Posts tagged with "education"

QuantumERA × Battle of Gettysburg

Free and Early Release of Mixed-Reality App that Recreates Battle of Gettysburg

Gettysburg: A Nation Divided has pushed its launch date and waived download fees to assist teachers, parents, and students

Parents and teachers are in search of educational solutions as millions of students are now learning from home.  To help and expand their choices, a new mixed-reality app that recreates the Battle of Gettysburg is launching early.  Normally priced at $12.99, the app will be free of charge for a limited time.

QuantumERA‘s Gettysburg: A Nation Divided, is a mobile experience that envelopes students in the battle as it unfolds around them. Narrated by actor Scott Eastwood, the app’s immersive scenes transport users to 1863 with 360-degree views and avatars of men and women who were involved in the battle. Included is an artifact scavenger hunt with the ability to earn points. The student’s involvement and interactivity provide a better understanding of what happened during the turning point of the Civil War.

“Working from home while schooling our two children has been overwhelming,” said mother of two, Laura Aplin. The Gettysburg app ”has been an educational retreat for our kids. Not only are they learning about one of the most important battles in American history, but they are also able to travel through time and outside of our home. They’re not just watching something, they’re part of the experience. The added blessing is that it allows me to dedicate more time to work knowing that the kids are engaged in something productive.”

Gettysburg: A Nation Divided unites historical scholarship and mixed-reality platforms to transform students from being in the audience to becoming part of the experience. This is a critical point of engagement in a world of video games and social media, where audiences are craving highly visual and interactive experiences.

“The world we live in has changed so dramatically in a matter of weeks,” said Lane Traylor, CEO of QuantumERA. “The QuantumERA team wanted to help by waiving fees to help children learn and also escape for a while. We also want to support the millions of teachers and parents who are undertaking multiple roles, easing some of the stress that comes with navigating their new norms.”

QuantumERA is a leading content creation company that creates mixed reality experiences.  They are most well-known for their award-winning Experience Real History™ brand that recreates the Battle of the Alamo through augmented reality apps and products.

Teachers and students can find free resources for hours of engagement and fun at PerspectivesXR.org, QuantumERA’s education partner.

Free downloads of Gettysburg: A Nation Divided are available in The Apple App Store for a limited time. The BETA version of this app, optimized for Apple iPads,  is now available. Mobile optimization for other Android devices coming soon.

WEBSITE / INSTAGRAM / TWITTER

Roybi Robot, 360 MAGAZINE, ai, tech, kids, children, youth, school

ROYBI ROBOT – AI-powered EdTech

A growing number of states say their schools will stay closed for the rest of the 2019-20 academic year to stem the Coronavirus outbreak. At Roybi Robot, a leader in AI-powered EdTech and personalized education, they know first hand the importance of AI in connection with remote education and learning.

At ROYBI, they’re already noticing a big shift towards remote learning due to the recent circumstances and headlines. And throughout this all, one thing seems inevitable: school settings, as they stand today, will change. Online and remote learning will be systems that educational institutions will adopt for future emergencies. They envision a future where the new culture of learning begins at home through devices with sophisticated AI technology such as Roybi Robot. Artificial Intelligence allows educators to follow the child’s progress in a smarter way and provides a personalized approach to each child individually. Additionally, it provides a closer collaboration between parents and educators, because it can connect in a joint force to education.

With many uncertainties around the school closures, many educators have already started approaching distance and remote learning in the long term, but lack of personalized attention and progress tracking has been a major challenge for them. The role of artificial intelligence becomes even more significant for a modern world as it can monitor each child individually and provide feedback to educators more accurately than traditional approaches.

At Roybi, they are NOT saying to eliminate school and the classroom. They are saying that to save time and cost, we can be educating children more at home (by the educators) and use AI to personalize the educational experience for each child. They envision a future where they can connect learners, parents, educators, and even their Roybi Robots together while creating an engaging and interactive learning experience.

Vaughn Lowery, 360 MAGAZINE, smile, dentistry

Top 10 college mistakes to avoid

Though the first year of college does not require you to take complex subjects and write a dissertation, you may find it surprisingly difficult as compared to your last high school year. In most colleges, the freshmen curriculum has plenty of subjects, and teachers’ expectations seem to exceed students’ abilities. However, your academic performance can be better than you think. To realize how much you can achieve as a freshman, try to avoid these common mistakes most people make when entering college or university. 

Skipping classes repeatedly

This is a major temptation for all students living on campus. When there is no one out there to control you, it is easy to skip all morning classes and attend just the ones you like. At first, some teachers may seem quite tolerant of student absences. However, you may regret skipping classes when it comes to tests or exams. Of course, it may be wise to skip a class occasionally after having a big party or spending a long night studying. Just make sure it does not happen often. 

Ignoring time management

When there are many things to do, you need to utilize at least some time-management techniques. Even though the first year is merely an introduction to college life, the pressure in academic subjects is crushing. Now, you have to decide what tasks are a top priority and how much time you can devote to each of them. 

Avoiding communication with teachers

All the teachers at college are new to a freshmen. Most of them devote some time to students who are willing to ask questions. Sometimes, it is the only way to make teacher’s instructions clear. So, take an opportunity to communicate with your teacher. It may help you write better papers and escape conflicts in your college life. 

Wasting money

If this is the first time you have lived on your own, you may go off budget. Now you have to pay for housing, cover your educational needs, and still have money for eating nutritiously. So, you need to make your monthly budget and decide how much you can spend on what. Keep your expenses under control, and you will save more time and energy for what is most important to you. 

Living off campus

There is nothing wrong with living at your parents’ place if your college is situated in your hometown. However, if you need to take a long daily commute, it would be better to move to campus. This way you will save precious time for studying, fun activities, and essential rest. Wasting a few hours on commute every day can kill your ambitious plans and deprive you of energy. 

Oversharing student life on social media

Many freshmen find their new experiences exciting. Still, be careful about what you put on social media. Always think about how your teachers or your future employers would react to your Facebook or Instagram profile. Despite privacy policies, what’s posted on the web can become more public than you may want. 

Depriving yourself of sleep

It happens to all students and everyone else. Nevertheless, studying all night long can kill your performance in a long-term prospect. Do not forget to take care of your health. Try to get as much sleep as you need. Remember that your daily productivity as well as your ability to enjoy life depends on how well-rested you are.

Not asking for help

No doubt, a freshman’s life is more difficult than people expect. Still, many students decide to cope with all their assignments alone. While it is good to be ambitious, it would be even better to learn to delegate your tasks. Ask RapidEssay to complete English 101 essays for you. Decide with your roommates who does what in the dorm. Asking for help is an essential skill that will help you immensely to get through your adult life.

Taking on too much

Besides home assignments and daily chores, your college life is full of fun activities. In participating too much, you can easily exhaust yourself and overlook some important tasks. At first, you can find yourself capable of doing many of the things that you like, but over time, you will see that you are ignoring your less than favorite, but still very important, tasks on a daily basis. 

Staying secluded more than necessary 

Clearly, not all people enjoy new challenges, social events, and stepping out of their comfort zone. If you are one of them, you may find yourself constantly hiding at home, doing the bare minimum of tasks you are expected to complete. In such a case, you are probably missing useful opportunities and potentially interesting activities. Try to take part in some campus events every now and then. As you stop fearing over-exhaustion, you will see many things that may interest you around school. Try one or two of them as they can be an enriching experience.

These are 10 common mistakes that either diminish our productivity or add more trouble to our lives as freshmen. By refraining from these compulsions, you may find it easier to perform well and actually enjoy your college life. 

Elizabeth Warren, presidential candidate, essence magazine, essence.com, 360 MAGAZINE

SEN. ELIZABETH WARREN: ESSENCE.COM OP-ED

Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) pens an exclusive op-ed for ESSENCE.com entitled, Closing the School-to-Prison Pipeline for Good. In this piece, she talks about the threat that young students of color face every day, rethinking the approach to public education and public safety and more. She states:

“In the 1990’s, hundreds of police officers were deployed to public schools across the country as a component of the war on drugs and later in response to school shootings. Today, at least fourteen million students attend schools staffed with a police officer — but without a single counselor, social worker, psychologist, or nurse.

The result is that in many cases, an infraction as simple as back talking or skipping class that should end in detention or administrative intervention can end in arrest. Over the years, the implementation of policies from Zero-Tolerance to surveillance to criminalizing lateness and absenteeism have created a system of loopholes that trap our most vulnerable students in a pipeline kept alive by the for-profit prison system. It’s a system that disproportionately hurts black and brown students and undermines their learning…As President, I will work to close the school to prison pipeline, by rethinking our approach to public education and public safety…”

In addition, she reflects on her recently revealed plan to invest $800 billion in public schools and how she would invest “an additional $100 billion in ‘Excellence Grants’—that’s equivalent to $1 million for every public school in the country—to invest in things like after school arts programs and school-based student mentoring programs…” This would be in an overall effort toreduce the impact of systemic racial and economic disadvantage on students.

For more, visit ESSENCE.com.

LEARNING + TRAVEL: THE SECRETS TO LONG LIFE?

New Survey Reveals Belief that Travel Plus a Passion for Learning are Key

We’ve all heard the theories that exercise, healthy diet and challenging mind games can help a person live longer with greater mental acuity, but it seems that travel (particularly travel with an educational focus) should be added to that list as well. Road Scholar, the nation’s non-profit leader in educational travel for Boomers and beyond, conducted an online national survey of more than 1,000 men and women, age 55 and older, and found that an overwhelming 85 percent of them believe travel actually can help extend their life. As for the main reason for travel, 43 percent said they travel to learn about other cultures and places. In fact, 26 percent described themselves as lifelong learners. In addition, a full 74 percent of respondents said travel was “important” or “very important” as a way to maintain mental acuity. Road Scholar was built on the belief that learning is the key to a longer and more fulfilled life, and a large number of their survey respondents seem to agree.

“We hear over and over how important learning, coupled with a travel component, is in the lives of Road Scholar participants, but it was fascinating to discover that so many of the people surveyed view travel and learning as synergistic, and the best way to learn about the world,” stated Road Scholar’s President and CEO, Jim Moses. “Road Scholar has always focused on learning, and our educational adventures combine the best of both education and travel.”

Of course, the findings also reflect a shift in current thinking about the role of learning in our lives, particularly as we age, noted Moses. “The concept of learning as an age-based activity for children and young adults is being replaced by a philosophy of the benefits of lifelong learning – an approach to learning that is not just school-based, but experiential, social and intellectual and continuing throughout the course of a person’s life. For many, travel is an ideal way to continue learning new things no matter their age,” he said.

“I definitely think that travel enhances and may contribute to longer life,” said Debbie S., a 65-year-old avid traveler who divides her time between Arlington TX and Presque Isle, WI. “It keeps your brain working. It’s also been proven that if you have passions that you tend to live longer.”

Maxine T., a 73-year-old woman from Walnut Creek, CA, agrees in the power of travel, saying “Each trip leaves us hungry for the next adventure so, I guess we’ll have to live a very long time. There sure is a lot of world to see!”

In addition to longevity, the survey asked respondents to list all the ways they keep their brains active and engaged and gave them a list of methods that included reading/book club, crossword puzzles, continuing education classes, travel, museum visits and attending lectures.

Travel was cited more frequently than any other category, by 69 percent of respondents. Reading and book clubs were a close second at 66 percent, followed by crossword puzzles at 49 percent and museum visits at 42 percent.  Continuing education and attending lectures were checked by 36 percent and 31 percent, respectively.

About Road Scholar

Road Scholar is the nation’s largest not-for-profit educational travel organization for adults – a true university of the world. It offers 5,500 programs in 150 countries and 50 states and financial aid for those who otherwise could not participate in its programs. Road Scholar educational adventures are created by Elderhostel, the world leader in educational travel since 1975. Learn more at roadscholar.org

Survey Methodology Details

This survey was conducted by Survata, an independent research firm in San Francisco. Survata interviewed 1000 online respondents between April 22, 2019 and April 28, 2019. Respondents were reached across the Survata publisher network, where they take a survey to unlock premium content, like articles and ebooks. Respondents received no cash compensation for their participation. More information on Survata’s methodology can be found at survata.com/methodology.

ADA’s 79th Scientific Sessions

American Diabetes Association’s 79th Scientific Sessions to Highlight the Latest Advances in Diabetes Research

World’s largest conference focused on diabetes research, treatment and care to be held

June 7-11, 2019, in San Francisco

WHAT

The American Diabetes Association (ADA) has officially opened online registration for members of the media to its 79th Scientific Sessions, the world’s largest scientific meeting focused on diabetes research, prevention, and care, to be held June 7-11, 2019, at the Moscone Center in San Francisco, California. More than 11,000 leading physicians, scientists, and health care professionals from around the world are expected to convene at the 2019 Scientific Sessions to unveil cutting-edge research, treatment recommendations, and advances toward a cure for diabetes. The Advance Program information outlines speakers, topics, and schedules of the five-day meeting, during which attendees receive exclusive access to more than 2,800 original research presentations and may participate in provocative and engaging exchanges with leading diabetes experts. The program is grouped into eight thematic areas: Acute and Chronic Complications; Behavioral Medicine, Clinical Nutrition, Education, and Exercise; Clinical Diabetes/Therapeutics; Epidemiology/Genetics; Immunology/Transplantation; Insulin Action/Molecular Metabolism; Integrated Physiology/Obesity; and Islet Biology/Insulin Secretion.

WHO

The ADA provides complimentary access to the Scientific Sessions to credentialed members of the media, including print, broadcast, and online media for the express purpose of gathering news and information to produce original news articles about research presented at the 79th Scientific Sessions. Media representatives welcome to attend include reporters, writers, photographers, and videographers. News organizations seeking media credentials must be members of the editorial staff, and media registration is limited to two individuals per outlet/news organization. All press attendees must adhere to the Guidelines for Press and Media.

SESSIONS

In addition to key scientific sessions and award lectures being developed by the Scientific Sessions Meeting Planning Committee, the 79th Scientific Sessions will feature results from the following key clinical trials, presented for the first time, including landmark trials sponsored by the National Institutes of Health:

  • The Vitamin D and Type 2 Diabetes (D2d) Study—A Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial for Diabetes Prevention
  • Longitudinal Outcomes in Youth with Type 2 Diabetes—The TODAY2 Study
  • Results and Comparisons from the RISE Clinical Trial—Adult Medication Study
  • PREVIEW Study Results—Prevention of Diabetes through Lifestyle Intervention and Population Studies Around the Words
  • DECLARE-TIMI 58 Trial
  • Once-Weekly Dulaglutide and Major Cardiovascular Events—Results of the REWIND Trial
  • The CAROLINA Trial—First Results of the Cardiovascular Outcomes Trial Comparing Linagliptin vs. Glimepiride
  • CREDENCE and CARMELINA—Results from Two Major Clinical Trials in Kidney and Cardiovascular Disease in Diabetes
  • Oral Semaglutide—The PIONEER Program Trials
  • Teplizumab for Prevention of Type 1 Diabetes in Relatives “At-Risk”

ADDITIONAL INFO

Scientific research will be highlighted during symposia, mini-symposia, current issues, oral and poster presentations, and Professional Interest Group discussions. The 79th Scientific Sessions also includes presence from more than 100 corporate and organizational exhibitors in over 100,000 square feet of exhibit space. For complete information on the 2019 Scientific Sessions, click here.

Beginning this year, the ADA is taking a tangible step to reduce paper consumption and demonstrate our commitment to the environment. Specifically, the ADA will no longer print the Scientific Sessions Abstract Book or on-site daily newspaper. Both will still be available through the Scientific Sessions meeting app (available free for Apple and Android mobile devices) and online.

Please send an email to the ADA Press Office: SciSessionsPress@diabetes.org if you have any questions.

Five Steps for Prevention from Watson Institute Experts

The Majority of Children with Autism Are Bullied—Do You Know How to Help?

Children with autism face unique social and education challenges that require attentive support. 1 in 59 children is diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. Boys are four times more likely than girls to have autism. Autism affects all ethnic and socioeconomic groups. Autism spectrum disorder encompasses a wide range of challenges with repetitive behaviors as well as social and communication skills.

For students with Autism, school can be daunting, as they are faced with social interactions and not feeling accepted. Coupled with that, children with Autism are at higher risk for being victimized or bullied by peers. Nearly two-thirds of children with autism between the ages of 6 and 15 have been bullied—over twice the rate of children without autism. 65% of parents report that their child had been victimized and 50% report being scared by their peers (Issues in Comprehensive Pediatric Nursing (2009)).  

These pressures can lead to refusal to attend school, anxiety or depression, and an overall decline in academic performance. This is borne out in the high school graduation rates for students with disabilities, which is only 67.1% (U.S. Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics), compared to an overall 84% graduation rate.

Clinical experts from the Watson Institute have five tips on combating bullying among all students, especially those with autism:

  1. Highlight individual strengths. Parents and teachers can be proactive by teaching children that it’s natural to expect others to be just like us, but the things that make us different are often the very things that make us special. Make a habit of complimenting students on their strengths—including in front of their peers.
  2. Widen perspectives. Teaching children to see things from more than one perspective is a key part of developing empathy. Help children connect beyond surface circumstances to underlying emotions. If a child makes fun of a student for not being good at something, ask them to reflect on something that is hard for them.
  3. Praise kindness. Children risk being teased or bullied themselves when they reach out to a student who is being bullied. It takes courage for students to act. Turn this perceived liability into an asset by applauding acts of kindness. This can be done individually, (“I saw how you stood up for Kyle and I’m really proud of you.”) and corporately, through public recognition or incentive programs.
  4. Get involved. If a bullying situation has developed, adult intervention is usually required. Leaving students to “work it out themselves” will often exacerbate or prolong a negative situation. Involve students and parents in addressing the situation. Approach the conversation with a problem-solving, not a punitive attitude.
  5. Provide support. Children can feel a range of emotions—from fear to shame and many more—when they’ve been the victim of bullying. Don’t assume because a child is no longer actively being bullied, that the situation is resolved. Make space for them to talk about their feelings and provide any additional support they need.

ABOUT THE WATSON INSTITUTE

The Watson Institute is organization providing special education programming as well as outpatient mental health services such as social skills groups, therapy, and evaluations for children ages 3 to 21.  www.thewatsoninstitute.org.

Rebel Wilson For InStyle May Issue

For her FIRST US COVER, Rebel Wilson is gracing InStyle’s May issue!  

Rebel celebrated her 39th birthday in a truly glamorous way: by shooting with InStyle in Paris. Inspired by over-the-top perfume ads from the ’70s and ’80s, she fronted our equally elaborate fragrance campaign for a fantasy scent dubbed Rebelle.  Watch Rebel in her greatest role yet, fragrance model. #Rebelle, available exclusively on InStyle.com.

WATCH THE VIDEO HERE

Here, she sits down with Editor in chief, Laura Brown, to talk about what’s next (politics?), her law degree, dating and more.

  • LB: Do you feel like you have a healthier attitude toward your appearance now?
    RW: Actually, when you get paparazzi’d and stuff, it does make you think about it. When Pitch Perfect came out, I became internationally famous, and people were hanging outside my house to take my photo. You have to think about it a bit more than a normal person. But I’m a pretty low-maintenance chick. Through working with my stylist, Elizabeth Stewart, I’ve learned all these little tips and tricks—and they really work. Then you feel more comfort- able when you have to dress up. I remember I didn’t even go to a friend’s wedding in my 20s because I didn’t know where to buy a dress in my size. Now it is the opposite. Now I have a wardrobe full of custom Givenchy.
  • LB: You’ve done so much in a relatively short time.
    RW: If you look at the odds of someone from Australia making it, they’re pretty small. When I look at all the things I’ve done in my career … I feel like I’ve got so much farther to go. But I am really proud, and, you know, I didn’t have to sleep my way to the top. [laughs]
  • LB: What’s it like dating and such?
    RW: People get very intimidated, which is weird, the idea that I would be intimidating to anyone. But it happens all the time, to the point that someone I really liked was so intimidated and got a lot of anxiety and couldn’t have a relationship with me because I’m in the public eye. They didn’t want that, so that kind of sucked. If someone thinks they’re on a date with Fat Amy, that’s not going to happen. Sorry, I can be almost as much fun, but I’m not like that
    in real life.
  • LB: Whose career do you admire?
    RW: I like Donna Langley, who runs Universal Studios. I think that’s awesome. Also, I have this weird feeling that I might go into politics in Australia.
  • LB: So what would your political platform be?
    RW: I want to help people, and part of my case [in Australia] was standing up to a big, bullying media organization. When I see other people needing to
    stand up for themselves, I like to inspire them or help them with the legal knowledge I have. And, God, as a woman, you need to stand up for yourself in so many ways. It’s important, and I think some people do find inspiration from me and my life. My mother was a public-school teacher. I have a sister who is a nurse, and I’m real big into military—I shouldn’t say just military dudes. [laughs] I’m into good education for people. Through the School [of St Jude] in Tanzania, I have been helping to lift kids out of poverty through education. The health-care system is really important. Those are the political platforms I naturally would have because of my background, so I do think when I am done with Hollywood, that’s what will happen.
  • LB: You could go Schwarzenegger. Except do it in Australia.
    RW: Yeah, but I feel like I’m more qualified. I have the top law degree from the University of New South Wales.

The issue hits newsstands on April 19th. Photography by Robbie Fimmano. See the full online article here.

CMRubinWorld and Race Issues

In a new interview with CMRubinWorld, Diversity/Inclusion expert and Cultural Anthropologist Dr. Michael Baran discusses his interactive web-based program that stimulates productive dialogue on the complex issues surrounding race.

Deepening divides fragment our societies and our economies. How can modern technologies help us to find the common ground and bring us closer together? Interactive Diversity Solutions (IDS) has created a web based program called “Don’t Guess My Race” to support teaching diversity issues. The CEO of IDS, Michael Baran, says the inspiration for the program came from research studies with children in Brazil. In Baran’s studies, he asked children to describe pictures he had taken of people’s faces. What he discovered was that this exercise sparked “extremely rich conversations about sensitive topics.” What if photographs could be used to create an interactive race awareness? In an increasingly interconnected world, race, identity and sexuality are often left undiscussed because for many, these are challenging topics and it’s difficult to find the right “space” to do it in an effective way. Yet it is a critical challenge for which all the world seeks solutions. “We want children to see how the world doesn’t come in bounded natural groups, but that there are spectrums of differences and multiplicities of intersecting identities that overlay this difference,” says Baran.

Read the full article here

About Michael Baran

Michael Baran is a cultural anthropologist with over twenty years experience conducting and organizing ethnographic research for social change on a variety of issues, including race and identity, racial disparities in education, violence against children, healthy housing, environmental health, human services, criminal justice reform, immigration reform, climate change, and early childhood development. He currently consults for businesses, schools and non-profits on issues related to diversity and inclusion, often incorporating the digital tools developed at Interactive Diversity Solutions as part of a blended approach.

About The Global Search for Education

CMRubinWorld’s award-winning series, The Global Search for Education, brings together distinguished thought leaders in education and innovation from around the world to explore the key learning issues faced by most nations. The series has become a highly visible platform for global discourse on 21st century learning, offering a diverse range of innovative ideas which are presented by the series founder, C. M. Rubin, together with the world’s leading thinkers.

For more information on CMRubinWorld check out their website here and follow @CMRubinWorld on Twitter.

Face Transplant Surgery: A New Case Study

A new case study out of New York University’s Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Developmentfinds that face transplant surgery in patients who have experienced severe facial trauma can improve speech production.

Face transplantation is one of the most extensive facial reconstructive procedures available. The procedure involves the partial or total replacement of nerves, muscles and skeletal structures of the face, head, and neck using donor tissues. With only 41 facial transplant procedures performed worldwide to date, this case study adds to the very limited literature documenting speech production outcomes post-facial transplant. The surgery – which was the first in New York State – was performed by experts at NYU Langone Health’s Face Transplant Program, led by Eduardo Rodriguez, MD, DDS, the Helen L. Kimmel Professor of Reconstructive Plastic Surgery and chair of the Hansjörg Wyss Department of Plastic Surgery.

“Our findings provide a window into the complex recovery process following major facial reconstruction and serve as an important foundation from which we can begin to understand how facial transplant can improve speech production preoperatively to postoperatively,” said Maria I. Grigos, the study’s lead author and associate professor of communicative sciences and disorders at NYU Steinhardt. “Among the many remarkable patterns observed, we found that the patient displayed more flexible control of facial movement as he adapted to the transplanted structures.”

Research Method

Using optical tracking, a form of motion tracking technology, Grigos and her team were able to examine first-hand how the facial transplant procedure alters movement of the face and contributes to improved speech production. Researchers compared data from the case study patient – a male victim who suffered third- and fourth-degree burns and major soft tissue loss in a fire – against four adult males who had not experienced severe facial trauma.

The patient’s speech production and facial movements were examined once before the procedure and four times in the 13 months following the procedure. Movements of the patient’s lips and jaw, as well as the intelligibility of his speech, were compared pre- to post-tranplant and then tracked across the recovery period.

“The remarkable changes that we captured in this patient reflect the multiple processes involved in the reintegration of neuromuscular control and in the learning of new strategies over the recovery period. Such adaptability is a positive indicator that treatment to improve speech production can be effective post–facial transplant surgery,” continued Grigos.

In addition to Grigos, the study’s co-authors include Eduardo D. Rodriguez, Étoile LeBlanc, J. Rodrigo Diaz-Siso and Natalie Plana of the Hansjörg Wyss Department of Plastic Surgery at NYU Langone Health, as well as Christina Hagedorn of the College of Staten Island, City University of New York.

NYU and its affiliated medical center, NYU Langone Health, continue to be pioneers in face transplant surgery and research.

About the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development

Located in the heart of New York City’s Greenwich Village, NYU’s Steinhardt School of Culture, Education and Human Development prepares students for careers in the arts, education, health, media and psychology. Since its founding in 1890, the Steinhardt School’s mission has been to expand human capacity through public service, global collaboration, research, scholarship, and practice. To learn more about NYU Steinhardt, visit steinhardt.nyu.edu.