Posts tagged with "Philanthropic"

Rita Azar illustration for entrepreneur article for 360 MAGAZINE

Art and design incubator at FIU develops entrepreneurial leaders in the creative sector

By: Tatianna Basanta

Quincy Chery is an artist, professional barber and a self-proclaimed “jack of all trades.” Growing up, he had a knack for creating one-of-a-kind products you could not find anywhere else. He has mass-produced a myriad of things ranging from phone cases and basketballs to his own original clothing line. 

While earning his undergraduate degree in art, Chery found a place that allowed him to not only structure and lay out his designs more clearly, but also to develop his own brick-and-mortar-store where he could sell his work. That place was the Ratcliffe Art + Design Incubator (RA+DI) at Florida International University

FIU’s Ratcliffe Art + Design Incubator is an innovative arts entrepreneurship space for teaching art and design students how to turn their ideas into profitable businesses.

Chery is now the proud owner of the Cutting Gallery, a barbershop and art gallery storefront in Miramar, Florida, where he cuts hair professionally, and sells his original creations and the work of other local artists around South Florida.

“Being involved in the incubator allowed me to meet and connect with some truly talented artists,” Quincy says. “And now with my store, I get to showcase and expose their work to the community. As an artist, one of the things that hinder us the most is, you can be talented, but no one sees your work. I have been able to take what I learned in school, and the connections I made, and combine them to benefit the art community.”

And he is just one of many success stories to come out of the incubator. 

The Ratcliffe Art + Design Incubator launched in 2017, in collaboration with FIU’s College of Communication, Architecture + The Arts and The Philip E. and Carole R. Ratcliffe Foundation, with an initial cohort of eight fellows. 

Each year, the incubator selects a new cohort of fellows for a one or two-year residency to work with two faculty designers who operate their own on-site studios while also overseeing the fellows’ development of startup businesses or patents. Each fellow also receives a full scholarship during their residency.

The incubator is now on its fourth cohort.

Bridging the gap between talent and entrepreneurship:

The incubator’s focus on art and design sets it apart from other incubators. Fellows learn about the business side of an artistic operation, including marketing, running a company, seeking venture capital, scaling and packaging. They come to understand how their practice as designers and artists translates directly to business as they design, demonstrate, pitch and sell their products, combining experiential learning, fieldwork and professional networking.

“Entrepreneurship education within academic art and design departments has been introduced into our university curricula to prepare graduates to actively participate in the process of building creative economies in our distinct communities,” said Jacek Kolasiński, director of the RA+DI. “These initiatives have focused on a search for new strategies and prospects to empower young artists and designers to create more sustainable economic futures for themselves and foster their creative energies to re-envision our future and prepare them to solve society’s most pressing challenges.”

RA+DI trains students to become employers who will create jobs instead of having to seek employment. Additionally, there is a focus on developing entrepreneurs with diverse backgrounds who design products for underrepresented communities.

Fellow Latricia Russell joined the incubator in 2018 and launched LR Beauty Co., her namesake beauty brand that offers professional makeup, skin therapy and hair braiding. She discovered the RA+DI while on her way to class one day and asked Kolasiński about renting out space for a beauty event she was hosting. Kolansińki ended up explaining how the fellowship program could actually grow her business and encouraged her to apply.

“I’m a thinker. I like to plan everything before taking action but participating in RA+DI has helped me to not just plan, but also how to act on my plans,” Russell said. “I feel more confident about testing my ideas and now affectionately refer to the incubator as ‘a space for doers.’”

After completing her fellowship and graduating from FIU, Russell had the skills she needed to convert her business from a travel studio experience, where she drove to and serviced clients on-location exclusively, to opening her own beauty studio. 

Art, design and technology all come together:

The Ratcliffe Incubator also uses its platform to help others understand how art, design and technology shape our world. And it is bringing these conversations right to people’s homes with its new podcast series titled “Ratcliffe Technology Conversations.” 

RA+DI director, Kolansińki, leads the series where he, along with guests, fellows, other artists and designers explore how technology merges in our world, our communities and all around us with topics ranging from NASA design and technology, to mangroves and the future of art and design during these unprecedented times.

“’RA+DI Technology Conversations’ is a program for everyone interested in technology and new tools to transform creative practices, business endeavors and personal lives,” Kolansińki says.

Its first episode “Mission to Mars” featured NASA project manager Andrew Johnson, who worked on Terrain Relative Navigation (TRN). TRN enables the Perseverance rover, which is set to land on Mars on February 18, 2021, to send back vital information of life on the planet. 

“Ratcliffe Technology Conversations” can be streamed on Spotify

 Philanthropic ties:

The late Philip and Carole Ratcliffe created the Ratcliffe Foundation in 2003 with a vision to provide access to education and training for aspiring entrepreneurs and small business owners to grow their ventures, create jobs and expand economic opportunities in local communities.

Based in Annapolis, Maryland, the Ratcliffe Foundation provides funds to institutions to encourage entrepreneurship in non-traditional business fields such as skilled trades, arts & design and aquaculture & environmental sciences. It strives to integrate its programs with local communities through mentorships and business involvement. 

“The FIU Ratcliffe Art + Design Incubator aligns closely with our foundation’s vision and we are deeply pleased to support its mission to provide students in creative fields with the tools necessary to succeed as entrepreneurs,” said Carlene Cassidy, chief executive officer of the Philip E. & Carole R. Ratcliffe Foundation.

The Ratcliffe Foundation donated an initial gift of $831,000 in 2017 to open the incubator at FIU’s Biscayne Bay Campus in North Miami, followed by a secondary gift of $631,000. The gifts provided funding for the incubator for a three-year period, $450,000 in scholarships, monthly lecture series, state-of-the-art technology, office space, a small business library, market research assistance, legal and accounting support, seed capital programs and training.

Last November, the Ratcliffe Foundation awarded the incubator another $2.5 million gift to aid in the incubator’s mission of developing diverse, entrepreneurial leaders in the creative sector and boost South Florida’s economy. 

The gift also supports micro-credentialing, co-curricular and experiential programming, and competition and entrepreneurship showcases, among other initiatives.

“This new four-year commitment from the Ratcliffe Foundation is a testament to the success of the early stages of this program and to its bright future. We are deeply grateful to the Foundation for its partnership as we continue to elevate and expand the Ratcliffe Art + Design Incubator,” said Oliver Ionita, CARTA’s senior director of development.

Helping in a time of need:

Early last year, the foundation also provided an additional emergency grant of $10,000 for the purchase of five 3-D printers that allowed the incubator to print more than 1,000 face shields for local healthcare workers in conjunction with FIU’s Miami Beach Urban Studios and College of Engineering & Computing

It gave the RA+DI fellows a unique opportunity to learn how to produce essential personal protective equipment (PPE) and serve the community.

Some RA+DI fellows also used the opportunity to expand their own fellowship business projects to help the community during the height of the pandemic.

Arina Polyanskaya took her business project, Re-dress — which focuses on repurposing second-hand clothing into custom fabric squares for furniture designs, pet beds and more — and created face masks for the community. With the help and support from the Ratcliffe Incubator, Polyanskaya created more than 50 masks in just four weeks. 

“A family member of mine works in a local hospital and, since the beginning of quarantine, she’s been really concerned with the amount of protective wear available for health care workers, as well as for the general public,” Polyanskaya adds. “Making fabric squares felt inappropriate with this pandemic going on, so I thought there must be a way to utilize my skills and materials in assisting with controlling the spread of the virus. And I found it through sewing face masks.”

Other fellows provided the community with a much-needed escape amidst the pandemic through their art.

Denis Rovinsky opened his own art studio and shared virtual exhibitions for the public to enjoy. His work focuses on kinetic installations that use sound and light as a means of expression. Growing up in Russia, Rovinsky didn’t think a career as an artist was in his future, but he says the incubator helped him learn to think like an entrepreneur and “show him the path to becoming an artist without starving to do it.”

Whether it is current or former fellows, this one-of-a-kind incubator based in South Florida, is giving artists and designers a look into the business world and a space to turn their ideas into reality while creating their own employment opportunities.  

Drive-In screening pop up article illustration by Gabrielle Archuleta for 360 MAGAZINE

Drive-In at the Ebell of LA

Drive-In screening awards-eligible films across LA & launches this weekend @ Ebell of Los Angeles
 
Necessity drives awards-eligible filmmaker Phyllis Stuart to create the Your Consideration Drive-In Screening Series for the awards season.
 
With the 2021 awards season in full swing and theaters still shuttered, awards voters are left to judge competing films at home via an online link this season. It’s not ideal. So one awards-eligible filmmaker, Phyllis Stuart (Wild Daze) launched a series the Your Consideration Drive-In screening series to give voters a place to experience films the way their creators intended them to be seen on the big screen. Their Drive-In will follow all public health and safety requirements as mandated by the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health and the City of Los Angeles.
 
Awards voters are inundated with online voting links Stuart said, so motivated by The old proverb: Needs Must When The Devil Drives, aim to give my film a fighting chance to reach voters and offer other awards-eligible filmmakers a place to envelop audiences Conveniently located pop-up locations keep voters close to home while allowing them to watch films.
 
WHAT: Your Consideration Drive-in Screening Series for film awards voters
WHERE: VARIOUS / FIRST VENUE: THE EBELL OF LOS ANGELES: East Parking Lot @742 S. Lucerne Blvd. LA CA 90005
WHEN: Opening Night January 30th & 31st at 7 P.M.
HOW: Adhering to the 2021 awards outreach rules, all Your Consideration Drive-In Screening invitations will be emailed to awards voters from participating studios and campaign publicists, who will each host their own screenings
 
Like a traveling treasure hunt, the Your Consideration pop-up drive-in screening series allows Los Angeles film awards voter audiences the chance to travel short distances to see awards-eligible films on a big screen, from the safety of their own vehicles. Says its founder, Phyllis Stuart, always loved scavenger hunts as a kid, and since we must still socially distance this is a safe way to witness cinematic splendor together.
 
The first two nights of the series will take place at The Ebell of Los Angeles on January 30th and 31st with Stuart’s feature-length documentary Wild Daze. Thereafter, until April 2021 studio awards-eligible films will run at three Your Consideration Drive-In venues.
 
Director of Special Events, Anessa Birkemeier believes supporting the documentary work of a female filmmaker like “Wild Daze” director Phyllis Stuart aligns with the mission at The Ebell of Los Angeles: To participate in and encourage the educational, cultural, and social growth of the diverse LA community. The venue parking lot with 150 spaces at 742 S. Lucerne Blvd., sits directly across from the clubhouse, where the Your Consideration Drive-In will launch. Ms. Birkemeier added, “The Ebell of Los Angeles is excited to host a drive-in experience that connects our community and supports the film industry.”
 
ABOUT YOUR CONSIDERATION DRIVE-IN SCREENING SERIES
Featuring a 40-foot inflatable screen with a 30,000 lumen Barco projector and FM transmitted audio, the pop-up drive-in accommodates 75 to 150 vehicles for evening film screenings beginning January 30th through April 2021. The series offers film awards, voters, the opportunity to watch awards-eligible films on the big screen in a charming Los Angeles cinematic environment. For more venue details visit HERE and to book a screening visit HERE.
 
ABOUT THE EBELL OF LOS ANGELES
The Ebell of Los Angeles is home to the Wilshire Ebell Women’s Club, an active club that began in 1894. In 1927 the women built their historic landmark in the mid-Wilshire area of Los Angeles. The 75,000 square foot property includes a tri-level clubhouse and the 1,238-seat Wilshire Ebell Theatre that has hosted top artists including Cher and Stevie Wonder and lectures by world leaders like Dr. Jill Biden. Judy Garland was discovered on the Broadway-style stage while performing as Baby Frances Gumm. Revenue from the Theatre, private events, film and TV&  productions fund the operations so that the Ebell women can continue their social and philanthropic work in the community. The Ebell will serve as one of three venues for the Your Consideration Drive-In screening series.
 
ABOUT WILD DAZE THE MOVIE
Under the banner of Light Productions (The Women’s Image Awards, 50 Years of Funny Females), filmmaker Phyllis Stuart forges an awards-eligible documentary Wild Daze, a project six years in the making, fueled by a fierce desire to save African wildlife, while protecting the women, children and forest peoples whose fates are tied up with the survival of the continent’s most iconic and majestic animals. Visit www.wilddazethemovie.com and follow developments on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. Trailer HERE.

First Jewish American Heritage National Park Made Law

Yesterday marks a significant win in the decades-long effort to recognize and celebrate the philanthropic legacy of Julius Rosenwald and his impact on American democratic equality.  With the president’s signing of the Julius Rosenwald and Rosenwald Schools Act of 2020, a process begins that would lead to the establishment of the first National Park Service site to honor a Jewish American and celebrate the contribution of a Jewish American to our society, while preserving a selection of iconic Rosenwald Schools.

The National Trust for Historic Preservation first highlighted the threatened natureof the Rosenwald legacy by placing Rosenwald Schools on its 11 Most Endangered Historic Places List in 2002. The National Trust supported the preservation of Rosenwald Schools for many years, providing workshops, conferences, and technical assistance – including a publication: the Grassroots Guide to Preserving Rosenwald Schools.

The heightened awareness created by the endangered list designation and Rosenwald Schools initiative  ultimately led to a partnership between the National Trust, the Campaign to Create the Julius Rosenwald and Rosenwald Schools National Historical Park, and the National Parks Conservation Association, which together collaborated to achieve the successful enactment of the Julius Rosenwald and the Rosenwald Schools Act of 2020 (H.R.3250).  Within this effort the Trust’s African American Cultural Heritage Action Fund established a grant fund that has provided over $2.5 million in matching grants to advance Rosenwald School preservation, including planning, engineering studies, architectural plans, archaeology, research, and rehabilitation.

“Rosenwald Schools unearth a fascinating and true history of African American activism, achievement, and resilience in the United States,” said Brent Leggs, executive director of the African American Cultural Heritage Action Fund.  “Their permanent preservation and interpretation broadens our understanding of the civil rights fight for equality in twentieth century America and the enduring power of interracial cooperation.”

BACKGROUND
Born in 1862 in Springfield, Illinois not far from the residence of then President Abraham Lincoln, Julius Rosenwald made his fortune as co-owner of Sears, Roebuck and Company. His own parents, however, had fled persecution in Germany in the late 1900s, and he began to channel his experience of hatred and bigotry into the creation of the Rosenwald School Fund, which had a lasting impact on education in America.  A prominent philanthropist, Rosenwald joined the board of esteemed black educator Booker T. Washington’s Tuskegee Institute in 1912.  Together, these two champions of social justice, one a former slave and the other a first-generation American refugee from persecution, used architecture and innovation to address the crisis in education facing Black families across the South.

Between 1917 and 1932, the Rosenwald School Fund, working in partnership with local Black communities, helped to finance the construction of more than 5300 state-of-the-art school buildings for community and academic use.  The schools served as a lifeline for students and educators whose progress was held back by the separate and unequal school system that ruled the Jim Crow South.  By 1928, one-third of the South’s rural African American school children and teachers were educated in Rosenwald Schools.  Notable former students include poet and activist Maya Angelou and the late Rep. John Lewis (D-GA), among many notable others.

“History shows us,” Leggs continued, “that countless ordinary citizens were the vanguards of collective action and human innovation.  These stories and landmarks serve as a testament to our progress, and they remind us that our work is not complete.”

Passage of the bill was a multi-year effort, but yesterday it was signed into law.  The legislation,  sponsored by Representative Danny Davis (D-IL) and Senator Richard Durbin (D-IL), directs the Department of the Interior to conduct a special resources study of sites associated with the life and legacy of Julius Rosenwald, with a special focus on Rosenwald Schools and determine how they might be designated as a new unit within the National Park System.  Once established, the Rosenwald park unit would become the first of over 420 National Park Service sites to honor the life and contributions of a Jewish American.

About the National Trust for Historic Preservation
The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded nonprofit organization, works to save America’s historic places.  http://savingplaces.org | @savingplaces

About the African American Cultural Heritage Action Fund
The African American Cultural Heritage Action Fund is a multi-year initiative of the National Trust for Historic Preservation in partnership with the Ford Foundation, the JPB Foundation, the Open Society Foundations and other partners, working to make an important and lasting contribution to our cultural landscape by elevating the stories and places of African American achievement and activism. Visit http://www.savingplaces.org/actionfund

Isabelle Fries makes a brief splash inside 360 MAGAZINE

ISABELLE FRIES

At 22 years old, Isabelle Fries has started to make a name for herself in the music industry. Not only is she gifted in her art, she has an extremely large heart.

Born in Sydney, but raised in Denver, Colorado, Fries found her inclination for singing at a young age. “I knew I wanted music to be a part of my life since I was about 7, but as I got older I was able to recognize that it is a labor of love for me,” she expressed. “I have never searched for fame through my music.” 

Not long after, she discovered her heart had room for another love, philanthropy. At just 15 years old, Fries became the first youth board member and youth leader for the Global Livingston Institute (GLI) an NGO in Uganda who’s mission is to educate students & community leaders on innovative approaches to international development and empower awareness, collaboration, conversations and personal growth. 

Through working with this organization, Isabelle travelled to Uganda to teach, perform and empower. In 2017, Fries performed in front of 20,000 people in Uganda at the annual iKnow HIV Awareness Concert Series along with other musicians from around the world, using music to breakdown barriers, bring people together and provide free medical testing and awareness for HIV for over 8,500 Ugandans.  

“I became a part of GLI when I was 15 and fully threw myself into their mission and their work. It is what opened my eyes to one of my passions I am now pursuing in international education. They really focus on young voices and drawing on perspectives from all types of individuals which is why I was asked to be on the board at such a young age. GLI is truly one of the most important things in my life so I could not be more thankful to be a part of it.” 

This wasn’t the only organization Fries carried out philanthropic work with. She volunteered in Haiti with The Road to Hope, an International Affairs Intern with Creative Visions in Malibu, California and a community worker with CEPIA in Costa Rica.

Isabelle still wanted to do more for Eastern African communities. She founded the “Bulamu Raise Your Voice Community Foundation (BCF)” and was able to draw on inspiration from one of her other life-long devotions: swimming. 

For twelve years, she swam competitively breaking records, winning State Championships and being a leader on her teams until complications from several autoimmune disorders forced her out of the water. This was never a part of her plan, but she was able to alter her life’s path and kept pushing through

“It is not something that I let control my life or hold me back from living. I take care of myself in every way I can and find strength in what I am able to do and learn new ways to improve my way of life,” she expressed. 

One of Fries’ missions with both GLI and BCF is to raise awareness for water safety on Lake Bunyonyi in Uganda by teaching swimming to prevent drownings. By working closely with GLI and the headmaster of the Kazi Primary School, Fries has been able to carry out this initiative, as well as implementing academic, music and sports curriculum.  

She said that the community of Lake Bunyonyi changed her life by seeing how they are such powerful and driven people. “I don’t go for my own benefit or to be a ‘white savior’ ,” she asserted. “When I work in Uganda, I give the individuals I work with support and resources and they truly do the rest.”

Isabelle was fortunate enough to meet one of her long time role models, Michael Phelps. Fostering a relationship with someone who has shaped her life in so many ways in and out of the water has been such a blessing, says Fries. This lead to her working with the Michael Phelps Foudation (MPF), where she took the opportunity to become certified in their “IM Water Safety Program” which is implemented in The Boys and Girls Clubs of America.

When given the opportunity again to combine her music and philanthropy through the MPF, she couldn’t resist. Isabelle was asked to open for country singer, Eric Church, at a MPF benefit concert in Chicago at the iconic Arcada Theater. “Swimming is an incredibly big part of my life as I was a serious competitive swimmer from the ages of 5 to 18, therefor having the chance to combine my music with my love and passion for swimming and water safety was very special and meaningful.” 

Now a recent graduate of The University of Southern California, Fries splits her time living between Denver and Los Angeles, continuing to pursue her passions: music and philanthropy, while working in Denver at a non-profit dedicated to mentoring students. Isabelle holds a degree in International Relations with minors in Spanish as well as  Non-Profits, Philanthropy and Volunteerism. 

While studying at USC, Isabelle was fortunate enough to catch the eye of Grammy-winning, multi-platinum producer/mixer Rob Chiarelli, who she’s fostered an incredibly close relationship with. 

She began releasing music signed with Chiarelli’s label Streetlamp records this year, already finding a widespread and loyal audience across all music platforms using her rich, soulful vocal that could be compared to the sound of Lauren Daigle or Adele. She recently released her 6th single, a raw piano ballad called “All We Had. When people listen to her music, Fries always wants to make them truly feel – whatever that feeling may be. Through channeling lyrics with her songwriters from her own life experiences, the emotions she is able to elicit are special to her. 

While the music may be interpreted differently for each unique individual, her raw style is something she hopes help guide those listeners on whatever journey they want to take. “I’ve always said, I love music because it lets you feel something you didn’t think you could.”

This is definitely something she mirrors artistically with one of her musical inspirations, Amy Winehouse. Growing up performing jazz music, Fries describes this genre as a big part of her musical identity, so she was instantly drawn to Winehouse’s style which she catalogs as “authentic, raw and groundbreaking. Amy created music unapologetically.”

But Fries’ number one music icon is Sir Elton John. “His music was always around me when I was growing up. My parents loved all music from that time and exposed me to it at a very young age which is one of the reasons it is the type of music I love the most. 

However, Elton John’s music was different for me, it felt like poetry and real emotion. His sound and songs are like stories that you never want to end. When I began to listen to him more I realized this is the type of music I want to sing and be a part of.” 

Feeling very blessed to have found such a supportive team, guiding her in finally being able to put her own original songs out there into the world, she is excited to evolve using her music to help create change, perform live again, and continue to build upon her body of work. While she’s away in the studio recording, we’ll be out here patiently waiting for more music, while she continues to use her voice to make the world a better place. 

L’Oréal Paris Women Of Worth Honorees

Today L’Oréal Paris announced the 2018 Women of Worth Honorees, recognizing 10 extraordinary women across the United States who are selflessly making a difference in their communities through volunteerism. Now in its 13th year, Women of Worth is the signature philanthropic program inspired by the L’Oréal Paris tagline, “Because You’re Worth It,” and honors the intrinsic worth of everyday women inspiring others and creating positive change. Each with their own inspiring journey, the Women of Worth are united by a singular vision of giving back to their communities to champion a range of charitable causes. From advocating for youth literacy programs, empowering women victim to cyberbullying, to providing sustainable food solutions, these women are finding unique and innovative ways to tackle some of society’s most pressing issues for greater good.

This year’s 10 Honorees join a group of 130 extraordinary Women of Worth who have turned their vision into reality. As a result of L’Oréal Paris’ support over the past 13 years, Women of Worth have gone on to receive national recognition from The White House, United Nations, and were awarded Presidential service medals. Past Honorees impacted national and local legislation mandating free sepsis education in schools, private insurers to cover the costs of diagnostic assessments for autism and required food service businesses to recycle their waste oil. Through their collective power, Women of Worth have gone on to provide resources to more than 78,000 homeless women in need across the country, funded nearly 50 childhood cancer research grants and rescued thousands of adults and children living in abusive situations.

Selected by a distinguished panel of judges, the 2018 L’Oréal Paris Women of Worth Honorees were chosen from thousands of nominees for their unwavering commitment, drive and desire to better the lives of those around them.  In addition to receiving $10,000 to support her charitable cause, each 2018 L’Oréal Paris Women of Worth Honoree will be supported by national paid media, receive educational and training opportunities and a platform to tell her story on a national scale. Starting today, the public is invited to support the Women of Worth by voting for one woman to become this year’s National Honoree, who will receive an additional $25,000 to support her cause for a total of $35,000.

Visit WomenofWorth.com to learn about the 2018 Honorees’ stories and vote once per day through November 30, 2018 for the woman’s organization that you believe has significant impact.

Ways to vote include:

• Visit WomenofWorth.com and register with an e-mail address to vote once per day

• Re-tweet a mention about one of the Women of Worth made by L’Oréal Paris on Twitter

“This year’s Honorees beautifully exemplify the L’Oréal Paris mission and we look forward to continuing to champion our Women of Worth to make an impact in their communities and around the world,” said Tim Coolican, President, L’Oréal Paris. “We are inspired by these breathtaking Women of Worth whose courageous spirit and incredible strength has sparked worth within others and it is our privilege to share their causes and stories with the world,” added Karen T. Fondu, President Emeritus and Chairwoman of L’Oréal Paris Women of Worth.

MEET THE 2018 WOMEN OF WORTH HONOREES

• Shreya Mantha – Charlotte, N.C.; Founder,  Foundation For Girls, a youth-led social venture that endeavors to change the life trajectory for at-risk girls and youth through programs in financial wellness, leadership, digital literacy and health and well-being.

• Alisha Zhao – Portland, Ore.; Founder, Kids First Project, a non-profit that brings programs and services to youth who are homeless and living in shelters.

• Hannah Dehradunwala – New York, N.Y.: Founder of New York-based Transfernation, which provides a platform for companies and corporate hospitality groups to donate extra food through on-demand pickups. The excess food is then delivered to community-based organizations that feed hungry and food insecure New Yorkers.

• Genevieve Chase – Sun Valley, Idaho.; Founder, American Women Veterans, is focused on raising awareness of women’s contributions to the military and giving female veterans a place to connect and advocate on behalf of military women and veterans.

• Dr. Holly Jacobs – Coral Gables, Fla.; Founder, Cyber Civil Rights Initiative, a non-profit that serves thousands of victims of cyber sexual assault around the world and advocates for technological, social and legal innovation to fight the offense.

• Jennifer Maddox – Chicago, Ill.; Police Officer and Founder, Future Ties, a non-profit organization that helps young people and families on the South Side of Chicago become the best version of themselves by providing life skills training, mentoring, academic support, field trips, conflict resolution, resume building, community volunteerism and workshops.

• Laura Reiss – Boca Raton, Fla.; Founder, The Samaritan365 Foundation and Kindness Matters Movement. The Kindness Matters movement educates and inspires children about the importance of being grateful for who they are, showing kindness to themselves and others, and the many different ways that they can give back so they can make a positive impact within their own communities and the world.

• Christy Silva, – Thorndale, Pa.; Founder, Aidan’s Heart Foundation, a non-profit that is committed to providing awareness, education and support to create heart-safe communities for youth regarding the prevention and response to Sudden Cardiac Arrest.

• Betty Mohlenbrock – San Diego, Calif.; Founder, Reading Legacies, an organization committed to empowering children and youth in underserved, low-income areas and/or those who have incarcerated parents or family members through intergenerational shared-reading experiences.

• Carolyn Keller – Miami, Fla.; Founder, EBeauty Community, a non-profit that supports women undergoing treatment for cancer through a wig exchange program.

To learn more about this year’s Honorees, read their stories and vote for the 2018 Women of Worth National Honoree, visit WomenofWorth.com, and L’Oréal Twitter (www.twitter.com/lorealparisusa). Join and follow the conversation using the hashtag #WomenofWorth.

BREAKFAST AT TIFFANY’S AUCTION

A fashion and cinematic icon, Audrey Hepburn was one of the most beautiful women ever to grace a Hollywood screen, and her most famous film was undoubtedly ‘Breakfast at Tiffany’s”.

Thanks to her, the whole concept of the ‘little black dress’ became a thing, and Holly Golightly – the star of the film – became a household name. Now, you can own one of the most enduring images of cinema: an original, full-sized coloured photographer’s proof of Audrey Hepburn from the 1963 film, with Holly wearing that dress and that tiara.

Proceeds from this auction will go to the Help A Life Foundation, which was formed in 2007 with the goal of housing and educating adolescent orphaned girls in Ethiopia, and providing them with a secure and supportive environment.