Posts tagged with "activism"

Car Cat is an NFT from 360 MAGAZINE’S OPENSEA collection

NFT | LA Roundup

At the crux of the crypto community are gatherings. During a four-day inaugural conference from March 28-31, the brilliant minds behind the Edge of NFT podcast–Joshua Kriger, Jeff Kelley, Eathan Janney and Zack Sekar brought the LA blockchain clique together.

L.A. LIVE, the entertainment complex perfectly set in DTLA and adjacent to the Arts District is where tons off-site events were held. Since parking is difficult to navigate, public transit is one’s ideal option. In fact, some arrived via e-bikes with helmet in tow.

Attendance included financial experts alongside web developers, to those eager to learn about digital market spaces, DeFi, Web 3 and minting NFTs. Thanks to the growing tech within the City of Angels, largely in part to lower startup costs in comparison to Silicon Valley, the event drew an international crowd. 

Notable speakers ranged from billionaire Mark Cuban, NBA legend and founder of Black Santa Baron Davis, famed DJ Steve Aoki and world-renowned CEOs Robby Yung and David Wachsman. Other highlights which grabbed our attention were the art installations, innovative activations and musical performances.

The venue’s outdoor courtyard provided us with a much needed recess in between talks. In fact, we caught performances by rappers Nelly and Rich the Kid, played Trivia at the Freckle and snacked on lite bites from a plethora of parked food trucks. 

Wednesday night included an exclusive party held by Magic Eden, the leading NFT market place on Solana. The beginning of the night included a panel discussion from the Magic Eden team members Jack Tanlu, Zhuoxun Yin, Sidney Zhang and Zhuojie Zhou. After the discourse, the night was led by sets from Flosstradamus, Waka Flocka Flame and Migos‘ very own Quavo.

However, like many industries in America, the tech arena is white male-dominated, threatening new generational wealth of both women and minorities. 

That said, there were few discussions which concentrated on marginalized people within the realm, including the web3 panel which featured Dapper Labs, Stephanie Smellie, Ridhima Khan, Jayne Peressini, Nicole Rochette with moderator Ros Gold-Onwude

Perhaps next season, the organizers will consider grants for POC, LGBTQ and artists alike, encouraging inclusivity.

In celebration of this metaverse, 360 MAGAZINE, a brand which was established within this emerging smart city, launched its NFT capsule.

Recap of NFT.NYC

360 MAGAZINE NFT ANIMAL SERIES ON OPENSEA

Article: Bee Davies, Yash Thadani, Vaughn Lowery

Kids Spark Video via Reb Czukoski for use by 360 Magazine

Transforming Theatre Kids into Citizen Artists

By: James Wallert

In April of 2018, I brought five high school students to an early morning event sponsored by the New York State Education Department. 200 educational leaders representing 27 school districts from all across the state were there to begin the process of creating integration plans for their districts. New York State has the most racially and socio-economically segregated schools in the nation and New York City Public Schools are more segregated today than they were before the landmark 1954 U. S. Supreme Court case Brown v. Board of Education in which the Justices ruled that “Separate but Equal” schools were unconstitutional. These students were invited to perform their original thirty-minute play, Laundry City, an exploration of the effects of educational segregation. A facilitator from the state squawks a few barely audible words of introduction via a microphone plugged into a portable speaker, “Please welcome Epic Theatre Ensemble”. Jeremiah, a high school senior wearing a T-Shirt with the words, “I am Epic” written across the front, steps into the center of the room, without a mic, and speaks directly to the audience:

JEREMIAH

School segregation,

That systematic placement,

Race and class, don’t make me laugh. 

That shit goes deeper than thin cloudy glass.

Right past society’s foundation, 

Back to America in the making. 

The original sin: Race.

The performers weave through the audience performing scene after scene, transforming from character to character. The show culminates in a town hall. The students had done meticulous research to craft a scene that made room for dozens of nuanced perspectives on this complex issue.

LIV

I’m not really sure what we mean by integration. What I’ve seen when we talk about integration, it is about Black and Latino kids going to white schools to become better. That isn’t integration, that’s, in my view, assimilation.

NASHALI

I consider integration when you do the hard work of valuing what each person brings to that setting. Integration is where we learn to understand each other and appreciate each other and nobody’s story or history is more important than another’s.

JEREMIAH

I think that’s racist. I think it’s classist. I don’t believe in the savior complex- that you need to have folks swoop in and save the poor Black and Latino children. I believe that Black and Latino folks have agency and power that have been untapped.

NAKKIA

For me, it’s not that certain communities are less powerful; it’s that certain communities haven’t been given the floor. How do we give people the floor? Segregation was intentional. Integration has to be intentional. Segregation was forced. Integration has to be forced.

DAVION

If integration made money somehow, America would do it.

The five actors portray 18 different characters throughout the course of this last scene, but the final question of the play is delivered by the students as themselves.

ENSEMBLE

Is separate but equal fair?

The five citizen artists join hands and bow. The crowd rises for a standing ovation. After taking in the love, the students gesture for the audience to retake their seats.

JEREMIAH

At Epic, we have a conversation after every performance and we always ask our audience the same first question: Imagine that two weeks from now, one morning you wake up and find yourself thinking about Laundry City. What is it that will be going through your mind? A line, a character, an idea, a question? What do you think will resonate with you over time?

The post-show discussion runs an hour—twice as long as the play that sparked it. The facilitator jumps back on the mic to thank the students and direct the district teams to return to their work sessions. I gather the cast to take them back to their school (it’s a weekday). A superintendent from Upstate comes over and asks the students if they can come by his table to take a look at his district’s integration plan and share their thoughts. They do. We start to head out again when a superintendent from NYC’s Upper West Side asks for some feedback from the students about her district’s plan. The students go over to her table. After several more invitations are proffered, we are eventually invited to stay through lunch so that the cast could review and respond to each of the 27 district integration plans. I make a quick call to their Principal who agrees to excuse them from the rest of their morning classes.

About an hour into this process of consultation, Jeremiah asked if he could speak to me in the hallway. “Jim, I feel like an activist,” he says, “I mean, I feel like I’m in a room full of people who can actually change things and they’re listening to me.”

Since 2015, the plays of Epic’s youth ensemble have received 225 performances (in-person and online) for 56,000 audience members including government employees, policy researchers, and legislators.

Large-scale cultural change is always led by young people and artists, but funding for in-school and after-school arts programs are often the first casualties of state and local budget cuts. We need to invest in arts education to cultivate the next generation of citizen artists. We need to champion the creation of youth art that is relevant, representative, and affordable for everyone. We need to proudly assert the value of art-making by demanding that young artists from historically marginalized communities get paid a reasonable wage for the work they make. We need to challenge oppressive systems by placing youth and their art in front of people with power. And once everyone has had a chance to experience the art, we need to provide the time and space for people to talk to one another about what it means to them and what actions they want to take next.

About the Author James Wallert is a Founder and Co-Artistic Director of Epic Theatre Ensemble and author of Citizen Artists: A Guide to Helping Young People Make Plays That Change the World.

art illustration by Gabrielle Marchan for use by 360 magazine

Remote Control

This week, Vera List Center at the New School is pleased to partner with High Line Art, writer and researcher Arthur Holland Michel, and The Clemente Soto Vélez Cultural and Educational Center to present Remote Control: Surveying Drones and Culture Today. Our three-day online symposium kicks off on Wednesday, February 9 with Soundscapes of Conflict, a panel discussion that will explore the embodied experience of drone warfare. (Please note: Guillermo Galindo‘s live performance of Remote Control at The Clemente has been postponed to a later date.)

On Thursday, February 10, Imaging War: Drones from the Ground will address the disconnect between depictions of drone warfare in Western and American media with the lived reality of those who experience it. The panel Aerial Empowerment: Drones for Art, Activism, and Collective Journalism brings together artists and activists in a discussion on the empowering possibilities of consumer-level drones and their implications for the broader discourse on technology, power, and surveillance, while Algorithms and Warfare explores the contested ethical implications of algorithmic warfare that separates human decision making from the effects of their actions. 

On Friday, February 11, Shifting Focus: Representing Drones considers filmic and artistic representations of drones, while Surfacing the War on Terror Today focuses on the twenty-year evolution of the “War on Terror” and the central role that drones have played in enabling its international reach. And finally, a closing lecture later that day features activist Kathy Kelly, whose peace activism contests the decades-long international disruption of US drone policies and occupation.

The Vera List Center for Art and Politics at The New School is generously supported by members of the Vera List Center Board and individual donors as well as the following institutional funders: The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Boris Lurie Art Foundation, Dayton Foundation, Ford Foundation, Kettering Fund, the Native Arts and Cultures Foundation, Pryor Cashman LLP, and The New School.

ComplexCon is Back!

By: Krishan Narsinghani

ComplexCon returns to Long Beach, CA this November 6-7 for two unforgettable days of shopping, performances, drops, food and reconnecting safely.

ComplexCon is the largest pop culture festival and exhibition in the world! A place that brings together music, lifestyle, art, sports, innovation, activism, and education. The two-day festival is the epicenter for tens of thousands of the world’s most active, influential, and engaged individuals. Guests in attendance will be able to shop hundreds of exclusive releases from the most sought after brands such as, Adidas, Kerwin Frosts, and Hello Kitty.

This year’s hosts are J Balvin and Kristen Noel Crawley, and the weekend will close with a live performance by ASAP Rocky

Over the weekend there will be in-depth conversations led by influencers and celebrities, art exhibits, food, brand activations, interactive technology, and much more. 

ComplexCon is a one-of-a-kind experience that brings together creators and audiences to celebrate culture, spark creativity, and foster community. We look forward to having you here.  

ComplexCon 2021 Recap Day 1

Day 1 was led with in-depth conversations, led by influencers and celebrities, art exhibits, food, brand activations, interactive technology, and much more. The day featured appearances by celebrities such as J Balvin, Lil Yachty and Gunna. Crowds flooded the floor for DJ sets by Zack Bia, Kitty Cash and Siobhan Bell. 

Adidas had an impactful start to the weekend with multiple activations and giveaways on the floor with top brands and talent. Adidas in collaboration with Prada constructed a interactive cube, which they are raffling off 10 pairs of their Adidas x Prada Re-Nylon. The multi-hyphenate talent Kerwin Frost, who has created “Kerwin’s Castle,” had a slew of celebrity appearances and raffle giveaways. 

J Balvin at ComplexCon covered by 360 MAGAZINE photographed by Armen Kelechian
Photographed by: Armen Kelechian

ComplexCon 2021 Recap Day 2

Day two of ComplexCon was nothing short of entertaining. With appearances from former NBA star, Dwayne Wade (at Lining), podcast sessions, a lagoon of food trucks and more. 

Hip-hop artist, Trinidad James, promoted his shoe collection in collaboration with Saucony. His brand Hommewrk is also spotlighted alongside the new crimson painted sneaker. Streetwear brand Babylon hosted a roulette table for attendees to play on in addition to a slot machine and pinwheel for prizes. Hello Kitty seemed to have a large presence at the event with multiple carnival inspired attractions including a ferris wheel perfect for a Fall day.

A$AP Rocky performed his iconic debut album LIVE. LOVE. A$AP for the first time, celebrating ten years since its release, as well as recent hits. With Rihanna cheering him on next to the stage, Rocky closed out the convention reminiscing through his career over the years and climbing a twenty-five foot pillar to top it off. 

Full lineup.

Hello Kitty
Image via 5WPR for 360 Magazine

Q×A – Co-Founders of Révolutionnaire

Justice Faith Betty, and Nia Faith Betty are co-founders of Révolutionnaire, a new social platform aimed at social awareness and activism. Originally a dance-oriented clothing brand started by sisters Justice and Nia, it has grown into a larger movement to empower the youth via a platform for education and conversation. We got to speak with the founders and one of their Action Leaders Naheim Banks below.

We were informed that you grew up with family members in the prison system which drove you towards a life dedicated to criminal justice reform. Can you talk more about how your activism and advocacy have expanded since you began this journey?

Naheim Banks: As you said, I have had family members involved in the system, and one of the things I realized while experiencing that was that our system is not a criminal justice system, but rather a criminal legal system because justice is what so many people don’t experience or get while going through our legal process. When I first began this journey on criminal legal reform, I started something in my school district called Teen Court, which is a youth diversionary program for minors that commit misdemeanors and other infractions. Part of what drew me to this work was because I could see myself in many of these kids, many of them in high school and middle school, who have parents working long hours, parents who are incarcerated and having to grow up way too fast. These kids happened to lose the moral luck lottery and have made mistakes, but that doesn’t mean we should let those mistakes define who they are for the rest of their lives. People are more than the worst thing they’ve ever done. I was encouraged to take my activism further when I saw voters reject Affirmative Action in my home state of California, reject cash bail, and reject a piece of legislation allowing for California to decertify police officers for misconduct despite being only one of four states to not have the authority to decertify law enforcement officers. Upon witnessing this, I decided to run to be an Assembly District Delegate to the California Democratic Party with the slate ‘Organizing for Progress’. Since being elected, I have made it a point to continue pushing the party to endorse legislation that supports Black lives and allows us to reimagine our criminal legal system. One of the ways I’m also doing that is by educating the public on legal reform through Révolutionnaire and our Action Guides and Petitions.

How has attending Howard University, an HBCU, impacted your views on activism and criminal justice reform?

Naheim: Attending Howard has really encouraged me to put myself out there and take risks. Before attending Howard, I always tried to fit into what Nikole Hannah-Jones calls, white spaces that are not made for people that look like me, and impact change within the confines of what is deemed ‘acceptable’. Not anymore. I no longer sugarcoat or tone down the issues that I am passionate about. Part of this huge passion that I have for criminal legal reform and my increased activism on the issue stems from the confidence Howard has instilled in me. Being a criminology major, I have had professors like Dr. Bahiyyah M. Muhammad that have so much passion for prison reform that their passion often rolls over onto you. At Howard, we have people that have non-profits like Just Us that mentors youth involved in the juvenile legal system; we have people that have started environmental justice organizations, gun reform organizations, and so many others that it inspires you to truly get out there in your community and make lasting change.

How did you find Révolutionnaire, and what drew you to become a part of the organization?

Naheim: I had followed Révolutionnaire since its original creation as a way to revolutionize dance apparel and empower all to celebrate the skin they’re in because I had never truly seen dance apparel that actually matched Black skin. I had been an outspoken advocate for criminal legal reform and when Nia Faith, one of the founders of the organization, reached out to me, I just couldn’t say no. Seeing the impact Nia and Justice already had on their homes, their schools, and their communities is what really inspired and drew me to become a part of the organization. I distinctly remember hearing Justice’s Valedictorian speech and one of the things she said that really fueled my love for Révolutionnaire, was that ‘Dreams Fuel Revolutions’. Everyone on this team has a dream for a better world and I just love having the opportunity to be a part of it.

What exactly are your responsibilities as an Action Leader with Révolutionnaire?

Naheim: As an Action Leader, I write about specific issues related to criminal legal reform such as the death penalty, three-strikes laws, and the War on Drugs. I give information to those that want to get more involved in legal reform initiatives and facilitate knowledge sharing and member engagement through writing petitions and 101 Action Guides on the issues that plague our society’s broken legal system.

Your website mentions that Révolutionnaire began with the idea to ‘revolutionize nude apparel’. Can you talk more about how this mission came about and what work has been done thus far?

Nia Faith Betty: I started Révolutionnaire as a dancewear line catering to dancers of color after growing up as a ballerina and never having access to apparel that matched my skin tone. I was tired of constantly feeling othered and dreamed of a more inclusive dance world. Today, the Révolutionnaire Shop has a collection of apparel and accessories for dancers, athletes, and everyone to celebrate the skin they’re in.

Justice Faith Betty: I was inspired by Nia’s journey and dream of revolutionizing the dance world and asked what it would look like if more young people with a dream of improving their communities had access to the network, tools, and information necessary to scale their impact across causes. And that question laid the foundation for Révolutionnaire – the social network for changemakers.

We’ve heard about the five key causes on which Révolutionnaire is centered. Can you tell us more about what work is being done by Révolutionnaire to specifically target these issues?

Nia: We’ve started off with five pillar causes (i.e., racial equity, environmentalism, criminal justice reform, housing + food security, gun reform) with more to come. Change starts with staying informed, so we’ve made information about each of these issues accessible to our audience by breaking down topics into 101 guides. Action items are embedded at the end of each 101 guide so members can move from learning about a problem in society to taking action – whether it’s through contacting their representative, signing a petition, finding volunteer opportunities, making a donation, or participating in another mode of engagement – all from within our platform. We also have action guides across our cause hubs for members to launch their own projects in their communities.

As Révolutionnaire continues to grow, it has been really exciting to see and hear about members getting their ideas off the ground and finding a network of supporters to ideate with.

Justice: We’re committed to making this work more sustainable through leveraging the power of technology to build community among like-minded young people. We recently launched group offerings and have spoken to so many youth-focused organizations who are excited to connect with other orgs doing fantastic work, feel a little less lonely on their respective journeys and scale their collective impact. As a further commitment to sustainability, we will be launching our Recharge library to offer our members content focused on mindfulness and self-care.

How can young people, like Naheim, get involved with Révolutionnaire?

Justice: Whether you are someone who has wanted to make a difference, but perhaps doesn’t know where to start or have been doing this work for a long time, but are looking for a community and resources all in one place to take your impact to the next level – join Révolutionnaire. If, like Naheim, you are excited about contributing your voice on issues that matter to you and have ideas for how young people can take action, we welcome contributions from community members directly on Révolutionnaire through blog posts, lounge conversations, action item submissions and petitions!

Have you experienced any pushback as young women trying to influence such radical change? If so, how do you combat that?

Nia: There are oftentimes unspoken rules and gatekeeping measures that make getting involved in activism daunting and intimidating for young people. We have revolutionized and streamlined how people get involved in changemaking, service, and activism. With anything that is new or different, there are always situations where people don’t agree with it or don’t want to evolve the current ways of taking action to adapt to the changing times. At the end of the day, we always focus on the net good. If the end result is positive change and more young people getting involved with making the world a better place, then we are on the right path.

Make sure to follow Nia, Justice, Naheim, and Révolutionnaire for more!

Cannabis illustration for 360 magazine

Kevin Durant Partners with WeedMaps

Weedmaps Announces Multi-Year Partnership with Kevin Durant, Thirty Five Ventures, and Boardroom

Partnership inclusive of collaborative content aimed to combat misconceptions around cannabis and advocate for legalization

Weedmaps, a leading technology platform for cannabis consumers and businesses, announced today a multi-year agreement with Kevin Durant and Thirty Five Ventures as well as a sponsorship deal with Boardroom. As part of Weedmaps’ mission to power a transparent and inclusive global cannabis economy, this strategic partnership will aim to further deconstruct the negative stereotypes associated with cannabis while elevating the conversation around the plant’s potential for athlete wellness and recovery.

Now more than ever, there is so much opportunity for growth in the cannabis industry as well as the removal of any remaining stigmas around its use, said Kevin Durant, two-time NBA champion and president of Thirty Five Ventures. As the technology leader in the industry, Weedmaps has consistently been at the forefront of change over the last decade. In partnering with Boardroom and Thirty Five Ventures, they’ve shown an even bigger commitment to innovation.

Weedmaps will become an official sponsor of Thirty Five Ventures’ sports business media network, Boardroom, as part of the agreement. Available today, the latest episode of Boardroom’s Out of Office podcast brings together Rich Kleiman, Kevin Durant, and Weedmaps CEO Chris Beals to discuss the potential for the strategic partnership’s long-term impact across the industry, as well as the many challenges ahead that we must address as the country moves closer toward legalization.

As the largest technology provider in the sector, we are serious about our responsibility to lead the national discussion around cannabis and the need for cannabis regulations to be updated across the board, said Chris Beals, Chief Executive Officer of Weedmaps. This partnership with Kevin Durant, Rich Kleiman, and the team at Thirty Five Ventures is a pivotal step forward in our ongoing efforts to break down stigmas surrounding cannabis, especially in the sports industry.

In addition to its sponsorship agreement, Boardroom will collaborate with Weedmaps to produce an original content series, which is tentatively slated for debut in 2022. The multi-year agreement also comprises ongoing integrations with Boardroom, including: Out of Office podcast, development and distribution of original content, co-branded collaborations and events, exclusive merchandise, and more.

Part of Weedmaps’ broader sports and wellness initiative, the company’s partnership with Thirty Five Ventures aims to further educate consumers about the plant’s potential for wellness and recovery. For information about how cannabis affects the body, cannabis products used by some of today’s biggest names in sports, and more, visit their website. Check out the latest episode of Boardroom’s Out of Office podcast here, and for more on Boardroom, visit the website.

About Weedmaps

Weedmaps is a leading online marketplace for cannabis users and businesses, operated by WM Technology, Inc. WM Technology, Inc.’s (Nasdaq: MAPS) mission is to power a transparent and inclusive global cannabis economy. Now in its second decade, WM Technology has been a driving force behind much of the legislative change we’ve seen in the past 10 years.

Founded in 2008, WM Technology is a leading technology and software infrastructure provider to the cannabis industry, comprising a B2C platform, Weedmaps, and B2B software, WM Business. The cloud-based SaaS solutions from WM Business provide an end-to-end operating system for cannabis retailers. WM Business’ tools support compliance with the complex, disparate, and constantly evolving regulations applicable to the cannabis industry. Through its website and mobile apps, WM Technology provides consumers with the latest information about cannabis retailers, brands, and products, facilitating product discovery and driving engagement with our retail and brand customers.

WM Technology holds a strong belief in the power of cannabis and the importance of enabling safe, legal access to consumers worldwide. Since inception, WM Technology has worked tirelessly, not only to become the most comprehensive platform for consumers, but to build the software solutions that power businesses compliantly in the space, to advocate for legalization, social equity, and licensing in many jurisdictions, and to facilitate further learning through partnering with subject matter experts on providing detailed, accurate information about the plant.

Headquartered in Irvine, California, WM Technology supports remote work for all eligible employees. Visit Weedmaps here.

About Thirty Five Ventures

Co-founded by 2x NBA champion Kevin Durant and entrepreneur Rich Kleiman, Thirty Five Ventures includes the sports business media network Boardroom; an investment portfolio with over 70+ companies, including Acorns, Coinbase, Dutchie, Overtime, Dapper Labs/NBA Top Shot, Postmates, Goldin Auctions, and more; a film/TV arm with projects including the documentary series In the Water (SHOWTIME), the Academy Award-winning Two Distant Strangers (Netflix), and the upcoming scripted series SWAGGER (Apple); equity partnerships with premium audio brand Master & Dynamic and digital media network Just Women’s Sports; a minority stake in the Philadelphia Union; and management of Kevin Durant’s on-and-off court business

About Boardroom

Boardroom is a media network founded by Kevin Durant and Rich Kleiman that looks inside the business of sports as we’ve never seen. The old days of gate-keeping and closed-door meetings are gone: now, athletes, tech moguls, and executives alike are moving the sports world – and culture itself – forward. Boardroom is at the forefront of this change, bringing both fans and entrepreneurs unique perspectives on the sports business news, hot topics, and key industry players they want to know about. Boardroom is a Thirty Five Ventures company.

Image via Transmedia Group for 360 Magazine

Maryam Henein – Q×A

Here at 360 Magazine, we were lucky enough to be able to speak with acclaimed journalist and activist Maryam Henein. We got to speak with her about her controversial and brave ongoing investigations as well as her work with her company HoneyColony. Read the entire conversation below.

So, you have a reputation as the most censored woman, even more censored than Laura Loomer, what aspects of your investigations and reports do you think have led to this?

I started feeling the wrath of technofascism, which is a term that I’ve popularized, as early as 2017, and in this case, it was in regard to selling CBD before mostly being on the front lines. Now today, everyone and their mother sells CBD, but back then it was novel. I started feeling censored for sharing information on the health benefits of CBD. Initially, we got shut down several times by different merchant processors, including PayPal, Stripe, and QuickBooks. My first ban was PayPal back in 2018. Then as I started doing investigations into the politics of CBD, I experienced even more censorship. I was a victim of Google’s ‘Medic Update’ and my website, HoneyColony was buried. Then I started doing research into Google and I was already covering vaccine safety, which is not a topic that the mainstream embraces. I discovered that Google is basically a drug company. And I went and reached out to Google whistleblower Zach Vorhies when I came upon his disclosure. As a result of Google’s algorithmic changes, we lost 67% of our traffic on HoneyColony. I was getting 500,000 unique visitors a month on our magazine and that all went to hell. And then slowly, as I started covering the Coronavirus, given that medical freedom and health are my beats, I got censored even more for peddling supposed “medical misinformation” because YouTube takes its directives from the World Health Organization, a.k.a “China.” I started covering politics and today I’m shadow banned on Twitter. I’m on my second strike on my second YouTube channel and banned from PayPal, Kiva, and GoFundMe. Square booted me the day of the “Deadly Insurrection.” I was a part of their CBD beta program and had signed an NDA, and for absolutely no reason, we lost our account. We went four months without being able to generate money. I soon learned that Dorsey owned Square up until a few months ago. So, I have been digitally assassinated, or they’ve tried to digitally assassinate my voice and my work. Back in 2017, I was telling people, Roseanne Barr today, you tomorrow. Well, here we are.

The topics of your stories have a wide range of backgrounds, from police brutality to animal extinction. It is obvious these issues are near to your heart. What inspires you to move on to a new and wildly different topic or area?

Just to set the record straight. I’m not really looking at police brutality, per se, that’s a subtopic of this multilayered psycho that I call George Floyd. Sometimes I cover stories by accident. I caught a lie by CNN or a kind of lie rather than by the mainstream media and I was driven to learn the truth. I am driven to show people how the mainstream media lies and deceives and doesn’t give a shit about details or accuracy. As far as the bees, they flew into my life and kind of stuck. Pun intended. Bees are wonderful teachers, they feed us, and they are working for the greater good. So, I am not sure what triggers my interest other than injustice, or something that I see will impact people on a global scale and it’s very hard to decipher fact from fiction. So, one has to be discerning and there’s a lot of corruption out there from actual journalists that are supposed to share the news with you. So, I’m an eclectic person, a lot of interests, I’m an intellectual. And I’ve also really dedicated many years of my life to empowering people to be their own best health advocate, having suffered from a chronic illness. Consider that today more and more information regarding health and wellness is buried.

Your film, Vanishing of the Bees was a massive success, what inspired you to convert your journalism into film? 

At that point, I was already working on independent projects of many kinds as a researcher and a producer, I wanted to make my own project and I decided. George Langworthy and I decided to collaborate and then the bees flew into our lives, and I had just recovered from a near-death experience where I was given a second chance and I wanted to cover something that is pertaining to all of us because we all eat, and we all take bees for granted. I wanted to give back and be in service to make the most out of my life.

Your current cases and investigation on the George Floyd case, what inspired you to research and investigate on your own?

As I mentioned earlier that kind of accidentally fell into the story when Zach Vorhies, the Google whistleblower, asked me about a year ago in Costa Rica, while we were under lockdown to recreate the George Floyd kneeling on his neck. So, he asked me to put my knee on his neck. And I asked, who’s George Floyd?  I don’t think anyone’s going to ever ask that question again and I interviewed the medical examiner’s office because I said, if you really want to look at how he died, let’s look at the death certificate autopsy report. I was told that it would take weeks and weeks, and I found another local publication that had said the same thing. Then, the next thing I saw was CNN had put out this preliminary report. So, they were trying to sow discord in the narrative. Soon, we had this tale of two autopsies that emerged and with Benjamin Crump and Michael Baden on the scene, which raised some suspicions that I was collecting. I just didn’t tap out of the story, and I was covering it. The different hearings and such and keeping a close eye. Then I decided, well, I’m probably suited to write the most comprehensive book out there because I’ve looked under lots of rocks, and I’m very detail oriented. So, I will have a lot of very interesting factual tidbits to offer people to show what really happened, and not what the mainstream wanted you to see, and what the corrupt government officials wanted you to see by sitting on the camera, body worn camera for four months.

What do you think is the biggest misconception about the George Floyd case? And what is the source of that misinformation?

The sources, definitely the mainstream media and the government officials behind the narrative and their objectives, whether it’s to defund the police, to destabilize America, to give the illusion that there’s systemic racism across the country. So, the biggest misconception, which is not really a misconception, because Keith Ellison, after all of this, went on 60 minutes and stated that this had nothing to do with race. This case has nothing to do with race. And that’s how it was painted. And while it could have characteristics of police brutality, it had nothing to do with race. And then you have the Attorney General. He also puts this emphasis on the many talking points that I discovered or that are obvious, but he believes in what you see with your eyes. Well, that’s a crock of shit, hello, movie magic, hello, eyes can deceive you. So many things are happening behind the surface. And that’s part used to trick human beings and to have them make decisions based on a lack of proper information and emotion. If you don’t have all the information your perception is skewed and you’re not able to make a proper conclusion or decision. So just really like many multi layered SOPs are just great examples of the lies, whether you want to call it the deep state or the mainstream media, which is the deep state bitch. They work hand in hand to deceive the people.

We know you got to speak with medical examiners to the 911 transcriptsand other information concerning the police department’s handling of the case, what were you able to find? And what was the most shocking piece of evidence you can speak on?

Well, I’m still gathering, still conducting investigations. So right now, I’ve uncovered a cover up. I’m not quite sure what the cover entails if it entails an informant. Clearly, someone I’m trying to speak to is gatekeeping the story and I’ve found some lies. I’ve done 911 calls. Well, there’s three, one from the store and two of the bystanders to the bystanders. Those were released and featured in the trial, but the main call has not been released. And in Minnesota, there’s a statute that only the caller can release the call. So, what is the prosecution asked for those bystanders to release the call, not the call from cut foods. I know who made the call. I know who identified the people in the store. And I’ll leave it at that for now. I have also obtained the death certificate. Just basically showing that George Floyd died of a heart attack while being restrained not because of being restrained. That one word has a big impact and can be debated emotionally and viciously. Probably I’d like to just pose well would have George Floyd died if he had not gathered lots of drugs. In that position now, Derek apparently had his knee on the neck of a team for 17 minutes and not much smaller child person survived. George Floyd was at least six foot four, 230 pounds. It took for three people to restrain him. So, would he have died? Without the drugs? Would he have died without the knee on the neck? Maybe not. So that was interesting to see what the death certificate is. I’m, I’m still trying to obtain some other records. I’ve just obtained the actual archival exhibits pretrial exhibits, so it’s much clearer and I’m putting together a short documentary. 

What significance did the George Ford case have on you personally and your brand HoneyColony?

It has no impact on my brand HoneyColony. As far as on me it’s been very revealing to see how information in this day and age is scrubbed by the Ministry of Truth and if you’re not there, covering it, and paying attention to the details, you will probably be a victim of what I call narrative supremacy, and you’ll probably be bamboozled. I’ve seen people who are well versed in this case, repeat a slight of numbers. For instance, George Floyd was arrested for aggravated robbery. The tale says the woman was pregnant, but the actual court document that I’ve read does not saying anywhere that she was pregnant. So, I don’t know where that piece of the puzzle or sorry that that detail started. But you have to be very, very detail oriented and specific. So, it’s, it’s taught me more than more than ever reminded me how the media lies, and how you have to be paying attention and really look at details because they should matter.

What did you learn about George Floyd’s life that you think more people should know about?

Well, George Floyd isn’t innocent and that doesn’t justify his death. But George Floyd was a career criminal, he spent the last 20 years of his life in and out of jail, and he was, according to some, bad news. He has appeared in at least one porno; he’s pretended to be a part of the water department and dressed in costume to help carry out this robbery. And so, we know that he can kind of act, play act and take on different personas if need be. So, let’s just keep that in the back of our minds. I do believe he was not an evil, or rather, you know, I think Lester, his friend, was a much bigger stand back. So, he certainly apparently was meant to change America, as one person stated. I don’t know what that means, but he was not supposed to die, and he was supposed to change. So do what you will with those phrases right now. 

What was the most difficult part in gaining sources and information about George Floyd’s life and death?

Well, it’s still currently difficult. I’m still under undertaking an investigation. And the hardest thing is people who can talk on behalf of Derek Chauvin. Nobody wants to say anything because they might wake up with a pig’s head on their doorstep. I’m not able to find any family members, very weird. So that’s been a challenge, contacting people from the force. I mean, I haven’t started trying to reach people on George Floyd’s side. I can tell you, for instance, I didn’t have any luck getting the initial second autopsy, independent from Michael Baden and Alicia Wilson. So where is that actual report? Was it just a verbal press release? He’s just the Hollywood medical examiner? Why wasn’t his autopsy even used in the trial of Derek Chauvin? Okay, sorry, I’ll just add that a lot of information has disappeared. I’ve been able to catch some of it because I was doing it in real time and when this first happened, but now it’s not like who owned that SUV Mercedes Benz. It’s not George. And you can’t find who the owner is. Although I do have a name. But yeah, so basically just information scrubbed, addresses. Very interesting that George lives in Texas at 3333. There’s a lot of three threes in this story. And six sixes.

Where can we learn more about you and your findings about the George Floyd case?

You can find me on my telegram channel at Truth Lives Here. Lady be on gab. And that book will be coming out next year. So, you can also contact me at Maryam@honeycolony.com 

Maryam Henein is an investigative journalist and functional medicine consultant. As founder and editor-in-chief of HoneyColony, an online magazine for health and wellness, she shares her wisdom with thousands of followers. She is also the director of the award-winning documentary film Vanishing of the Bees, narrated by Elliot Page. For more information, visit her website.  

HoneyColony is dedicated to cross-pollinating with companies who uphold high-quality standards that value planet, humanity, honesty, and fair-trade practices. HoneyColony is committed to unite the growing number of people adopting healthy lifestyles and seeking to cut through the hype and claims about natural products and remedies.  For more information, visit HoneyColony.

Art by Kaelen of 360 for use by 360 Magazine

Tidal announces Triumph Over Trauma Special

Today TIDAL, in partnership with influential politico, lawyer and advocate Angela Rye, is announcing the premiere of Triumph Over Trauma: Black Wall Street Then and Now – a one-hour long special commemorating the centennial of one of the worst attacks of racial violence in American history: the Tulsa Race Massacre. The special will premiere on Saturday, June 19 at 6 pm ET to also honor the Juneteenth holiday, which celebrates the effective end of slavery in the United States.

The Tulsa Race Massacre devastated the prosperous African-American business community in Tulsa, Oklahoma’s Greenwood District known as Black Wall Street and claimed hundreds of lives. Viewers will hear from three living survivors of the massacre – Mother Fletcher, Mother Randle, and Uncle Red – who will discuss memories of Black Wall Street, escaping the night of the massacre, their legacy, and much more. The hour-long special will also feature local politicians, business leaders, Black youth of Tusla, activists, writers, and more reflecting, learning, inspiring, and growing – and most importantly shedding light on untold history.

The special will be broadcast simultaneously on TIDAL’s YouTube channel as well as in-app – both members and non-members alike will be able to view. You can find a preview here.

Highlighting the historical moments that impact society is an integral part of TIDAL’s DNA. By celebrating how integral all voices are to culture and community, TIDAL continues its commitment to providing its members with culture-shifting content.

Artwork courtesy of Capitol Music Group for use by 360 Magazine

Fire in Little Africa – Elevator

FIRE IN LITTLE AFRICA ALBUM OUT NOW + POWERFUL VISUAL FOR ELEVATOR VIA MOTOWN RECORDS/BLACK FORUM IN PARTNERSHIP WITH THE BOB DYLAN CENTER AND WOODY GUTHRIE CENTER, Album Brings Fresh And Important Perspective To The 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre And Celebrates The City’s Vibrant Hip Hop Scene, LISTEN & STREAM FIRE IN LITTLE AFRICA HERE, WATCH ELEVATOR VISUAL HERE

Fire in Little Africa, a groundbreaking album of original material, written and recorded by a collective of Oklahoma hip hop artists to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the Tulsa Race Massacre, will be released on May 28 by Motown Records/Black Forum in partnership with Tulsa’s Bob Dylan Center and Woody Guthrie Center.

The 21-track collection gets to the truth of what happened on May 31 and June 1, 1921 when a white mob descended on the streets of Greenwood, then a prosperous Tulsa neighborhood known as Black Wall Street, and burned down the business district, destroying roughly 1,500 homes, killing hundreds and leaving thousands of Black Tulsans homeless. For years, this historic, albeit dire, chapter was left out of classrooms and textbooks as the city attempted to erase this part of its past. The artists heard on Fire in Little Africa get to the truth through urgent songs, recalling stories told and stories lived in hope to usher in a new era for Tulsa as they help the community process this generational trauma through music.

‘Fire in Little Africa’ is a powerful and timely project that provides a platform and outlet for the incredibly talented and thriving music community of Tulsa, Oklahoma, said Motown Records Chairman & CEO, Ethiopia Habtemariam. Carrying the legacy of the Black Wall Street community, ‘Fire in Little Africa’ is a body of work filled with purpose and prolific storytelling. I am honored and feel privileged to have Motown Records/Black Forum partner with Dr. View, the Bob Dylan Center and Guthrie Center to release this impactful hip-hop album.

Track List

  1. Elevator
  2. City of Dreams
  3. Shining
  4. Descendants
  5. Regardless
  6. Party Plane (feat. Charlie Wilson)
  7. Been Through It All
  8. Drowning
  9. Our World
  10. Top Down
  11. Creme of the Crop
  12. 918 Thug Town Skit
  13. Watchu On
  14. P.O.D.
  15. Reparations
  16. P.O.D. Pt. II
  17. Raw Cocaine
  18. The Rain
  19. North Tulsa Got Something to Say
  20. Brunch at the Brady
  21. Young & Free

I am honored to be a part of the ‘Fire In Little Africa’ album featuring the musical contributions of young talented local artists from my hometown of Tulsa, Oklahoma. This tragedy has been suppressed for generations. Charlie Wilson continues, Growing up in Tulsa we named our band, The GAP Band, after Greenwood, Archer and Pine Streets, the wealthiest and most successful African American community in the United States in the early 20th century. I am proud to see a new generation of talented Tulsans continue to tell the story of our ancestors. They are opening the door for many generations to come by shedding light not only on the race massacre but the excellence of the Black Wall Street and Greenwood community.

Stevie Dr. View Johnson, PhD, Manager, Education & Diversity Outreach at the Woody Guthrie Center|Bob Dylan Center and the album’s executive producer added, Fire in Little Africa has evolved into a communal hip hop movement and we’re excited that we get to share the flavor, history and legacy of Black Wall Street with the world, in collaboration with the amazing leadership of the Motown/Black Forum family. We’re grateful for Ethiopia’s foresight in providing us an opportunity to share our important stories with the world. There are Black Wall Streets across the diaspora and we unequivocally know that ‘Fire in Little Africa’ will inspire many people. In the words of Steph Simon, ‘everything is us.’ 

In this feature Rolling Stone noted, ‘Fire in Little Africa’ is poised to teach the world about that long-suppressed history, from locals who grew up in a community that still lives with the aftermath of the massacre. Just as important, the artists involved in the project also hope it serves as a launching-pad moment for Tulsa’s hip-hop scene, which has long flown under the national radar.

The album was recorded in Greenwood over a five-day period in March 2020. Studios were set up at the Greenwood Cultural Center and other locations, including the former home of 1921 massacre mastermind/KKK leader Tate Brady. The house is now owned by former NFL first-round draft pick and Tulsa native Felix Jones. The Tulsa World was on hand to speak with the artists involved in the historic sessions. Read the article HERE and check out the accompanying video HERE.

‘Fireside with Dr. View’ is a weekly podcast featuring Dr. View in conversation with thought leaders in activism, academia and culture, centered on the movement behind the Fire in Little Africa music. Listen to Fireside with Dr. View HERE. Hosts Ali Shaw and Doc Free sit down with Fire in Little Africa artists, Tulsa community leaders and national voices for conversations on music and culture in the Fire in Little Africa podcast, which can be found HERE.

Located in the Tulsa Arts District, the Woody Guthrie Center opened in 2013. The Bob Dylan Center is expected to open on the same block within the next year. Both are projects of the George Kaiser Family Foundation, the primary funder for Fire in Little Africa. The album is chronicled in a documentary film, which will be released later this year.

Fire in Little Africa marks the first new material released by Black Forum since the label’s relaunch earlier this year. Black Forum originally debuted in 1970 with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s Why I Oppose The War In Vietnam, which won a GRAMMY Award for Best Spoken Word Album. The label reissued Dr. King’s influential speech earlier this year.

Visit the official Fire in Little Africa website, YouTube, Instagram and Facebook. Follow the Black Forum on Instagram, Facebook and YouTube.

Respect Poster via Metro Goldwyn Mayer for use by 360 Magazine

Soul Icon Aretha Franklin is the Subject of Upcoming Film: Respect

Respect is a new biopic that covers an iconic female performer, Civil Rights Activist, and Queen of Soul Aretha Franklin.  Following the rise of Aretha Franklin’s career from a child singing in her father’s church’s choir to her international superstardom, Respect is the remarkable true story of the music icon’s journey to find her voice.

It will star another icon in her own right, Jennifer Hudson, as Franklin. This is not her first time acting, and has also been in films like Spike Lee’s Chi-raq and in the first season of the Fox hit series: Empire. Given her background as a singer, her acting chops and what we’ve seen of the film so far, I’m certain Hudson will be excellent. The film also stars Forest Whitaker (Star Wars, Black Panther) and Tituss Burgess (The Unbreakable Kimmy Shmidt.)   

According to Billboard, the film has had a rough journey, being originally slated for release in the fall of 2020, and has been delayed several times due first to the pandemic and then because of a number of other factors. Thankfully, the film is finally set to release so we’ll get to see the film that’s been in the works for so long. 

Director Liesl Tommy makes her feature film debut with Respect. She’s previously been known for directing plays. Tommy is the first Black woman ever nominated for a Tony award for Best Direction of a Play in 2016 for Eclipsed, and is an Associate Artist at the Berkeley Rep and an Artist Trustee with the Sundance Institute’s Board of Trustees. 

With a story by Callie Khouri (Oscar® winner for Writing, Thelma & Louise) and Tracey Scott Wilson, and screenplay written by Tracey Scott Wilson. Wilson and Tommy have worked together creatively since the 2009 play The Good Negro written by Wilson, directed by Tommy at The Public Theatre. Wilson was a writer on FX’s hit series: The Americans which garnered her a Peabody Award as well as an Emmy® and WGA Award nominations.

The film is set to release in theatres on August 13, 2021. To watch the new trailer, click HERE.

JENNIFER HUDSON ANNOUNCES ORIGINAL SONG FROM ARETHA FRANKLIN BIOPIC RESPECT: “HERE I AM (SINGING MY WAY HOME)” CO-WRITTEN WITH CAROLE KING OUT FRIDAY

RESPECT ORIGINAL MOTION PICTURE SOUNDTRACK OUT AUGUST 13 VIA EPIC RECORDS

IMPACTING RADIO ON JUNE 21

Academy® Award-winning actress and GRAMMY® Award-winning recording artist Jennifer Hudson announces a new original song entitled “Here I Am (Singing My Way Home),” co-written with four time GRAMMY® Award winner, Kennedy Center Honoree, and Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Songwriters Hall of Fame Inductee Carole King (marking their first collaboration) and Jamie Hartman [Lewis Capaldi, Christina Aguilera] out Friday. GRAMMY® Award-winning Black Eyed Peas co-founder and mega-producer will.i.am produced the track. Hudson announced the collaboration on her social platforms this morning – HERE

Paving the way for Hudson’s blockbuster bigscreen turn as Aretha Franklin, it will appear on the Original Motion Picture Soundtrack to RESPECT and serve as the film’s only original song. Hudson was handpicked by Franklin to portray her in the film from MGM, which opens in theatres nationwide on August 13. The soundtrack will be available on the same day.

Get “Here I Am (Singing My Way Home)” HERE Friday via Epic Records. 

Pre-order the Soundtrack HERE

Hudson added, “Music is such a living and breathing character in this film, as it was in Ms. Franklin’s life. The process of creating this song was like constructing the greatest tribute I could possibly offer to her spirit. It was the final exhale of this extraordinary project and one that I let out with complete fulfillment. Being able to do so with Carole and Jamie was an incredible privilege. Carole is one of the greatest songwriters of all time and, whether we were trading stories, playing piano together over video conference, or working through lyrics, it was always a masterclass – both in life and music. Jamie and I have collaborated together in the past and it’s always so wonderful to create with him – he is continuously thinking outside of the box in a way that deepens the musical experience in indescribable ways. Our goal was to show that music was always the anchor for Ms. Franklin, in all that she did, and I hope this song illustrates the strength of her voice – both literally and figuratively – which always brought her home.”

About the collaboration, King commented, “Writing a song with Jamie Hartman and Jennifer Hudson felt both familiar and fresh at the same time. The process of songwriting continues to amaze me.  One minute there’s nothing, and then a song grows out of the seed of an idea.  The seed was dormant when Jennifer, Jamie, and I first met virtually. Jennifer and I had previously performed together, and I was excited about writing with her for no less than a film called Respect in which Jennifer plays Aretha Franklin! I’m so pleased to have not just one but two songs as part of the soundtrack of Respect-the 21st century song “Here I Am (Singing My Way Home)” and my 20th century co-write with Gerry Goffin, “(You Make Me Feel Like a) Natural Woman.”

Epic Records Chairwoman and CEO Sylvia Rhone said, “What Jennifer, Carole, and Jamie have created together is nothing short of historic. It celebrates the legacy of Aretha Franklin by channeling her spirit and style in an original, no less. As soon as I heard it, I was speechless. It has all the elements of a future American songbook staple.”

“Here I Am (Singing My Way Home)” highlights Hudson’s earthquaking range with a seismic crescendo. Right out of the gate, she proclaims, “It’s time for me to sing” over glorious church organ before twinkling piano wraps around her vocals. It officially impacts Hot AC and Urban AC on Monday June 21.

One of the biggest, boldest, and brightest voices in contemporary music, Jennifer Hudson stands alone. Not only is she a two-time GRAMMY® Award winner and best-selling author, but she has received an Academy® Award, a Golden Globe®, and countless other honors as an actress. Her self-titled 2008 debut Jennifer Hudson earned a platinum certification, the 2011 follow-up I Remember Me went gold, and 2014’s JHUD drew a GRAMMY® nod. She has starred in films ranging from Dreamgirls and Sex and the City to Chi-Raq and Sing, in addition to taking over Broadway in The Color Purple, for which the soundtrack garnered Hudson another Grammy win. Along the way, she became a best-selling author and served as a coach on The Voice UK and U.S.  In 2019, she appeared as Grizabella in the big-screen adaptation of Cats, and she also contributed “I’ll Fight” to the critically acclaimed documentary RBG, garnering an Academy® Award nomination. In 2021, she stars as Aretha Franklin in director Liesl Tommy’s highly anticipated biopic Respect, of which she is also an executive producer. Franklin personally chose Hudson to star. She will be releasing new music soon.

Jennifer Hudson and RESPECT dazzled the crowd Sunday night at a premiere fit for a queen 

Celebrating the legacy of Aretha Franklin was director Liesl Tommy and costars Marlon Wayans, Marc Maron, Tituss Burgess, Audra McDonald, Tate Donovan, Hailey Kilgore, Saycon Sengbloh, Skye Dakota Turner, screenwriter Tracey Scott Wilson, producers Scott Bernstein, Jonathan Glickman and Stacey Sher, and more.

Other guests included Timbaland, Jennifer Holliday, Debbie Allen, Michael K. Williams, Tori Kelly, Derek Hough, Jordin Sparks, and more

After the premiere, attendees celebrated outside, complete with food trucks and music from Donald Taylor and the LA Mass Choir. Aretha Franklin’s granddaughter Grace Franklin graced the audience with her grandmother’s favorite song, “Ain’t No Way,” and Aretha’s son Edward Franklin sang “My Girl.” 

Buy your tickets now to see RESPECT in theaters this Friday!

Find out what it means.

IN THEATERS AUGUST 13

Following the rise of Aretha Franklin’s career from a child singing in her father’s church’s choir to her international superstardom, RESPECT is the remarkable true story of the music icon’s journey to find her voice.

DIRECTOR: Liesl Tommy

SCREENPLAY BY: Tracey Scott Wilson

STORY BY: Callie Khouri and Tracey Scott Wilson

PRODUCERS: Harvey Mason Jr., Scott Bernstein, p.g.a., Jonathan Glickman, Stacey Sher

EXECUTIVE PRODUCERS: Jennifer Hudson, Liesl Tommy, Sue Baden-Powell, Aaron L. Gilbert, Jason Cloth

CAST: Jennifer Hudson, Forest Whitaker, Marlon Wayans, Audra McDonald, Marc Maron, Tituss Burgess, Kimberly Scott, Saycon Sengbloh, Hailey Kilgore, Heather Headley, Skye Dakota Turner, Tate Donovan and Mary J. Blige

RATED: PG-13

FROM METRO GOLDWYN MAYER PICTURES, IN ASSOCIATION WITH BRON CREATIVE AND ONE COMMUNITY

ABOUT RESPECT

From MGM, Respect follows the rise of Aretha Franklin’s career from a child singing in her father’s church’s choir to her international superstardom, Respect is the remarkable true story of Franklin’s journey to find her voice.

Jennifer Hudson, Executive Producer/Actor, of "RESPECT" image shot by and copyedighted to Eric Charbonneau,via Aleana Reyes at EPK.TV by United Artists Releasing. © 2021 Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Pictures Inc. for use by 360 Magazine