Posts tagged with "Markice Moore"

Emily Bunn image via emilyxbunn on Instagram for use by 360 Magazine "Emily" page

Emily

Emily Bunn is a writer and photographer, who has been published by the likes of 360 Magazine, County Lines Magazine, Cambridge Editors, Society19, Milkcrate, WhatsPop and Gauge Magazine, among others. Specializing in lifestyle writing and entertainment journalism, Emily is constantly on the pulse of pop culture.

A bonafide media mogul, Emily currently works at 360 Magazine. While Emily produces stories in a variety of topics, she concentrates on the topics of fashion and beauty, music and entertainment, current affairs coverage, and auto industry writing. The impressive roster of clientele she’s produced writing for via 360 Magazine includes celebrities such as Beyoncé, Markice Moore, and John Oates, and high-end brands like Rolls-Royce, Lamborghini, and TAG Heuer. While Emily began as a digital media intern with 360, she has been able to cement herself as a valuable asset to the magazine as the Executive Assistant.

Emily is arriving on the scene of the publishing industry with spunk and diligence. She recently graduated magna cum laude in May of 2021 from Emerson College. During her time at Emerson, Emily majored in Writing, Literature and Publishing, with a minor in Photography. She was involved with various on-campus publications, including writing for the music blog, Milkcrate, and providing photography for the design-oriented literary magazine, Gauge.

Emily’s photographic responsibilities progressed throughout her collegiate career, due to success in documentary, darkroom, and digital photography courses. Emily’s deep passion for image-making blossomed as she worked as a film and photo tech at Emerson College’s darkroom and photo lab. Able to produce images both through both analog and digital mediums, Emily enjoys documenting street photography and live music events. Her debut photography exhibition, “People Watching” was showcased at the Huret-Spector Gallery in Boston, Massachusetts in November of 2020.

A live music enthusiast, Emily has always been very involved in her local music scene. In Boston, she worked on the Live Events team at Emerson College’s radio station, WECB.fm. Representing the underground sound of Emerson, Emily worked with the team to produce open mic nights, campus events, and sold out concerts. Eventually, Emily’s participation with WECB.fm landed her the position of Live Events Manager. She produced large scale concerts for a variety of notable musicians, including Alex G, Japanese Breakfast, and Diet Cig. Emily also worked to highlight emerging, local artists in her community by photographing album covers and organizing band photoshoots.

Emily’s involvement with the radio station didn’t stop there, as she was also a live broadcast DJ personality on WECB.fm. Throughout her entire collegiate career, Emily performed as the personality for several radio shows, including “The Cry Guys” and “Suppy?” As a DJ, Emily worked to curate weekly radio show playlists and grow her listenership. Both of her shows highlighted recently released alternative music. A weekly album review accompanied each episode, in which Emily researched and reported on musicians and offered her opinion on stand-out album tracks. Both “Suppy?” and “The Cry Guys” premiered weekly on Sunday mornings, and Emily was sure to wake up, electrify, and excite listeners with her punk music curation.

Looking towards the future, Emily is working to continue expanding her music coverage repertoire, honing in her interviewing abilities, and creating engaging, politically conscious, intelligent digital content. Connect with her on LinkedIn or Instagram.

"People Watching" photography exhibit by Emily Bunn, photographed by Emily Bunn, for use by 360 Magazine "Emily" page

Emily Bunn at her “People Watching” photography exhibit at the Huret-Spector Gallery in Boston, MA.

Markice Moore image by Starz for use by 360 Magazine

Markice Moore Q&A

By: Emily Bunn

The most sought-after ‘bad guy’: Markice Moore is a rising force to be reckoned with in Hollywood’s entertainment industry. Most notably recognized for his role as Ray Ray on the hit seriesSnowfall,” Moore is continuing to flesh out his acting resume with his upcoming involvement with 50 Cent’s show on Starz, “Black Mafia Family.” “Black Mafia Family” tales place in the late 1980s and is based on the story of two brothers, Demetrius “Big Meech” Flenory and Terry “Southwest T” Flenory, who had been involved in money laundering and drug trafficking schemes. We sat down with the rising star to discuss the relevance of “Black Mafia Family”’s themes in the present, Moore’s method acting experiences, upcoming music releases, and more.

Where were you when you received the call to join the cast of “Black Mafia Family”?

I was in Las Vegas at the craps table and I just lost $200. So when my manager called it was the best news ever!

What are you most excited about regarding your involvement in “Black Mafia Family”?

I’m most excited about working with 50 Cent again after working on “The Oath” with him for Crackle. His name rings bells in Hollywood now, so it’s an honor to be attached to his brand.

How do you feel about being popularly cast into roles as antagonists or villains?

Wow! I’m popularly casted! That’s kind of cool. I fucking love it! I love playing the bad guy, I mean, I think we all kind of relate to the bad guy. Some of us just don’t have the balls to do what he does, you know. To commit to antagonizing is a skill set.

What has been your favorite role you’ve ever played, and why?

Ryan Payne on The Paynes was my favorite character because he was so goofy and a nitwit. Even my mother called and told me, “You’re really acting now, Ryan is a dumb ass.”

Both “Snowfall” and “Black Mafia Family” revolve around crime and drugs in the 1980s. Can you speak on the relevance of these themes within the shows as still existing today?

Well if we may go a little deep, I believe it’s important to touch on these topics because our culture, African American culture, has been systematically targeted so heavily by oppressors using tactics like drugs and violence as conduits to control our narrative. It’s important that we take some of that power back and tell our sides of those stories. They use their mediums to paint a picture of us as only drug dealers, instead of humanizing us like they do their heroes.

How did your experience living in Atlanta compare to the experiences illustrated in your involvement with the film, “ATL”?

It was literally the same. At the time of filming I was hustling, bootlegging liquor, and playing with guns. My Austin character kept me out of trouble.

Following your 2020 release of “Nervous,” are you looking to put out any more music soon?

Yes. Absolutely. I am one half of a rap group called Pool Boys.  We are releasing more new music this summer. Right now, we have “Nervous,” “Cold,” and another record called Clubhouse that’s going crazy!

Are there any other upcoming acting projects you’re working on to come in 2021 that you can tell us about?

Yes! I have a production company called, “TABLE READ PRODUCTIONS” and we are working on a movie made by people in the clubhouse called, “Green Bean Me.” So, be on the lookout for that.