Posts tagged with "infection"

Kaelen Felix Illustrates a Dental Article for 360 MAGAZINE

Oral Hygiene × SARS-CoV-2

The British Dental Journal recently found that poor oral hygiene may be linked to more severe cases of COVID-19 because of the harmful bacteria found in mouths that have not been properly taken care of.

While the mouth has always been known as a gateway to the rest of the body, giving it the ability to cause problems in other areas, it is now found that poor oral hygiene can cause respiratory infections, making COVID-19 stronger.

The good news is that the best defense, in this scenario, is to follow good oral practices, like flossing, brushing and using mouthwash.

COVID-19 continues to be deadly, but there does appear to be some sort of link in more than half of fatal cases.

According to the British Dental Journal, “More than 80% of COVID-19 patients in ICUs exhibited an exceptionally high bacterial load, with more than 50% of deaths exhibiting bacterial superinfections.”

Even though COVID-19 is transferred virally, complications like pneumonia and acute respiratory distress might be caused by bacterial superinfection, which begins in the mouth.

The study says, “We recommend that oral hygiene be maintained, if not improved, during a SARS-CoV-2 infection in order to reduce the bacterial load in the mouth and the potential risk of a bacterial superinfection.”

Again, hygiene can be maintained by brushing, flossing and using mouthwash, but oral-care probiotics can also offer protection.

Oral-care probiotics are a specialized type of probiotic formulated to repopulate the oral cavity bacteria, which battles harmful bacteria that could lead to cavities, gingivitis and periodontal disease.

Dr. Eric Goulder, founder of the Heart and Stroke Prevention Center of Central Ohio, said he thinks heart health is also determined by oral health. His team uses ProBiora, which supports health in teeth and gums.

“We think everyone should be extra careful during the pandemic, and oral-care probiotics are a great way to help keep the oral cavity in balance 24-7,” Dr. Goulder said.

To see the study, you can click right here.

Dog and Cat illustrated by Mina Tocalini for 360 MAGAZINE.

What To Do For Dog Bites

Every year, 4.7 million people in the United States suffer dog bites.

Dogs might be our best friends, but the reality is that they’ve got some sharp teeth. If you’re in the wrong place at the wrong time, you could fall victim to their pearly whites. 

If you suffer a dog puncture wound or a full-on bite, it is important to know what to do in the aftermath. 

Keep reading to find out the five most important things to do after a dog bite when it comes to your health and legal action you may need to take.

Document the Wound

If you or someone around you can, take pictures of the wound before tending to it. Having evidence of the dog puncture wound or dog bite in its original state will be helpful if legal action is taken later on. It will provide photo evidence of the severity of the injury.

Call for Help

Place a clean towel or cloth over the wound, and apply pressure to stop the bleeding. If the injury is serious and requires professional care, call emergency services. While you are waiting for them to arrive, you can begin to collect information from the dog’s owner and anyone in the area who witnessed the event. 

Exchange Information 

Make sure to exchange contact information with the dog’s owner. You will need these details in case legal or insurance-related action is taken and because you will want to be able to obtain information on the dog’s medical history. Be sure to get their name, address, phone number, and any other relevant contact information. 

It will be important to find out whether the dog was vaccinated for certain diseases such as rabies because, after a dog bite, you are at risk of infection from any bacteria or illness the dog might have had and will require treatment accordingly.

Get Contact Information of Witnesses

If there were witnesses at the scene of the crime, make sure to get their information. In the case of a lawsuit or insurance claim, witness accounts of the incident will likely help your case. They will be able to corroborate and provide a more accurate idea of the events that took place. 

If you decide legal action is the appropriate route, you will need to present all of the information obtained at the crime scene to a dog bite lawyer. The lawyer will use the information provided to build a case. 

Seek Medical Help

After an aggressive encounter with a dog, you should seek help from a medical professional who knows how to treat a dog bite. A doctor will be able to determine whether you need stitches, clean the wound thoroughly, and advise you on how to prevent the wound from getting infected.

If you do notice signs of infection, such as redness, pus, increased pain, or fever, it is important to go back to the doctor for further treatment.

Taking Care of a Dog Puncture Wound or Bite

If you have suffered from a dog puncture wound or a dog bite, it is important to follow all of these steps. They will help you stay healthy by minimizing the risk of infection, and they will allow you to qualify for the best legal help possible. The more information you are able to obtain about the dog and its owner, the better. 

INTERACTIVE MAP FOR COVID-19

UC Berkeley shares a new interactive map they’ve created that allows you to zoom in on different regions of California to see the levels of certain particulate matter in the air revealed to increase the likelihood of dying from a COVID-19 infection.

The data would suggest that the San Joaquin Valley, which includes Fresno and Bakersfield, may be at particular risk, but all counties include areas with elevated levels of air pollution.

Their map also allows users to select a number of metrics to overlay each county. Users can choose to see the number of coronavirus cases (both per capita and in real terms) for each county, the number of deaths, the number of hospital beds, and other data that help tell a story unique to each region.

You can find more details about this project here.

Check this page for more maps, infographics, and other resources they’ve developed as part of their response to the crisis.

Staying Healthy When The Temperature Drops

Staying healthy can be a challenge when the temperature drops, we all know the feeling of being unprepared for the bitter winter wind and then catching a cold a few days later. With an abundance of medicines helping us to rid the cold faster, it may seem tempting to take out a quick unsecured loan to get you all the latest supplements and medication. However, with these loans in place for financial emergencies only, this is now a thing of the past! Here we are going to give you some top tips for staying healthy when the temperature drops, without breaking the bank.

Sleep

When tackling the winter months it is important to get plenty of sleep in order to strengthen your immune system and fight the infection as the number of germs increases. With the nights drawing in and getting darker earlier, there is plenty of time to rest up to help reach your recommended 8 hours of sleep per night.

Stay Warm

Another way of ensuring that you stay healthy during the winter months is to keep as warm as possible. Although the weather outside may seem bright and inviting, do not be fooled! The weather outside can still be bitterly cold, which can lead to you becoming ill if you do not stay as wrapped up warm. Get yourself a winter coat, a hat and a scarf as this will help you to stay warm and fight off any potential infection. In addition to this, drinking warm beverages and eating warm food can also help you to feel better and ensure that you are healthy throughout winter.

Eat Healthy

Arguably one of the most important ways of staying healthy when the temperature drops are your diet. Although it may seem tempting to go for all the unhealthy treats, many forget to focus on the vegetables and healthy alternatives. If your diet is balanced with a large number of fresh vegetables then you will get the vitamins that you need to help fight infection and help to keep you healthy against typical winter illness, such as the common cold.

In addition to this, staying hydrated during this time of year is also important, as it will help you to concentrate during work hours as well as allow you to maintain healthy bodily functions.

Avoid Caffeine

Caffeine is something that most people run to when it is cold outside. With the long, dark working days, it can be hard to get up in the morning when the bed is so warm, that is why most opt for caffeine at work and throughout the course of the day to stay warm. However, this could be making it worse! Although it may seem tempting to reach for the tea and coffee, it is best to keep to one or two cups a day and replace the rest with something warm such as a mug of soup.

Not only does caffeine have an effect on your concentration levels, but it also has a negative effect on your mood and your immune system.

As you can see, it is easy to look after yourself during the winter months without having to spend a fortune on supplements or medication.

CHILDREN × HEARING LOSS

Have Your Child Screened by an Audiologist if You Suspect Hearing Loss

As children get back to school, keep in mind that academic struggles may be a sign of hearing loss

 

According to the National Institutes of Health’s National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, about two to three out of every 1,000 children in the United States are born with a detectable level of hearing loss in one or both ears. The total number of children with some type of hearing loss is unknown and many cases go undiagnosed. Children with mild hearing loss may go undetected but could experience an impact on their learning ability and schoolwork.  The American Academy of Audiology is working to educate the public on the importance of hearing health, particularly in children.

While most infants’ hearing is tested, ear infections in subsequent years and exposure to loud noises as well as various illness or genetic traits can lead to hearing loss. Five out of six children experience ear infections in their first three years.

 

“A child with just minor hearing loss can be missing 50 percent of the classroom discussion,” said Jackie Clark, Ph.D., president of the American Academy of Audiology.  “There are children who have been diagnosed with a learning disability when really what they need are hearing aids.”

Lack of hearing can lead to behavioral issues, lack of focus, even depression in children. Children with hearing loss often don’t recognize that they can’t hear and parents don’t always know the signs.

Here are some of the signs parents and teachers should look for:

·         Child has difficulty following through with assignments and often doesn’t seem to

understand the task

·         Child often doesn’t understand questions and either does not respond or doesn’t respond appropriately

·         Child’s speech is different from other children the same age. He/she may struggle to pronounce simple words or is unable to repeat a phrase. May have problems articulating or language delays.

·         Child often asks you to repeat things or watches your face intently trying to understand what you’re saying

·         Child has difficulty hearing on the phone

·         Child speaks loudly when not warranted

·         Child has chronic ear pain

·         Child often complains of noises he/she cannot identify

·         Child cannot keep up academically

“Often parents and teachers overlook the fact that a child’s behavior may be a sign of hearing loss,” Clark explained.  “If parents suspect an issue, they should have their child evaluated by an audiologist.  Audiologists have the tools and training to identify hearing loss, degrees of hearing loss, and can recommend solutions.”

The American Academy of Audiology provides a list of licensed audiologists on its website: www.audiology.org. Click on “Find an Audiologist.”

Photo Credit: Google Images

Holiday Season × Teeth

The winter months bring around an exciting holiday time of year, but they also bring cold weather and health threats. Aside from your common cold, the flu, and other immune system worries – the holiday season also poses a serious, overlooked-by-many, threat to your teeth.

Dentists this time of year run down their lists, check them twice, and can easily tell if you’ve been naughty or nice to your teeth.

Dr. Mazen Natour, Top NYC DMD and Prosthodontist who says your teeth may be more sensitive during the winter months and prone to cavities, staining, and more.

Here are some reasons why:

• Hot beverages, like hot cocoa, tea, and coffee can irritate nerve endings due to the large temperature difference between the hot beverage and cold outdoor temperatures

• Sugary treats, like holiday cocktails, seasonal pies and other baked goods can increase your chance of tooth decay, sensitivity, and cavities

• Colds and sinus infections, common in the winter, swell the maxillary sinus area near your teeth which can contribute to tooth pain and overall sensitivity

• Did you know that red wine drinking can stain your teeth? Keep this in mind as you’re reaching for the extra glass at your next holiday party

These points are a snapshot of why your teeth may be more sensitive and prone to havoc this holiday season.

Dr. Mazen Natour DMD, Manhattan-based Prosthodontist

Website: www.natourdmd.com

Dr Natour has more than 20 years of experience in implantology, cosmetic and sports dentistry, periodontics, prosthodontics. He is a Clinical Professor and Director of the Implant Honors Program at New York University College of Dentistry – the world’s first Undergraduate Implant Program at the top-ranked Dental School globally. He is a renowned clinical instructor and lecturer for several leading American and European Dental Implant Companies. He is a Diplomat at the International Congress of Oral Implantology (ICOI), a Member of the Academy of Osseo Integration, American Dental Association, New York State Dental Association, and NYU Implant Alumni Association. He received his Doctorate in Dental Science from Université Saint Joseph in Beirut, Lebanon, his Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study in Prosthodontics from Boston University Goldman Dental School, his Doctorate in Medical Dentistry & MSc in Biomaterials from Boston University, where he was also Assistant Clinical Professor in the General Dentistry Program, and he also completed a four-year fellowship in Implant Dentistry at New York University College of Dentistry.