Posts tagged with "hospital"

Rita Azar, 360 MAGAZINE, travel, illustration

Medjet COVID-19 Air Medical Transport Benefits

Medjet, the industry leading air medical transport and travel security membership program, announced today that it has expanded its transport benefits for COVID-19. Effective today, Medjet members who fall ill from COVID-19, and become hospitalized while traveling globally, may now be transported to a home hospital of their choice. In October of 2020, Medjet was the first program of its kind to add COVID-19 transport benefits, but previously had limited transport services to travel within the US, Canada, Mexico, Central America and the Caribbean.

“As more and more countries in Europe, Asia, Africa and South America have opened their borders to travelers, we have increased our COVID-19 transport capabilities. Our members’ safety is always our top priority, and we continually evolve our services based on member needs,” said Mike Hallman, CEO of Medjet.

The expansion of global benefits will not increase Medjet membership prices, and benefits are applicable to both existing and new MedjetAssist and MedjetHorizon memberships as of July 12, 2021.

“While COVID is still a top concern for travelers, our own internal polling (in May) also showed that members were still very concerned with all the other accidents and illnesses that kept us busy pre-COVID. I think there’s now a heightened awareness of vulnerability, overall, while away from home. We hope that being able to get members back from more destinations, even for COVID, gives them the confidence to enjoy traveling again,” said Hallman.

Despite the increased cost of providing transport for a COVID-19 positive member, Medjet will continue to absorb 100% of all costs associated with the transport, and maintain its “no cost caps on transports” policy. A regular air ambulance transport can cost up to $30,000 domestically, and up to $180,000 internationally. Medjet memberships start at $99.

Updates and restrictions surrounding COVID-19 transport benefits can be found here. Full Medjet rules and regulations can be found here.

ABOUT MEDJET

Medjet was the first company in the U.S. to implement the air-medical transport membership concept. Since 1991, Medjet has forged a global network of air medical transport and security response providers to meet traveler health and safety needs. At any given time, Medjet has access to hundreds of air ambulances, commercial medical escorts, and highly trained security and crisis response personnel, ready to launch from both domestic and international locations. The company most notably differentiates from other players in the market through its commitment to arrange air medical transfer, regardless of medical necessity, to the member’s hospital of choice in their home country. It is the preferred program for virtually every major luxury travel consortia (Virtuoso, Signature, Westa), and thousands of organizations including AARP, Morgan Stanley, and the NFL.

Medjet memberships are available to residents of the U.S., Canada and Mexico, and protect members while traveling 150 miles or more from their primary residence (domestic and international travel benefits).

Rolls-Royce Makes Custom Car for Children’s Hospital

Every motor car that is meticulously handcrafted at the Home of Rolls-Royce is unique, with its own story and inspiration. But one Bespoke project has a special place in the affections of the marque’s 2,000-strong workforce – and it recently returned to the company’s Global Centre of Luxury Manufacturing Excellence, at Goodwood, for some much-needed TLC.

The Rolls-Royce SRH belongs to St Richard’s Hospital in Chichester, where it performs a vitally important role: young patients on the paediatric day surgery unit use it to drive themselves to theatre when the time comes for their operation, rather than walking or being wheeled on a trolley. This simple yet ingenious idea transforms what would otherwise be an anxious, intimidating moment into a truly memorable and enjoyable experience for children, parents and staff alike.

Since the car entered service in 2017, it has conveyed no fewer than 2,000 brave youngsters in true Rolls-Royce comfort and style. But inevitably, its singular working condition, the marque is unaware of any other Rolls-Royce being routinely driven along corridors by unlicensed children in a state of nervous excitement had exacted a toll on its beautiful Bespoke bodywork and paint. 

The car was therefore recalled to the Home of Rolls-Royce for its first 100,000m* service, lovingly carried out by specialists from the Bespoke Team and other technical and craft departments, to restore it to its original condition.

The car was built in 2017, when the hospital asked Rolls-Royce if it could repair the original theatre transport – an electric plastic Jeep – that had succumbed after suffering one too many traumatic injuries of its own. The marque respectfully declined, offering instead to create a new one, to Rolls-Royce standards.

A small team designed and constructed a Bespoke bodyshell in fibreglass reinforced with carbon-fibre, complete with the marque’s iconic Pantheon grille. The bonnet strips were ‘real’ ones cut to length; the two-tone finish was applied exactly as it would be on a full-size commission, with the wheel covers, seats and coachlines all perfectly color-matched.

The seat was hand-made from wood, with padding upholstered in medical-grade vinyl, hot‑welded to eliminate seams that could trap dirt. The team also designed a custom aluminium footwell that lifts out for cleaning.

In keeping with a Bespoke project, a number of components were individually created, including handcrafted treadplates, 3D-printed dash, wheel caps and spacers and trim pieces. As a true Rolls-Royce, it is completed with a laser-etched RR badge and its own Spirit of Ecstasy mascot.

Electric power provides the authentic noiseless Rolls-Royce driving experience; and like its road-going counterparts, its speed is limited, in this case to 4 mph. The project took around 400 hours to complete.

Following its service and repairs, the car has now returned to the Hospital to resume its humble but transformational duties.

Linda Collins, Day Surgery Unit Sister, said, “The servicing of our mini Rolls-Royce is perfect timing as we transition out of Covid restrictions and begin to restore our paediatric surgical services. Once again, our youngest patients can experience the full use of the car as part of their journey to surgery. This helps to take the emphasis away from the procedure they’re undergoing and focus on the unique experience of driving a genuine Rolls-Royce while being safely supervised through the hospital corridors. A huge thank you to Rolls-Royce Motor Cars for helping to keep our beloved little car in tip top condition.”

Airplane illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Medjet Partnership with Luxury Card

Pioneer in Air Medical Transport & Travel Security Memberships Now Available with Exclusive Pricing for Luxury Card’s Mastercard Gold Card, Mastercard Black Card and Mastercard Titanium Card Members

Medjet, the industry leader in air medical transport and travel security memberships for travelers, has announced a new partnership with Luxury Card, a global leader in the premium credit card market. Luxury Card’s Mastercard Gold Card, Mastercard Black Card and Mastercard Titanium Card members are now eligible for discounts on the company’s two membership options: MedjetAssist and MedjetHorizon.


“Medjet offers unparalleled professionalism and peace of mind,” says Marina Kissam, Vice President of Customer Experience at Luxury Card. “Safety while traveling is a growing priority, so we are pleased that our Cardmembers will be able to take advantage of exclusive savings on Medjet memberships before they embark on their next adventure.”

An industry forerunner, Medjet provides travelers hospitalized more than 150 miles from home with premier air medical transport to a hospital of their choice at home. Most travel insurance medical evacuation coverage is only to the “nearest acceptable” hospital. In October of 2020, Medjet was the first program of its kind to announce transport benefits for its members hospitalized with COVID-19 in the contiguous United States, Canada, Mexico and Belize, the Caribbean, the Bahamas, and Bermuda at no additional cost to members. That was followed shortly thereafter with the addition of Costa Rica and, just this month, Medjet added all of Central America (including Panama, Guatemala, and Honduras) to the list of countries from which members can be transported, if hospitalized with COVID-19.

“Even before the pandemic, statistics showed that one in 30 trips end in a medical emergency,” said Mike Hallman, CEO of Medjet. “We hope this new partnership, and Medjet protection, can bring a little more confidence to travelers, knowing that if the worst happens, they have someone to call.”

Since 1991, Medjet has upheld the highest service and standards in the industry. With the partnership between Luxury Card and Medjet, Luxury Card members can now receive 10% off all annual MedjetAssist memberships, which start at $265 per year for an individual, $359 for a family (two adults and up to five children). Additional security and crisis response protections are available with the MedjetHorizon membership for just an additional $149 per year for individual memberships or an additional $179 per year for family memberships. This discount is available to Luxury Card members until December 31, 2021. 

Medjet Website

Luxury Card Website

COVID-19 Trial Tests if Common Drug Can Keep Patients Out of Hospital

At-risk people diagnosed with COVID-19 across the United States and Canada can participate in a clinical trial testing whether a common drug can keep them from getting sicker and keep them out of the hospital.­­

The trial, conducted by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, is based on a discovery by the University of Virginia School of Medicine’s Alban Gaultier, PhD, and a former graduate student, Dorian A Rosen, PhD.

Gaultier and Rosen found last year that the antidepressant fluvoxamine may stop the deadly inflammation known as sepsis, in which the immune response spirals out of control. The drug’s apparent benefit for dampening dangerous inflammation prompted the Washington University researchers to begin investigating its potential benefit for COVID-19, which can also cause dangerous overreactions of the immune system.

“If this clinical trial is proven successful, fluvoxamine could become a standard treatment for patients newly diagnosed with COVID-19, especially patients at risk,” Gaultier said. “Even the best vaccines do not protect 100% of the population, and discovery of safe and affordable treatments to prevent COVID-19-associated complications is critical.”

Fluvoxamine and COVID-19

Earlier this year, the Washington University researchers launched their first clinical trial of the drug in patients with COVID-19. That trial compared fluvoxamine with a harmless placebo in 152 adult outpatients. None of the 80 participants who received fluvoxamine became seriously ill after 15 days, while six patients who received placebo did. Of those six, four were hospitalized, for periods ranging from four to 21 days. One was on a ventilator for 10 days.

Based on those initial results, Washington University is now launching a much larger trial open to residents across the United States and Canada. The trial is seeking approximately 880 at-risk participants, age 18 and older, who have tested positive for COVID-19 and are experiencing mild symptoms.

Participants will be provided with either fluvoxamine or a placebo for approximately 15 days. No face-to-face contact is required; everything necessary will be sent to the participants’ doorsteps.

Contactless Check-Ins

The researchers will track the patients by videochat, email or telephone to determine if fluvoxamine provides a benefit and helps keep participants out of the hospital. During brief daily check-ins, trial participants will report their oxygen levels, blood pressure and temperature, along with whether they are feeling shortness of breath or have had any other problems.

The study team will continue to follow the participants for approximately 90 days after they have finished taking fluvoxamine or the placebo.

The trial is open to people who have at least one risk factor for severe COVID-19, such as being 40 or older, being part of a high-risk racial/ethnic group (such as African-American, Hispanic, Native American or biracial), or having one or more medical conditions such as obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, a lung disease or an immune disorder such as rheumatoid arthritis.

For more information about the trial, visit this website.

Dog and Cat illustrated by Mina Tocalini for 360 MAGAZINE.

What To Do For Dog Bites

Every year, 4.7 million people in the United States suffer dog bites.

Dogs might be our best friends, but the reality is that they’ve got some sharp teeth. If you’re in the wrong place at the wrong time, you could fall victim to their pearly whites. 

If you suffer a dog puncture wound or a full-on bite, it is important to know what to do in the aftermath. 

Keep reading to find out the five most important things to do after a dog bite when it comes to your health and legal action you may need to take.

Document the Wound

If you or someone around you can, take pictures of the wound before tending to it. Having evidence of the dog puncture wound or dog bite in its original state will be helpful if legal action is taken later on. It will provide photo evidence of the severity of the injury.

Call for Help

Place a clean towel or cloth over the wound, and apply pressure to stop the bleeding. If the injury is serious and requires professional care, call emergency services. While you are waiting for them to arrive, you can begin to collect information from the dog’s owner and anyone in the area who witnessed the event. 

Exchange Information 

Make sure to exchange contact information with the dog’s owner. You will need these details in case legal or insurance-related action is taken and because you will want to be able to obtain information on the dog’s medical history. Be sure to get their name, address, phone number, and any other relevant contact information. 

It will be important to find out whether the dog was vaccinated for certain diseases such as rabies because, after a dog bite, you are at risk of infection from any bacteria or illness the dog might have had and will require treatment accordingly.

Get Contact Information of Witnesses

If there were witnesses at the scene of the crime, make sure to get their information. In the case of a lawsuit or insurance claim, witness accounts of the incident will likely help your case. They will be able to corroborate and provide a more accurate idea of the events that took place. 

If you decide legal action is the appropriate route, you will need to present all of the information obtained at the crime scene to a dog bite lawyer. The lawyer will use the information provided to build a case. 

Seek Medical Help

After an aggressive encounter with a dog, you should seek help from a medical professional who knows how to treat a dog bite. A doctor will be able to determine whether you need stitches, clean the wound thoroughly, and advise you on how to prevent the wound from getting infected.

If you do notice signs of infection, such as redness, pus, increased pain, or fever, it is important to go back to the doctor for further treatment.

Taking Care of a Dog Puncture Wound or Bite

If you have suffered from a dog puncture wound or a dog bite, it is important to follow all of these steps. They will help you stay healthy by minimizing the risk of infection, and they will allow you to qualify for the best legal help possible. The more information you are able to obtain about the dog and its owner, the better. 

Lebanon explosion illustrated by Mina Tocalini for 360 MAGAZINE.

Huge Explosion In Beirut

By Vaughn Lowery × Rita Azar

According to CNN, there was a massive explosion in Beirut just now. Shattering glass and debris followed by monstrous amounts of smoke.

A Massive explosion hit an ammunition storage in the port of Beirut. Many Lebanese civilians have been affected, houses have been burned down, glass has been shattered and there has been fatalities.

This blast has not just hit Beirut’s Eastern areas next to the port but has destroyed many key infrastructure building like hospitals, infrastructure buildings, kilometers away, including the headquarters of former prime minister Saad Hariri. The explosive could be heard all the way to the Bekka valleys capital Zahle 56 kilometers away. Al Jazeera’s Zeina Khodr, reporting from Beirut stated, “The explosion was felt across the city.” She added, “There is chaos in the streets.” Tensions are higher than ever.

The source of the explosion is still unknown.

Actual footage can be seen here.

Check out coverage by BBC.

Mask illustrated by Mina Tocalini for 360 MAGAZINE.

Caring for Our Caregivers

Caring for Our Caregivers, an initiative launched in response to the real and rigorous toll the COVID-19 pandemic has taken on healthcare workers, is providing frontline heroes around the world with wellness and relaxation resources via apps preloaded onto donated tablets. Led by nonprofit organization Sufi Psychology Association (SPA), the initiative was developed in an immediate response and driven solely by donations, volunteers and good will, the initiative has resulted in  491 donated tablets and 16,300 headsets among 151 hospitals to 16,791 healthcare heroes across the globe to date, spanning four countries and 25 states in the U.S. Diligently working to expand their reach as the pandemic continues on, the SPA delivers tablets with a preloaded Sufi meditation and mental health app to doctors, nurses, therapists and other medical professionals internationally in an effort to offer frontline heroes the opportunity and resources to decompress and take care of themselves during an extremely challenging time. Sufism, which is based upon experiential learning and understanding, offers techniques for managing the long-term impacts and effects the pandemic has taken on many. 

 “As the COVID-19 crisis demanded healthcare workers take on unimaginable stress and sacrifice their mental health to keep us all safe, we knew that we must do something to mitigate the effects and make sure they were being taken care of, too,” said Saloumeh Bozorgzadeh, PsyD., President of Sufi Psychology Association. “Launching the Caring for Our Caregivers initiative has made a direct impact on the lives of many selfless medical professionals. The key to our program is that the sessions can be utilized on the user’s time, as we know daily schedules are anything but regular while the world fights this virus. Whether recipients utilize the technology before a shift or after a hard day’s work, we want to ensure they have the tools needed to unwind and recharge.”  

From PTSD to exhaustion, burnout and trauma among healthcare workers has been on the rise long before quarantine fatigue. The need for access to these resources is crucial to prevent deterioration of mental health amongst healthcare industry workers, and Caring for Our Caregivers has many donations scheduled to continue on with their mission. 

 Launched in a direct response to the COVID-19 pandemic and led by Sufi Psychology Association, Caring for Our Caregivers delivers tablets preloaded with meditation, wellness and relaxation resources to healthcare workers via hospital deliveries around the globe. Driven solely by donations, volunteers and goodwill, they have donated 491 tablets and 16,246 headsets to 149 hospitals around the globe spanning four countries and 25 states in the U.S. to date.  

Sufi Psychology Association (SPA) is a nonprofit organization based in California specializing in exercising the principles of Sufi Psychology of M.T.O Shahmaghsoudi®, a.k.a The Science of the Soul, in order to expand upon the current limitations of psychology, encompassing the entirety of the human being. SPA practices the principles of Sufism so that each individual may come to know his or her innermost self, far beyond thoughts, feelings and behaviors, reacquainting them with their true identity, the “I”. In identifying the “I”, one moves past the habitual patterns of behavior, repetitive thought process and emotional reactivity to discover harmony, balance and joy from within. The SPA reminds individuals that there is more to them than just their situations and circumstances. In addition to holding workshops and experiential conferences at universities throughout the school year, The SPA offers many other means of learning, including workshops, educational information at weekend retreats and Tamarkoz® classes for credit. Additionally, the SPA conducts research on Sufi Psychology, the practices of Sufism and publishes a semi-annual journal, Sufism: The Science of the Soul.

Follow Sufi Psychology Association: Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

Tamar Braxton Attempted Suicide

By Eamonn Burke

American singer, actress, and TV personality Tamar Braxton was found by her boyfriend unconscious in her hotel room last Thursday. After an emergency call about a possible overdose she was transported to a local hospital. It’s reported that she had been drinking and using prescription pills that night, and the incident is believed to be an attempted suicide after this note was allegedly discovered:

“I am a slave. I do not own my life. My stories. My pictures. My thoughts or beliefs. I’ve asked my massa to free me. I’m threatened and punished for it. The only way I see out is death. I will choose that before I continue to love (sic) like this. Please help me.”

Tamar’s team has thanked fans and friends for the “outpouring of support that Tamar has received”, which is “a testament to the light that she brings to people.” Her family, meanwhile, asks fans to “pray 4 our family.”

It’s no secret that Tamar was having a tough time leading up to the incident. She sent an email the the bosses of WeTV, her network, shaming them for destroying her family and making her suicidal. She claimed that the show Braxton Family Values distorted the image of her family and caused “disarray” among them, even likening it to “cruel white slave masters who once chained our forefathers.”

Reports say Tamar is now awake and fully conscious, and is being moved to another hospital where she can receive more specific treatment for her apparent mental illness. She will remain there until further action is determined.

Doctor illustration

Nurse Hospitalized Despite Negative COVID Test

By Eamonn Burke

Heather Valentine, a 24 year old ICU nurse in Houston, is now in the ICU with a case of the novel coronavirus. After noticing heightened exhaustion during her shifts and later a fever and cough, she got an antibody test. She came back negative, but according to the CDC these tests can be wrong around 50% of the time. A viral test for COVID, taken the next day, also came back negative. Her doctor, however, asked her to come in for a CT scan, and based on these results he was certain that she had the illness.

Initially skeptical that she had the virus, Valentine now spreads an important message. “You never think it’s going to happen to you, but I’m a perfect example,” she said. “Take every precaution, wear a mask, don’t go out if you don’t have to, it’s not worth it.”

This comes as Texas sees one of the worst bouts of COVID-19 in the world, seeing new records in cases daily. The hospitals are overrun and running out of supplies, as are many others across the country with the recent surge of the coronavirus across the nation.

360 Magazine, Wheelchair

‘UZ Leuven’ Minipacemakers

On Thursday May 28th, the Belgian university hospital UZ Leuven implanted a new type of wireless minipacemaker in a patient. This was a first in Europe. The new generation of minipacemakers allows two times as many patients to qualify, in comparison with the first generation.

The Micra pacemaker is a wireless minipacemaker that has been used in UZ Leuven since 2015. Surgery for such a small pacemaker is a lot less invasive than for a normal pacemaker. The device is placed in the heart via a small incision in the groin. The minipacemaker is invisible to the patient and in the first generation of the device, researchers found that the number of complications could be reduced with 63 percent.

Helping more patients

So far, the minipacemaker could only be used in 16 percent of the patient requiring a pacemaker. “The first generation of the device only measured the heart activity in one ventricle of the heart. Patients that needed to have the heart activity in the atrium measured as well, did not qualify. With this new type of pacemaker, we can also treat patients with a complete interruption of the heart activity between the ventricle and the atrium”, according to dr. Christophe Garweg, cardiologist in UZ Leuven.

With the new generation of the Micra pacemaker, up to 40 percent of the patients could qualify. Dr. Garweg: “The new pacemaker can also measure heart activity in the atrium and as such coordinate the electrical activity between atrium and ventricle. This restores the normal heart rhythm and improves the patient’s quality of life. The minipacemaker operates more or less like a conventional pacemaker, which is implanted under the skin and connected to the heart with two leads.”

First implants

UZ Leuven was actively involved in the development of the new pacemaker. At the moment the new type of pacemaker is only used in the context of clinical trials. At a later time, its use will be extended. In the meantime, the new pacemaker has been implanted in two patients. Both procedures went according to plan, and both patients are doing well.

A revolution for the pacemaker

The development of the wireless pacemaker in 2009 was a big revolution in the history of the pacemaker. It was the first big step forward since the clinical introduction of the pacemaker in the sixties. Worldwide, 35,000 Micra-systems have been implanted. UZ Leuven started with implanting the minipacemakers as the first Belgian hospital in 2015. In the meantime, for Belgium UZ Leuven is the hospital with the most expertise in Micra’s, in Europe it is in the top 5. In Belgium, the technology is not yet reimbursed so for now UZ Leuven finances the device for the patient with its own means.

Pacemaker and bradycardia

A pacemaker is required when a patient’s heart rhythm is too low (bradycardia) and medication is no longer sufficient. It stops the heart from pumping enough oxygenated blood through the body. Patients experience difficulty during physical exercise: they faint, tire quickly, and run out of breath more quickly. A pacemaker replaces the heart’s natural rhythm thanks to electrical impulses.