Posts tagged with "hospital"

Airplane illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Medjet Partnership with Luxury Card

Pioneer in Air Medical Transport & Travel Security Memberships Now Available with Exclusive Pricing for Luxury Card’s Mastercard Gold Card, Mastercard Black Card and Mastercard Titanium Card Members

Medjet, the industry leader in air medical transport and travel security memberships for travelers, has announced a new partnership with Luxury Card, a global leader in the premium credit card market. Luxury Card’s Mastercard Gold Card, Mastercard Black Card and Mastercard Titanium Card members are now eligible for discounts on the company’s two membership options: MedjetAssist and MedjetHorizon.


“Medjet offers unparalleled professionalism and peace of mind,” says Marina Kissam, Vice President of Customer Experience at Luxury Card. “Safety while traveling is a growing priority, so we are pleased that our Cardmembers will be able to take advantage of exclusive savings on Medjet memberships before they embark on their next adventure.”

An industry forerunner, Medjet provides travelers hospitalized more than 150 miles from home with premier air medical transport to a hospital of their choice at home. Most travel insurance medical evacuation coverage is only to the “nearest acceptable” hospital. In October of 2020, Medjet was the first program of its kind to announce transport benefits for its members hospitalized with COVID-19 in the contiguous United States, Canada, Mexico and Belize, the Caribbean, the Bahamas, and Bermuda at no additional cost to members. That was followed shortly thereafter with the addition of Costa Rica and, just this month, Medjet added all of Central America (including Panama, Guatemala, and Honduras) to the list of countries from which members can be transported, if hospitalized with COVID-19.

“Even before the pandemic, statistics showed that one in 30 trips end in a medical emergency,” said Mike Hallman, CEO of Medjet. “We hope this new partnership, and Medjet protection, can bring a little more confidence to travelers, knowing that if the worst happens, they have someone to call.”

Since 1991, Medjet has upheld the highest service and standards in the industry. With the partnership between Luxury Card and Medjet, Luxury Card members can now receive 10% off all annual MedjetAssist memberships, which start at $265 per year for an individual, $359 for a family (two adults and up to five children). Additional security and crisis response protections are available with the MedjetHorizon membership for just an additional $149 per year for individual memberships or an additional $179 per year for family memberships. This discount is available to Luxury Card members until December 31, 2021. 

Medjet Website

Luxury Card Website

COVID-19 Trial Tests if Common Drug Can Keep Patients Out of Hospital

At-risk people diagnosed with COVID-19 across the United States and Canada can participate in a clinical trial testing whether a common drug can keep them from getting sicker and keep them out of the hospital.­­

The trial, conducted by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, is based on a discovery by the University of Virginia School of Medicine’s Alban Gaultier, PhD, and a former graduate student, Dorian A Rosen, PhD.

Gaultier and Rosen found last year that the antidepressant fluvoxamine may stop the deadly inflammation known as sepsis, in which the immune response spirals out of control. The drug’s apparent benefit for dampening dangerous inflammation prompted the Washington University researchers to begin investigating its potential benefit for COVID-19, which can also cause dangerous overreactions of the immune system.

“If this clinical trial is proven successful, fluvoxamine could become a standard treatment for patients newly diagnosed with COVID-19, especially patients at risk,” Gaultier said. “Even the best vaccines do not protect 100% of the population, and discovery of safe and affordable treatments to prevent COVID-19-associated complications is critical.”

Fluvoxamine and COVID-19

Earlier this year, the Washington University researchers launched their first clinical trial of the drug in patients with COVID-19. That trial compared fluvoxamine with a harmless placebo in 152 adult outpatients. None of the 80 participants who received fluvoxamine became seriously ill after 15 days, while six patients who received placebo did. Of those six, four were hospitalized, for periods ranging from four to 21 days. One was on a ventilator for 10 days.

Based on those initial results, Washington University is now launching a much larger trial open to residents across the United States and Canada. The trial is seeking approximately 880 at-risk participants, age 18 and older, who have tested positive for COVID-19 and are experiencing mild symptoms.

Participants will be provided with either fluvoxamine or a placebo for approximately 15 days. No face-to-face contact is required; everything necessary will be sent to the participants’ doorsteps.

Contactless Check-Ins

The researchers will track the patients by videochat, email or telephone to determine if fluvoxamine provides a benefit and helps keep participants out of the hospital. During brief daily check-ins, trial participants will report their oxygen levels, blood pressure and temperature, along with whether they are feeling shortness of breath or have had any other problems.

The study team will continue to follow the participants for approximately 90 days after they have finished taking fluvoxamine or the placebo.

The trial is open to people who have at least one risk factor for severe COVID-19, such as being 40 or older, being part of a high-risk racial/ethnic group (such as African-American, Hispanic, Native American or biracial), or having one or more medical conditions such as obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, a lung disease or an immune disorder such as rheumatoid arthritis.

For more information about the trial, visit this website.

Dog and Cat illustrated by Mina Tocalini for 360 MAGAZINE.

What To Do For Dog Bites

Every year, 4.7 million people in the United States suffer dog bites.

Dogs might be our best friends, but the reality is that they’ve got some sharp teeth. If you’re in the wrong place at the wrong time, you could fall victim to their pearly whites. 

If you suffer a dog puncture wound or a full-on bite, it is important to know what to do in the aftermath. 

Keep reading to find out the five most important things to do after a dog bite when it comes to your health and legal action you may need to take.

Document the Wound

If you or someone around you can, take pictures of the wound before tending to it. Having evidence of the dog puncture wound or dog bite in its original state will be helpful if legal action is taken later on. It will provide photo evidence of the severity of the injury.

Call for Help

Place a clean towel or cloth over the wound, and apply pressure to stop the bleeding. If the injury is serious and requires professional care, call emergency services. While you are waiting for them to arrive, you can begin to collect information from the dog’s owner and anyone in the area who witnessed the event. 

Exchange Information 

Make sure to exchange contact information with the dog’s owner. You will need these details in case legal or insurance-related action is taken and because you will want to be able to obtain information on the dog’s medical history. Be sure to get their name, address, phone number, and any other relevant contact information. 

It will be important to find out whether the dog was vaccinated for certain diseases such as rabies because, after a dog bite, you are at risk of infection from any bacteria or illness the dog might have had and will require treatment accordingly.

Get Contact Information of Witnesses

If there were witnesses at the scene of the crime, make sure to get their information. In the case of a lawsuit or insurance claim, witness accounts of the incident will likely help your case. They will be able to corroborate and provide a more accurate idea of the events that took place. 

If you decide legal action is the appropriate route, you will need to present all of the information obtained at the crime scene to a dog bite lawyer. The lawyer will use the information provided to build a case. 

Seek Medical Help

After an aggressive encounter with a dog, you should seek help from a medical professional who knows how to treat a dog bite. A doctor will be able to determine whether you need stitches, clean the wound thoroughly, and advise you on how to prevent the wound from getting infected.

If you do notice signs of infection, such as redness, pus, increased pain, or fever, it is important to go back to the doctor for further treatment.

Taking Care of a Dog Puncture Wound or Bite

If you have suffered from a dog puncture wound or a dog bite, it is important to follow all of these steps. They will help you stay healthy by minimizing the risk of infection, and they will allow you to qualify for the best legal help possible. The more information you are able to obtain about the dog and its owner, the better. 

Lebanon explosion illustrated by Mina Tocalini for 360 MAGAZINE.

Huge Explosion In Beirut

By Vaughn Lowery × Rita Azar

According to CNN, there was a massive explosion in Beirut just now. Shattering glass and debris followed by monstrous amounts of smoke.

A Massive explosion hit an ammunition storage in the port of Beirut. Many Lebanese civilians have been affected, houses have been burned down, glass has been shattered and there has been fatalities.

This blast has not just hit Beirut’s Eastern areas next to the port but has destroyed many key infrastructure building like hospitals, infrastructure buildings, kilometers away, including the headquarters of former prime minister Saad Hariri. The explosive could be heard all the way to the Bekka valleys capital Zahle 56 kilometers away. Al Jazeera’s Zeina Khodr, reporting from Beirut stated, “The explosion was felt across the city.” She added, “There is chaos in the streets.” Tensions are higher than ever.

The source of the explosion is still unknown.

Actual footage can be seen here.

Check out coverage by BBC.

Mask illustrated by Mina Tocalini for 360 MAGAZINE.

Caring for Our Caregivers

Caring for Our Caregivers, an initiative launched in response to the real and rigorous toll the COVID-19 pandemic has taken on healthcare workers, is providing frontline heroes around the world with wellness and relaxation resources via apps preloaded onto donated tablets. Led by nonprofit organization Sufi Psychology Association (SPA), the initiative was developed in an immediate response and driven solely by donations, volunteers and good will, the initiative has resulted in  491 donated tablets and 16,300 headsets among 151 hospitals to 16,791 healthcare heroes across the globe to date, spanning four countries and 25 states in the U.S. Diligently working to expand their reach as the pandemic continues on, the SPA delivers tablets with a preloaded Sufi meditation and mental health app to doctors, nurses, therapists and other medical professionals internationally in an effort to offer frontline heroes the opportunity and resources to decompress and take care of themselves during an extremely challenging time. Sufism, which is based upon experiential learning and understanding, offers techniques for managing the long-term impacts and effects the pandemic has taken on many. 

 “As the COVID-19 crisis demanded healthcare workers take on unimaginable stress and sacrifice their mental health to keep us all safe, we knew that we must do something to mitigate the effects and make sure they were being taken care of, too,” said Saloumeh Bozorgzadeh, PsyD., President of Sufi Psychology Association. “Launching the Caring for Our Caregivers initiative has made a direct impact on the lives of many selfless medical professionals. The key to our program is that the sessions can be utilized on the user’s time, as we know daily schedules are anything but regular while the world fights this virus. Whether recipients utilize the technology before a shift or after a hard day’s work, we want to ensure they have the tools needed to unwind and recharge.”  

From PTSD to exhaustion, burnout and trauma among healthcare workers has been on the rise long before quarantine fatigue. The need for access to these resources is crucial to prevent deterioration of mental health amongst healthcare industry workers, and Caring for Our Caregivers has many donations scheduled to continue on with their mission. 

 Launched in a direct response to the COVID-19 pandemic and led by Sufi Psychology Association, Caring for Our Caregivers delivers tablets preloaded with meditation, wellness and relaxation resources to healthcare workers via hospital deliveries around the globe. Driven solely by donations, volunteers and goodwill, they have donated 491 tablets and 16,246 headsets to 149 hospitals around the globe spanning four countries and 25 states in the U.S. to date.  

Sufi Psychology Association (SPA) is a nonprofit organization based in California specializing in exercising the principles of Sufi Psychology of M.T.O Shahmaghsoudi®, a.k.a The Science of the Soul, in order to expand upon the current limitations of psychology, encompassing the entirety of the human being. SPA practices the principles of Sufism so that each individual may come to know his or her innermost self, far beyond thoughts, feelings and behaviors, reacquainting them with their true identity, the “I”. In identifying the “I”, one moves past the habitual patterns of behavior, repetitive thought process and emotional reactivity to discover harmony, balance and joy from within. The SPA reminds individuals that there is more to them than just their situations and circumstances. In addition to holding workshops and experiential conferences at universities throughout the school year, The SPA offers many other means of learning, including workshops, educational information at weekend retreats and Tamarkoz® classes for credit. Additionally, the SPA conducts research on Sufi Psychology, the practices of Sufism and publishes a semi-annual journal, Sufism: The Science of the Soul.

Follow Sufi Psychology Association: Facebook | Instagram | Twitter

Tamar Braxton Attempted Suicide

By Eamonn Burke

American singer, actress, and TV personality Tamar Braxton was found by her boyfriend unconscious in her hotel room last Thursday. After an emergency call about a possible overdose she was transported to a local hospital. It’s reported that she had been drinking and using prescription pills that night, and the incident is believed to be an attempted suicide after this note was allegedly discovered:

“I am a slave. I do not own my life. My stories. My pictures. My thoughts or beliefs. I’ve asked my massa to free me. I’m threatened and punished for it. The only way I see out is death. I will choose that before I continue to love (sic) like this. Please help me.”

Tamar’s team has thanked fans and friends for the “outpouring of support that Tamar has received”, which is “a testament to the light that she brings to people.” Her family, meanwhile, asks fans to “pray 4 our family.”

It’s no secret that Tamar was having a tough time leading up to the incident. She sent an email the the bosses of WeTV, her network, shaming them for destroying her family and making her suicidal. She claimed that the show Braxton Family Values distorted the image of her family and caused “disarray” among them, even likening it to “cruel white slave masters who once chained our forefathers.”

Reports say Tamar is now awake and fully conscious, and is being moved to another hospital where she can receive more specific treatment for her apparent mental illness. She will remain there until further action is determined.

Doctor illustration

Nurse Hospitalized Despite Negative COVID Test

By Eamonn Burke

Heather Valentine, a 24 year old ICU nurse in Houston, is now in the ICU with a case of the novel coronavirus. After noticing heightened exhaustion during her shifts and later a fever and cough, she got an antibody test. She came back negative, but according to the CDC these tests can be wrong around 50% of the time. A viral test for COVID, taken the next day, also came back negative. Her doctor, however, asked her to come in for a CT scan, and based on these results he was certain that she had the illness.

Initially skeptical that she had the virus, Valentine now spreads an important message. “You never think it’s going to happen to you, but I’m a perfect example,” she said. “Take every precaution, wear a mask, don’t go out if you don’t have to, it’s not worth it.”

This comes as Texas sees one of the worst bouts of COVID-19 in the world, seeing new records in cases daily. The hospitals are overrun and running out of supplies, as are many others across the country with the recent surge of the coronavirus across the nation.

360 Magazine, Wheelchair

‘UZ Leuven’ Minipacemakers

On Thursday May 28th, the Belgian university hospital UZ Leuven implanted a new type of wireless minipacemaker in a patient. This was a first in Europe. The new generation of minipacemakers allows two times as many patients to qualify, in comparison with the first generation.

The Micra pacemaker is a wireless minipacemaker that has been used in UZ Leuven since 2015. Surgery for such a small pacemaker is a lot less invasive than for a normal pacemaker. The device is placed in the heart via a small incision in the groin. The minipacemaker is invisible to the patient and in the first generation of the device, researchers found that the number of complications could be reduced with 63 percent.

Helping more patients

So far, the minipacemaker could only be used in 16 percent of the patient requiring a pacemaker. “The first generation of the device only measured the heart activity in one ventricle of the heart. Patients that needed to have the heart activity in the atrium measured as well, did not qualify. With this new type of pacemaker, we can also treat patients with a complete interruption of the heart activity between the ventricle and the atrium”, according to dr. Christophe Garweg, cardiologist in UZ Leuven.

With the new generation of the Micra pacemaker, up to 40 percent of the patients could qualify. Dr. Garweg: “The new pacemaker can also measure heart activity in the atrium and as such coordinate the electrical activity between atrium and ventricle. This restores the normal heart rhythm and improves the patient’s quality of life. The minipacemaker operates more or less like a conventional pacemaker, which is implanted under the skin and connected to the heart with two leads.”

First implants

UZ Leuven was actively involved in the development of the new pacemaker. At the moment the new type of pacemaker is only used in the context of clinical trials. At a later time, its use will be extended. In the meantime, the new pacemaker has been implanted in two patients. Both procedures went according to plan, and both patients are doing well.

A revolution for the pacemaker

The development of the wireless pacemaker in 2009 was a big revolution in the history of the pacemaker. It was the first big step forward since the clinical introduction of the pacemaker in the sixties. Worldwide, 35,000 Micra-systems have been implanted. UZ Leuven started with implanting the minipacemakers as the first Belgian hospital in 2015. In the meantime, for Belgium UZ Leuven is the hospital with the most expertise in Micra’s, in Europe it is in the top 5. In Belgium, the technology is not yet reimbursed so for now UZ Leuven finances the device for the patient with its own means.

Pacemaker and bradycardia

A pacemaker is required when a patient’s heart rhythm is too low (bradycardia) and medication is no longer sufficient. It stops the heart from pumping enough oxygenated blood through the body. Patients experience difficulty during physical exercise: they faint, tire quickly, and run out of breath more quickly. A pacemaker replaces the heart’s natural rhythm thanks to electrical impulses.

Covid and health illustration

Coronavirus 2nd Wave

By Eamonn Burke

As states are beginning to reopen from the months-long quarantine due to the outbreak of the novel coronavirus COVID-19, and summer approaches, hoards of people are going back in public in a largely relaxed manner in terms of the social distancing and protective measures. Restaurants, shops, and gyms such as Equinox are opening, and people are excited to get back to normal life. Another major source of the spread has been protests, as crowds gather in cities across the nation to fight racial injustices in the country. While most are seen wearing masks, the spatial proximity is still certainly cause for concern.

It should come as no surprise, then, that COVID cases have spiked in recent weeks. 19 states, mostly in the southern and western parts of the country, reported increases in average COVID cases in the past two weeks. Texas has been hit especially hard – hospitalizations have doubled since memorial day, and hit record highs for multiple days in a row. North Carolina and Florida have experienced similar peaks. The county judge in Houston is contemplating another stay at home order.

There is concern in the east as well, as New York Governor Andrew Cuomo warns against a comeback of the virus in response to a video of a large crowd of people in Manhattan with few masks in sight.

The stock market is reacting to these troubling signs, as the Dow Jones Industrial Average has plummeted, as has S&P and Nasdaq.

Recent projections put the U.S. at 130,000 total deaths by July 4, and over 100,000 more deaths by September. There is good news too – Dr. Anthony Fauci says that the progress in the search for a vaccine is promising, and we could have trials running by the end of this year.

Ivory Rowen, illustration, 360 MAGAZINE

Cook County Hospital Restoration

Hyatt Place and Hyatt House Chicago Medical/University District, the first combined Hyatt Place and Hyatt House hotels located in Chicago, is set to open this summer in the Beaux-Arts classical-style landmark formerly the site of the remarkable 106-year old Cook County Hospital, at 1835 W. Harrison St. on the Near West Side. This 342,000 square foot adaptive reuse project, part of a $150 million multiphase plan spearheaded by Murphy Development and SOM, in a design-build collaboration with Walsh Construction, Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates, Inc., and KOO, will also feature over 4,000 sq. feet of meeting space, open concept public spaces, a 24-hour fitness center, a food hall, medical offices, and a museum paying tribute to the hospital’s legacy. Upon opening, the hotels will be operated by Aimbridge Hospitality.

The hotels will create an experience that enables guests to enjoy the benefits of both brands in one location, while ensuring guests the utmost confidence in public traveling following COVID-19.

“We are excited to introduce the first combined Hyatt Place and Hyatt House hotels to the Chicago area, while also paying homage to such an incredible landmark” said General Manager Nilesh Pandey. “Our guests can appreciate the contemporary design and spacious layout of our guestrooms – from the separate spaces to sleep and work, including the Cozy Corner at Hyatt Place, to the apartment-style suites with real kitchens at Hyatt House – our guests can choose the space that fits their needs.”

An inspired design by Paul Gerhardt, the Cook County Hospital created a loud statement amongst the various other medical buildings surrounding it in the medical district. Consequently, both the exterior and interior of the building suffered severe deterioration due to deferred maintenance and exposure to the elements once it closed down. With Ionic columns, along with faces of lions and cherubs emulated throughout, it communicated the ideation of power and strength especially for those less fortunate, a feeling that to this day remains true to the space.

Drawing inspiration from the history of this remarkable piece of infrastructure, the project will restore and preserve the historical pieces that have been rooted there for over 160 years, which includes the original Beaux-Arts masonry detailing and terracotta ornamentation of the exterior, the wood-framed windows, interior decorative plaster work, the double height main lobby and 106-year old restored marble stone staircase, elevator cores, as well as the double loaded corridor and terrazzo flooring of the interior. The team also spent over $18 million to replace all windows and 4,160 terra cotta pieces on the exterior, made of granite, brick, and limestone.

The interior of the building was completely gutted except for the impressive old surgical theaters on the eighth floor, first used by Rush Medical School when the hospital opened in 1857. Replaced by Stroger Hospital of Cook County, the space was later preserved as an architecturally significant landmark, often referred to as Chicago’s “Ellis Island,” a safe haven where anyone was able to receive service and care. The hospital turned hotel is now both an official Chicago landmark, and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. It is also known for being host to the world’s first ever blood bank, and inspiration for the hit medical TV drama “ER.” The new adaptive reuse design will include a new façade for a portion of the southern face of the hospital, previously connected to the demolished projecting wings and additions of the building. A museum gallery will also be built on site to pay homage to the history of the building.

Located in the epicenter of one of the most robust medical districts in the world, Hyatt Place Chicago Medical/University District and Hyatt House Chicago Medical/University District embodies the sense of rebirth for a true landmark, a resurgence of life and a sense of inclusion in the neighborhood and surrounding communities. Close to many well-known medical institutions including Rush University Medical Center, the Cook County Hospital is the symbolic heart of the Illinois Medical District that consists of over 560 acres of medical facilities and labs, with over 29,000 employees and 50,000 daily visitors. With close proximities to the United Center, Fifth Third Arena – Chicago Blackhawks Community Ice Rink, UIC and Rush University, the hotels will serve not only the medical district, but also anyone else traveling in and out of town for upcoming events, leisure and much more.

Hyatt Place Chicago Medical/University District will offer the following, with safety guidelines in place to adhere to the health and well-being of all guests:

103 spacious guestrooms with separate spaces to sleep, work and play, as well as a Cozy Corner sofa-sleeper

Free Wi-Fi throughout hotel and guestrooms
Necessities program for forgotten items that guests can buy, borrow or enjoy for free
Event Spaces with more than 4,000 square feet of flexible, high-tech meeting/function space
Fitness Center featuring cardio equipment with LCD touchscreens and free earbuds

Hyatt House Chicago Medical/University District will also offer:

107 stylish apartment-style Kitchen Suites with fully-fitted kitchens, comfy living rooms, spacious bedrooms and stylish bathrooms with complimentary skin and hair care amenities from KenetMD™
Free Wi-Fi throughout hotel and guestrooms
The Commons, a comfy lobby lounge with an open and welcoming space for guests to relax, work or socialize, and the Outdoor Commons, which includes a fire pit and BBQ grill
24-hour Workout Room to keep fitness routines going
Gathering Rooms with more than 4,000 square feet of flexible meeting spaces, a thoughtful food and beverage menu, audiovisual equipment and a House Host to make sure events are a success
Borrows Menu with often-forgotten items from phone charges to razors
A Very Important Resident (VIR) program, which includes a complimentary welcome amenity, H Bar dining credit, laundry credit, and other personalized perks, for guests staying 21 or more consecutive nights

Additional conveniences, including 24-hour Guest Laundry
A pet-friendly policy that welcomes dogs or cats

This project is part of the Cook County Hospital’s transformative $150 million renovation led by Murphy Development and Walsh Group. The multiphase project will also include the opening of Dr. Murphy’s Food Hall, a 10,000 sq. ft. dining destination led by Hospitality HQ and Akhtar Nawab, the award-winning Chef, restaurateur, TV personality, and food hall veteran, along with medical offices, a daycare center, and a museum paying tribute to the hospital’s legacy.

Reservations with opening rates/offers are now available for travel after July 25, 2020.