Posts tagged with "literature"

Book illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

NIXON LIBRARY REOPENS MUSEUM

AFTER 14 MONTH CLOSURE, NIXON LIBRARY REOPENS THEIR MUSEUM

Announces plans to honor First Responders, open Civic Education Center, expand opportunities for Young Leaders

The Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Museum reopens today at 10:00 AM PT, with a red white and blue ceremony to welcome its first museum visitors since March of 2020. This is the first presidential library to reopen in the U.S. following month-long closures from the Covid-19 pandemic. Eight first responders and frontline workers will cut the ribbon to officially reopen the museum. 

“After 14 challenging months, we couldn’t be more pleased to welcome visitors to the first presidential library in the country to reopen its doors,” Nixon Foundation President Hugh Hewitt said. “I’m grateful to our partners with the National Archives, to our community leaders for their continued support, and to our Foundation members for their dedication to our educational mission.”

Three new exhibitions await visitors to the Nixon Library:

  • The Presidents Club —briefly open for a few weeks last Fall— will reopen today. This originally-curated, storyteller exhibition chronicles the fascinating friendships and rivalries between some of history’s most well-known U.S. Presidents, from our Founding Fathers to the present day.
  • The President and The Planet, an outdoor exhibit perfect for all ages, that explores the consequential environmental initiatives of the Nixon administration.
  • Evening the Odds: Women Leading the Way, a permanent display on the legacy of the Nixon administration’s efforts to advance women in athletics, politics, and business.

The President’s original farmhouse birthplace reopens today as well. The Pat Nixon Rose Gardens continue to burst with color, filled with blooming, picturesque annuals, perennials and more. The Gardens —and the flower-ringed Memorial Site of President and Mrs. Nixon— are open and included with regular admission. 

Additionally, Hewitt announced that Tricia Nixon Cox, on behalf of the Nixon Foundation, will lead a Rose Garden Party salute to scores of frontline workers and first responders on June 12, 2021. The Foundation has invited representatives from charities with which it worked to coordinate its 14 month-long Conquering Covid campaign.

Hewitt also announced the Nixon Foundation’s intention to create and ultimately endow a Civic Education Center at the Nixon Library. 

Hewitt said: “President Nixon was committed to bringing young Americans into the political process; he advocated for the 26th amendment to lower the voting age to 18, and for expanding educational opportunities wherever possible. In that spirit, I’m proud to redouble the Nixon Foundation’s commitment to its educational mission by partnering with Southern California educational institutions to promote civic learning and fill a void that exists in our school systems today.” 

The Foundation will invest in its online distance learning initiatives and in-person civic education programs for high school students and teachers, and plans to operate them frequently. 

“One of the Nixon Foundation’s major post-pandemic priorities is to ensure that the basic pillars of American citizenship are alive and well among school-aged Americans,” Hewitt added. 

 After closing the Nixon Library’s doors in March of 2020, the Nixon Foundation continued its work by having:

  • Coordinated a 14-month campaign to support first responders by hosting more than 40 blood drives, four food drives and acquiring and donating 700,000 masks to schools, small businesses and medical workers. 
  • Migrated its educational mission fully online by adopting new distance learning initiatives.
  • Hosted then-Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and then-EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler for major policy announcements in July and September 2020, respectively. 
  • Launched The Nixon Seminar on Conservative Realism and National Security, a monthly online gathering of senior statesmen and rising specialists in various aspects of great power competition and American national security to discuss issues of current and continuing importance to the nation’s interests abroad.
  • Enhanced its iconic rose gardens and renewed its partnership with the American Rose Society to keep the flowers looking beautiful. 
  • Introduced “The President’s Society,” a new level of membership support open exclusively to millennials.

The Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Museum is open every Wednesday through Sunday from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.

The museum and federal spaces are open according to federal COVID-19 requirements, while requirements in the privately-managed Nixon Foundation spaces will continue to align with guidance from the State of California and the County of Orange.

Visitors are encouraged to purchase tickets online in advance of their visit by going to this website.

Mission-based events, speakers’ series programming and privately-contracted events at the Nixon Library are gradually resuming in accordance with guidelines issued by the State of California. 

Book award illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Sheikh Zayed Book Award

Sheikh Zayed Book Award Announces 2021 Winners

The World’s Leading Arab Literature and Culture Prizes

  • Three women win including Iman Mersal for the Literature Prize, with additional awards to a study of Saudi Women writers, Arab oration, and a history of supremacy
  • Each winner receives a career-changing prize of $204,181
  • Winners hail from five countries: Egypt (2), Lebanon (1), Saudi Arabia (2), Tunisia (2), and the US (1)
  • Literature and Children’s Book categories receive translation funding
  • The awards will be presented in a ceremony streamed live during the Abu Dhabi International Book Fair (May 23-29, 2021)
  • Record-breaking year for submissions with over 2,349 entries from 57 countries
  • Cultural Personality of the Year to be announced at a later date

Under the patronage of His Highness Sheikh Mohammed bin Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan, Crown Prince of the Emirate of Abu Dhabi and Deputy Supreme Commander of the United Arab Emirates Armed Forces, the Sheikh Zayed Book has revealed the winners of its 15th edition across eight key categories.

Three women took prizes this year with internationally renowned Egyptian author Iman Mersalwinning the Literature Prize, Dr. Asma bint Muqbil bin Awad Al-Ahmadi taking the Young Author Prize for her critical study of Saudi Women writers, and University of Chicago professorTahera Qutbuddin winning the Prize for Culture in Other Languages for her book Arabic Oration: Art and Function.

Michael Cooperson, a UCLA professor of Arabic, won the Translation Prize for his innovative translation of Maqamat Al-Hariri’s Impostures, a story of the popular Arab folk character Abu Zayd. The Children’s Literature category was won by the Tunisian author Mizouni Bannani for his novel An Artist Journey (Rehlat Fannan); The Literary and Art Criticism Prize was won by Khelil Gouia for his history of Tunisian art, The Path of Modernisation in the Visual Arts: From Drawing to Painting (Massar al Tahdeeth fil Funoon al Tashkeeliyya men al Ursooma ela al Lawhah). The Development of Nations Prize went to the Egyptian scholar Saeed El-Masri for his thought-provoking Legacy of Supremacy between Folklore and Religion (Turah al Este’la Bayn al Fokelore wal Majal al Dini). The Publishing and Technology Prize was presented to Dar Al Jadeed Publishing of Lebanon. The Cultural Personality of the Year Award to be announced at a later date. 

The winning titles in the children’s books and literature categories will be entitled for translation funding through the Award’s Translation Grant. Nine books have been translated into multiple languages since the launch of this grant. The Award has seen a growing interest in translation requests, reiterating the importance of building bridges between nations, cultures, literature, and heritage.

The Awards will be formally presented on May 24th and streamed live on YouTube from the Abu Dhabi International Book Fair (23-29 May 2021).

The winners will each receive a prize of $204,181 US (the equivalent of 750,000 United Arab Emirates dirhams) both in recognition of their achievements and to support their ongoing work. SZBA prize alumna Dame Marina Warner (Arab Culture in Other Languages, 2013) has described the Award as one that nourishes the academic community, “less of a trophy than a lavish bursary that allows the recipient to continue their adventures in understanding”.

2020 saw a record-breaking year for submissions, with 2,349 entries from 57 countries, particularly strongin the Young Author, Literature, and Children’s Literature categories. The Judging Committee noted that, despite a challenging year due to the global pandemic, they were delighted by the increase in submissions, reflecting not only the importance of literary awards but the resilience and vitality of the publishing industry.   

One of the Arab world’s most prestigious literary prizes, the Sheikh Zayed Book Award aims to showcase the most powerful, stimulating, and challenging works representing the Arab world, and to encourage greater scholarship and creativity by recognizing and rewarding these significant cultural achievements in Arabic culture.   In the words of last year’s Children’s Literature winner Ibtisam Barakat, the Sheikh Zayed Book Award is “the Arab world’s equivalent to the Nobel prize”.

H.E. Mohamed Khalifa Al Mubarak, Chairman of the Department of Culture and Tourism – Abu Dhabi, said, “Since its first edition in 2006, the Sheikh Zayed Book Award has proved to be a beacon of culture and literature, recognised and respected internationally as a champion of creativity. Through this inspirational Award, we honour the memory of our nation’s founding father, the late Sheikh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan, whose far-reaching vision for the UAE was intrinsically linked to the cornerstones of culture, knowledge and human development.”

Dr. Ali bin Tamim, Chairman of the Abu Dhabi Arabic Language Centre and Secretary General of the Sheikh Zayed Book Award, commented, “As one of the Arab world’s leading cultural awards we are proud to support a flourishing international publishing landscape and pleased to see winners are from five countries across the globe. The judges were especially impressed with the range of genres, the breadth of topics and the ambition of the scholars and writers represented here.  This year’s winners highlight the depth and prestige of the Award in the Arab world and beyond. We commend their achievement and look forward to seeing more superb work in the years to come.

French-Lebanese author Amin Maalouf, winner of the 2016 Cultural Personality of the year, commented, ‘In such difficult times, it is more important than ever to focus on books and on cultural values. They alone can provide us with the moral compass we so desperately need to move on with our eyes wide open.’

The 2021 Sheikh Zayed Book Award Winners:

The Prize for Literature: Dr. Iman Mersal for her book In the Footsteps of Enayat Al-Zayyat (Fee Athar Enayat Al Zayyat)

The judges presented this award to Ms. Mersal for her unique and poignant exploration of the life of the Egyptian writer Enayat al Zayat who died in 1963 four years before her only novel was published. Mersal blends a mix of investigative journalism and storytelling to illuminate a writer’s struggles with mental health and uncover the roots of a woman’s search for identity in contemporary Arab society. 

Iman Mersal is an Egyptian poet, writer, academic and translator. She works as an assistant professor of Arabic literature and Middle Eastern studies at the University of Alberta, Canada and currently resides in Marseille, France. An anthology of her works was translated into more than twenty-two languages and she has five poetry collections published. Herr book, Mamar Moetem Yasloh fee Talom Al Raks (A Dark Path Suitable for Learning to Dance), is one of the most important poetry books issued by the generation of the nineties in Arabic poetry.

The Prize for Young Author: Dr. Asma bint Muqbil bin Awad Al-Ahmadi for her book The Problems of the Narrated Self in the Saudi Feminist Novel (Eshkalyat Al-Thaat Al-Saredah Fee Al-Rwayah Al-Nesaayah Al-Saudiah)

The judges present this award to Dr. Asma bint Muqbil bin Awad Al-Ahmadi for her exploration of the themes of female identity through the lens of Saudi Arabian feminist literature, 1999-2012. This groundbreaking work focuses on topics that female Saudi writers have explored, such as belonging and self-realization.

A Saudi academic and critic, winner of the Sharjah Prize for Gulf Women’s Creativity 2019. Dr. Al-Ahmadi holds a PhD in Philosophy – Specializing in Arabic Language and Literature, and she is currently working as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Islamic Culture and Language Skills in the College of Science and Arts – King Abdulaziz University.

Prize for Children’s Literature: Mr. Mizouni Bannani for his book An Artist’s Journey (Rehlat Fannan)

The judges present this award to Mr. Bannani for his innovative use of language and multi-sensory educational techniques in ‘An Artist’s Journey‘. Mr. Bannani’s work is intended to inspire educators and children to learn through active participation and to ignite a sense of wonder and imagination in the process.

Mizouni Bannani is a Professor of Education Sciences at the Higher Institute for Applied Studies in Humanities in Sbeitla, Tunisia. He published two collections of short stories entitled Humma Al Ardh (The Fever of the Earth) in 1989, and Mawawil Aaed men Dhefat Al Nar (Mawawil of the One who Returned from the Shore of Fire) in 1996, in addition to a novel entitled Doroob Al Hawan (Paths of Humiliation). Bannani works as a literary and artistic consultant at Al Moanasah Publishing House and has participated in establishing the branch of the Union of Tunisian Writers in Kasserine in 1997 and chaired it until 2017.

Prize for Publishing & Technology: Dar Al Jadeed Publishing – Lebanon

The judges present this award to Dar Al-Jadeed Publishing for their continued dedication and focus on intellectual and linguistic studies. Their commitment to amplifying Arab poets and writers, as well as their dedication to young writers, has greatly fostered the Arab literary landscape.

Dar Al Jadeed Publishing was founded in Beirut in 2000 with a unique focus on long-forgotten topics in Arab publishing, as well as science books and linguistic and intellectual studies. The company was founded by late Lebanese writer and translator Lokman Slim and Rasha al Ameer as a strictly cultural project that pursues genuine skills and talents looking to be discovered and published in isolation from ideological considerations and partisanship. Bearing in mind the importance of science books to knowledge and the progress of a society, as well as the cultivation of rational, mythology-free knowledge.

Prize for Arabic Culture in Other Languages: Dr. Tahera Qutbuddin for her work Arabic Oration: Art and Function  

The judges present this award to Chicago-based writer Tahera Qutbuddin for her close examination of oration in the Arabic language. Ms. Qutbuddin’s comprehensive exploration of the oration tradition in Arabic society allows for a deeper understanding of how this tradition has shaped the contemporary Arab world.

Tahera Qutbuddin is a Professor of Arabic Literature at the University of Chicago and serves on the editorial board of NYU Abu Dhabi’s Library of Arabic Literature. She obtained her PhD and MA from Harvard University, USA, Tamhidi Magister and BA from Ain Shams University, Cairo, and high school diploma from Sophia College, Mumbai. Her research focuses on intersections of the literary, the religious, and the political in classical Arabic poetry and prose.

Prize for Translation: Dr. Michael Cooperson for his translation of Impostures by Al-Hariri from Arabic to English  

The judges present this award to Michael Cooperson for his bold and innovative approach to translation of the classic Arab work ‘Impostures’. Mr. Cooperson excellently translated the sentiments and emotions of the ‘Impostures‘ in such a way that makes for increased accessibility among English-speaking audiences. 

Michael Cooperson is an American author and translator, Cooperson studied at Harvard University and the American University of Cairo, and currently a professor of Arabic language and literature at the University of California, Los Angeles. He has published two monographs on early Abbasid cultural history: ‘Classical Arabic Biography’ and ‘Al-Ma’mun’. In addition to Impostures, he has translated Abdelfattah Kilito’s ‘L’Auteur et ses doubles (The Author and his Doubles)’ and Ibn al-Jawzi’s ‘Manaqib al-Imam Ahmad ibn Hanbal (Virtues of the Imam Ahmad ibn Hanbal)’. His other interests include Maltese language and culture.

Prize for Literary and Art Criticism: Dr. Khelil Gouia for his book The Path of Modernisation in the Visual Arts: From Drawing to Painting (Massar al Tahdeeth fil Funoon al Tashkeeliyya men al Ursooma ela al Lawhah)

The judges present this award to Khelil Gouia for his narrative and research uncovers the progression of Tunisian art, illustrating connections between pre-modernist and contemporary forms of the art form.  

Doctor Khelil Gouia is a professor of aesthetics, art theories and semiology of the image at the Higher Institute of Arts of the University of Sfax, Tunisia. He holds a PhD in arts sciences and techniques, specialising in art theories and history, as well as a professorial degree in philosophy from the University of Tunis, and an in-depth studies certificate in the history of modern art (ISBAT). His published books include Tashkeel Al Roya (The Formation of the Vision), Omarat Al Roya (The Architecture of the Vision), Bonyat Al Thaeykah wa Soltat Al Namothaj (The Structure of Taste and the Authority of the Model), Al Aamal Al Fanny wa Tahwolatoh bayn Al Nathar wa Al Natharyah (Artwork and Its Transformations between Theory and Theory, An Attempt in the Constructivism of Looking) and Masar Al Tahdeeth fe Al Fonoon Al Tashkelyah, men Al Orsomah ella Al Lawha (The Path of Modernisation in the Visual Arts, From Drawing to Painting).

Prize for Contribution to the Development of Nations: Dr. Saeed El-Masri for his book Legacy of Supremacy between Folklore and Religion (Turath al Este’la Bayn al Folklore wal Majal al Dini)

The judges present this award to Dr. Saeed El-Masri for his groundbreaking research into the history of arrogance in pre-modern and contemporary Arabic society. His exploration of arrogance gets to the root of how arrogance has contributed to the spread of extremism and hate within Arab society. 

Saeed El-Masry is a Professor of Sociology at the Faculty of Arts at Cairo University, and an advisor to the Minister of Culture on the development of the cultural system in Egypt. Dr. El-Masry is a cultural anthropologist and holds a PhD in sociology. He won the United Nations Award for Excellence in Human Development in 2013 for the Egypt Human Development Report, which he participated in preparing in 2010. He also won the Arab Grand Prize for Heritage for the book Eaadat Entaj Al Turath Al Shaaby; Kayfa Yatshabath Al Fokaraa Belhayat fee thel Al.

Chris Crowley's The Practical Navigator book press image for use by 360 Magazine

Chris Crowley’s “The Practical Navigator”

Chris Crowley is the author (with the late Henry S. Lodge, MD) of “Younger Next Year, the New York Times bestseller, with over two million copies sold in twenty-three languages. A former Wall Street trial lawyer, Crowley’s debut work of fiction is “The Practical Navigator” now available everywhere books are sold.

Read below for an excerpt adapted from “The Practical Navigator,” a literary legal crime thriller.

July 1988, Broken Harbor  

Harry’s death was utterly like him: orderly, decisive, and oddly considerate. He sailed to Maine without telling a soul—left a note saying he was going on a business trip but of course he wasn’t. He picked up his boat in Marion and sailed overnight to Broken Island, seven miles off the coast of Maine, near the Canadian border. It’s a big boat, over fifty feet, but it has all kinds of gadgets so it wasn’t hard for someone like Harry to do it alone. Actually, he wasn’t entirely alone. He had stopped at the New York apartment and picked up Gus, the big black Newfoundland, to keep him company on this . . . this journey, I guess. He got there late in the afternoon, furled the sails, and set the anchor with his usual care. Then he fed the dog and had something himself, down below. Put the dishes in the sink and opened a bottle of wine, which he took up into the cockpit. A very good bottle of wine, but he only had the one glass. It was a sacrament, I imagine; he didn’t really drink.

 No one was there so I can’t tell, but it looks as if Harry sat there for quite a while, with Gus at his side. I see them with great clarity: there is Gus, with his huge head on Harry’s lap and Harry calmly looking around, his hands working the thick black fur around Gus’s neck and ears. Or I see them both, sitting up now, looking at the beach and that remarkable shoreline, the sun going down over the Cut. It is the loveliest place. Then he shuts Gus down below. One imagines the intimate business of getting Gus down the steps. Harry stands at the bottom of the companionway, and gets his arms around him (a face full of fur, legs every which way; Gus’s great face is interested but relaxed: they’ve done this a hundred times). Then he picks him up, all hundred pounds of him, and gently sets him down on the cabin sole. Sets out some water. Harry put him below because he didn’t want him to see. Or more likely, he was afraid the dog would jump in and try to save him, as Newfies are bred to do. 

 Then, after he had lowered the guardrail on the starboard side, he got the Camden marine operator to call the sheriff, Bud Wilkerson, over in Hanson, and told him what he was about to do. Hung up before Bud could say anything, but wanted him to know so he’d come out and get the dog. Then he put on his commodore’s cap—an old-fashioned hat with a small, shiny visor and a narrow crown, the kind worn in the Navy in World War I. Do you remember the photos of Admiral Sims? Like that. That was one of a number of affectations at the Great Arcadia Yacht Club of New York, Boston, and Mount Desert, of which Harry had recently been commodore. That and the pips, the four raised brass-and-enamel symbols of his rank on each epaulet. Then Harry sat down on the gunwale with his back to the water. And blew his brains out. Here’s an interesting thing. Just before he did it, he tied a float to his leg. When he shot himself, his body went over the side, as he intended. Not a drop of blood in the boat. But it floated. So my friend Bud wouldn’t have to dive for it when he got there. Imagine thinking of that, in the closing moments of your life. Well, Harry—my brother, Harry—had a weakness for order. More than a weakness, a passion. 

He was a subtle man, entirely capable of making his way in a dark and uncertain world. But his great passion was for order. That was the real business of his life: not making an astonishing fortune as a very young man or becoming a cabinet officer, but preserving order. Against the sweet, dark pull of the Labyrinth, as it spins away, under the city, under our lives.

“The Practical Navigator” is available for purchase on Amazon, Barnes and Noble, Indie Bound, and as an ebook.

VIDAS book illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

VIDAS: Deep in Mexico and Spain

ADVENTURE AWAITS IN THIS NEW COMING-OF-AGE TRAVEL MEMOIR 

“VIDAS: Deep in Mexico and Spain”

A Tribute to The Glorious Diversity of Our Worlds

Shortly after the American ministers of hate started demonizing the people of Mexico, New York Times Best-Selling Author Edward Stanton began writing about his own wide experience living in that country, confounding the bigots and their bogeys, showing the real women, men, and children he knew there. When the coronavirus struck Spain last year, he decided to include that country as a homage to it and its people, whom he also knew and loved. 

This is how VIDAS: Deep in Mexico and Spain was born.

A wayward descendant of Mexico’s national hero, a femme fatale who recites poems in cantinas, a Tunisian prostitute in Barcelona, a Spanish psychiatrist who fights brave bulls, the wise owner of the world’s oldest restaurant. They are just a handful of the characters portrayed in VIDAS: Deep in Mexico and Spain, the first memoir to capture Mexico and Spain from the perspective of an American and the knowledge of an insider.

VIDAS explores subjects as diverse as the art of blasphemy, the cult of the Virgin Mary, superstition and witchcraft, the bordellos of Mexico, Spain’s paradise of drink and food, the bullfight, and the running of bulls in Pamplona, the pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela. Every chapter of this vibrant travel memoir depicts a different person or place, which combined create a cross-section of the most populous Spanish-speaking countries in the New and Old World. VIDAS is a passage from childhood to adolescence and maturity, a tribute to nature and the open road, an exaltation of love, food, and wine, a journey from the tender, mortal flesh to the luminous world of the spirit.

-RELEASE DATE: March 1st, 2021
-PUBLISHING COMPANY: Waterside Publications
-ISBN-13: 978-1-949003-47-5 (print)
-ISBN-13: 978-1-949003-48-2 (eBook)
-GENRE: Nonfiction, travel, memoir, culture, diversity
-PRICE: $17.95 (print) $9.95 (eBook)
-PURCHASING INFO: VIDAS is available for purchase on Amazon here.

Why You Need This Book

Filled with photographs, this engaging and unique memoir provides a sensory travel experience many of us are craving today. VIDAS: Deep in Mexico and Spain offers the opportunity to learn about faraway lands and striking events while never leaving home. This timely “armchair travel” memoir is for anyone searching for an escape during our troubled time.

“Lyrical…Iconic…Elegant…” –KIRKUS REVIEWS

“A love letter to the Mexican and Spanish peoples, a pure affirmation of life in countries with radical cultures of death.” –ANA MERINO, WINNER 2020 PREMIO NADAL

About the Author, Edward Stanton:

Born in Colorado and raised in California, Edward Stanton has lived in Mexico, Argentina, Uruguay, and Spain. He’s the author of twelve books, some of them translated and published in Spanish, Arabic, and Chinese. Road of Stars to Santiago, the story of his 500-mile walk on the ancient pilgrimage route to Compostela, was called one of the best books on the subject by the New York Times; Stanton’s environmental novel Wide as the Wind, the first to treat the tragic history of Easter Island, won the Next Generation Indie Book Award for Young Adult Fiction and three other international prizes. 

Film illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

Unforgettable Foreign Films

10 Foreign Films with the Most Unforgettable Love Stories

By Roberta Seret, PhD

I have two loves – literature and film. The most powerful love stories jump off the pages or off the screen, narrating different types of love turmoil, journeying through danger and obstacles to find love. The best love stories occur when love triumphs over evil. 

In the past twenty years, I have taught film through my NGO at the United Nations and at New York University. It is a love story that captures my students the most. Their 10 favorite love stories in foreign films deceit different ways of loving, but they all try to overcome these obstacles to find it. Although they may not always get their happy ending, it’s always worth the risk:

1.     JOJO RABBIT – (New Zealand) 2019, director Taika Waititi. During World War ll, ten-year-old Jojo is being brainwashed as a Hitler Youth. Strangely, his mother allows this, for it is her only way to protect him. We see how deeply a mother loves her son as she prepares him to be independent. Simultaneously, the director expresses his love for the future of children to do what’s right.

2.     HONEYLAND – (Republic of Northern Macedonia) 2019, directors Tamara Kotevska and Ljubomir Stefanov. Nominated for an Oscar for Best Documentary and Best Feature Film, this story recreates a Paradise Lost and its destruction by a greedy man. Love for beauty and nature, and the desire to recapture it, is represented by honey – becoming extinct – and man’s inhumanity to lose it.

3.     NEVER LOOK AWAY – (Germany) 2018, director Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck. Based on the life of the famous painter, Gerhard Richter, the director recreates the artist’s search for Truth. It is only through love for Art that the artist can find peace. It is this tumultuous search that pushes him/her to create.

4.     CAPERNAUM – (Lebanon) 2018, director Nadine Labaki. Lost children, abandoned, hungry, and forced to go against their conscience, are victims of war-torn Lebanon and Syria. The director opens her heart by using her hand-held camera to capture how children suffer in their struggle to survive. It is through her love for these children that we understand and want to help. 

5.     FACES PLACES – (France) 2017, directors Agnes Varda and JR. At 89-years-old and one year before her death, famed filmmaker, Agnes Varda embarks on a road trip to show her appreciation to the people of France. As a token of her deep love, she offers them a new type of art – photos of themselves – while she is making a film of their acceptance. Photography mixes with cinematography, the moving image fuses with still art, to show the director’s love for people and give them Art. 

6.     LION – (India/ Australia) 2016, director Garth Davis. The true story of 5-year-old Saroo, who gets lost on a train in India and cannot communicate in a different dialect to return home. He is placed in an orphanage and adopted by a couple from Tasmania, Australia. Twenty-five years later, his obsession to find his biological mother is proof of his filial love.

7.     TONI ERDMANN – (Germany / Romania) 2016, director Maren Ade. A father loves his ambitious, modern daughter and wants to help her understand what happiness and love are. But the generational gap proves to be stronger than his quest. Despite his struggles and sacrifices, she answers when she sings Whitney Houston’s song, “Learning to love yourself is the greatest love of all.”

8.     PHOENIX – (Germany) 2014, director Christian Petzold. Nelly survives World War II because she is obsessed at Auschwitz to be loved again by the man she loves. She does return to him but disfigured, and he does not recognize her. Deceitfully, he schemes to help her survive the traumas of her past. But as she learns the truth, will her love forgive him?

9.     IDA – (Poland) 2013, director Pawel Pawlikowski. Ida embarks on a spiritual journey to choose between a life of love and family, or God and religion. As she voyages toward the answer, she learns about her history and what the material world can offer. But she keeps repeating, “And then?” She realizes it is love for God and the spirit that can offer her the truest love.

10.  CASABLANCA – (USA/ Morocco) 1942, director Michael Curtiz. This is the best love story of all. For those who will see this film for the first time, I am jealous. This is an American movie made in Morocco with an anti-Hollywood ending. It shows and answers what is true love? What we see on the screen is a love that hurts – for all of us. And yet, love must be experienced, and this film must be seen!

Roberta Seret, Ph.D., is the director of Advanced English and Film at the United Nations for the Hospitality Committee and Founder of the NGO at the United Nations, International Cinema Education. She is the author of the Transylvanian Trilogy, with Love Odyssey releasing March 23, 2021. Visit her website for more information.

Dr. Seuss illustration by Heather Skovlund for 360 Magazine

The Controversial Career of Dr. Seuss

By: Carly Cohen

The American children’s author, political cartoonist, illustrator, poet, animator, and filmmaker, the brilliant Theodor Seuss Geisel. Dr. Seuss has been extremely well known ever since he started his books and films. The books and films are classics and bring joy and childhood memories.

Dr. Seuss was born on March 2, 1904, and released his first book in 1937 called And To Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street. In total, he has written over 60 books and sold over 600 million copies throughout his career. In his early career, he attended Lincoln College at the University of Oxford for English literature, but left without receiving a degree and came back to the U.S. After moving back to the United States, Dr. Seuss began to send his work to different advertising agencies, magazines and publishers. In 1927, his first cartoon was published in The Saturday Evening Post.  His career was long, successful, and brilliant.

In the latest news, Dr. Seuss will stop being published due to “hurtful and wrong racist images.” In his books and cartoons, there has been ‘insensitive’ imagery that is causing this news. Dr. Seuss’s enterprise assured consumers that the books which are no longer being published are a part of the plan to “ensure Dr. Seuss Enterprise’s catalog represents and supports all communities and families.”  The decision of this issue most definitely was not easy for the Dr. Seuss organization. Since this is such a serious and sensitive issue, it required for the organization to think it through, bring in experts, and spend long hours deciding on what is best way to maintain Dr. Seuss’ name and be sensitive to all of his readers.

Not all of his books will stop being published, but they still will all be carefully inspected. The confirmed books that will no longer be available for purchase are McElligot’s Pool, On Beyond Zebra!, Scrambled Eggs Super!, The Cat’s Quizzer, And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street, and If I Ran the Zoo. The Cat In The Hat has also been under discussion concerning discontinuation, but will be fully examined before any decisions are made.

In The Cats Quizzer, the Japanese character has a bright yellow face and is standing on Mt. Fuji. If I Ran A Zoo shows examples of orientalism and white supremacy. Another issue with the Dr. Seuss books has been that a majority of the human characters are white, which makes it appear that Dr. Seuss focuses on white men and women.

A school in Virginia has already banned the copies of these Dr. Seuss books, and others are having similar discussions.

Even in death, Dr. Seuss receives backlash from his work along with many other brands such as Aunt Jemima pancake mix and Uncle Ben’s Eskimo Pies, which also had to change their branding due to racial issues. Brands from this point on need to pay close attention to their advertising to ensure that they’re being inclusive of all audiences.

All Good Just A Week Ago

If you’re feeling a little bit lonely as a single person during quarantine, there might be a perfect book for you.

For both men and women, “All Good Just A Week Ago: Funny Dating Stories to Help You Keep Your Head in the Game” is chock-full of funny, relatable dating stories put together from interviews.

With teachable moments and unimaginable scenarios, “All Good Just A Week Ago” helps single people keep their heads in the game.

Erika McCall and Niesha Forbes, two best friends, wanted to put their quarantine time to good use, so they set up 50 interviews to gather data and stories for the book.

These stories prove that relationships can make you laugh and roll your eyes instead of cry, all while showing us that we’re not alone.

In 1950, only 22% of Americans were without a romantic partner. In 2019, 124 million Americans were without a partner.

Though the percentage of people in relationships has gone down, the desire to find love and companionship has not.

McCall said, “It’s the year of 20/20 vision, and it’s time for a dating and love revolution.”

Both authors agreed that the revolution begins with this book. With a goal to understand romantic communication and expectations, “All Good Just A Week Ago” uses stories to heal relationships and foster close, loving, committed relationships in a generation obsesses with “hook up culture.”

McCall and Forbes even get into a few of their own stories. McCall herself is single and wants to clear the way for her future husband to enter her life while Forbes is on her way to her third wedding anniversary and hopes that sharing her experience can help bring about mutual respect, kindness and traditional courtship in relationships.

McCall said her story is every woman’s story while Forbes said, “It is critical to know that once you get to a certain age, things you did in your early twenties, all those toxic behavior patterns where you’re not putting your worth above your desire to be with someone, if you don’t do the work on yourself, you will find yourself in your thirties, forties and even fifties, having not learned the important lessons or found true love.”

Following the laughs in the beginning of the book, readers will reach a call to action that encourages men and women to think critically about how to move forward with healthier relationship dynamics.

For more information about the book or to order it, you can click right here.

Mikhail Gorbachev’s Book

“I was fortunate in being with Margret Thatcher when she met Mikhail Gorbachev in 1984. He did more to end the Cold War than anyone else and it ended without a shot being fired. We need to listen to his wise advice and encourage Vladimir Putin, not just Donald Trump, to act on it. Neither wants war but, as Gorbachev writes, we could end up with it by accident with the world being devastated.” Sir Malcolm Rifkind, former Foreign Secretary and Defence Secretary of the United Kingdom

“Mikhail Gorbachev has written this short book to warn us of the grave risks we now face and to urge us all, political leaders and citizens alike, to take action to address them. He argues that self-serving policies and narrow-minded politics aimed at the pursuit of national interests are taking the place of political principles and overshadowing the vision of a free and just world for all peoples. He offers his view of where Russia is heading and he urges political leaders in the West to recognize that re-establishing trust between Russia and the West requires the courage of true leadership and a commitment to genuine dialogue and understanding on both sides. This succinct account of the immense challenges we now face by one of the world’s greatest statesmen will be of interest to everyone concerned about the current state of the world and its future.” George Schultz

The Book:

Thirty years after the end of the Cold War, world peace is at risk again. The President of the United States has withdrawn from the disarmament treaty with Russia, Europe is disintegrating, China is surging forward and a wave of nationalism and populism is destabilizing established political institutions and endangering hard-won liberties.

In view of this dangerous and unpredictable state of affairs, Mikhail Gorbachev, the last great statesman of the 1989 revolution, has written this short book to warn us of the grave risks we now face and to urge us all, political leaders and citizens alike, to take action to address them. He focuses on the big challenges of our time, such as the renewal of the arms race and the growing risks of nuclear war, the new tension between Russia and the West, the global environmental crisis, the rise of populism and the decline of democracy. He argues that self-serving policies and narrow-minded politics aimed at the pursuit of national interests are taking the place of political principles and overshadowing the vision of a free and just world for all peoples. He offers his view of where Russia is heading and he urges political leaders in the West to recognize that re-establishing trust between Russia and the West requires the courage of true leadership and a commitment to genuine dialogue and understanding on both sides.

This succinct account of the immense challenges we now face by one of the world’s greatest statesmen will be of interest to everyone concerned about the current state of the world and its future.

The Author:

Mikhail Gorbachev was the last leader of the Soviet Union, serving as General Secretary of the Communist Party from 1985 to 1991 and President of the USSR from 1990 to 1991. He played a pivotal role in bringing an end to the Cold War and he was awarded the Noble Peace Prize in 1990.  Since then, he has maintained an active role in world affairs through the Gorbachev Foundation, a non-profit organization which promotes democracy and humanitarian initiatives globally.

China Goes Green Novel

What does it mean for the future of the planet when one of the world’s most durable authoritarian governance systems pursues “ecological civilization?” Despite its staggering pollution and colossal appetite for resources, China exemplifies a model of state-led environmentalism which concentrates decisive political, economic, and epistemic power under centralized leadership. On the face of it, China seems to embody hope for a radical new approach to environmental governance.

In this thought-provoking book, Yifei Li and Judith Shapiro probe the concrete mechanisms of China’s coercive environmentalism to show how “going green” helps the state to further other agendas such as citizen surveillance and geopolitical influence. Through top-down initiatives, regulations, and campaigns to mitigate pollution and environmental degradation, the Chinese authorities also promote control over the behavior of individuals and enterprises, pacification of borderlands, and expansion of Chinese power and influence along the Belt and Road and even into the global commons. Given the limited time that remains to mitigate climate change and protect millions of species from extinction, we need to consider whether a green authoritarianism can show us the way. This book explores both its promises and risks.

The Authors:

Yifei Li is Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies at NYU Shanghai, and Global Network Assistant Professor at NYU.

Judith Shapiro is Professor and Director of the Masters in Natural Resources and Sustainable Development at American University.

360 Magazine

W.E.B Du Bois Book

W.E.B. Du Bois spent many decades fighting to ensure that African Americans could claim their place as full citizens and thereby fulfill the deeply compromised ideals of American democracy. Yet he died in Africa, having apparently given up on the United States.

In this tour-de-force, Elvira Basevich examines this paradox by tracing the development of his life and thought and the relevance of his legacy to our troubled age. She adroitly analyzes the main concepts that inform Du Bois’ critique of American democracy, such as the color line and double consciousness, before examining how these concepts might inform our understanding of contemporary struggles, from Black Lives Matter to the campaign for reparations for slavery. She stresses the continuity in Du Bois’ thought, from his early writings to his later embrace of self-segregation and Pan-Africanism, while not shying away from assessing the challenging implications of his later work.

This wonderful book vindicates the power of Du Bois’ thought to help transform a stubbornly unjust world. It is essential reading for racial justice activists as well as students of African American philosophy and political thought.

The Author:

Elvira Basevich is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at University of Massachusetts, Lowell.

Reviews:

“Unique among books on Du Bois, Basevich originally and persuasively presents a liberal ideal of civic enfranchisement as the heart of Du Bois’ thought.”

Chike Jeffers, Dalhousie University

“A valuable and compelling addition to the literature on Du Bois. Both a useful introduction to those unfamiliar with his thought and an innovative interpretation that will hold the interest of experts, Basevich has achieved a remarkable feat—and produced an apt tribute to her subject.”

I’ll Benjamin McKean, Ohio State University