Posts tagged with "drugs"

Tyler Posey Illustration by Alex Bogdan for use by 360 Magazine

Tyler Posey

By: Ally Brewster

Tyler Posey is a Santa Monica born, Santa Clarita raised actor and pop-punk/rock musician best known for his roles as Scott McCall on Teen Wolf and the lead role of Aidan the zombie-horror movie Alone (2020). In addition to his successful acting career, he’s been striving for an equally successful music career.

Throughout the last decade Posey has been in multiple bands, including Lost in Kostko (You’re Gonna Need A Towel [EP] 2011), PVMNTS (Better Days [EP] 2018), and Five North (Scumbag [EP] 2020). During the pandemic he made the decision to go solo with his next EP, enjoying the artistic freedom that came from being on your own. Posey has been working alongside the record label Big Noise Music Group, the same label his band Five North (Tyler Posey and Kyle Murphy) worked with, for his debut solo EP titled DRUGS.

Before those two singles for his debut EP, Tyler released the single “This Luv Sux” with artist’s Phem and Audio Chateau. “This Luv Sux” was his introduction to solo music, a song about a bad relationship, the alternative punk sound heard throughout the rest of his music.

DRUGS, to be released later this year, is the EP that is home to the two singles Posey has released so far this year, “Happy” and “Shut Up” (feat. Phem and Travis Barker). The two singles set up the tone and theme of the EP, which is a raw, honest story about Posey’s struggle with drugs and becoming sober in the form of pop-punk songs.

In the single “Happy,” during the second verse he sings, “Yeah, I know how to nod / Nodding, I’m half awake / With my eyes rolling back, can’t you tеll I’m okay?” Posey told NME that this is a reference to the “drug term called nodding out,” stating the verse is, “a very violent visual of somebody [who’s] really fucked up on drugs.” These types of experiences and feelings are what Posey is bringing to his debut EP, using as a way to explain his struggles and emotions.

Watch the “Happy” music video here.

This Fall Posey will join his fellow Big Noise artists Mod Sun and girlfriends on the Internet Killed the Rockstar Tour. The tour will travel to 15 cities around the US beginning September 5, 2021.

Internet Killed the Rockstar Tour Dates

Sun, SEP 5 – BottleRock Napa Valley 2021 – Napa County, CA [SOLD OUT]

Thu, SEP 9 – The Roxy Theatre – Los Angeles, CA [SOLD OUT]

Fri, SEP 10 – The Roxy Theatre – Los Angeles, CA [SOLD OUT]

Sat, SEP 11 – Popcon Retreat Festival 2021 – Las Vegas, NV

Tue, SEP 14 – Varsity Theater – Minneapolis, MN [SOLD OUT]

Thu, SEP 16 – House of Blues Cleveland – Cleveland, OH

Fri, SEP 17 – Park West – Chicago, IL

Sun, SEP 19 – Saint Andrews Hall – Detroit, MI

Tue, SEP 21 – The Fillmore Philadelphia – Philadelphia, PA [SOLD OUT]

Wed, SEP 22 – Brighton Music Hall – Allston, MA [SOLD OUT]

Thu, SEP 23 – Music Hall of Williamsburg – Brooklyn, NY [SOLD OUT]

Sat, SEP 25 – Black Cat -Washington DC

Sun, SEP 26 – The Underground – Fillmore Charlotte – Charlotte, NC

Thu, SEP 30 – The Masquerade – Atlanta, GA

Sun, OCT 3 – South Side Music Hall – Dallas, TX

Buy tickets here.

Be on the lookout for Tyler Posey’s EP DRUGS that will be released later this year!

Art by Nicole of 360 Magazine for use by 360 Magazine

How to Cook with Cannabis Butter

Everything’s Better With Homemade Cannabis Butter

While edibles have been around for some time, it’s not as simple as throwing buds into dough and calling it a day. There are steps that you need to take to make your own cannabis edibles and one of the most versatile things you can make is butter.

Also known as cannabutter or weed butter, cannabis butter can be used in cooking your favorite recipes in much the same way regular butter is used. At a basic level, cannabis butter is butter that contains marijuana properties, including the all important THC. But before you start dropping raw weed into some softened butter and calling it done, you need to learn how to make it work the right way.

How to make your own batch of cannabutter

Why isn’t it just a matter of putting a spoonful of green goodness into your favorite pasta sauce or pancake mix recipe?  An excellent question! Here’s why:

  1. Your body can’t process raw weed. In fact, the psychoactive properties won’t be activated at all because the cannabinoids won’t enter your bloodstream. In the best case scenario, you would just digest the weed like you would kale. If you aren’t so lucky though, you could end up reacting to the raw plant. Gastrointestinal problems, like vomiting and diarrhea, are a definite possibility.
  2. Have you ever tasted raw weed? It’s pretty nasty. Now imagine that flavor in your favorite brownie or waffle recipe. Gross, right? If you haven’t made the mistake of tasting raw weed, it’s got a really foul flavor, with a strong odor and bitter aftertaste.
  3. It’s necessary to decarboxylate your weed before you attempt to use it, in order to activate the THC and CBD properties. Decarbox… What now? Read on!

What is decarboxylation and why does it matter?

Basically, decarboxylation is the process of removing  a chemical from an organic substance. In this case, the chemical COOH. Raw and dried cannabis contains tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) and cannabinolic acid (CBDA). It also contains C02 and that is the compound that stands between you and usable levels of THC and CBD in your weed.

The process of decarboxylation happens naturally when you smoke weed by the very act of lighting it up. But you can’t light your cookie dough on fire, so you need to find another way to decarboxylate your weed to create edibles that actually contain THC. It also needs to happen at a lower temperature than fire and for a longer period of time, to be effective. Why longer at a lower temp? Well, that’s because of the terpenes.

Terpenes are natural oils in cannabis that give your weed that noticeable odor, and taste. Different strains will have different flavors because of the combination of terpenes in them. But they’re not just about flavor: terpenes work with the cannabinoids in your weed to create some of the effects you experience when you consume it.

Terpenes are important to know about before you try to create your edibles so that you understand the process: these oils will break down at temperatures above 310 degrees fahrenheit. That isn’t a problem when you’re smoking your weed because it’s a short distance from the burning end of your joint to your lungs.

But when you are decarboxylating weed for edibles, you need to use a temperature below 310 degrees, so by default, you need a longer period of time to bake your buds for them to ultimately contain active ingredients in your final edible product.

Once decarboxylated, you can use your weed in a lot of ways: You can sprinkle it on your salad or even infuse it into a drink or tea. But the easiest way to use it is to turn it into cannabis butter. Anything you make or bake probably contains butter—from sautéing veggies and greasing a pan for Sunday morning eggs, to adding a little THC to your toast—so this makes cannabis butter a flexible edible option. 

How To Make Cannabis Butter

Tools and ingredients: Oven, Stove, Baking Sheet, a bud of your favorite strain, medium saucepan, butter, bowl for finished product, cheesecloth, rubber band, string or tape

Instructions

  1. Preheat your oven to 240 degrees fahrenheit. While you’re waiting for the right temperature, spread your marijuana on the baking sheet. You’re looking to create one layer of weed.
  2. Bake the cannabis on the middle rack for about 40 minutes. Most ovens have a side that cooks hotter than the other so turn the sheet a couple of times to get an even bake. Decarboxylation activates the THC and the CBD, which makes it possible for your body to absorb it. After 40 minutes, the marijuana should be dry and crumbly. That’s the consistency you need to mix it into the butter.
  3. How much butter is the right amount? A good measure is four sticks of butter to one ounce of marijuana. You can adjust as needed. If you are using four sticks of butter, your next step is to put four cups of water into the saucepan. Bring the water to a boil and once it’s boiling, add in your butter. Yes, into the boiling water! Stir the mixture until the butter has completely melted.
  4. Once the butter has melted, add your marijuana to the water/butter mix and reduce the heat to low. At a level to boil water, you could end up burning your weed. What you want is the water to be barely simmering. Now you have to wait. 
  5. Let the butter/water/weed mix simmer on low for three hours. You can go on to step 6 while you wait, and then come back to this step. Basically, the three hour simmer is reducing the water content, as if you were creating a sauce with your weed. When you get close to the three hour mark, check the top of the mixture. When it’s done, it will be shiny, with a thick texture. Take the saucepan off the heat.
  6. While your mixture is reducing, you can get prepped with the other items that you’ll need. Get out a large mixing bowl. Pyrex, plastic or metal are fine: it just needs to be able to handle the heat of your mixture. Put two layers of cheesecloth over the top of the bowl and hold them fast with the rubber band, string, or tape. The mixture will be heavy and if you don’t fix the cheesecloth in place, they could get pulled into the mix, rather than staying in place. Of the three, string is the most effective: just make sure it’s tight and that you secure the string on the lower and smaller part of the bowl, so it can ride up while you are straining!
  7. Slowly pour the hot mixture through the cheesecloth. What goes through the cheesecloth will eventually be the weed butter. You’ll throw out the stuff on top of the cheesecloth. 
  8. When your entire mixture has drained through, pick up the cheesecloth by the four corners, twist them together to keep everything inside. It should look like a small bag out of it. Now squeeze the cheesecloth bag to make sure that you get every ounce of that delicious butter.
  9. Now you wait. Again. But it’s so worth it! Place the mixing bowl in the refrigerator so that the cannabis butter can cool. While it’s cooling, the butter will separate from any remaining water. How will you know when it’s done? When the top layer is solid.
  10. Run a knife around the edge of the solid butter, to separate it from the mixing bowl. Now you can lift it out and put it on a cutting board. If there is still some moisture, just dab it dry with a clean towel.

You’re done! You can cut up the weed butter into smaller pieces for easy storage at this point, or leave it whole.

Cooking with weed butter

If you need some inspiration for recipes to cook with your weed butter, the internet is the right place to look! But before you start cooking or baking, if you’re not used to edibles, there are a few things you should know, as the experience is quite a bit different from smoking weed.

  •     The effects of the THC / CBD can take anywhere from 30 to 190 minutes to kick in. This is because of the way food is digested in your stomach and how long that takes. The flip side is that you won’t need as much weed to achieve a good high as you would with a joint. A typical joint is about ½ a gram of weed. But a starting point with edibles is more like 0.001 grams (or one milligram), which shows you just how potent edibles can be. Because of this delay, it’s important to be patient if you don’t feel anything right away, rather than eating more of your new edible. Too much THC can result in paranoia, anxiety, nausea, and a general bad feeling. Start with small quantities of weed and take it slow.
  •     Eating marijuana-laced food has a tendency to be a lot more intense because the THC is sent directly into your bloodstream through the process of digestion, instead of being filtered through your lungs. 
  •     Finally, the high from edibles can last a lot longer than smoking, so it’s something to consider if you have plans later in the day!

Edibles are a great option for those who don’t want to smoke weed but still want either the pain relief or the high, or both! Just take it slow, and when in doubt, visit your local dispensary and see what they recommend!

Bio

Anthony Franciosi, also known as Ant, is an honest to goodness farmer whose fingers are as green as the organic cannabis he grows. He is the proud founder of Honest Marijuana– an all natural, completely organic marijuana growery in Colorado.

 

TT The Artist illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

TT the Artist × Netflix

TT THE ARTIST’S GROUNDBREAKING DOCUMENTARY

“DARK CITY BENEATH THE BEAT “

LANDS AT NETFLIX

Tedra Wilson A.K.A. TT The Artist Directorial Debut Produced by ColorCreative

Netflix has licensed multi-hyphenate director, Tedra Wilson a.k.a. TT The Artist’s, critically acclaimed debut documentary musical, DARK CITY BENEATH THE BEAT.  Winner of the Bushwick Film Festival for Best Feature Documentary 2020, the doc takes you on a journey about the rising Baltimore club music and dance culture.

The film is an audiovisual experience that defines the soundscape of Baltimore city. Inspired by an all-original Baltimore club music soundtrack, the film spotlights local club artists, DJs, dancers, producers, and Baltimore’s budding creative community as they are realizing their life dreams. Rhythmic and raw, these stories illustrate the unique characteristics of the city’s landscape and social climate to its creative LGBTQ community and showcases Baltimore club music as a positive subculture in a city overshadowed by trauma, drugs, and violence. 

The film is a noted love letter to Baltimore that uplifts the narrative of the city and is produced by Issa Rae and Deniese Davis through their management production company ColorCreative. In addition to the Netflix premiere, TT will also be dropping its soundtrack through Issa Rae’s Raedio

The soundtrack, titled, Dark City Beneath The Beat Original Motion Picture Soundtrack is a fusion of Baltimore club music intermixed with poetry, hip hop, house, and soul. Executive produced by TT The Artist and Baltimore club music hero Mighty Mark, the eighteen track project features local artists on the rise from the “Charm City.”  The soundtrack is available on all digital streaming music platforms including Apple Music, Spotify, Tidal among others. The documentary feature will premiere on Netflix April 15, 2021.  

About TT The Artist:

TT The Artist is a multi-hyphenate filmmaker whose work is an intersection of music, art, fashion, and film. Her bold and colorful visual storytelling is influenced by her love for black cinema and narratives that expand the representation of women of color and LGBTQ stories on screen. TT The Artist has worked with influential DJs and producers in the music industry such as Grammy award winning producer Diplo. TT The Artist’s musical success in the television and the film sync world has secured her placements on The Chi, Twenties, Netflix’s Nappily Ever After, HBO’s hit series Insecure, and more. Stepping out of the recording studio and into the director’s chair, TT The Artist was selected as a shadow director for Insecure’ s highly anticipated season 4. TT has directed many of her own videos such as CENTER OF ATTENTIONPAYROLLBLACK HERSTORY, and WOAH. TT The Artist is also a participant in Powderkeg’s 2020 FUSE Program, founded by Paul Feig. Most recently, TT shot WHEW CHILE for Dai Burger, which debuted on Paper Magazine.

TT The Artist is represented by ColorCreative management and the law firm of Del, Shaw, Moonves, Tanaka, Finkelstein & Lezcano.

Tedra Wilson a.k.a. TT The Artist

COVID-19 Trial Tests if Common Drug Can Keep Patients Out of Hospital

At-risk people diagnosed with COVID-19 across the United States and Canada can participate in a clinical trial testing whether a common drug can keep them from getting sicker and keep them out of the hospital.­­

The trial, conducted by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, is based on a discovery by the University of Virginia School of Medicine’s Alban Gaultier, PhD, and a former graduate student, Dorian A Rosen, PhD.

Gaultier and Rosen found last year that the antidepressant fluvoxamine may stop the deadly inflammation known as sepsis, in which the immune response spirals out of control. The drug’s apparent benefit for dampening dangerous inflammation prompted the Washington University researchers to begin investigating its potential benefit for COVID-19, which can also cause dangerous overreactions of the immune system.

“If this clinical trial is proven successful, fluvoxamine could become a standard treatment for patients newly diagnosed with COVID-19, especially patients at risk,” Gaultier said. “Even the best vaccines do not protect 100% of the population, and discovery of safe and affordable treatments to prevent COVID-19-associated complications is critical.”

Fluvoxamine and COVID-19

Earlier this year, the Washington University researchers launched their first clinical trial of the drug in patients with COVID-19. That trial compared fluvoxamine with a harmless placebo in 152 adult outpatients. None of the 80 participants who received fluvoxamine became seriously ill after 15 days, while six patients who received placebo did. Of those six, four were hospitalized, for periods ranging from four to 21 days. One was on a ventilator for 10 days.

Based on those initial results, Washington University is now launching a much larger trial open to residents across the United States and Canada. The trial is seeking approximately 880 at-risk participants, age 18 and older, who have tested positive for COVID-19 and are experiencing mild symptoms.

Participants will be provided with either fluvoxamine or a placebo for approximately 15 days. No face-to-face contact is required; everything necessary will be sent to the participants’ doorsteps.

Contactless Check-Ins

The researchers will track the patients by videochat, email or telephone to determine if fluvoxamine provides a benefit and helps keep participants out of the hospital. During brief daily check-ins, trial participants will report their oxygen levels, blood pressure and temperature, along with whether they are feeling shortness of breath or have had any other problems.

The study team will continue to follow the participants for approximately 90 days after they have finished taking fluvoxamine or the placebo.

The trial is open to people who have at least one risk factor for severe COVID-19, such as being 40 or older, being part of a high-risk racial/ethnic group (such as African-American, Hispanic, Native American or biracial), or having one or more medical conditions such as obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, a lung disease or an immune disorder such as rheumatoid arthritis.

For more information about the trial, visit this website.

Robinson Cano MLB illustration by Kaelen Felix for 360 Magazine

Robinson Cano Suspended for PED

By Hannah DiPilato

Major League Baseball player Robinson Cano has been suspended after testing positive for stanozolol, a performance-enhancing drug. MLB commissioner, Rob Manfred, confirmed on Wednesday in a statement that Cano will be banned for the entire 2021 season. 

This is the 38-year-old’s second suspension due to testing positive for PED. In 2018, while Cano played for the Seattle Mariners, he tested positive for using diuretic and missed 80 games according to ESPN

At the time of his first offense, Cano said the diuretic “was given to me by a licensed doctor in the Dominican Republic to treat a medical ailment.” He said he was unaware the drug was banned in the MLB. 

In the MLB, testing positive for a PED a second time will result in an automatic 162 game suspension. This rule is an agreement between Major League Baseball and the MLB Players Association. 

Neither Cano nor the players’ union has made a statement about his second positive test for a PED. 

“We were extremely disappointed to be informed about Robinson’s suspension for violating Major League Baseball’s Joint Drug Prevention and Treatment Program,” said Mets president Sandy Alderson in a statement. “The violation is very unfortunate for him, the organization, our fans, and the sport. The Mets fully support MLB’s efforts toward eliminating performance-enhancing substances from the game.”

Cano will have to forfeit his 2021 salary where he was set to make $24 million. According to Fox Business, Cano is still set to make $48 million between 2022 and 2023. The Mets are responsible for $40 million while the Mariners agreed to pay the remaining $8 million. 

The news of Cano’s suspension is great news for player DJ LeMaiheu. According to the New York Post, LeMaiheu would be the perfect player for either the New York Mets or the New York Yankees to add to their rosters. After rejecting an $18.9 million qualifying offer from the Yankees, LeMaiheu is a free agent. 

After the loss of Cano for the 2021 season, the Mets are now in need of a starting second baseman. This adds to the list of starting positions that the Mets are seeking out since they are already looking for a starting pitcher, catcher and center field. The Mets could also start Jeff McNeil at second base, a position he would be comfortable in. 

Cano was traded to the Mets in 2018 sending player Jared Kelenic to the Mariners. Throughout his 16 seasons playing the sport, Cano is a .303 hitter with 334 home runs, 1,302 RBIs and two Gold Gloves according to ESPN

Cano was on his way to achieving 3,000 career hits and was at 2,624 before his suspension. This suspension will certainly create uncertainty for the future of his baseball career.

Kaelen Felix Illustrates a Drug Article for 360 MAGAZINE

Oregon Decriminalizes Drugs

By Justin Lyons

This year’s election will go down as a legendary one in the history of the United States of America, and for some of the bigger fights, the country still doesn’t have an answer.

Where answers do exist seem to be in propositions and measures, and the big winners are those hoping for the decriminalization of drugs. Mississippi, New Jersey, South Dakota, Montana and Arizona all approved the legalization of recreational marijuana.

The biggest victory for those in favor of drug decriminalization probably came in Oregon, where the penalty for small amounts of heroin, methamphetamine, cocaine and other drugs was lessened.

According to Ballotpedia, Oregon’s Measure 110 would reclassify the possession of controlled substances such as those listed above from a Class A misdemeanor to a Class E violation, which would result in a $100 fine or the necessity of a “completed health assessment.”

The Oregon Criminal Justice Commission estimated that convictions for possession would decrease by 90.7%.

Addiction recovery centers conduct the health assessments, which will include a screening from a certified alcohol and drug counselor and must be completed within 45 days of the Class E violation.

The funds for the assessments and the recovery programs will come from the Oregon Marijuana Account and money the state of Oregon saves from reductions in arrests, incarceration and official supervision. The recovery centers will provide treatment 24 hours per day along with health assessments, intervention plans, case management services and peer support and outreach.

The possession quantity of the now decriminalized drugs to be classified as a Class E violation are as follows: one gram of heroin or less, two grams of cocaine or less, two grams of methamphetamine or less, one gram or five pills of MDMA or less, 40 or fewer user units of LSD, less than 12 grams of psilocybin, fewer than 40 user units of methadone and fewer than 40 pills, tables or capsules of oxycodone.

A person carrying more than the specified amounts may face a misdemeanor with less than a year imprisonment, a $6,250 fine or both.

According to Yes on Measure 110, more than 125 Oregon-based organizations endorsed the measure, including Oregon Chapter of the American College of Physicians, Oregon Nurses Association, Oregon School Psychologists’ Association and Law Enforcement Action Partnership.

Ballotpedia also said the Democratic Party of Oregon, Multnomah Democrats and Working Families Party of Oregon support the bill, right alongside 11-time-GRAMMY-Award-Winning artist John Legend.

The measure is to be implemented no later than Feb. 1 of 2021.

Yungblud illustrated by Mina Tocalini for 360 MAGAZINE.

Yungblud – Strawberry Lipstick

YUNGBLUD shares his explosive new song “Strawberry Lipstick” and its equally outrageous video. Released via Locomotion/Interscope Records, “Strawberry Lipstick” is the brand-new single from the British singer/songwriter/multi-instrumentalist full-length sophomore album, due out later this year. Stream/download “Strawberry Lipstick” HERE, and check out the video HERE.

Directed by Christian Breslauer (Roddy Ricch, Tory Lanez, Marshmello) the “Strawberry Lipstick” video stars YUNGBLUD, his band, and L.A.-based singer/songwriter Jesse Jo Stark. With a whirlwind intensity true to YUNGBLUD’s chaotic charisma, the visual places him in a series of outlandish scenarios: mixing it up in a boxing ring, dancing in a custom Union Jack dress, lounging in a bathtub full of strawberries alongside Stark. A perfect foil to YUNGBLUD, Stark is a captivating presence.

Co-produced by YUNGBLUD with his longtime collaborators Chris Greatti (Poppy, Grimes) and Zakk Cervini (Bishop Briggs, Machine Gun Kelly), “Strawberry Lipstick” is a delightfully warped love song propelled by the 22-year-old artist’s snarling vocals and larger-than-life energy. With its fuzzed-out riffs and glam-rock flash, the gloriously catchy track also spotlights YUNGBLUD’s gender-bending tendencies.

Endlessly creative, YUNGBLUD also recently announced the upcoming release of his new graphic novel, The Twisted Tales of the Ritalin Club Volume 2: Weird Times at Quarry Banks University. The follow-up to The Twisted Tales of the Ritalin Club (his 2019 debut as a graphic novelist), the comic follows YUNGBLUD and his super-powered friends as they navigate university life and all its drugs, sex, and relationship drama — ultimately finding themselves caught in a trip that may cost them their lives. Due out via Z2 Comics this November, Weird Times at Quarry Banks University is now available for preorder in multiple editions. Go HERE for more info.

Born in Yorkshire, England, YUNGBLUD (aka Dominic Harrison) is a multi-instrumentalist who first picked up a guitar at age two and began writing his own songs at age 10. The 22-year-old artist is known for voicing what he feels are major concerns for his generation, using his music to unite and empower the youth of today. After breaking onto the scene with his self-titled EP, YUNGBLUD made his full-length debut with 21st Century Liability — a 2018 release that channeled his outrage about the state of the world into confrontational yet catchy songs steeped in punk fury and pop melodicism. The following year, YUNGBLUD released Live In Atlanta and the hope for the underrated youth EP, which debuted in the top 10 on the UK Official Albums chart. Over the years, YUNGBLUD has performed to sold-out crowds in over 20 countries and played some of the world’s biggest festivals, including Austin City Limits, Life Is Beautiful, Lollapalooza, Reading and Leeds Festivals, and Vans Warped Tour.

Follow Yungblud: Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | YouTube

Landon Cube, music, 360 MAGAZINE, Republic Records

Landon Cube – Drugs

Maryland bred singer-songwriter LandonCube releases his new track “Drugs” today.

Listen to Drugs”HERE

The track follows a string of releases from Landon Cube in 2019 including his song “Pretty” feat. 24kGoldn, which received over 5 million streams in the first couple of months of release and was included on Spotify’s Most Necessary and Clout Culture playlists, as well as his EP Orangewhich has garnered over 46 million streams worldwide since its release. The EP features previously released tracks “20,” “17,” “Nuisance” and “Makeup,” which received over 1 million streams in the first month of its release. Both tracks came after his previously released tracks “Round n Round” feat. Sprite Lee (15+ million streams), “DriveMy Car” (14+ million streams) and “19” (9+ million streams). He also appeared on Lil Skies’ “Nowadays” and “RedRoses,” which both garnered over 250 million streams individually. The singer wrapped up his first headlining tour last fall and is currently embarking on a national tour with Iann Dior.

There’s a poignant yet feel-good vibe that makes 21-year-old recording artist Landon Cube’s sound infectious. The Southern Maryland native has a diverse history within music, punctuated by his versatile catalog. With Landon’s new single “Makeup,” the young star on the rise is geared to level up to the next chapter in his career. At 16, he made the firm decision that music was his chosen trajectory and once he graduated high school, he dropped his introductory cut “Euphoria.” His participation with local viral video crew Cufboys added fuel to the fire, as Landon began galvanizing a fan base through his laid-back authenticity and knack for melding sounds. Through Cufboys he met burgeoning star Lil Skies, as the two joined forces on cuts like “Red Roses” and “Nowadays,” the former impressively hitting one million streams in less than a month. It wasn’t long before Landon was Los Angeles bound and continued his upward mobility as an artist, ultimately joining the Republic Records roster. Landon Cube, who already has over 4 million monthly listeners on Spotify, has already secured a solid following based upon his honest and heartfelt music, and the next phase in his career will bring more of that to the forefront.

HELLOMD, gaming app, tech, app, cannabis, 360 MAGAZINE

HelloMD Gaming App

HELLOMD LAUNCHES FIRST CANNABIS GAMING APP WITH $420 JACKPOT PER GAME

Daily Bonfire app invites legal age players nationwide to donate winnings to fight the war on drugs or cash out at local, regulated dispensaries 

HelloMD, the world’s largest online community of cannabis consumers, lifestyle experts, best-in-class CBD products and medical professionals, today announces the launch of Daily Bonfire, the first cannabis gaming app. Hosted by cannabis comedians, including the star of Netflix’s “Cooking on High,” Ngaio Bealum, Daily Bonfire not only offers iPhone and Android users the chance to win $420 per live game but also the opportunity to help fight the war on drugs and support regulated retailers throughout the country.

“Technology always sets out to solve a problem, and that’s what inspired Daily Bonfire,” explains canna-tech entrepreneur and HelloMD co-founder Mark Hadfield. “In an effort to ‘normalize’ cannabis, the trend has been to downplay the recreational benefits of cannabis and showcase its medicinal properties. Now that we’ve achieved mainstreamification, Daily Bonfire is here to bring cannabis back to its playful roots by celebrating the plant’s monumental contributions to pop culture, science and history. We’ve also designed the app to incentivize users to play an active role in combating today’s illicit retail marketplace while giving back to organizations that are tirelessly working to right the wrongs of prohibition,” says Hadfield.

Available for download on iPhones at the Apple App store for (Android will soon follow in 2020), each Daily Bonfire game begins with a collective vote to donate 5% or 50% of the winnings to one of three non-profits:  ACLU, NORML, or MAPS.  The comedic host then challenges players to test their cannabis IQ by answering a round of 12 multiple choice questions with each successful response moving players to the next question. The final winner(s) can decide to immediately cash out or visit a local partner dispensary where their Daily Bonfire dollars unlock exclusive discounts. 

“I hella look forward to hosting Daily Bonfire each week,” says local Bay Area host Ngaio Bealum, who also regularly hosts High Times events and has appeared on “The Sarah Silverman Program.” “I get to encourage consumers to get lit and profit and learn compelling facts about cannabis.  Who knew that it was the first product ever sold over the internet in 1971… between MIT and Stanford computer science students? Weed makes you smarter. It’s science.”

Daily Bonfire was recently named one of the “Top 5 cannabis brands to dominate 2020” by Merry Jane. 

Watch HERE.

ABOUT HELLOMD

HelloMD is the world’s largest online community of cannabis patients, lifestyle experts, medical professionals, and trusted CBD brands, offering today’s consumer a one-stop-shop experience in the palm of their hands. Named “the Quora of cannabis” by TechCrunch, HelloMD is available in the U.S., Canada and South Africa.  

Vaughn Lowery, 360 MAGAZINE

Alcoholics Anonymous

Extending the Hand of A.A.
Alcoholics who are Deaf can access A.A.’s program of recovery in an updated American Sign Language translation of Alcoholics Anonymous

With over 35 million printed copies sold, the book Alcoholics Anonymous is now available in an updated abridged translation into American Sign Language. Commonly referred to as “The Big Book” this basic text of the worldwide Fellowship that bears its name is now available on DVD to the Deaf community, the Hard-of-Hearing community and the hearing community as well.
DVD features:

  • Professional ASL signers and DVD video production
  • Updated translation inspired and reviewed by A.A. members who are Deaf
  • Audio track and subtitles for use among ASL and non-ASL users
  • The basic principles and practices of the Fellowship that have provided a pathway to recovery for alcoholics for over 80 years
  • Can be ordered at www.aa.org or may be available through a local A.A. office near you

A.A. has always been committed to making its program of recovery available to anyone, anywhere who reaches out for help with a drinking problem. This translation has been updated with current language and signing most familiar in today’s Deaf community.

Founded in 1935 on the principle of one alcoholic helping another to achieve sobriety, A.A. is an effective and enduring program of recovery that has changed countless lives. As explained in the book, A.A.’s recovery program of twelve suggested Steps was formulated through the experience of its first 100 members and has reached millions of sufferers around the world.

For more information about A.A. resources for alcoholics who are Deaf or Hard-of-Hearing, please contact the Accessibilities and Remote Communities Coordinator at the General Service Office at Access@aa.org or by phone at 212-870-3344.

*If you’re in the UK and need assistance with substance abuse, check out Abbeycare Foundation Drug Rehab.