Posts tagged with "artists"

Red Bull Culture Clash via 360 magazine

Red Bull Culture Clash

Red Bull Culture Clash, the innovative live music experience where four crews face off to win over the crowd and celebrate Jamaican sound system culture, returned to New York Thursday May 19. 

Crews and their participating artists were given the reins to take over each corner of a venue and faced off for a four-round bout, bringing big sound, heavy tunes, and fierce competition all in an effort to outshine their competition and win over the crowd. The winners were selected based on crowd response. 

The event was hosted by Gitoo  and featured top New York-based collectives APOCALIPSISClub CringeHalf Moon, and CORPUS and special guests including  2 MillyThe Kid MeroKalifaCLIPShow Me the Body, M.O.P (Lil’ Fame and Billy Danze), CapellaRicky Blaze, and Havoc from Mobb Deep

Everything was left on the stage as APOCALIPSIS was crowned the winner of the East Coast showdown.

APOCALIPSIS, featuring Dana Lu, Riobamba, Bembona, LITA, Nino Augustine, Dos Flakos and JFuse,  is a NYC-based record label founded by Ecuadorian-Lithuanian artist Riobamba. APOCALIPSIS amplifies the stories of artists de aquí y de allá (from here and there), doing everything in its power to re-distribute equity in the music industry.

Red Bull Culture Clash event images via Vaughn Lowery for use by 360 MAGAZINE
Red Bull Culture Clash event images via Vaughn Lowery for use by 360 MAGAZINE
Ballet Hispánico School of Dance photo of teacher teaching child students ballet via Michelle Tabnik PR for use by 360 Magazine

Ballet Hispánico Summer Program

Ballet Hispánico School of Dance announces that registration is now open for a week-long summer professional development program for dance teachers, July 11-15, 2022. The program is $525 for in-person attendees and $435 for virtual attendees, with discounts available for School of Dance partner organizations, including NDEO and NASD members. The registration deadline is Friday, June 10, 2022. For more information and to register, visit HERE.

The Ballet Hispánico professional development program is an opportunity for dance teachers to immerse themselves amongst fellow educators, share teaching practices, and further their teaching artistry. With daily class and student observation, theory is seen in practice and discussed. All educators are welcome, from seasoned faculty to new teachers, community dance practitioners, dance education undergraduates/graduates, dance studio owners, and K-12 teachers.

Course Highlights:

  • Observe in-person and/or virtual class offerings at Ballet Hispánico headquarters, led by seasoned School of Dance faculty addressing varied age groups and dance genres.
  • Discuss and reflect on class observations and presentations with an emphasis on application for each teacher’s individual practice.
  • Examine Early Childhood curricular bridging points and other developmental benchmarks for instruction.
  • Engage with Ballet Hispánico pedagogy and curricular design through the lens of culture and repertory.
  • Interact with tools for social-emotional learning and addressing the diverse student-learner.
  • Challenge narratives of collective dance histories and dance archives
  • Identify cultura and other teaching identities, and their implications for pedagogical practices.
  • Receive a Certificate of Completion.

2022 Guest Faculty and Sessions:

Yebel Gallegos – Visiting Assistant Professor of Dance at Bard College, multi-faceted dance artist from El Paso, Texas, played an important role in the founding of Cressida Danza Contemporanea also helped in the creation and implementation of the Festival Yucatan Escenica, an international contemporary dance festival, former dancer, company teacher, rehearsal director, and academic coordinator for the Conservatorio de Danza de Yucate, recently concluded a six-year tenure working full time with the Ririe-Woodbury Dance Company, BFA in dance, both from the University of Texas at Austin and from the Escuela Profesional de Danza de Mazatlen, directed by Delfos Dance Company, MFA from the University of Washington in Seattle.

Elisa de la Rosa – daughter of migrant farmworkers, and granddaughter to Mexican immigrant grandparents; a first generation college graduate is originally from a small border town in Texas, Assistant Professor of Dance at Texas Woman’s University (TWU), choreographer, performer, dance educator, and the founding artistic director of De La Rosa Dance Company, Artistic Director of the TWU Dance International Dance Company, was a dance educator for 14 years in middle and high school Texas dance programs, has designed professional development for dance educators in various school districts and presented to Aldine, Denton, Edinburg, and La Joya Independent School Districts, integrated the Dance and Digital Media Communications Curriculum into her instruction and was awarded a $3,500 grant for technology by The Texas Cultural Trust, BA in Dance with Secondary Teacher Certification from Texas Woman’s University, and an MFA in Dance from Montclair State University.

Gregory Youdan – has performed with the NY Baroque Dance Company, Sokolow Theatre/Dance and Heidi Latsky Dance, where he now serves as a board member, Currently, visiting research scholar at Brown University and adjunct lecturer at Lehman College, Westheimer Fellow through Mark Morris Dance Group’s Dance for PD program and is a teaching artist in their Dance for PD en Espanola, a 2021 National Association for Latino Arts and Cultures Advocacy Fellow and 2021 Latin Impact Honoree, serves on the development committee for the International Association for Dance Medicine and Science (IADMS), the research committee for the National Organization for Arts in Health (NOAH), and the advisory council for Dance Data Project, a member of the Latinx Dance Educators Alliance.

Dr. Afdaniels Mabingo – a Ugandan dance researcher, scholar, performer, educator, Afro-optimist and co-founder of AFRIKA SPEAKS, holds Ph.D. in Dance Studies from the University of Auckland, recipient of the prestigious Fulbright scholarship, Mabingo also holds an MA in Dance Education from New York University, and an MA in Performing Arts and a BA in Dance degree, both from Makerere University in Uganda, has taught at Makerere University in Uganda, New York University, the University of Auckland in New Zealand, and Edna Manley College of the Visual and Performing Arts in Jamaica, has also guest lectured at Columbia University and Princeton University, his research sits at the intersection of decolonization, interculturalism, postcolonialism, dance pedagogy and African philosophy, latest book titled Ubuntu as Dance Pedagogy: Individuality, Community, and Inclusion in Teaching and Learning of Indigenous Dances in Uganda, received scholarships and awards that included: Fulbright Junior Staff Development Scholarship, Fulbright Scholar in Residence (deferred), the University of Auckland Doctoral Scholarship, Makerere University Staff Development Scholarship, George Payne award for outstanding academic leadership and excellence at NYU, and the best overall Humanities student award at the 48thst-49th graduation at Makerere University, has taught dance schools and community settings in the U.S., Australia, South Sudan, Germany, Uganda, and New Zealand, has presented keynotes, delivered paper presentation, and facilitated dance workshops for conference gatherings such as daCi-WDA, NDEO, CORD, WAAE, and WDA,&#a0;has also staged choreographies and performed in New York City, Adelaide in Australia, Rwanda, Auckland in New Zealand, and Uganda;

Testimonials

  • “This is my first Professional Development experience, and I have been blown away!” – Margaret
  • “This week has been a work for the mind.” – Lynette
  • “I can now provide my students with tools that I didn’t have in my own dancing.” – Dandara

About Ballet Hispánico

Ballet Hispánico has been the leading voice intersecting artistic excellence and advocacy and is now the largest Latinx cultural organization in the United States and one of America’s Cultural Treasures. Ballet Hispánico brings communities together to celebrate and explore Latino cultures through innovative dance productions, transformative dance training, and enduring community engagement experiences.

National Medal of Arts recipient Tina Ramirez founded Ballet Hispánico in 1970, at the height of the post-war civil rights movements. From its inception Ballet Hispánico focused on providing a haven for Black and Brown Latinx youth and families seeking artistic place and cultural sanctuary. By providing the space for Latinx dance and dancers to flourish, Ballet Hispánico uplifted marginalized emerging and working artists, which combined with the training, authenticity of voice, and power of representation, fueled the organization’s roots and trajectory. In 2009, Ballet Hispánico welcomed Eduardo Vilaro as its Artistic Director, ushering in a new era by inserting fresh energy to the company’s founding values and leading Ballet Hispánico into an artistically vibrant future. Today, Ballet Hispánico’s New York City headquarters house a School of Dance and state-of-the-art dance studios for its programs and the arts community. From its grassroots origins as a dance school and community-based performing arts troupe, for fifty years Ballet Hispánico has stood as a catalyst for social change.

Ballet Hispánico provides the physical home and cultural heart for Latinx dance in the United States. Ballet Hispánico has developed a robust public presence across its three main programs: its Company, School of Dance, and Community Arts Partnerships.

Through its exemplary artistry, distinguished training program, and deep-rooted community engagement efforts Ballet Hispánico champions and amplifies underrepresented voices in the field. For fifty years Ballet Hispánico has provided a place of honor for the omitted, overlooked, and oppressed. As it looks to the next fifty years and beyond, Ballet Hispánico seeks to empower, and give agency to, the Latinx experience and those individuals within it.

Panel with a Striding Lion, Neo-Babylonian period, 605-562 BC, glazed ceramic. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Fletcher Fund, 1931 via Cole Calhoun Getty Communications for use by 360 MAGAZINE

Getty’s MESOPOTAMIA

Getty’s online digital experience, MESOPOTAMIA, is now viewable in Arabic, French, Hindi, Mandarin Chinese, Spanish, and English. MESOPOTAMIA offers an intimate look at ancient objects from a recent exhibition at the Getty Villa, some dating up to 5,000 years old.

MESOPOTAMIA reimagines how art collections and archives can be experienced online, taking users on a journey that presents objects in lifelike detail. Visitors can simply scroll to tour the online experience at their own pace, accompanied by a narrative that details the symbolic, religious, and sometimes practical meanings and purposes of these ancient works of art.

Featured objects in MESOPOTAMIA were captured using photogrammetry and in some cases, additional LIDAR and structured light scanning to replicate every detail. This allows users to see nearly every wedge-shaped impression on a 4,000-year-old cuneiform tablet, or the hairline cracks on other ancient tablets. In one instance, users can see the bubbles in the glaze of a lion relief that once lined Babylon’s Ishtar Gate.

To give objects a sense of size, scale, and context, the feature situates the objects within their gallery setting, and strings the experience together using a Steadicam video capture. This creates the sense of floating through the space, from one highlight to another.

As technology continues to advance and audiences anticipate more dynamic visual experiences, Getty is committed to experimenting with innovative ways of visual storytelling,” says Serena Parr, immersive lead at Getty. “MESOPOTAMIA is an example of Getty’s goal to bridge the gap between ancient art history and online learning, and we hope global audiences will enjoy diving into this fascinating time period.

Other recent Getty digital experiences include Return to Palmyra12 Sunsets, and Bauhaus: Building the New Artist.

Kids Spark Video via Reb Czukoski for use by 360 Magazine

Transforming Theatre Kids into Citizen Artists

By: James Wallert

In April of 2018, I brought five high school students to an early morning event sponsored by the New York State Education Department. 200 educational leaders representing 27 school districts from all across the state were there to begin the process of creating integration plans for their districts. New York State has the most racially and socio-economically segregated schools in the nation and New York City Public Schools are more segregated today than they were before the landmark 1954 U. S. Supreme Court case Brown v. Board of Education in which the Justices ruled that “Separate but Equal” schools were unconstitutional. These students were invited to perform their original thirty-minute play, Laundry City, an exploration of the effects of educational segregation. A facilitator from the state squawks a few barely audible words of introduction via a microphone plugged into a portable speaker, “Please welcome Epic Theatre Ensemble”. Jeremiah, a high school senior wearing a T-Shirt with the words, “I am Epic” written across the front, steps into the center of the room, without a mic, and speaks directly to the audience:

JEREMIAH

School segregation,

That systematic placement,

Race and class, don’t make me laugh. 

That shit goes deeper than thin cloudy glass.

Right past society’s foundation, 

Back to America in the making. 

The original sin: Race.

The performers weave through the audience performing scene after scene, transforming from character to character. The show culminates in a town hall. The students had done meticulous research to craft a scene that made room for dozens of nuanced perspectives on this complex issue.

LIV

I’m not really sure what we mean by integration. What I’ve seen when we talk about integration, it is about Black and Latino kids going to white schools to become better. That isn’t integration, that’s, in my view, assimilation.

NASHALI

I consider integration when you do the hard work of valuing what each person brings to that setting. Integration is where we learn to understand each other and appreciate each other and nobody’s story or history is more important than another’s.

JEREMIAH

I think that’s racist. I think it’s classist. I don’t believe in the savior complex- that you need to have folks swoop in and save the poor Black and Latino children. I believe that Black and Latino folks have agency and power that have been untapped.

NAKKIA

For me, it’s not that certain communities are less powerful; it’s that certain communities haven’t been given the floor. How do we give people the floor? Segregation was intentional. Integration has to be intentional. Segregation was forced. Integration has to be forced.

DAVION

If integration made money somehow, America would do it.

The five actors portray 18 different characters throughout the course of this last scene, but the final question of the play is delivered by the students as themselves.

ENSEMBLE

Is separate but equal fair?

The five citizen artists join hands and bow. The crowd rises for a standing ovation. After taking in the love, the students gesture for the audience to retake their seats.

JEREMIAH

At Epic, we have a conversation after every performance and we always ask our audience the same first question: Imagine that two weeks from now, one morning you wake up and find yourself thinking about Laundry City. What is it that will be going through your mind? A line, a character, an idea, a question? What do you think will resonate with you over time?

The post-show discussion runs an hour—twice as long as the play that sparked it. The facilitator jumps back on the mic to thank the students and direct the district teams to return to their work sessions. I gather the cast to take them back to their school (it’s a weekday). A superintendent from Upstate comes over and asks the students if they can come by his table to take a look at his district’s integration plan and share their thoughts. They do. We start to head out again when a superintendent from NYC’s Upper West Side asks for some feedback from the students about her district’s plan. The students go over to her table. After several more invitations are proffered, we are eventually invited to stay through lunch so that the cast could review and respond to each of the 27 district integration plans. I make a quick call to their Principal who agrees to excuse them from the rest of their morning classes.

About an hour into this process of consultation, Jeremiah asked if he could speak to me in the hallway. “Jim, I feel like an activist,” he says, “I mean, I feel like I’m in a room full of people who can actually change things and they’re listening to me.”

Since 2015, the plays of Epic’s youth ensemble have received 225 performances (in-person and online) for 56,000 audience members including government employees, policy researchers, and legislators.

Large-scale cultural change is always led by young people and artists, but funding for in-school and after-school arts programs are often the first casualties of state and local budget cuts. We need to invest in arts education to cultivate the next generation of citizen artists. We need to champion the creation of youth art that is relevant, representative, and affordable for everyone. We need to proudly assert the value of art-making by demanding that young artists from historically marginalized communities get paid a reasonable wage for the work they make. We need to challenge oppressive systems by placing youth and their art in front of people with power. And once everyone has had a chance to experience the art, we need to provide the time and space for people to talk to one another about what it means to them and what actions they want to take next.

About the Author James Wallert is a Founder and Co-Artistic Director of Epic Theatre Ensemble and author of Citizen Artists: A Guide to Helping Young People Make Plays That Change the World.

Bahari group photo via Epic Records Publicity for use by 360 MAGAZINE

BAHARI – “Way of Love” Music Video

Iconic pop duo Bahari released the music video for their coveted single “Ways of Love,” and you’ll want to take a look. The steamy video can be viewed HERE.

The compassionate lyrics captivate all audiences, “You give me these feelings, I don’t understand, Take control of my body, I’m in your hands.”

“‘Ways of Love’ is about that moment and feeling right before you finally give in to falling in love with someone. It’s about that decision to trust someone with your heart and to learn the way that they love,” says Bahari considering the message behind the single.

You can stream “Ways of LoveHERE.

Bahari

A match made in heaven, this alt-pop woman duo consists of singer/keyboarder Ruby Carr and singer/bassist Natalia Panzarella. The two artists came together by random chance one day when they were both at the same songwriting session. They knew they stuck gold from that moment and continued to generate music together.

Their first and perhaps most noteworthy hit came in 2014 with “Wild Ones,” accumulating a total of over 40 million Spotify streams. They continued with their successes in 2016 with the release of their EP Dancing on the Sun and singles “Get Together” and “Fucked Up.” They even hit the stage on tours with Selena Gomez and Birdy and joined forces with Zedd, ILLENIUM and Grey on collabs.

Bahari produced another newsy hit in 2018 with “Savage,” which was later revamped into a remix in 2020 featuring BIA. “Savage” amasses over 100 million streams/views and now serves as promo content for “American Horror Stories.” In 2021, the duo’s “CRASHING” in cooperation with ILLENIUM joined the To All The Boys: P.S. I Still Love You Original Soundtrack. Follow along as Bahari takes on 2022 with more electrifying projects to come.

Sondra Perry photo via Travis Matthews for use by 360 MAGAZINE

ROLLS-ROYCE MUSE PROGRAMME

Lineage for a Phantom Zone marks an important milestone in Rolls-Royce’s creative history. The newly commissioned work by artist Sondra Perry, sees Muse, the Rolls-Royce Art Programme’s inaugural award, the Dream Commission, come to fruition. Initiated to advance the medium of moving image art, the Dream Commission has consisted of a two-year process during which leading lights of the artistic world selected Sondra Perry to create an entirely new work. I am pleased to confirm this work will be shown at the prestigious Fondation Beyeler in Switzerland, before travelling to Serpentine, London. On behalf of Rolls-Royce, I congratulate Sondra Perry on this exciting commission, and we look forward to sharing her installation this year.”

Chief Executive Officer of Rolls-Royce Motor Cars, Torsten Müller-Ötvös.

American artist Sondra Perry joins forces with the Rolls-Royce Art Programme Muse to produce the immersive experience known as Lineage for a Phantom Zone. The program was shaped in support of the Dream Commission, and will open for one full month from February 13 to March 13 at Foundation Beyeler, Switzerland.

One of the most powerful mediums in art today is moving image art. This new program promises to embrace and highlight nothing but that, with film, animation, artificial intelligence and virtual reality pieces incorporated throughout the course. The emergence of social media combined with the affects of the COVID-19 pandemic have altered our world as we knew it, pushing for the rise of the digital age.

In support of the Dream Commission, Rolls-Royce aims to back developing artists in the field of art creation. The establishment of this new platform of moving image artwork expands the realm that we previously knew. With constant visualization of revolutionizing technical and conceptual boundaries, Rolls-Royce fulfills this through their exploration in cooperation with the Dream Commission.

May 2021 Dream Commission winner Sondra Perry works as a moving medium artist specializing in pieces relating to the topics of race, identity and technology. Perry received this honor out of a limited four differing artists in the same field, chosen by a Jury of modern-day art figures. Lineage for a Phantom Zone navigates through Perry’s journey of life highlighting the importance of dreaming. The philosophies of memory, lineage and longing are touched as well, explored through sensory elements that induce the physical, emotional and mental feelings of dreaming.

The 2022 inaugural Dream Commission was made possible through cooperation with Fondation Beyeler, Basel and Serpentine, London.

Explore Dream Commission content HERE.

Fabolous onstage at Drai's Nightclub via Radis Denphutaraphrechar for use by 360 MAGAZINE

DRAI’S LIVE

Fabolous, GRAMMY and BET nominated rapper stunned fans at Drai’s Nightclub on Friday, January 21. The performance was Fabolous’ first full-length Drai’s LIVE concert of the year held in Las Vegas. Fabolous staged his hits “Throw It in the Bag” and “You Be Killin’ Em” for attendees as they partied all night on The Cromwell Rooftop.

Adding to the excitement, artist and record producer Juicy J performed his own Drai’s LIVE performance on Saturday, January 22. Juicy J played some his top hits like “Show Out” and “Stay Fly,” and some of his leading collaborations with other artists like “Powerglide” by Rae Sremmurd and “I Don’t Mind,” by Usher. Juicy J has, too, worked with other leading individuals in the music industry such as 2 Chainz, Megan Thee Stallion, Lil Baby and more.

Drai’s Nightclub is open on Friday and Saturday’s from 10 PM to 3 AM. Tickets and VIP table reservations can be made on their HERE. All other specific requests can be made by emailing info@draislv.com.

Drai’s Beachclub • Nightclub

Drai’s Beachclub • Nightclub innovates nightlife, located on top of the extraordinary rooftop of The Cromwell – the 11-story hotel with an impeccable view of the Las Vegas Strip. The Beachclub accompanies 30,000-square feet of numerous pools, cabanas and bungalows and two full-service bars. Inside the scene, Drai’s Nightclub sports 25,000-square feet of pure first-class nightclub luxury. The Nightclub holds Drai’s Live, a performance concert sequence showcasing full-length sets from the best of the best in the music industry, including Wiz Khalifa, Future and 2 Chainz. Located on the corner of Las Vegas Boulevard and Flamingo Boulevard, Drai’s is set in the ideal location for nightlife enthusiasts.

The Cromwell

Named a Top 10 “Best U.S. Casino” by USA TODAY 10BEST Readers’ Choice and the esteemed receiver of the Forbes Travel Guide Recommended Award, The Cromwell brings innovation and excitement to the hotel scene in Las Vegas. Sporting high-tech, advanced technology, The Cromwell is the first hotel in Las Vegas to use mobile key technology for guest room access. Conveniently located across from Caesars Palace, this hotel holds 188 rooms with 19 suites, a virtual concierge service called ‘Ivy,’ an enormous casino, Bound – the hotel’s very own lobby bar, Interlude – casino lounge, and Drai’s Beachclub • Nightclub, The Cromwell has everything you could be looking for out of the Las Vegas experience.

LA Art Show

The LA Art Show is Back

By Yash Thadani, Krish Narsinghani

Los Angeles’ longest-running art show returned Wednesday evening, January 23rd. The exhibition was held at the Los Angeles Convention center in the heart of Downtown LA. Immediately upon entering the venue, patrons were presented with a red carpet walkway leading to the south hall ballroom that featured work from numerous artists from around the world. Installations from Takashi Murakami to Banksy were all at arm’s-length available to purchase. 

Venturing off to the back area of the hall guests were greeted by various vendors from DogHAUS to BuzzPop sampling their products. The event also had countless stands offering premium open bar services for the attendees. In addition, there was a lounge with embellished furniture and two champagne bars for VIP attendees. 

This 2022 exposition has also integrated cutting-edge forms of digital media such as NFTs to create a depiction of emotional and alluring experience for the audience. Johnny “KMNDZ” was one of the many artists breaking barriers of digital art with a collection of nearly 900 exclusive NFTs that premiered at the LA Art Show

A crowd favorite was a portrayal of The Joker and Batman in a boxing ring. In true artistic irony, Batman was beaten and confused with The Joker standing over him being the clear winner. It was a distasteful paradox showing that bad guys sometimes do end up winning. 

To top it off, the Off-White model and notably recognized international actress Kaia Gerber was the official host of the 2022 premiere party. As one of the largest international art fairs in the U.S. this occasion was the perfect place to view prominent artists and their work across a number of verticals including paintings, prints, sculptures and NFTs.

About the LA Art Show

The LA Art Show creates one of the largest international art fairs in the United States, providing an exciting, immersive, insider art experience to sponsors, their select guests and VIP clients. The show attracts an elite roster of national and international galleries, acclaimed artists, highly regarded curators, architects, design professionals, along with discerning collectors. This innovative, exceptional cultural environment attracts executives and board members of Southern California businesses, state, county, and municipal government representatives, as well as leaders of the region’s cultural institutions. Attendees are trendsetters, influencers and alpha consumers, who seek and demand the newest and the best in all areas of their lives—art, design, food, technology and travel being specific passion points.

Since 2015, LA Art Show has been a strong and unwavering supporter of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital® as it leads the way the world understands, treats, and defeats childhood cancer and other life-threatening diseases. In 2022, St. Jude returned as the beneficiary with the LA Art Show donating 15% of all ticket proceeds to its life saving mission. The LA Art Show is proud to bring together St. Jude and the art community.

Maria BLANCHARD for use by 360 Magazine

Masterpieces from the Musée d’Art Moderne de Paris

Musée d’Art Moderne de Paris (MAM) and the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao now present the new exhibition From Fauvism to Surrealism: Masterpieces from the Musée d’Art Moderne de Paris. The exhibition is sponsored by the BBVA Foundation, which has been able to showcase an array of around 70 art pieces by revolutionary artists.

The pieces exemplify the history of the MAM paired with a display of the artistic efforts that encompassed Paris during the leading decades in the 20th century. The bravery and freedom of fauvist and cubist artists in the two movements during this time period was deemed scandalous. The movements were able to transform conventional interpretation of portraiture, landscape and still-life.

MAM was developed on the Exposition Internationale (1937) as a homestead to modern art collections of the city of Paris. Exposition Internationale grew promptly in years after as more and more art was acquired by significant artists of the Parisian art scene, becoming a formal museum in 1961. Sponsors like Dr. Maurice Girardin provided vital support for the project, as his museum endowment of 1953 became the core for the collection of modern masters.

The pieces of the museum are arranged chronologically over three sections. The sections begin at the top of 20th century and lead to the time after World War II. The variety of artwork in this exhibition illustrates a historical viewpoint of the key protagonists that were so convoluted in crucial artistic movements.

Zara Biggs, Nike Communications, for use by 360 Magazine

BOMBAY SAPPHIRE HOLIDAY DISPLAYS LIGHT UP NYC

BOMBAY SAPPHIRE hosted its inaugural holiday window display to honor and rejuvenate imagination and creativity in New York City. The BOMBAY SAPPHIRE holiday windows gain inspiration from the traditional 5th Avenue holiday window displays while serving a greater purpose. The intention of the displays is to revive the creativity that has been deprived of downtown Manhattan since the beginning of the pandemic.

The storefront series was held in SoHo through December 19, in partnership with artist Shavanté Royster, fashion designer Romeo Hunte and NYC dancer Nicole von Arx.

Shavanté Royster

The Brooklyn-based Shavanté Royster is a graphic designer and illustrator, working in the creative industry since 2009. Growing up in a military family, often having to travel during her life motivated Shavanté’s innovation. Through her art, Shavanté often takes inspiration from travel, expressing this through shapes and rich colors. Shavanté’s work is comprised of digital illustration, painting and mixed media.

Romeo Hunte

Romeo Hunte New York is a lifestyle apparel brand designed in NYC for consumers who appreciate sophisticated details. The edgy aesthetic that the collection radiates mixes both feminine and masculine characteristics. Romeo Hunte pieces blend lavish outerwear with contemporary apparel. The Romeo Hunte woman and man can be described as a “dynamic duo” that appreciates the arts and pop culture with a modern flare.

Nicole von Arx

Nicole von Arx (NVA) studied Ballet, Contemporary and Hip Hop in Geneva, Switzerland at Dance Area, shortly after traveling to New York in 2008 to attend school at the Alvin Ailey School, graduating in 2011. Currently based among NYC and Geneva, NVA is a dancer and choreographer in both dance scenes. NVA has collaborated with the most notable choreographers in New York as a creator, dancer and teacher. Continuing her career, NVA has also worked independently as a choreographer with musicians, film directors and photographers.

The visionaries that were created through the course of the display aimed to fill the empty storefronts with avant-garde ‘windows of art.’ The pandemic has transformed the lives of creatives, small businesses and retail in New York and all over the world. BOMBAY SAPPHIRE worked to ensure that the artistic society would be celebrated and uplifted this holiday season with their holiday displays.

Each window highlighted a winter dreamscape created by artist Shavanté Royster. Both Shavanté and Romeo Hunte’s creative point-of-views joined forces to emulate the holiday magic of 5th avenue. Live models were seen wearing Romeo’s winter apparel upon Shavanté’s backdrops, with performances by NYC dancers.

Romeo’s devoted window showcased people draped in his designs that were created personally for the display. Romeo set the scene of a holiday celebration before a show over cocktails. The garments were designed with inspiration from Shavanté, with the backdrop and fashion coinciding throughout the display.

Romeo spoke on the experience of designing for the holiday displays, stating, “It’s been a joy to work on BOMBAY SAPPHIRE’s Holiday Storefront Series which pays homage to exciting young creative talents everywhere and the tenacity of New York City coming back after the pandemic. It was refreshing to collaborate with artist Shavanté Royster and the dancers as mixed media has always been an important part of my work, so it was cool to build and see the narrative of the holiday windows come to life with them through different facets, such as the dancers wearing some of my designs. I hope everyone can leave the windows feeling a burst of creativity and inspiration for the holidays, and hope for the year ahead!”