Posts tagged with "USC"

Mental health graphic via 360 MAGAZINE

USC Annenberg Inclusion Initiative

As Mental Health Awareness Month kicks off, news and stories about mental health may seem to saturate media outlets. Yet a new report reveals that in top movies, mental health is rarely in the spotlight.

The study, entitled “Mental Health Conditions Across 200 Popular Films” is the second report on mental health in popular media from Professor Stacy L. Smith and the USC Annenberg Inclusion Initiative. The report is supported by the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention and NYT best-selling author, purpose coach, host of the top health and wellness podcast “On Purpose,” and former monk, Jay Shetty. The study provides an update on the prevalence and portrayal of mental health conditions in popular films by examining the 100 top-grossing films of 2019 and comparing the findings to those from the initiative’s report on popular movies from 2016.

Of the 4,502 speaking or named characters across the top films of 2019, 1.5% were depicted with a mental health condition. There has been little change over time, as 1.7% of characters in the most popular films of 2016 had a mental health condition. As a point of contrast, 21% of U.S. adults experience mental illness, according to national population research studies, such as the U.S. National Comorbidity Survey.

“Stories can provide a window into different worlds and experiences, but the results of this study demonstrate that mental health is rarely a focal point in popular film,” said Smith. “With the growing need for mental health care in the U.S., and the ongoing concern about well-being, storytellers and creatives are missing critical opportunities to educate audiences.”

More than half of the films included in the study from 2019 didn’t feature even one character with a mental health condition, and thirty percent had only one character with a mental health condition. A total of seven different mental health conditions appeared across the sample. Those included: addiction, anxiety/PTSD, depression/mood disorders, suicide, significant disturbances in thinking, cognitive impairment, and obsessive-compulsive disorder. There were more depictions of anxiety/PTSD in 2019 than in 2016, while portrayals of cognitive impairment and spectrum disorders declined. The remaining mental health conditions remained consistent with 2016.

More than half (59.2%) of characters with a mental health condition in the most popular films of 2019 were male while 40.8% were female. Three-quarters of the characters with a mental health condition across the films of 2019 were White, while only 16 characters were from underrepresented racial/ethnic groups. Only two characters with a mental health condition were LGBTQ, and 42.3% had a disability. The picture of mental health conditions in popular film remains one of predominantly white, male, straight, and able-bodied characters.

“The portrayal of mental health in film has a powerful role to play especially during this period of global mental health crisis,” said Christine Yu Moutier, chief medical officer at the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. “Entertainment educates the public, whether it’s with intention or not. And because humans are deeply wired for social connection and imitation, contagion can occur with detrimental effects or with positive impact. Portrayals can not only destigmatize and stop perpetuating dangerous tropes about people who live with mental health conditions, but they can also have the potential to deepen mental health literacy and inspire hope. All people have mental health, and now more than ever, Americans are hungry for information and resources to allow us to not only cope, but to flourish, and to support others’ mental health.”

The study also explored the portrayal and context in which mental health conditions are depicted. Nearly three-quarters of characters with mental health conditions experienced some form of disparagement in the film — either verbally or nonverbally expressed by the character themselves or another character. While disparagement could be general and not connected to a diagnosis, 45.1% of characters with mental health conditions faced derisions specifically about their mental health. More than 40% of characters with a mental health condition were the object of jokes or humor related to their mental health, an increase from 2016 (22%).

“The confluence of these contextual factors means that when mental health is presented in film, it is often stigmatized or demeaned,” said Smith. “For audiences, the nature of mental health portrayals may heighten the possibility of negative effects when it comes to real-world outcomes.”

Characters with mental health conditions were also linked with violence in several ways. More than half of characters with a mental health condition were perpetrators of violence (63.4%), a significant increase from 2016 (46%). Additionally, nearly two-thirds (66.2%) of characters with mental health conditions were victims of violence. Finally, more than one-third (38%) of the characters with mental health conditions died at some point in the film, including by homicide or suicide. Over half (59.3%) of the characters with a mental health condition who perished did so by violent means. Nearly one-quarter (22.2%) of the characters with mental health conditions who died did so by suicide.

Less than one-third (29.6%) of characters with a mental health condition were shown in therapy, including individual appointments, group therapy, addiction, support, and inpatient care. Only 12.7% of characters with mental health conditions utilized medication or other treatments. Films in 2019 showed more characters receiving both therapy and medication or other treatment compared to 2016.

With solution in mind, the initiative brought Purpose Coach, NYT best-selling author, and “On Purpose” podcast host Jay Shetty into the fold as Chief Well-Being Advisor. In this role, he will serve as a resource to the program and entertainment industry at large on issues of mental health and wellbeing, strategizing new ways to approach the subject matter on-screen and on sets, to work towards positive change.

“I am thrilled to be joining Dr. Smith and the USC Annenberg Inclusion Initiative as the Chief Well-Being Advisor,” said Jay Shetty. “It has always been my passion to bridge the gap between mental health and entertainment. The access that the initiative has to further explore these important matters on-screen and on sets and make real systemic change within the industry is what excites me the most.”

The study also provides a core solution for depicting mental health in popular entertainment. Building on the Mental Health Media Guide, the study offers a blueprint for a mental health policy that can be adopted by production companies, studios, and other groups. This policy outlines ways that creative talent, executives, and those overseeing production can tell authentic stories, provide opportunities to nurture mental health for those working in production, and provide audiences with more information on mental health.

The report is the latest from the Annenberg Inclusion Initiative and can be found online here.

Black Out Photo via Allied Global Marketing for use by 360 Magazine

Blues for an Alabama Sky Performance

Center Theatre Group hosted its popular Black Out Night Performance for Blues for an Alabama Sky on Friday, April 8, 2022, at the Mark Taper Forum. Actress Wendy Raquel Robinson began the sold-out night with a pre-show address welcoming the audience into the theatre for this special performance of “Blues for an Alabama Sky” intended for Black theatregoers. Robinson, during the welcome, gave flowers to Pearl Cleage and director Phylicia Rashad for their continued excellence in the arts and for giving voice to cultural yet universal stories. Guests in attendance included: Susan Kelechi-Watson, Geffri Maya, Patrick Walker, Larry Powell and other notables.

The performance was followed by a reception on the Music Center Plaza featuring live music. Sip & Sonder provided coffee and Gwen’s Bakery provided desserts.

This revival of Pearl Cleage’s rich and beautiful work runs at the Mark Taper Forum from April 6 through May 8, 2022, with the opening night set for Wednesday, April 13, 2022. 

Tony Award-winning actress Phylicia Rashad, who originated the role of Angel in the world premiere of “Blues for an Alabama Sky” more than 25 years ago returns to direct this timeless piece that was first presented in 1995 at Atlanta’s Alliance Theatre. She leads a cast that features Joe Holt, Nija Okoro, Dennis Pearson, Greg Alverez Reid and Kim Steele.

Set in 1930’s Harlem, Angel is a free-spirited Cotton Club singer who’s out of luck but never out of dreams. Guy is a costume designer waiting for Josephine Baker to invite him to join her in Paris. Delia, a young activist, is trying to give the women of Harlem a choice about their future. Sam, a prominent physician, is either delivering babies or out at the club letting the good times roll. And Leland, who recently arrived in Harlem from Alabama, is haunted by the wide-open skies and the lost love he left behind. The lives and dreams of these men and women converge with passion and politics as the art and celebration of the Harlem Renaissance give way to the harsh realities of the Great Depression. 

Tickets for all other performances of Blues for an Alabama Sky are currently on sale at Center Theatre Group/Mark Taper Forum. They are also available through their website. Performances run Tuesday through Friday at 8 PM, Saturday at 2:30 PM and 8 PM, Sunday at 1 PM and 6:30 PM Call for exceptions. Center Theatre Group’s first Black Out Night was created in February of 2022 for Jeremy O. HarrisSlave Play and was based on the event he created in 2019 during the Broadway engagement to provide a freeing environment for Black-identifying audience members to experience the unflinching new work free from the white gaze.

Lady London headshot press photo via Steph Paul for use by 360 MAGAZINE

Lady London – Lady Like: The Boss Tape

Trinidadian/ Jamaican American artist Lady London released her “Lady Like: The Boss Tape;” a series of her most acclaimed freestyles since she surfaced in the rap scene in 2018.

The New Jersey/ New York artist possesses a wide range of talents, from being a rapper, songwriter, poet, published author and educated woman, there’s not much that she cannot do. Her music reflects her drive, and “Lady Like: The Boss Tape” highlights all the best parts of her music.

This compilation of freestyles showcases London’s talent of freestyling, which gained her praise on social media. In her tracks, London remixes some iconic Hip Hop tracks and gives them her own flare. Featured tracks include “Lisa Story” ft. Dub Aura that samples “Get Me Home” by Foxy Brown and “Long Live Shamello” that remixes Busta Rhymes’ “Put Your Hands Where My Eyes Could See.” Check out the full tracklist below.

The popularity of London’s freestyles has gained widespread attention, earning herself co-signs from Cardi B, Nas, Timbaland and so many more. Sitting at 618k followers on Instagram, London has established a loyal fanbase that has supported her music through the years. Lady London continues to elevate the rap scene, and last year she released two standout singles; “Money Over” and “Never,” which is her most personal record to date.

Lady London is one artist that you will want to keep on your radar as we dive into 2022.

About Lady London

New Jersey-born and Los-Angeles based rapper Lady London is known for her rhythmic lyricism. While her mother was Jamaican and Father Trinidadian, her childhood was divided between East Orange, New Jersey and the Bronx, New York. Hip hop culture has been an integral part of her life, as her uncle was Chino XL, and she grew up inspired by artists like JAY-Z, Lil Kim and Whitney Houston. In college, London was on a pre-med path, but still expressed her love for the arts while putting on successful poetry shows. In 2018, she posted one of her poetry videos online, and the video went viral with 8-million plus views. After London obtained her Master of Science from Keck School of Medicine at USC, she also was accepted into the school’s medical program.

Ultimately, London put her dream of medical school in the past to chase her dream of music. She talks about the decision, stating, “everything changed, I figured I could always go back to school. Convincing my West Indian family was very interesting. They didn’t understand why I was willing to give up everything I had been working towards. I knew I had to do music, though. You can’t run from destiny.”

Moreover, London’s career has taken off since 2018. This artist has generated millions of views online with her own original music. Her single released in 2021, “Money Over,” accumulated 500,000-plus views on YouTube as the one and only Cardi B described London as “the most slept on” to social media. London serves as a SAVAGE ambassador for Rihanna’s FENTY. Giving a performance in support of Black Lives Matter at the BET Awards, London caught the attention of many, eventually becoming co-signed by Diddy and Revolt TV.

“There are multiple levels to me,” Lady London clarifies. “I’m not one-dimensional. I really take my craft seriously. I consider rap to be an artform—not a trend. I’ve studied cadences, timing, breath control, double and triple entendres, and syllables. It almost breaks down to an exact science. I pay attention to verbiage, semantics, and diction. I’m a connoisseur of rhythmical composition in its purest form. I’m just a boss.”

Lady London continues to prove herself in the rap world as a force to be reckoned with.

Lady Like: The Boss Tape Tracklist

  1. Viral
  2. Long Live Shamello
  3. Yikes
  4. Lemon Pepper, Wet
  5. Lady What, Lady Who?
  6. All I See
  7. Black Love
  8. Buss It/Ski
  9. Welcome To The Party
  10. You’re Still Mine ft. Makaela
  11. Reciprocity
  12. Girl Like Me
  13. Lisa’s Story ft. Dub Aura
sports illustration by Allison Christensen for use by 360 Magazine

Paolo Uggetti × ESPN

Paolo Uggetti, one of the nation’s most talented young sports journalists, has joined ESPN as a college football writer.

Uggetti has covered the NBA nationally for The Ringer for the past five years, writing features on everything from Devin Booker’s Mexican heritage to players’ mental health in the bubble, to tracking down the KIA that Blake Griffin dunked over in the 2011 dunk contest.

Uggetti also interned with The Wall Street Journal sports department, where he discovered the kinds of stories he loves to write — niche, sometimes quirky, but always human.

“After working on finding compelling stories in the NBA for a few seasons, I’m really looking forward to diving into the unique culture of college football alongside the team at ESPN,” said Uggetti. “The number of story opportunities in a sport that’s going through so much change is exciting, and I can’t wait to get a chance to tell some of those stories.”

ESPN college football deputy editor Ryan Canner-O’Mealy added: “We couldn’t be more excited to add Paolo to our talented team. His eye for interesting stories and history of in-depth reporting will make for a seamless transition into the world of college football.”

Uggetti is proudly from El Salvador but moved to Los Angeles when he was nine years old, falling in love with other sports besides fútbol. Uggetti is fluent in his native Spanish and graduated from USC in 2017. There, he covered the Trojans football team for two seasons and won two LA Press Club awards for stories he wrote for the student-run online publication.

Photo via Noelle Accardi of Universal music for use by 360 Magazine

GRYFINN × NEW BLOOD

Today, L.A.-based artist/producer Gryffin releases a brand-new single entitled “New Blood” with buzzing singer and songwriter Boy Matthews [Duke Dumont, Hayden James, Riton, Oliver Heldens]. Released today via Darkroom / Interscope Records, the track seamlessly integrates show-stopping falsetto vocals with unpredictable and undeniable production, fusing dancefloor bliss and pop energy. The track arrives alongside accompanying lyric video, which can be found HERE.

Listen to Gryffin’s “New Blood” with Boy Matthews HERE. 

“’New Blood’ is one of my favorite records I’ve ever done” says Gryffin on the creation of the track. “It is about a special someone coming into your life and allowing you to rediscover your inner self and happiness in life again. Boy Matthews is one of the most talented vocalists I’ve ever worked with. His soul and energy gave this song the euphoric vibes I was looking for. I’m so proud of this record and hope you enjoy it as much as I do.”  

2021 has shaped up to be a banner year for Gryffin. In just a month, his most recent single “Best Is Yet To Come” with Kyle Reynolds has amassed over 13 million total streams and counting between the OriginalMax Styler RemixCheyenne Giles Remix, and Acoustic version. Dancing Astronaut praised the latter as “touching” and went on to claim, Gryffin and Kyle Reynolds smoothly play off each other in the acoustic’s visual and place another layer of charged emotion onto an already faultless merger.

Currently in the middle of his Las Vegas residency at The Wynn’s Encore Beach Club and XS Nightclub, Gryffin is also performing at major markets across the U.S. See full show dates below, and purchase tickets HERE.

GRYFFIN’S UPCOMING SHOWS:

8/13  Salt Lake City, UT Das Energi Festival

8/14  Las Vegas, NV  Encore Beach Club at Night

8/22  Las Vegas, NV  XS Nightswim

8/27  Grand Rapids, MI  Breakaway Music Festival – Grand Rapids

8/28  San Bernadino, CA  Beyond Wonderland

8/29  Water Mill, NY  Palm Tree Festival

9/3  Columbus, OH Breakaway Music Festival

9/4  Las Vegas, NV  Lost in Dreams

9/5  El Paso, TX   Freakazoid Robots

9/10  Surrey BC, Canada FVDED in the Park

9/18  Las Vegas, NV  Encore Beach Club at Night

9/19  Atlanta, GA   Imagine Festival

10/2 Charlotte, NC   Breakaway Music Festival

10/30  San Bernadino, CA  Escape Festival

ABOUT GRYFFIN 

Born Dan Griffith, Gryffin got his start in music as a classically trained pianist and guitarist and also played in several bands. After receiving an electrical engineering degree from the University of Southern California, he pursued a path in music production, drawing equally from his carefully honed musicality and edgy ingenuity. Gryffin made his breakthrough in 2016 with two singles showcasing his melodic take on dance music: “Heading Home” ft. Josef Salvat (which shot to #1 on Spotify’s US and Global Viral charts) and the Bipolar Sunshine collaboration “Whole Heart.” In addition, his 2017 smash single “Feel Good” — with Illenium and featuring Daya— peaked at #18 on the Dance/Mix Show Airplay charts. Gryffin’s major triumphs also include “Tie Me Down” ft. Elley Duhé (which hit #2 on the Spotify US Viral Chart and #9 on the Global Viral Chart), “Remember” ft. Zohara (which garnered 6.5 million streams in its first few weeks and earned support from Tiesto, who featured the track on an Instagram story), and “All You Need to Know” with SLANDER ft. Calle Lehmann (a gold-certified smash that’s now surpassed 100 million streams). Arriving in October 2019, Gryffin’s debut album Gravity quickly climbed to #1 on Billboard’s Dance/Electronic Albums chart.

Isabelle Fries makes a brief splash inside 360 MAGAZINE

ISABELLE FRIES

At 22 years old, Isabelle Fries has started to make a name for herself in the music industry. Not only is she gifted in her art, she has an extremely large heart.

Born in Sydney, but raised in Denver, Colorado, Fries found her inclination for singing at a young age. “I knew I wanted music to be a part of my life since I was about 7, but as I got older I was able to recognize that it is a labor of love for me,” she expressed. “I have never searched for fame through my music.” 

Not long after, she discovered her heart had room for another love, philanthropy. At just 15 years old, Fries became the first youth board member and youth leader for the Global Livingston Institute (GLI) an NGO in Uganda who’s mission is to educate students & community leaders on innovative approaches to international development and empower awareness, collaboration, conversations and personal growth. 

Through working with this organization, Isabelle travelled to Uganda to teach, perform and empower. In 2017, Fries performed in front of 20,000 people in Uganda at the annual iKnow HIV Awareness Concert Series along with other musicians from around the world, using music to breakdown barriers, bring people together and provide free medical testing and awareness for HIV for over 8,500 Ugandans.  

“I became a part of GLI when I was 15 and fully threw myself into their mission and their work. It is what opened my eyes to one of my passions I am now pursuing in international education. They really focus on young voices and drawing on perspectives from all types of individuals which is why I was asked to be on the board at such a young age. GLI is truly one of the most important things in my life so I could not be more thankful to be a part of it.” 

This wasn’t the only organization Fries carried out philanthropic work with. She volunteered in Haiti with The Road to Hope, an International Affairs Intern with Creative Visions in Malibu, California and a community worker with CEPIA in Costa Rica.

Isabelle still wanted to do more for Eastern African communities. She founded the “Bulamu Raise Your Voice Community Foundation (BCF)” and was able to draw on inspiration from one of her other life-long devotions: swimming. 

For twelve years, she swam competitively breaking records, winning State Championships and being a leader on her teams until complications from several autoimmune disorders forced her out of the water. This was never a part of her plan, but she was able to alter her life’s path and kept pushing through

“It is not something that I let control my life or hold me back from living. I take care of myself in every way I can and find strength in what I am able to do and learn new ways to improve my way of life,” she expressed. 

One of Fries’ missions with both GLI and BCF is to raise awareness for water safety on Lake Bunyonyi in Uganda by teaching swimming to prevent drownings. By working closely with GLI and the headmaster of the Kazi Primary School, Fries has been able to carry out this initiative, as well as implementing academic, music and sports curriculum.  

She said that the community of Lake Bunyonyi changed her life by seeing how they are such powerful and driven people. “I don’t go for my own benefit or to be a ‘white savior’ ,” she asserted. “When I work in Uganda, I give the individuals I work with support and resources and they truly do the rest.”

Isabelle was fortunate enough to meet one of her long time role models, Michael Phelps. Fostering a relationship with someone who has shaped her life in so many ways in and out of the water has been such a blessing, says Fries. This lead to her working with the Michael Phelps Foudation (MPF), where she took the opportunity to become certified in their “IM Water Safety Program” which is implemented in The Boys and Girls Clubs of America.

When given the opportunity again to combine her music and philanthropy through the MPF, she couldn’t resist. Isabelle was asked to open for country singer, Eric Church, at a MPF benefit concert in Chicago at the iconic Arcada Theater. “Swimming is an incredibly big part of my life as I was a serious competitive swimmer from the ages of 5 to 18, therefor having the chance to combine my music with my love and passion for swimming and water safety was very special and meaningful.” 

Now a recent graduate of The University of Southern California, Fries splits her time living between Denver and Los Angeles, continuing to pursue her passions: music and philanthropy, while working in Denver at a non-profit dedicated to mentoring students. Isabelle holds a degree in International Relations with minors in Spanish as well as  Non-Profits, Philanthropy and Volunteerism. 

While studying at USC, Isabelle was fortunate enough to catch the eye of Grammy-winning, multi-platinum producer/mixer Rob Chiarelli, who she’s fostered an incredibly close relationship with. 

She began releasing music signed with Chiarelli’s label Streetlamp records this year, already finding a widespread and loyal audience across all music platforms using her rich, soulful vocal that could be compared to the sound of Lauren Daigle or Adele. She recently released her 6th single, a raw piano ballad called “All We Had. When people listen to her music, Fries always wants to make them truly feel – whatever that feeling may be. Through channeling lyrics with her songwriters from her own life experiences, the emotions she is able to elicit are special to her. 

While the music may be interpreted differently for each unique individual, her raw style is something she hopes help guide those listeners on whatever journey they want to take. “I’ve always said, I love music because it lets you feel something you didn’t think you could.”

This is definitely something she mirrors artistically with one of her musical inspirations, Amy Winehouse. Growing up performing jazz music, Fries describes this genre as a big part of her musical identity, so she was instantly drawn to Winehouse’s style which she catalogs as “authentic, raw and groundbreaking. Amy created music unapologetically.”

But Fries’ number one music icon is Sir Elton John. “His music was always around me when I was growing up. My parents loved all music from that time and exposed me to it at a very young age which is one of the reasons it is the type of music I love the most. 

However, Elton John’s music was different for me, it felt like poetry and real emotion. His sound and songs are like stories that you never want to end. When I began to listen to him more I realized this is the type of music I want to sing and be a part of.” 

Feeling very blessed to have found such a supportive team, guiding her in finally being able to put her own original songs out there into the world, she is excited to evolve using her music to help create change, perform live again, and continue to build upon her body of work. While she’s away in the studio recording, we’ll be out here patiently waiting for more music, while she continues to use her voice to make the world a better place. 

“MOOD” ALL DAY 24KGOLDN AND IANN DIOR LINK UP FOR NEW VIDEO

24kGoldn – Mood

West Coast rapper/singer 24kGoldn has followed up with the video counterpart featuring himself and Iann Dior for their new song, “Mood.” In the fun new Sebastian Sdaigui directed music video, 24kGoldn and Iann Dior go back to back between vibrant scenes and melodic croons that help set the atmosphere.

“Mood” ft. Iann Dior follows Goldn’s previous singles “Unbelievable” ft. Kaash Paige and “City Of Angels,” which is featured on his Dropped Outta College EP. The eight tracks collectively demonstrate his breadth of talent and tells the story of his life as a budding artist and a college student at USC – exploring the emotions, relationships, and desires he felt at the time. Listen to Dropped Outta College in full HERE.

$1-3k reporting and engagement grants, all-expenses-paid health journalism training

In this era of dwindling newsroom resources, we’ve got a proposition for you: come spend five days with us at USC Annenberg’s Center for Health Journalism learning about how race, ethnicity, education level and socioeconomic status influence health, and go home with a $1,000 reporting grant (and, for five journalists, community engagement grants of $2,000 as well!)

The USC Annenberg Center for Health Journalism’s will bring 20 journalists to USC March 18-22, 2018 for the all-expenses-paid 2018 California Fellowship.

The Fellowship will take an in-depth look at how socioeconomic status interacts with community conditions to affect an individual’s prospects for health and also examine how California is responding to the uncertainties wrought by a new Administration, especially with regard to Californians who rely on Medi-Cal, federal subsidies and safety net clinics.

The $1,000 reporting grant is meant to help with the costs of producing a substantive explanatory or investigative project on a health issue important to your community. Each Fellow will also receive six months of mentoring by a senior journalist. And up to five Fellows will receive an additional $2,000 for community engagement, as well as six months of specialized mentoring on creative ways to involve their communities in their reporting and maximize the impact of their work. Recent projects have focused not just on traditional health topics, but sex ed controversies and the impacts of gang violence, toxic stress, environmental contaminants and the opioid epidemic.

The Fellowship week is jam-packed with workshops, seminars and field trips that will help you understand the relationship between a community’s health and the health of the individuals who live there. From experts in various fields and prize-winning journalists, Fellows learn new ways of thinking about the health of their communities — and effective ways of explaining them to their audiences. Each Fellowship also features a half-day project workshop for Fellows and their editors, whom we bring in at our expense.

Many Fellowship projects have won awards (including a Pulitzer Prize) and helped Fellows advance their careers. 2017 Fellow Antonia Cereijido of Latino USA said, “Especially at a time when it feels like journalists can’t keep up with the news, pulling back to think holistically about something as important as health offers an opportunity to reorient and better understand what direction you want your reporting to take.” Monica Velez of the Merced Sun-Star said, “I learned there is a lot more to health care than insurance and how important patient stories are.”

Who Can Apply

The Fellowship is open to print, broadcast and online journalists from California, as well as journalists based elsewhere who contribute to California media outlets or to national outlets with a California footprint. Both newsroom staffers and freelance contributors are encouraged to apply. And it’s not just health reporters we’re looking for. We define health very broadly. Through past Fellowships, general assignment reporters as well as education, criminal justice, county and state government and environmental reporters have found new ways to think about their coverage. 2017 Fellow Mackenzie Mays, an education reporter for the Fresno Bee, said, “The program has helped me think outside the box, particularly when it comes to community engagement and reaching new audiences. As someone who does not cover health, the workshop has made me think of the many ways health can spill over into other parts of people’s lives.”

To encourage collaboration between mainstream and ethnic media, preference will be given to applicants who propose a joint project for use by both media outlets.

For more information about how to apply, visit CenterforHealthJournalism.orgor email Martha Shirk at CAHealth@usc.edu. The deadline to apply is December 15, 2017. We strongly encourage a conversation about your proposed project before you apply.

Art With Purpose

Breast Cancer Awareness pieces that are for millennials, by a millennial!

Marc Thaler began Art with Purpose after he graduated this past December from USC. His mother battled breast cancer, so the cause is close to home. He has raised over $40,000 since the brands’ start.

His pieces are streetwear inspired – hoodies, denim jackets, hats, etc. and 25% of sales go toward breast cancer research at hospitals like, City of Hope, St Johns, Keck School of Medicine at USC and other organizations such as John Wayne Cancer Institute and Phase One Foundation. Marc believes that he is so successful because “young people are into fashionable streetwear, and can afford to buy a piece of clothing, but might never think to write a check to a foundation.”

JOSH BYER

(In the Cool Twilight, Josh Byer)

Josh Byer is an artist residing in Vancouver, Canada. Josh has invented a painting technique called Faux Fauvism. The goal of Faux Fauvism is to pinpoint the moment in cognition when pattern recognition occurs. 

Featured five times on the front page of Reddit, his online galleries have received 12 million views since 2015. Paintings appear in recent features from Style.ca, VICE, OPALUS Magazine, The ARTBO, Creative Boom, and 1968 Magazine. Licensed artwork can be found on products available from Posterlounge, Walmart, Overstock.com, Wayfair, Art.com, Amazon, AllPosters, and Great Big Canvas.


Below are several of his recent pieces:


Greta Garbo

mixed media on wood panel

8” x 10”


Running Away

mixed media on cold press paper

11” x 15”


August

mixed media on cold press paper

11” x 15”


Eclipse

mixed media on cold press paper

11” x 15”


Orchard

acrylic and ink and watercolor on cold press paper

9” x 12”

Audrey Hepburn

mixed media on wood panel

8” x 12”

The Sunday Sisters

acrylic and ink on cold press paper

18” x 24”


In the Cool Twilight

mixed media on linen paper

9” x 12”


The Night That Rock and Roll Came Back

acrylic and ink and watercolor on cold press paper

9” X 12”


The Forest Dancers

acrylic and ink on cold press paper

12” x 18”


The Swan in the Moon

acrylic and ink on cold press paper

12” x 18”

For more information on Josh Byer

Visit: http://www.byercreative.com/