothers.

Some of the fathers who are involved with the Dads’ Resource Center were asked to provide tips for dealing with Father’s Day as noncustodial fathers struggling to be in the lives of their children. Here were some of their responses:

  • Make the most of the time you get. “Treat every day you are with your kids like it’s Father’s Day for you. For the kids make Father’s Day fun for them and it will be fun for you.
  • Be empathetic for your children. “Put yourself in your children’s position and try to be as understanding as possible. They are stuck in the middle and can’t show a lot of emotion. Don’t take offense if they don’t act happy because they are in survival mode.”
  • Make it about them. “I am happy in my house when they are happy. I just want to give them refuge from this storm. So, if they want to be on their phone talking with their friends, if they want to zone out and watch TV and that makes them happy, I am happy.”

For those fathers who are unable to spend Father’s Day with their children:

  • Don’t get stuck on what day it is. “You have to treat Father’s Day like any other day. Then create your own Father’s Day an evening during the week before or the weekend before or after.”
  • Be flexible and creative. “Stay connected in any way possible, even if it isn’t reciprocated.”
  • Open your heart to other children. “I try to find ways to hang out with other kids, like my nieces or nephews. Enjoying time with them makes me feel like a dad again.”

“Nothing is more devastating to a man than being denied access to his children and being completely powerless to do anything about it, “said Steiner. “But the children are the ones who suffer the most in these situations. They are unnecessarily denied the presence of their fathers and subjected to persistent tensions and uncertainty.”

Dads’ Resource Center was established by Dr. Joel N. Myers, a father of eight and the founder and CEO of AccuWeather. The mission is to help combat the issues associated with children growing up without their fathers in the home. At its heart, the center is a child advocacy organization that aims to ensure that each child has the appropriate involvement and contributions from both parents.

About Dads’ Resource Center

The Dads’ Resource Center is committed to providing education, resources, and advocacy for dads who are separated or divorced and are determined to uphold their sacred responsibility as fathers. The Dads’ Resource Center was founded by Dr. Joel N. Myers, the founder and CEO of AccuWeather. His own experience as a single father led him to start the group. To get more information, visit HERE.

Ballet Hispánico School of Dance photo of teacher teaching child students ballet via Michelle Tabnik PR for use by 360 Magazine

Ballet Hispánico Summer Program

Ballet Hispánico School of Dance announces that registration is now open for a week-long summer professional development program for dance teachers, July 11-15, 2022. The program is $525 for in-person attendees and $435 for virtual attendees, with discounts available for School of Dance partner organizations, including NDEO and NASD members. The registration deadline is Friday, June 10, 2022. For more information and to register, visit HERE.

The Ballet Hispánico professional development program is an opportunity for dance teachers to immerse themselves amongst fellow educators, share teaching practices, and further their teaching artistry. With daily class and student observation, theory is seen in practice and discussed. All educators are welcome, from seasoned faculty to new teachers, community dance practitioners, dance education undergraduates/graduates, dance studio owners, and K-12 teachers.

Course Highlights:

  • Observe in-person and/or virtual class offerings at Ballet Hispánico headquarters, led by seasoned School of Dance faculty addressing varied age groups and dance genres.
  • Discuss and reflect on class observations and presentations with an emphasis on application for each teacher’s individual practice.
  • Examine Early Childhood curricular bridging points and other developmental benchmarks for instruction.
  • Engage with Ballet Hispánico pedagogy and curricular design through the lens of culture and repertory.
  • Interact with tools for social-emotional learning and addressing the diverse student-learner.
  • Challenge narratives of collective dance histories and dance archives
  • Identify cultura and other teaching identities, and their implications for pedagogical practices.
  • Receive a Certificate of Completion.

2022 Guest Faculty and Sessions:

Yebel Gallegos – Visiting Assistant Professor of Dance at Bard College, multi-faceted dance artist from El Paso, Texas, played an important role in the founding of Cressida Danza Contemporanea also helped in the creation and implementation of the Festival Yucatan Escenica, an international contemporary dance festival, former dancer, company teacher, rehearsal director, and academic coordinator for the Conservatorio de Danza de Yucate, recently concluded a six-year tenure working full time with the Ririe-Woodbury Dance Company, BFA in dance, both from the University of Texas at Austin and from the Escuela Profesional de Danza de Mazatlen, directed by Delfos Dance Company, MFA from the University of Washington in Seattle.

Elisa de la Rosa – daughter of migrant farmworkers, and granddaughter to Mexican immigrant grandparents; a first generation college graduate is originally from a small border town in Texas, Assistant Professor of Dance at Texas Woman’s University (TWU), choreographer, performer, dance educator, and the founding artistic director of De La Rosa Dance Company, Artistic Director of the TWU Dance International Dance Company, was a dance educator for 14 years in middle and high school Texas dance programs, has designed professional development for dance educators in various school districts and presented to Aldine, Denton, Edinburg, and La Joya Independent School Districts, integrated the Dance and Digital Media Communications Curriculum into her instruction and was awarded a $3,500 grant for technology by The Texas Cultural Trust, BA in Dance with Secondary Teacher Certification from Texas Woman’s University, and an MFA in Dance from Montclair State University.

Gregory Youdan – has performed with the NY Baroque Dance Company, Sokolow Theatre/Dance and Heidi Latsky Dance, where he now serves as a board member, Currently, visiting research scholar at Brown University and adjunct lecturer at Lehman College, Westheimer Fellow through Mark Morris Dance Group’s Dance for PD program and is a teaching artist in their Dance for PD en Espanola, a 2021 National Association for Latino Arts and Cultures Advocacy Fellow and 2021 Latin Impact Honoree, serves on the development committee for the International Association for Dance Medicine and Science (IADMS), the research committee for the National Organization for Arts in Health (NOAH), and the advisory council for Dance Data Project, a member of the Latinx Dance Educators Alliance.

Dr. Afdaniels Mabingo – a Ugandan dance researcher, scholar, performer, educator, Afro-optimist and co-founder of AFRIKA SPEAKS, holds Ph.D. in Dance Studies from the University of Auckland, recipient of the prestigious Fulbright scholarship, Mabingo also holds an MA in Dance Education from New York University, and an MA in Performing Arts and a BA in Dance degree, both from Makerere University in Uganda, has taught at Makerere University in Uganda, New York University, the University of Auckland in New Zealand, and Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts in Jamaica, has also guest lectured at Columbia University and Princeton University, his research sits at the intersection of decolonization, interculturalism, postcolonialism, dance pedagogy and African philosophy, latest book titled Ubuntu as Dance Pedagogy: Individuality, Community, and Inclusion in Teaching and Learning of Indigenous Dances in Uganda, received scholarships and awards that included: Fulbright Junior Staff Development Scholarship, Fulbright Scholar in Residence (deferred), the University of Auckland Doctoral Scholarship, Makerere University Staff Development Scholarship, George Payne award for outstanding academic leadership and excellence at NYU, and the best overall Humanities student award at the 48thst-49th graduation at Makerere University, has taught dance schools and community settings in the U.S., Australia, South Sudan, Germany, Uganda, and New Zealand, has presented keynotes, delivered paper presentation, and facilitated dance workshops for conference gatherings such as daCi-WDA, NDEO, CORD, WAAE, and WDA,&#a0;has also staged choreographies and performed in New York City, Adelaide in Australia, Rwanda, Auckland in New Zealand, and Uganda;

Testimonials

  • “This is my first Professional Development experience, and I have been blown away!” – Margaret
  • “This week has been a work for the mind.” – Lynette
  • “I can now provide my students with tools that I didn’t have in my own dancing.” – Dandara

About Ballet Hispánico

Ballet Hispánico has been the leading voice intersecting artistic excellence and advocacy and is now the largest Latinx cultural organization in the United States and one of America’s Cultural Treasures. Ballet Hispánico brings communities together to celebrate and explore Latino cultures through innovative dance productions, transformative dance training, and enduring community engagement experiences.

National Medal of Arts recipient Tina Ramirez founded Ballet Hispánico in 1970, at the height of the post-war civil rights movements. From its inception Ballet Hispánico focused on providing a haven for Black and Brown Latinx youth and families seeking artistic place and cultural sanctuary. By providing the space for Latinx dance and dancers to flourish, Ballet Hispánico uplifted marginalized emerging and working artists, which combined with the training, authenticity of voice, and power of representation, fueled the organization’s roots and trajectory. In 2009, Ballet Hispánico welcomed Eduardo Vilaro as its Artistic Director, ushering in a new era by inserting fresh energy to the company’s founding values and leading Ballet Hispánico into an artistically vibrant future. Today, Ballet Hispánico’s New York City headquarters house a School of Dance and state-of-the-art dance studios for its programs and the arts community. From its grassroots origins as a dance school and community-based performing arts troupe, for fifty years Ballet Hispánico has stood as a catalyst for social change.

Ballet Hispánico provides the physical home and cultural heart for Latinx dance in the United States. Ballet Hispánico has developed a robust public presence across its three main programs: its Company, School of Dance, and Community Arts Partnerships.

Through its exemplary artistry, distinguished training program, and deep-rooted community engagement efforts Ballet Hispánico champions and amplifies underrepresented voices in the field. For fifty years Ballet Hispánico has provided a place of honor for the omitted, overlooked, and oppressed. As it looks to the next fifty years and beyond, Ballet Hispánico seeks to empower, and give agency to, the Latinx experience and those individuals within it.

College Student via 360 Magazine

Law School at LLS

Thinking about transitioning from journalism to law? Consider the JD Evening Program at Loyola Law School. The No. 1 evening program in the West, it will be rebooted in fall 2022 to a hybrid schedule requiring a regular on-campus commitment of just one night a week (Mondays).

Loyola Law School has long been a place where reporters from an array of news outlets, including the Associated Press and CNN, have transitioned from newsroom to courtroom. That is no surprise, given its location in downtown Los Angeles, support of journalists in the form of programs like the annual Journalist Law School, and faculty members who hail from the newsroom (including Sam Pillsbury, who went from newspaper reporter to federal prosecutor before becoming a professor).

The reinvented program leverages the law school’s 100+ year history as a leader in the part-time JD field with remote instruction cultivated through the pre-pandemic launch of its innovative online graduate tax program. Learn more about Loyola and how the new format of its legendary JD Evening program puts a law degree within reach for those with even the busiest of schedules. Download your copy of the digital brochure.

In the brochure, you will find helpful information about the rebooted JD Evening program. Start planning your application to LLS and learn more about unique learning and networking opportunities.

Also, feel free to reach out to their team directly. Admissions representatives are delighted to share their personal experiences consulting with prospective students on how to build a successful application and plan for law school. Make an appointment to speak with an Admissions counselor or visit during chat hours.

Mina Tocalini illustration for mental health article inside 360 magazine

College Mental Health Webinar

College students are facing a serious mental health crisis, driven in part by the pandemic.  After nearly two years of remote schooling, restricted gatherings, and constant Covid testing, many students are anxious, socially isolated, depressed—and are overwhelming campus mental health centers.

According to a nationwide survey of college students conducted by the Healthy Minds Network and the American College Health Association, the pandemic has intensified a decade-long trend of increased rates of depression, anxiety, substance misuse, and serious thoughts of suicide.  

An expert panel of psychologists will examine what is causing this crisis, what is being done, and tips on how to identify the symptoms of depression and anxiety and how students and their families can find the support they need to build resiliency to lead a mentally healthy college experience. The webinar is free and open to the public.  

The Moderator

M. Dolores Cimini, PhD: Director, Center for Behavioral Health Promotion and Applied Research, University at Albany-SUNY, and Director of the nationally recognized Middle Earth Peer Assistance Program, Dr. Cimini has led comprehensive efforts in research-to-practice translation at the University at Albany for the past 30 years with over $910 million in support from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), U.S. Department of Education, U.S. Department of Justice, and New York State Office of Addiction Services and Supports. The screening and brief intervention program developed by Dr. Cimini (the STEPS Comprehensive Alcohol Screening and Brief Intervention Program) has earned 13 national awards for best practices and innovation in behavioral health care. Dr. Cimini has co-edited two books, including a volume focused on college student health and well-being entitled Promoting Behavioral Health and Reducing Risk Among College Students: A Comprehensive Approach (2018)

The Panel

Amie Haas, PhD: Dr. Haas is a professor at Palo Alto University in the Department of Psychology with a specialization in college student substance abuse issues. Her research focuses on the identification of high-risk drinking and drug use practices in college students and the development of targeted interventions using a harm reduction model. She worked in collaboration with Santa Clara University for several years developing new programs for alcohol prevention and education and has consulted with other universities to guide campus prevention programming. Her work focuses on behaviors like pregaming (i.e., drinking before students go out to consume alcohol at a function), co-occurring cannabis and alcohol use, overdoses, and factors related to alcohol-induced blackout and sexual risk-taking. In her career, she has received funding through NIDA and the U.S. Department of Education.    

Donna Sheperis, PhD, LPC, NCC, ACS, CCMHC: A board Certified Tele-Mental Health Provider, she is a professor and associate chair of PAU’s Department of Counseling In addition, Dr. Sheperis is Director of the PAU eClinic which partners with college success agencies to provide mental health support to their students. Sheperis has 30 years of experience in clinical mental health counseling settings. Her work focuses on tele-mental health, internet interventions, technology & mental health, and adult mental health. She is past president of the Association for Assessment and Research in Counseling and on the Ethics Appeals Committee for the American Counseling Association.

Predair Robinson, PhD: Director of Academic Satellites, UC Davis Student Health and Counseling Services, Dr. Robinson is a clinical psychologist who directs the counseling and outreach services for eight academic satellites for UC Davis community students; this includes the four undergraduate dean’s offices, Veterinary Medicine, School of Medicine, School of Nursing, and Graduate Studies. In addition to managing programming, development, and personnel, he supervises and trains counseling staff, doctoral interns, and postdoctoral residents and provides short-term therapy and crisis intervention services for students. Prior to joining UC Davis, he served as Interim Director of the Sexual and Gender Identities Clinic (SGIC), a specialty training clinic affiliated with Palo Alto University. In this role, he provided clinical supervision to second-year doctoral trainees who treated LGBTQ+ folks in the Bay Area.  

About Palo Alto University (PAU)

PAU is a private, non-profit university located in the heart of Northern California’s Silicon Valley It’s dedicated to addressing pressing and emerging issues in the fields of psychology and counseling that meet the needs of today’s diverse society. PAU offers undergraduate and graduate programs that are led by faculty who make significant contributions in their field. Online, hybrid, and residential program options are available. PAU is accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC).  PAU’s doctoral programs are accredited by the American Psychological Association (APA) and its master’s in counseling programs by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling & Related Educational Programs (CACREP). 

Health clipboard graphic via Rita Azar for use by 360 MAGAZINE

Special Olympics NY × ACA/NY

Special Olympics New York and Advance Care Alliance of New York (ACA/NY) come together to guarantee proper retrieval of healthcare services for those with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The groups come together to declare their objective of diminishing health inequalities for these groups of people by generating new opportunities.

Stacey Hengsterman, President and CEO of Special Olympics New York spoke on the partnership, stating, “This is one of our most exciting health collaborations yet. Through extensive cross-promotion, support, and more, we plan to improve our already outstanding health care for individuals with disabilities in New York.”

New efforts have begun commencement, while members from ACA/NY assisted at the Special Olympics New York’s floor hockey tournament, the Winter Classic. The tournament took place at the Jacob K. Javits Center in Manhattan which cultivated an energetic event for all those involved.

Jaime Madden, Chief Administrative Officer of ACA/NY recalls attending the Winter Classic, declaring, “It was a tremendous opportunity for ACA/NY to be a part of Special Olympics New York’s Winter Classic. What a sight it was to watch the extraordinary examples of teamwork and athleticism displayed by the athletes and coaches.”

While the joint partnership continues, Special Olympics NY promises to publicize crucial health info through ACA/NY’s Family Forum program, urging education of individuals throughout the region. ACA/NY has announced their commitment to many Downstate Special Olympics NY events during the course of the course of 2022. Moreover, ACA/NY has announced they will supply volunteers for Special Olympic NY’s Healthy Athletes projects, which aim to provide free health screenings and education.

“As we continue to grow our relationship with one another, ACA/NY looks forward to many more events of inclusion with Special Olympics New York,” says Madden. The groups co-hosted a Family Forum conference to discuss Special Olympics NY curriculum opportunities to ACA/NY families.

Black Music Month via Alex Bogdan for use by 360 Magazine

THE BLACKHOUSE FOUNDATION 15th YEAR CELEBRATION

THE BLACKHOUSE FOUNDATION WRAPS 2022 FESTIVAL PROGRAMMING WITH A CELEBRATION OF 15 YEARS AT THE SUNDANCE FILM FESTIVAL

Reaffirms Commitment to Education by Introducing The International Screenwriter’s Lab

With festivities underway, The Blackhouse Foundation has curated dynamic conversations in celebration of the culture’s premiere thought leaders, with a lineup including Regina Hall, Tina Knowles-Lawson, Richard Lawson, Ahmir “Questlove” Thompson, industry executives across film, television, visual media and more!

The Blackhouse Foundation’s programming slate will culminate with a celebratory look back at the foundation’s 15 year history at The Sundance Film Festival, its evolution, and a look towards the future of Blackhouse. Executive Director Jenean Glover will moderate this discussion with Blackhouse Chairman and Co-Founder Brickson Diamond, Co-Founder and Board Member Carol Ann Shine, and Board Members Pauline Fischer, Datari Turner, and Dolly Turner. Register now via Crowdcast to attend! 

As The Blackhouse Foundation steps into its 15th year, Blackhouse reaffirms its commitment to education and to creating opportunities for Black filmmakers domestically and internationally. The Blackhouse Foundation, in partnership with Pauline Fischer’s PMF Media Group and VentureLift Africa, recently introduced the International Scriptwriter’s Lab, a creative accelerator and fellowship program whose core mission is to support global, emerging storytellers of compelling film and television projects and help position the participants on a path to project launch. Focusing on Kenyan participants this year – the five Fellows of the inaugural cohort consist of screenwriters Damaris Irungu, Voline Ogutu, Carolyne Kemunto, Wanjiru Kairu and Grace Irungu – the goal is to create a bridge between African and Hollywood-based storytellers, especially African-American storytellers, and help position all participants for success through increased preparedness and connection and to create and nurture a pipeline of talented creative voices across the region.

Today’s Programming Schedule at The Blackhouse!

Building Inclusive Content at Lionsgate

Date: Sunday, 1/23

Time: 1pm – 2pm MT

The Blackhouse Foundation is proud to present a fireside chat with Lionsgate on the future of inclusive content. Join their President of Motion Picture Group, Nathan Kahane, and Head of Inclusive Content, Kamala Avila-Salmon, for an intimate conversation with Blackhouse CEO, Brickson Diamond, on how this leading film studio is building an intentional and integrated roadmap for a more diverse and inclusive film slate for years to come.

Onyx Collective Presents: Summer of Soul, A Necessary Story

Date: Sunday, 1/23

Time: 2:30pm – 3:30pm MT

Join Summer of Soul Director Ahmir “Questlove” Thompson and Onyx Collective’s President Tara Duncan for an intimate conversation about Black erasure and getting history right. Moderated by The Atlantic’s Hannah Giorgis, they will reflect on the importance of building transformative narratives and curating these untold stories that have the power to change the world.

Celebrating 15 Years of the Blackhouse at Sundance

Date: Sunday, 1/23

Time: 4pm – 5pm MT

The Blackhouse Foundation remains a linchpin for culture on a global scale through engagements at Sundance and beyond. But how did we get here? Join the foundation’s leadership as they recap their illustrious 15-year evolution.

For 2022, The Blackhouse Foundation proudly welcomes Meta back as Presenting Sponsor. Onyx Collective joins The Blackhouse Foundation as Select Sponsor, while Lionsgate and Participant contribute as Supporting Sponsors and ICM Partners joins as Sponsor.

The Blackhouse Foundation continues to champion and support leading black writers, directors, producers, crew, and talent throughout film, television, digital media, and beyond with an unshakable platform.

ABOUT THE BLACKHOUSE FOUNDATION:

The Blackhouse Foundation works to expand opportunities for Black content creators by providing pathways to opportunities within film, television, digital, and emerging platforms. Blackhouse provides opportunities for minority creatives to learn about the financial production, marketing, and distribution resources that will raise the profile of their content, while also providing participants with a nucleus for continuing support, community, and education.

Lady London headshot press photo via Steph Paul for use by 360 MAGAZINE

Lady London – Lady Like: The Boss Tape

Trinidadian/ Jamaican American artist Lady London released her “Lady Like: The Boss Tape;” a series of her most acclaimed freestyles since she surfaced in the rap scene in 2018.

The New Jersey/ New York artist possesses a wide range of talents, from being a rapper, songwriter, poet, published author and educated woman, there’s not much that she cannot do. Her music reflects her drive, and “Lady Like: The Boss Tape” highlights all the best parts of her music.

This compilation of freestyles showcases London’s talent of freestyling, which gained her praise on social media. In her tracks, London remixes some iconic Hip Hop tracks and gives them her own flare. Featured tracks include “Lisa Story” ft. Dub Aura that samples “Get Me Home” by Foxy Brown and “Long Live Shamello” that remixes Busta Rhymes’ “Put Your Hands Where My Eyes Could See.” Check out the full tracklist below.

The popularity of London’s freestyles has gained widespread attention, earning herself co-signs from Cardi B, Nas, Timbaland and so many more. Sitting at 618k followers on Instagram, London has established a loyal fanbase that has supported her music through the years. Lady London continues to elevate the rap scene, and last year she released two standout singles; “Money Over” and “Never,” which is her most personal record to date.

Lady London is one artist that you will want to keep on your radar as we dive into 2022.

About Lady London

New Jersey-born and Los-Angeles based rapper Lady London is known for her rhythmic lyricism. While her mother was Jamaican and Father Trinidadian, her childhood was divided between East Orange, New Jersey and the Bronx, New York. Hip hop culture has been an integral part of her life, as her uncle was Chino XL, and she grew up inspired by artists like JAY-Z, Lil Kim and Whitney Houston. In college, London was on a pre-med path, but still expressed her love for the arts while putting on successful poetry shows. In 2018, she posted one of her poetry videos online, and the video went viral with 8-million plus views. After London obtained her Master of Science from Keck School of Medicine at USC, she also was accepted into the school’s medical program.

Ultimately, London put her dream of medical school in the past to chase her dream of music. She talks about the decision, stating, “everything changed, I figured I could always go back to school. Convincing my West Indian family was very interesting. They didn’t understand why I was willing to give up everything I had been working towards. I knew I had to do music, though. You can’t run from destiny.”

Moreover, London’s career has taken off since 2018. This artist has generated millions of views online with her own original music. Her single released in 2021, “Money Over,” accumulated 500,000-plus views on YouTube as the one and only Cardi B described London as “the most slept on” to social media. London serves as a SAVAGE ambassador for Rihanna’s FENTY. Giving a performance in support of Black Lives Matter at the BET Awards, London caught the attention of many, eventually becoming co-signed by Diddy and Revolt TV.

“There are multiple levels to me,” Lady London clarifies. “I’m not one-dimensional. I really take my craft seriously. I consider rap to be an artform—not a trend. I’ve studied cadences, timing, breath control, double and triple entendres, and syllables. It almost breaks down to an exact science. I pay attention to verbiage, semantics, and diction. I’m a connoisseur of rhythmical composition in its purest form. I’m just a boss.”

Lady London continues to prove herself in the rap world as a force to be reckoned with.

Lady Like: The Boss Tape Tracklist

  1. Viral
  2. Long Live Shamello
  3. Yikes
  4. Lemon Pepper, Wet
  5. Lady What, Lady Who?
  6. All I See
  7. Black Love
  8. Buss It/Ski
  9. Welcome To The Party
  10. You’re Still Mine ft. Makaela
  11. Reciprocity
  12. Girl Like Me
  13. Lisa’s Story ft. Dub Aura