Posts tagged with "STUDY"

Male pattern baldness article illustration for 360 magazine by Kaelen Felix

Embrace the Shine: What Being Bald Says About a Man

Bald men are more likely, on average, to say that they’re sexier than their hairy counterparts. However, those with hair are more likely to be terrified at the prospect of losing their hair, leading to an apparent discrepancy. Regardless of how an individual man feels about hair loss, there are actually many social benefits to shaving off your locks.

Here’s the Honest Truth: Partially Bald Men are Less Attractive

When men and women were polled to determine what was more attractive: men with hair or without it, there tended to be a consensus that either or was up to preference. However, if you’re partially balding, have a bald spot on the top or sides of your head, you’re considered less attractive on average. They were also perceived as weaker compared to bald men. 

Many men keep a bit of hair on their head, even if they’re balding because it’s difficult to accept their hair is receding. If you’re not ready to completely get rid of your hair, you can purchase expensive hair plugs or try a finasteride tablet treatment plan. 

On Average, Bald Men are More Attractive than Those with Hair

You don’t need to worry about keeping those locks forever because women consider bald men incredibly attractive. Plenty of celebrities like Jeff Bezos, Jason Statham, and Bruce Willis have no hair on their heads, and they’re among the most high-profile, rich stars in the world. Jeff Bezos, the founder of Amazon, is actually the richest man on earth.

None of them needed hair to achieve their goals or attract a partner – and neither do you. There’s just something about being bald that entices women, and it’s probably the fact that you don’t care about social expectations and embrace your true style. Realize that a lack of hair doesn’t mean a lack of masculinity or attractiveness!

Bald Men are Seen as Stronger 

Men with entirely bald heads were perceived to be more masculine, taller, dominant, and about 13% stronger than those with full heads of hair, according to this United States study conducted in 2012. This association with masculinity may be appropriate for men who want to hold power in government to shave off all thinning hair completely.

Many other magazines have tried to mimic this study to see what their viewers thought. The Guardian photoshopped celebrities without hair and compared them to their typically hairy selves. About half of the celebrities selected were seen as appearing more powerful without hair, including Harry Styles and Simon Cowell.

Bald Men Are More Intelligent

Researches from Barry University in Florida created a social experiment that asked if baldness in men made them more physically attractive, aggressive, tolerant, or mature. They found that men with fuller hair were lower than bald men on all of these metrics – including intelligence. All ratings were consistent with all of their participants.

The reason for this is because bald men are typically older, though obviously, that isn’t always the case. Older men are seen as more intelligent and wiser, which can only come with experience. Men no longer need to have a piece of paper to hold the appearance of intelligence; you only need to shave off those hairs!

Bald Men are Seen as More Sexually Potent

Male pattern baldness is associated with too much testosterone in the average person’s body, which is the primary sex hormone. However, this couldn’t be farther from the truth. Baldness is actually caused by a hormone called dihydrotestosterone (DHT), a derivative product of testosterone.

While baldness doesn’t actually make you more sexually potent, you can use that rumor to your advantage. After all, baldness doesn’t make you stronger or more intelligent; it makes you perceive these traits. What’s the harm in your potential partner thinking you’re better in bed because you’re bald?

Kaelen Felix Illustrates a Dental Article for 360 MAGAZINE

Oral Hygiene × SARS-CoV-2

The British Dental Journal recently found that poor oral hygiene may be linked to more severe cases of COVID-19 because of the harmful bacteria found in mouths that have not been properly taken care of.

While the mouth has always been known as a gateway to the rest of the body, giving it the ability to cause problems in other areas, it is now found that poor oral hygiene can cause respiratory infections, making COVID-19 stronger.

The good news is that the best defense, in this scenario, is to follow good oral practices, like flossing, brushing and using mouthwash.

COVID-19 continues to be deadly, but there does appear to be some sort of link in more than half of fatal cases.

According to the British Dental Journal, “More than 80% of COVID-19 patients in ICUs exhibited an exceptionally high bacterial load, with more than 50% of deaths exhibiting bacterial superinfections.”

Even though COVID-19 is transferred virally, complications like pneumonia and acute respiratory distress might be caused by bacterial superinfection, which begins in the mouth.

The study says, “We recommend that oral hygiene be maintained, if not improved, during a SARS-CoV-2 infection in order to reduce the bacterial load in the mouth and the potential risk of a bacterial superinfection.”

Again, hygiene can be maintained by brushing, flossing and using mouthwash, but oral-care probiotics can also offer protection.

Oral-care probiotics are a specialized type of probiotic formulated to repopulate the oral cavity bacteria, which battles harmful bacteria that could lead to cavities, gingivitis and periodontal disease.

Dr. Eric Goulder, founder of the Heart and Stroke Prevention Center of Central Ohio, said he thinks heart health is also determined by oral health. His team uses ProBiora, which supports health in teeth and gums.

“We think everyone should be extra careful during the pandemic, and oral-care probiotics are a great way to help keep the oral cavity in balance 24-7,” Dr. Goulder said.

To see the study, you can click right here.

Cryptograph platform announced by the 360 MAGAZINE.

Pornhub brings back “LifePlan”

Pornhub, the premier online destination for adult entertainment, today announced that it will bring back its popular “LifePlan” subscription – a lifetime membership to its high-definition (HD), on-demand premium subscription service, Pornhub Premium – for Black Friday this year. The LifePlan offering will be available starting on Thursday, November 26th at midnight and run until Tuesday, December 1st at 7:00 a.m. Limited quantities of LifePlan memberships will start at a one-time fee of $200 and, as availability runs out, membership prices will increase by $25 increments up to $500.

Via LifePlan, users will have access to Pornhub Premium, which provides well over 500,000 premium videos that are available in addition to the standard Pornhub library. Additional perks to a Pornhub Premium subscription include an ad-free experience, faster video streaming and access to a wide array of content in full HD, 4K as well as Virtual Reality.

“Thanksgiving is a time to come together and give thanks for all the wonderful things that have happened during the year, but 2020 has been a challenging year, to say the least,” said Corey Price, VP, Pornhub. “No matter what other surprises 2020 throws our way, having Pornhub Premium for life is the best way to guarantee your year has a happy ending.”

Pornhub released a new promotional video for LifePlan, inspired by the need for something to be thankful for at the end of a particularly challenging year. The video was created by Madrid-based creative agency Officer & Gentleman and features families gathered for a festive Thanksgiving dinner but coming up short when it’s time to be thankful for the year that was 2020 – until Pornhub LifePlan enters the picture.

To view the video, please visit: https://youtu.be/HhrCrfDMcQU

For more information on LifePlan and Pornhub’s Black Friday deals, please visit www.pornhub.com/lifeplan or www.pornhubpremium.com/lifeplan.

About Pornhub:
Founded in 2007, Pornhub is the leading free, ad-supported adult video streaming website, offering viewers the opportunity to upload and share their own videos. With over 13 million videos and over 140 million visitors a day, Pornhub truly is the best adult site in the world. Pornhub has built the largest dedicated membership base in the adult community, averaging over 76 million monthly active members, offering viewers a fun and sophisticated social experience directly in site, complete with messaging, photos, achievement badges.

Kaelen Felix Illustrates a Food and Travel Article for 360 MAGAZINE

Purdue alumna × Stovetop stuffing

If Stove Top stuffing makes an appearance at your Thanksgiving dinner, you can thank a Purdue University alumna.

The late Ruth Siems, a 1953 home economics graduate, is credited with the invention of Stove Top stuffing. The product hit shelves in 1971 as a dish appropriate for Thanksgiving but also for everyday meals. The secret behind the dish is the dimensions of the bread crumbs, which General Foods patented in 1975. Siems is listed first among the inventors, followed by Anthony Capossela Jr., John Halligan and C. Robert Wyss.

Siems’ invention came at a time when there was a high demand in the U.S. for convenience foods. She worked on developing Stove Top stuffing while working at General Foods, and the invention quickly became a Thanksgiving staple.

Siems grew up in Evansville, Indiana, and died in 2005 in Newburgh, Indiana, according to her obituary in The New York Times. She worked at General Foods almost 35 years. Kraft Foods now owns Stove Top stuffing, which sells about 60 million boxes a year. The dish comes in a variety of flavors.

Purdue Archives and Special Collections has information about Siems’ work on food inventions as part of the Gertrude Sunderlin Papers. Sunderlin was an early foods and nutrition professor at Purdue.

About Purdue University

Purdue University is a top public research institution developing practical solutions to today’s toughest challenges. Ranked the No. 5 Most Innovative University in the United States by U.S. News & World Report, Purdue delivers world-changing research and out-of-this-world discovery. Committed to hands-on and online, real-world learning, Purdue offers a transformative education to all. Committed to affordability and accessibility, Purdue has frozen tuition and most fees at 2012-13 levels, enabling more students than ever to graduate debt-free. See how Purdue never stops in the persistent pursuit of the next giant leap at https://purdue.edu/.

Loose Standards Undermined Research on COVID-19 Test Accuracy

The COVID-19 pandemic was met with a rush of research on the many factors related to the crisis, including the accuracy of different testing methods. However, many of the studies conducted in the early stages of the pandemic did not meet the usual rigorous scientific standards, according to researchers at Rice University and Baylor College of Medicine.

In “The estimation of diagnostic accuracy of tests for COVID-19: A scoping review,” which will appear in an upcoming edition of the Journal of Infection, authors Dierdre Axell-House, Richa Lavingia, Megan Rafferty, Eva Clark, E. Susan Amirian and Elizabeth Chiao found that better-designed studies are needed to appropriately evaluate the different types of COVID-19 tests.

They reviewed 49 articles published between Dec. 31, 2019, and June 19, 2020, that evaluated the validity of different types of coronavirus testing. These studies were assessed using elements of the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS-2) guidelines, which are used to evaluate if bias could be playing a role in the results of studies on diagnostic test accuracy.

Amirian, an epidemiologist at Rice’s Texas Policy Lab (TPL), said when it comes to conducting studies on testing accuracy, design is critically important. She said the major limitations found in the design of most of the studies they examined could lead to erroneous or misleading results.

“Without rigorous evaluations of which tests are the most accurate, it’s hard to know which tests are more likely to lead to false negatives, which could contribute to greater spread of the virus,” said Rafferty, a health data analyst at the TPL. “Although it’s difficult to say, some of the quality issues may have resulted from these studies being streamlined in response to the immediate need for timely information.”

“COVID-19 has now been a health crisis for nearly a year,” Amirian said. “With regard to research, the academic community needs to move away from being in acute emergency mode and think about how we’re going to handle this as a chronic crisis. When researchers are in emergency mode, we tend to be more open to sacrificing a lot of the strict quality standards for conducting research that we usually uphold.”

The paper is available online here.

New Study Shows the Development of Insulin Resistance in Children

A new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows that individualised and family-based physical activity and dietary counselling considerably slows down the development of insulin resistance, which is a precursor of type 2 diabetes, in 6–9-year-old children. Published in Diabetologia, the study focused on predominantly normal-weight children.

Insulin resistance refers to the body’s weakened metabolic response to insulin in the target tissues, i.e. in skeletal muscles, adipose tissue and the liver. Insulin resistance is usually the first sign of disturbed glucose metabolism, developing much earlier than abnormalities in pancreatic insulin secretion, elevated glucose levels and, eventually, type 2 diabetes. Earlier studies have shown that physical activity and dietary counselling reduces insulin resistance in overweight and obese children. This new study from the University of Eastern Finland is significant not only scientifically, but also in terms of public health and clinical practice, because it is the first to show that a combination of physical activity and dietary counselling can be used to slow down the long-term development of insulin resistance in children who were predominantly normal-weight at baseline.

More than 500 Finnish children aged between 6 and 9 years at baseline participated in the Physical Activity and Nutrition in Children (PANIC) study ongoing at the University of Eastern Finland. Children and their caregivers in the intervention group were given individualised and family-based physical activity and dietary counselling over a period of two years. Children and their caregivers in the control group, on the other hand, were given instructions on physical exercise and nutrition as per the national guidelines, but no actual lifestyle counselling. At baseline and two years later, the researchers analysed children’s physical activity and sedentary behaviour using the Actiheart sensor that measures heart rate and body movements. Physical activity was also assessed by the PANIC Physical Activity Questionnaire, and dietary factors were assessed by a 4-day food record over four days. Children’s body fat percentage and lean body mass were measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, DXA. Fasting serum insulin and HOMA-IR were used as indicators of insulin resistance.

The study showed that during the two-year follow-up, increase of insulin resistance was roughly 35% lower in the group that was given individualised and family-based physical activity and dietary counselling than in the control group. The attenuating effect of counselling on insulin resistance was explained especially by changes in physical activity and sedentary behaviour, and slightly less by changes in overall dietary quality and in the consumption of high-fat spreads. Counselling did not have an effect on body fat percentage or lean body mass, i.e. changes in body composition did not mediate the beneficial effect of intervention on insulin resistance.

“This is an interesting finding. The attenuating effect of physical activity and dietary counselling on insulin resistance in children is likely caused by the fact that physical activity and a healthy diet boost metabolism in skeletal muscles, adipose tissue and in the liver, and not so much by a lower body fat percentage or lean body mass,” Professor Timo Lakka, the lead author of the study, says.

Although type 2 diabetes usually develops in adulthood, research suggests that its prevention is best begun already in childhood.

“Increasing physical activity, reducing sedentary behaviour and eating food of better quality should be a priority for all children, not just for those who are overweight,” Professor Lakka points out.

Professor Lakka points out that in addition to body composition measurements, all children should also be asked about their physical activity, sedentary behaviour and diet when they visit a child health clinic or a school nurse.

“Identifying children who have unhealthy lifestyle habits and who are at an increased risk of type 2 diabetes in adulthood would allow a better targeting of measures that are geared towards preventing type 2 diabetes. The best way to collect lifestyle-related data is to use scientifically validated, well-proven digital applications. This would allow the data to be optimally used for promoting children’s health and well-being, and for making scientifically informed decisions,” Professor Lakka says.

For further information, please contact:

Professor Timo Lakka, University of Eastern Finland, Institute of Biomedicine,

tel. +358407707329, timo.lakka@uef.fi

https://uefconnect.uef.fi/en/person/timo-a..lakka/

https://www.panicstudy.fi/

Research article:

Lakka, T.A., Lintu, N., Väistö, J. et al. A 2 year physical activity and dietary intervention attenuates the increase in insulin resistance in a general population of children: the PANIC study. Diabetologia 63, 2270–2281 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00125-020-05250-0

https://news.cision.com/university-of-eastern-finland/r/physical-activity-and-dietar

Kaelen Felix Illustrates a Farm Animal Article for 360 MAGAZINE

Faunalytics x Farm Sanctuary

A new study from Faunalytics suggests that people who interact with farm animals at sanctuaries are more likely to consume fewer animal products.

Farm Sanctuary, America’s premier farm animal sanctuary and advocacy organization, joined Faunalytics to release the study, which showed that 70% of non-vegans who went on a tour through Farm Sanctuary said they would make dietary changes to reduce consumption of animal products. Comparatively, only 53% said they would change their diets prior to taking the tour.

You can see the study by clicking right here.

Farm Sanctuary followed up with participants in the survey two months later, and non-vegans reported eating less chicken, turkey, beef, pork, fish, shellfish, eggs and dairy, with many correspondents crediting the tour for that change.

Tourists didn’t only make active lifestyle changes. They also changed opinions. While 52% of participants said humans contribute to farm animal suffering before the tour, that number went up to 69% after the tour.

78% of omnivores said they were willing to cook vegetarian or vegan meals, which is up 12% from the 66% who were willing before the tour. 48% also said they were willing to discuss veganism and vegetarianism with others, but 73% said they’d had conversations with others about the subject at the time of the two month check-in.

The study took place at Farm Sanctuary locations in New York and California with over 1,200 subjects, and Farm Sanctuary hopes to continue progress by showing that tours can be both fun and effective.

Tom Beggs, a Faunalytics research scientist and the lead author of the study, said the public is becoming more aware of the way animals are treated in the food system, and a global shift is happening.

“The results from our study confirm something that most farm animal sanctuaries are already aware of: having meaningful interactions with farmed animals encourages people to empathize with them, and more importantly, to consider them as sentient individuals and not food,” Beggs said.

The study also shows that it’s important to find a balance between light-hearted and educational when sending a message about animal cruelty. The best way to spread the word is to make it easy to take immediate action by doing things like providing recipes, selling plant-based ingredients and foods and offering opportunities to get more involved in the cause.

Megan Watkins, CEO of Farm Sanctuary, said industrial agriculture is a major threat to our current world.

“The critical role that farm sanctuaries play in modeling a compassionate relationship with animals and inspiring positive lifestyle change cannot be overstated,” Watkins said. “Whether you visit in-person or virtually, the best way to glimpse the future is to visit a farm sanctuary.”

Faunalytics’ recent Animal Product Impact Scales list revealed the products causing the most suffering to animals in the United States. You can see that list by clicking right here

To learn more about Faunlytics, you can click right here, and to learn more about Farm Sanctuary, you can click right here.

Violence Spikes in Major Cities

By Eamonn Burke

Last month, 65 people were shot in New York City and 87 in Chicago over the course of the 4th of July weekend. Six children were killed that weekend as well. The holiday may have been a peak in homicides, but numbers of shootings and deaths have been trending upward as the nation handles a pandemic and a historic recession. The amount of shootings in NYC from January to July exceeded the total for the entire year of 2019. Other major cities are experiencing high rates of gun violence as well, such as Philadelphia, where more than 240 people have been killed this year and which now has the 2nd highest homicide rate in the nation. Chicago saw a violent July, with 584 shootings and 105 deaths. Even smaller cities like Pheonix and Omaha are seeing rises.

As a whole, homicides are up 24% in the nation since last year. Data shows homicides and shootings trending upward sharply since late May in major cities across the US. However, as a national study shows, gun violence was creeping upward even before the pandemic began.

President Trump blames the rise in violent crime to “radical” Democratic politicians , such as Major Bill DeBlasio, despite signs that this is a bipartisan issue. DeBlasio himself blames the shootings on the virus, among other factors such as the BLM protests and faults in the criminal justice system that have recently been exposed. The Council on Criminal Justice also concluded that the virus is the root issue, and that it must be stopped first in order to reduce homicides. A chart of homicides in Chicago does in fact show a major spike after the beginning of the protests, and the BLM protests in 2014 and 2015 had a similar effect on gun violence. However, further analysis of police data instead points to a decrease in gun-related arrests as a potential cause, as well as the increase in gun purchases in recent months.

Police say that many of these crimes are gang related, and a shortage of staff due to the virus have made it harder to crack down on crime. DeBlasio was adamant about getting back on top of the gun crisis through the courts: “Our courts not only need to reopen, they need to reopen as fully and as quickly as possible.” Chief administrative judge Lawrence Marks fired back, saying the blame of courts was “false, misleading and irresponsible.”

A strange finding amongst this gun crisis is that rates of other crimes such as burglaries have not followed the same trend, and have even decreased in some cases. As this is extremely odd, it’s possible that it’s a matter of what is getting reported given the complications of COVID-19 and the BLM protests on policing.

Jean Button illustrated by Mina Tocalini for 360 MAGAZINE.

Covid-19 on Clothes

By Eamonn Burke

As a relatively new virus, new information is coming out about Covid-19 every day. While much is known, such as the fact that it spreads through air and is most dangerous to the elderly, there is much that remains unknown.

One of these unanswered questions is that if clothing: can the coronavirus survive on clothing? What we do know from evidence is that the virus can in fact live on other surfaces like plastic and steel for up to nine days. There is no evidence, however, that answers the question about clothes.

What we do know is that viruses similar to Covid – MERS, SARS – do not survive on clothes, as they are porous surfaces that can trap the virus and dry it out. A study from Johns Hopkins Medicine corroborates this, finding the probability of the virus being transferred through clothing is low. However, another study did find that the virus can live on shoes.

While the most important protective measures against COVID-19 remain social distancing and wearing masks, the CDC still recommends to air on the side of caution and wash clothes, specifically on the warmest setting to dry them out. The findings also pose issue for companies who need to handle clothing returns. Many large companies like Macy’s and Gap have amended their return policies to consider this, but it is also important for small businesses to do the same.

Research Finds Exercise Prevents Vision Loss

Exercise can slow or prevent the development of macular degeneration and may benefit other common causes of vision loss, such as glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy, new research suggests.

A study from the University of Virginia School of Medicine found that exercise reduced the harmful overgrowth of blood vessels in the eyes of lab mice by up to 45%. This tangle of blood vessels is a key contributor to macular degeneration and several other eye diseases.

The study represents the first experimental evidence showing that exercise can reduce the severity of macular degeneration, a leading cause of vision loss, the scientists report. Ten million Americans are estimated to have the condition.

“There has long been a question about whether maintaining a healthy lifestyle can delay or prevent the development of macular degeneration. The way that question has historically been answered has been by taking surveys of people, asking them what they are eating and how much exercise they are performing,” said researcher Bradley Gelfand, PhD, of UVA’s Center for Advanced Vision Science. “That is basically the most sophisticated study that has been done. The problem with that is that people are notoriously bad self-reporters … and that can lead to conclusions that may or not be true. This [study] offers hard evidence from the lab for very first time.”

The Benefits of Exercise

Enticingly, the research found that the bar for receiving the benefits from exercise was relatively low – more exercise didn’t mean more benefit. “Mice are kind of like people in that they will do a spectrum of exercise. As long as they had a wheel and ran on it, there was a benefit,” Gelfand said. “The benefit that they obtained is saturated at low levels of exercise.”

An initial test comparing mice that voluntarily exercised versus those that did not found that exercise reduced the blood vessel overgrowth by 45%. A second test, to confirm the findings, found a reduction of 32%.

The scientists aren’t certain exactly how exercise is preventing the blood vessel overgrowth. There could be a variety of factors at play, they say, including increased blood flow to the eyes.

Gelfand, of UVA’s Department of Ophthalmology and Department of Biomedical Engineering, noted that the onset of vision loss is often associated with a decrease in exercise. “It is fairly well known that as people’s eyes and vision deteriorate, their tendency to engage in physical activity also goes down,” he said. “It can be a challenging thing to study in older people. … How much of that is one causing the other?”

The researchers already have submitted grant proposals in hopes of obtaining funding to pursue their findings further.

“The next step is to look at how and why this happens, and to see if we can develop a pill or method that will give you the benefits of exercise without having to exercise,” Gelfand said. “We’re talking about a fairly elderly population [of people with macular degeneration], many of whom may not be capable of conducting the type of exercise regimen that may be required to see some kind of benefit.” (He urged people to consult their doctors before beginning any
aggressive exercise program.)

Gelfand, a self-described couch potato, disclosed a secret motivation for the research: “One reason I wanted to do this study was sort of selfish. I was hoping to find some reason not to exercise,” he joked. “It turned out exercise really is good for you.”

Findings Published

The researchers have published their findings in the scientific journal IOVS. The research team consisted of Ryan D. Makin, Dionne Argyle, Shuichiro Hirahara, Yosuke Nagasaka, Mei Zhang, Zhen Yan, Nagaraj Kerur, Jayakrishna Ambati and Gelfand, who holds appointments in both UVA’s School of Medicine and School of Engineering. Ambati is a founder of iVeena Holdings, iVeena Delivery Systems and Inflammasome Therapeutics and has provided consulting services to Allergan, Immunovant, Olix Pharmaceuticals, Retinal Solutions and Saksin LifeSciences unrelated to the findings. Ambati, Gelfand and Kerur are named as inventors on macular degeneration patent applications filed by UVA and the University of Kentucky.

The research was supported by the National Institutes of Health, grants R01EY028027, DP1GM114862, R01EY022238, R01EY024068, R01EY028027, K99EY024336, R00EY024336, R01AI14874, R21EY030651, T32 HL007284, 5T32 GM008715 and R01GM114840; the American Heart Association, grant 13SDG16770008; the John Templeton Foundation, grant 60763; and the Beckman Initiative for Macular Research.

To keep up with the latest medical research news from UVA, subscribe to the Making of Medicine blog here.