Art

Beyonce illustration by Kaelen Felix for 360 Magazine

Ivy Park x Adidas to Drop Drip 2.2

By Hannah DiPilato

After an incredibly successful clothing drop of the Adidas x Ivy Park collection, Beyoncé is at it again with a darker line. Adidas x Ivy Park’s Drip 2 sold out almost instantly, but a line that Beyoncé dubbed “Drip 2.2: Black Pack” is coming soon. 

The Ivy Park Instagram account, @weareivypark, posted a teaser video of the collection captioned “THIS IS MY PARK.” Beyoncé also uploaded three posts on her Instagram to showcase the collection’s styles.

The line will debut on the Adidas website in the United States on November 17 and worldwide on the Adidas website on November 18. The collection will be available in-store on November 19. Hopefully, if you weren’t able to snag something from the first collection, these three days will be your lucky chance. 

Drip 2.2 has much more neutral colors than the original Drip 2 drop. Drip 2 had a variety of bright green and teal colors and Drip 2.2 will feature black and nude. This makes the upcoming collection a bit more versatile and fitting for the winter months. 

According to Teen Vogue, the designs “are similar to the last two drops; biker shorts, [sports] bras, a jumpsuit, sweats, fanny packs, and more. The only thing that’s really changed is the colors.” 

A landing page announcing the launch can be found on Beyoncé’s website that shows off some of the styles we can expect next week. Teen Vogue also featured images of the collection. 

British Vogue will feature Beyoncé on the cover of their December issue this year. Beyonce is shown in many stunning outfits throughout the shoot. In one image, she is showing off one of the neon looks from the Adidas x Ivy Park Drip 2 collection. The neon green jumpsuit is paired with a bold, dazzling necklace and a bright green bucket hat. 

The three beautiful covers of Beyoncé were photographed by Kennedi Carter. According to Billboard, the 21-year-old photographer is the youngest photographer to shoot a cover in British Vouge’s history. 

The December issue will also include an interview with Beyoncé conducted by Edward Enninful that shares how Beyoncé conquered 2020. She even shares that the most recent Ivy Park collection was inspired by quarantine. 

“During quarantine, fashion was a place of escape for me. My kids and I came up with Fashion Fridays,”  Beyoncé said. “Every Friday, we would dress up in my clothes or make clothes together and take each other’s pictures. It became a ritual for us and an opportunity to handle this crazy year together,”

“The newest Ivy Park collection was inspired by this new tradition. It consciously uses bright, bold colours to remind us to smile,” she continued. “I used a lot of neon yellow and coral mixed with baby blue and earth tones that felt soothing. They brought me joy and made me smile in the midst of a tough time for all of us.”

This interview allows Beyoncé to dive deeper into her thoughts on fashion and her Ivy Park x Adidas collection. Along with the interview being featured in the December issue of British Vogue, it’s available on Vogue’s website

Ivy Park has been killing the athleisure game since it was founded in 2016. The company was originally joined with the popular store Topshop, but Beyoncé split from the Topshop name after allegations against the Ivy Park co-founder Sir Phillip Green. 

Beyonce spoke in Elle about the origin of Ivy Park. “I would wake up in the morning, and my dad would come knocking at my door, telling me it’s time to go running, said Beyoncé. “I remember wanting to stop, but I would push myself to keep going. It taught me discipline.”

In 2019, the collaboration between Ivy Park and Adidas was launched and marked the rebranding of Ivy Park after splitting from Topshop. Now Ivy Park and Adidas are making waves with their joint collections. The collections have featured athletic clothing as well as spunky accessories. 

Follow Beyoncé on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook to make sure you don’t miss updates about the collection. You can also follow Ivy Park on Instagram and Twitter for recent updates. Make sure to mark your calendar for the release of Drip 2.2.

Sneaker Illustration for 360 mag by Kaelen Felix

Beyoncé’s Ivy Park × Adidas dropping new collection on Oct. 30

21 hours ago, Beyoncé posted on Instagram a photo that read “THIS IS MY PARK” over a field of wild poppies, just below a purple mountainscape. She tagged @weareivypark, her iconic clothing brand, and the infamous @adidas. The post was captioned, “DRIP 2 October 20.”

Evidently, Beyoncé is planning her second Ivy Park drop, which will reveal a second collection on Oct. 30, ten days from today. But, aside from the Instagram post, little is known about what the collection has to offer.

Its predecessor, the capsule collection, sold functional athleisure and was cherished by many celebrities, including Zendaya, Cardi B, Janelle Monáe, and Reese Witherspoon. It sported mostly maroons and oranges and was adored by those select few who got their hands on it.

The second collection keeps the promise Ivy Park makes on its website, first posted when the first collection sold out almost immediately. Aside from clothes, it also sold sneakers and accessories between $25 and $170, according to Kelsey Garcia of PopSugar.

“This IVY PARK capsule collection is only the first in an ongoing partnership with our world-class ally, adidas,” it says. “Thank you for being part of the flow. Stay tuned.”

Beyoncé announcement comes after weeks of her posting for Black Lives Matter, offering tributes to Breonna Taylor, George Floyd, Jacob Blake, and other Black Americans killed at the hands of law enforcement, and the release of her film/visual album, Black is King.

Next Friday, we will finally see what Beyoncé has to offer us, in a highly anticipated clothing drop that could literally be anything.

Bob Marley illustrated by Kaelen Felix for 360 MAGAZINE.

Bob Marley – Freedom Fighter

“Bob Marley was a revolutionary whose weapons of choice were unity and knowledge in the battles against oppression and ignorance. His music and his words fight on for generations across the earth.” – Chuck D

Today, episode seven of Bob Marley’s Legacy documentary series continues with “Freedom Fighter,” a powerful new short featuring insight and interviews from some of the world’s most respected artists, writers, activists, and filmmakers, each offering their own take on Bob’s music, his message, and his unique power at uniting and articulating the long and painful journey from oppression and the struggles his brothers and sisters have endured over the years. 

From slavery to the Civil Rights Movement to this present day, the episode also explores current social issues from the mass incarceration of African Americans in the United States and the power and importance of modern-day activism and movements such as Black Lives Matter and The People’s Budget Movement. Narrated by Public Enemy’s Chuck D, the episode features interviews with rappers 2 Chainz and LL Cool J, media mogul and filmmaker Yandy Smith, human rights activist Malcolm X, American Civil Rights activist Mary Hooks, best-selling authors Aya de Leon and Jamila T. Davis, and reporter, Dani McClain. 

The episode also features a performance from Grammy-nominated EARTHGANG, interviews with Ferrell Scott and Corvain Cooper, who are both serving life in prison without the possibility of parole sentences for nonviolent marijuana charges, as well as art director and friend of Bob Marley, Neville Garrick, Island Records Founder, Chris Blackwell and family members, Cedella Marley, Donisha Prendergast, Ky-Mani Marley, Ziggy Marley, and many more. “Freedom Fighter” is available to watch on Bob Marley’s Official YouTube Channel. Watch HERE.

“Freedom Fighter” follows the digital EP release of Songs of Freedom: Rarities, which features Marley songs from alternate mixes, previously unavailable for streaming, including the original version of “Iron Lion Zion,” “Is This Love” (horns mix), “One Love/People Get Ready” (12″ mix) and more. Listen to Songs of Freedom: Rarities EP HERE.

Also available now, the digital EP release of I Know A Place – The Remixes (Part 1 + Part 2) features remixes previously only available on European remix 12″ and various CD singles. The tracks, formerly unavailable for streaming, include Peter Hoff’s Radio Edit, Bedroom Rockers Extended Mix, and more. Listen to I Know A Place – The Remixes (Part 1 + Part 2). The music video for “I Know A Place” has also been remastered in HD and is available now, via Bob Marley’s official YouTube channel HERE

Bob Marley’s “Sun Is Shining (Hawkins Remix)” EP is also available now. The brand new Hawkins Remix is featured in the trailer for the new Aaron Sorkin film, The Trial of the Chicago 7, available now on Netflix. Listen to the “Sun Is Shining (Hawkins Remix)” EP HERE.

UMe and Tuff Gong recently announced three new and exclusive limited-edition collector series coming later this year. On December 11, twelve limited-edition Bob Marley vinyl LP’s, each numbered and pressed exclusively at the legendary Tuff Gong International headquarters in Kingston, Jamaica, will be available, featuring nine original studio albums and two original live albums, plus the world’s best-selling reggae album, Legend, all including a highly-desirable Tuff Gong stamp. To view the full list of the limited-edition Jamaican LPs, click HERE. To listen or purchase, click HERE.

On November 20, the twelve titles will also be available on premium half-speed mastered vinyl. All tracks were mastered by Miles Showell at Abbey Road Studios in London. To view the full list of the half-speed master LPs, click HERE. To listen or purchase, click HERE

On December 4, the long-awaited CD version of the iconic Complete Island Recordings LP box, which includes all nine Bob Marley & The Wailers studio albums recorded for Island Records, plus two live albums, Live! and Babylon By Bus, will be released. The Complete Island Recordings CD box set will include the 11 albums packaged in CD wallets, housed in a brushed silver clamshell box that simulates the larger hinged lighter from the LP set. To view the full list of the Complete Island CDs, click HERE. To listen or purchase, click HERE.

In this digital era, Bob Marley remains one of the most followed posthumous artists on social media, and MARLEY75 will serve to bring his music and message to the digital foreground, reaching new audiences and perspectives with innovative content and groundbreaking technology. Special live events, exclusive digital content, recordings, exhibitions, plus rare and unearthed treasures will also be revealed throughout the year. 

Bob Marley’s music continues to inspire generation upon generation, as his legacy lives on through his message of love, justice, and unity, a sentiment needed more than ever in 2020. In conjunction with Tuff Gong and UMe, a division of the Universal Music Group, the Marley family will continue to ensure the highest quality, integrity, and care is taken to honor Bob’s legacy and to celebrate one of the 20th century’s most important and influential figures.

Additional information on MARLEY75 events will be revealed soon.

Subscribe to Bob Marley’s Official YouTube Channel and never miss an update.

ABOUT BOB MARLEY

Bob Marley, a Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee, is notable not only as the man who put reggae on the global map but, as a statesman in his native Jamaica, he famously brought together the country’s warring factions. Today, Bob Marley remains one of the 20th century’s most important and influential entertainment icons. Marley’s lifestyle and music continue to inspire new generations as his legacy lives on through his music. In the digital era, he has the second-highest social media following of any posthumous celebrity, with the official Bob Marley Facebook page drawing more than 70 million fans, ranking it among the Top 20 of all Facebook pages and Top 10 among celebrity pages. Marley’s music catalog has sold millions of albums worldwide. His iconic collection, LEGEND, holds the distinction of being the longest-charting album in the history of Billboard magazine’s Catalog Albums chart and remains the world’s best-selling reggae album. Marley’s accolades include inductions into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame (1994) and ASCAP Songwriters Hall of Fame (2010), GRAMMY® Lifetime Achievement Award (2001), multiple entries in the GRAMMY® Hall Of Fame, and a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame (2001). For more information, visit bobmarley.com

HBO’s Halloween Movies

Illustration by Kaelen Felix

HBO: ALL THE SCARES, ALL IN ONE PLACE

Stream spooky new flicks, horror cult classics, eerie mysteries, and much more — all on HBO Max.

Start your 7-day free* trial HERE and take your Halloween to the next level.

*Free trial is for new customers only. After your free trial ends, you’ll be charged $14.99/mo. plus applicable tax. Restrictions apply.

New Spooks:

Lovecraft Country

Need a scare? Catch up on the “smart, gripping and wonderfully wild” (TIME) series following three travelers escaping the monsters — real and imagined — in 1950s America. Now streaming.

The Witches

Get spooked with our newest haunt starring Octavia Spencer, Anne Hathaway, and Stanley Tucci. In the spooky reimagining of Roald Dahl’s beloved story for a modern audience, Robert Zemeckis’s visually innovative film tells the darkly humorous and heartwarming tale of a young orphaned boy who, in late 1967, goes to live with his loving Grandma in the rural Alabama town of Demopolis. As the boy and his grandmother encounter some deceptively glamorous but thoroughly diabolical witches, she wisely whisks him away to a seaside resort. Regrettably, they arrive at precisely the same time that the world’s Grand High Witch has gathered her fellow cronies from around the globe—undercover—to carry out her nefarious plans.

Frightening New Flicks:

The Invisible Man

The unseen maniac of the Universal monsters canon returns to invisible life in this frightening 2020 reboot. Golden Globe(R)-winner Elisabeth Moss (TV’s “The Handmaid’s Tale”) stars as a young woman who escapes her abusive relationship with an optics engineer only to have him fake his death and return as the titular terror–who makes it his sole mission to terrorize her.

Black Christmas: Premieres Halloween at 8 pm

IT: Chapter Two

For 27 years, it has waited…now, the diabolical evil that appears as Pennywise the Clown has awakened once again to terrorize Derry, Maine. It’s up to the Losers Club, who reunite as adults, to stop “It” once and for all. “A psychologically merciless sequel…deeper, scarier, funnier” (Empire).

Cult Classics:

Child’s Play 2

Chucky the demon doll returns to terrorize a young boy again in this horror sequel. In the wake of his mother’s breakdown, little Andy has been stuck with a foster family. But when the ‘Good Guys’ dolls go back into production, the murderous Chucky–a doll possessed by the spirit of a serial killer–comes back to life and begins a bloody rampage that centers on Andy.

Alien

Ridley Scott’s classic sci-fi chiller about seven astronauts who find intergalactic horror in deep space. Tom Skerritt plays the captain of the spaceship Nostromo, whose crew is picked off one-by-one by a seemingly indestructible creature. Sigourney Weaver is the tough Ripley, who faces the killer in a final showdown that made movie history.

Eraserhead

A printer named Henry Spencer is on vacation when he learns that his ex-girlfriend, Mary X, has given birth to a terribly deformed baby. Henry marries Mary and the two try living together, but it does not work out. So Mary leaves and Henry begins to care for the baby. After this, several bizarre events take place. There are visions of a woman in Henry’s radiator who dances and crushes small, tadpole-like creatures. Henry has a tryst with a woman who lives across the hall, and he has a dream that his head is being used to make pencil erasers.

Old School Horror:

Night of the Living Dead

An army of dead bodies comes to life and terrorizes a group of friends trapped inside a rural farmhouse.

Horror of Dracula

On a search for his missing friend Jonathan Harker, vampire hunter Dr. Van Helsing is led to Count Dracula’s castle. Upon arriving, Van Helsing finds an undead Harker in Dracula’s crypt and discovers that the count’s next target is Harker’s ailing fiancée, Lucy Holmwood. With the help of her brother, Arthur, Van Helsing struggles to protect Lucy and put an end to Count Dracula’s parasitic reign of terror.

The Curse of Frankenstein

Eerie Series:

A retelling of Shelley’s famous novel, but told in flashbacks from the point of view of Dr. Frankenstein, awaiting execution for the murder of his wife in the climactic confrontation with the monster.

True Blood

In the near future, vampires have come out of the coffin…no longer in need of a human fix. But can a young Louisiana waitress (Anna Paquin) forge a love match with a bloodsucker? HBO presents this drama series created by Alan Ball (‘Six Feet Under’) and based on the best-selling ‘Sookie Stackhouse’ novels by Charlaine Harris.

The Outsider

The gruesome murder of an 11-year-old boy in the Georgia woods leads a local detective into a disturbing search for the truth in this drama series based on Stephen King’s bestselling novel. Ben Mendelsohn, Cynthia Erivo, Bill Camp, Mare Winningham, Paddy Considine, Julianne Nicholson, Yul Vazquez, Jeremy Bobb, Marc Menchaca, and Jason Bateman star.

The Murders at White House Farm

An infamous true crime story. Over thirty years ago, three generations of one family were murdered at their isolated farm. Initial evidence pointed the finger at the daughter of the family who had a history of mental illness, however one detective refused to accept this and delved deeper into the investigation. His determination uncovered new evidence that shed suspicion on another family member. This is a dramatized true crime story based on extensive research, interviews, and published accounts, looking at the mystery behind what happened that fateful day.

Kaelen Felix Illustrates an Article about Skai Jackson for 360 MAGAZINE

Skai Jackson × DWTS

Skai Jackson, the 18-year-old television and social media star, hit the cover of 360 MAGAZINE.

A competitor on the 29th season of ABC’s hit television series “Dancing with the Stars,” Jackson is mostly known for her role as Zuri Ross in the Disney Channel show “Jessie” and its spin-off series “Bunk’d,” as well as her social media presence. Her cover with 360 MAGAZINE was featured on “Dancing with the Stars,” and you can see it right here.

Now, she is partnered with Alan Bersten in the popular ballroom dancing competition.

She danced the tango with Bersten to Nicki Minaj‘s “Super Bass” in the first week of the show and scored a 21 out of 30 from the three judges.

In the second week, she danced the samba to Ne-Yo‘s “Miss Independent.” The duo scored their lowest score up to this point in the competition with a 15, but they were saved while Charles Oakley and Emma Slater were eliminated.

Jackson and Bersten then danced the jive to “Almost There” from “The Princess and the Frog.” They scored an 18 and moved on to the next round.

Week four saw the two dance the foxtrot to John Legend‘s “Ordinary People.” Jackson dedicated the dance to her “Jessie” co-star Cameron Boyce, who died at the age of 20 in 2019.

She spread the word about dedicating the dance on Twitter.

“Just got off stage…I did my thing for Cameron tonight,” she tweeted.

She also encouraged viewers to donate to the Cameron Boyce Foundation, a program that honors Boyce with a goal to end gun violence and cure epilepsy. Combining an issue that affected Boyce personally with an issue he was passionate about, the foundation aims to be the bridge for people who want to help but don’t know how.

To help, you can follow the Cameron Boyce Foundation on Instagram, donate and encourage others to get involved.

The dance scored the first ten of the year from Carrie Ann Inaba. It also received nines from Derek Hough and Bruno Tonioli, giving it a total score of 28, the highest score of the season at the time.

The two danced jazz in the fifth week to “The Power of Love” by Huey Lewis & The News for the show’s 80’s night. Set to a “Back to the Future” backdrop, the costumes completed the feel of the movie and the dance scored a 24.

Week 6 will air Wednesday night on ABC, and Jackson and Bersten will dance the cha-cha-cha.

You can follow Skai Jackson on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

DVF illustration by Kaelin Felix for 360 magazine

U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum

Last week, The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum reached more than 1,000 supporters and raised nearly $3 million during their eleventh annual “What You Do Matters” New York Tribute Event. This event is held in support of the Museum’s critical role as a living memorial to the Holocaust. This year, fashion icon Diane von Furstenberg served as master of ceremonies for the event’s inaugural virtual platform.

Von Furstenberg shared her personal connection to the Holocaust and the Museum, “As a daughter of a Holocaust survivor, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum is especially personal to me. … My mother used to tell me, ‘God saved me so that I gave you life. By giving you life, you gave me my life back, you are my torch of freedom.’”

Von Furstenberg’s mother was arrested in occupied Belgium in 1944 when she was just 21 years old and was transported to Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp, where she spent 13 months as a forced laborer, surviving at a mere 49 pounds. Her daughter was born nine months later despite doctors’ warnings of the impossibility of a safe pregnancy.

“I have been involved in the Museum since its inception,” Von Furstenberg said. “When you think about the moment we are living now – the enormity of changes and challenges – remember this history and its lessons about the fragility of freedom, the nature of hate and the consequences of indifference could not be more relevant…We have to make sure that everybody remembers. To remember is to give voice to the six million that were silenced.”

During the virtual event, celebrities including Jason Alexander, Jamie Lee Curtis, David Eigenberg, Morgan Freeman, Camryn Manheim, Tim Matheson and Daniela Ruah read excerpts from the Museum’s collections, giving voice to the victims of the Holocaust, and participated in the Museum’s pledge to Holocaust survivors to never forget.

The New York virtual tribute event also featured an interview with 100-year-old Benjamin Ferencz, the last surviving Nuremberg prosecutor, and the Museum’s partner in the Ferencz International Justice Initiative.  Ferencz said that in order to have a better and more peaceful world than the one he’s witnessed, the slogan “never give up” must be added to his well-known philosophy of “law not war.”

Photograph of Diane von Furstenberg and her mother, next to live shot of Diane von Furstenberg
Photograph of Diane von Furstenberg and her mother, next to live shot of Diane von Furstenberg
Ben Ferencz and Naomi Kikoler, Director, Simon-Skjodt Center for the Prevention of Genocide
Ben Ferencz and Naomi Kikoler, Director, Simon-Skjodt Center for the Prevention of Genocide

THANKS AMY

By Althea Champion

By the time of Amy Winehouse’s death in 2011, the death itself was no shock. Today, more than nine years after her death, people still wallow in the sorrow it brought and celebrate the birthday of a legend.

In the weeks leading up to her death, her antics were well-documented. She developed tumultuous relationships with rehab facilities that she entered and exited frequently, engaged in fights, and attracted unwanted attention from the press.

Winehouse insisted that she came by her popularity honestly.

“I don’t write a song and think, ‘oh, a million people will hear this,'” she told E! News in 2007. “I write a song because I need to make sense of why I do certain things.”

And the public loved it. Winehouse relished in her pain and imperfection, sporting big boobs, thick eyeliner, and a mane of hair that stood in contradiction to the rest of her small frame—but it undeniably worked.

Her fame began with the debut of Frank, a 2003 album that garnered acclamation from critics and others in the U.K. That success was followed by the infamous Back to Black album in 2006, known most well by Rehab, which shot her to Grammy-winner status, despite her inability to physically accept the awards in 2008; she couldn’t secure a visa in time.

Her talent was undeniable. Her sultry voice, embellished by a darling rasp, captivated her audience and made her a star. The musical contributions she gifted the world are still sung today from rooftops—now, with indisputable irony.

During 2010, she was singing, performing, and alternating between sobriety and heavy drinking. In Jan. 2011, she had a seizure that she allegedly had no recollection of. And for the rest of 2011, until her death in July, she alternated between hospitals, rehabilitation clinics, and her apartment.

Then on July 23rd, she was found dead by her security guard, Andrew Morris, accompanied by three empty vodka bottles.

On the day of her tragic death, stars like Lady Gaga, Adele, Rihanna, Tony Bennett, and Kelly Clarkson paid tribute to the singer, expressing their grief on social media. Today, a Winehouse birthday does not pass by without someone noticing. On what would have been her 37th birthday, the same occurred.

Famous figures like Patti Smith, Lady Gaga, and Nas took to social media, expressing how they missed the icon, and commemorating the gift she gave to everyone, despite herself.

Like the rockstars who preceded her, she lives on in the hearts and ears of many, reminding us to be proud of who we are.

If you or a loved one is struggling with alcohol abuse, visit this link or call this number: (877) 373-4513

Ruth Bader Ginsburg illustration by Kaelen Felix for 360 MAGAZINE.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg

By Cassandra Yany

Ruth Bader Ginsburg died Friday after her long battle with cancer. The 87-year-old Supreme Court justice was a trailblazer who continuously worked to end gender discrimination and preserve our civil liberties. 

The Supreme Court announced Friday that Ginsburg passed away at her Washington D.C. home due to complications from metastatic pancreatic cancer. She had previously overcome lung, liver and colon cancer. In July, she revealed that the cancer had returned, but that she would continue to serve on the Supreme Court.

Ginsburg’s revolutionary career started when she graduated at the top of her class from Cornell University, earning a Bachelor’s degree in government. Two years later, she attended Harvard Law School with her husband, Martin Ginsburg. There, she was one of only nine women in her class of over 500 students, according to NPR.

During their time at Harvard, Martin was diagnosed with testicular cancer, so Ruth would take notes for the two of them and help him with his work, all while trying to juggle being a new mom. When Martin landed a job at a firm in New York, the family packed up and Ruth finished her education at Columbia University. 

Once Ginsburg finished school, she began to experience the discrimination that came with being a female lawyer. According to TIME, she was unable to secure a position at a premier law firm or one of the Supreme Court clerkships, regardless of the fact that she had been the first students to serve on both the Harvard and Columbia Law reviews, and graduated at the top of her class. These jobs were instead easily given to males who had ranked lower than her in school. This led her to work a lower court clerkship and teach at the Rutgers Law Newark campus.

At Rutgers, she co-founded the Women’s Rights Law Reporter. While she was there, she learned that she wasn’t earning the same wage as one of her male counterparts. The dean attributed this pay disparity to the fact that the male professor had a family to support, while Ginsburg’s husband already had a good-paying job. This type of discrimination caused her to hide her second pregnancy.

After her son was born, Ginsburg began teaching at Columbia, becoming the university’s first tenured female professor. There, she also co-authored the first case book on discrimination law. She later went on to co-found the Women’s Rights Project of the American Civil Liberties Union in 1972.

During her work as a lawyer, Ginsburg established that equal protection under the law, as stated in the 14th Amendment, should extend to gender. She won five out of the six cases that she argued before the Supreme Court on gender discrimination. She often chose to find this prejudice in cases where males were the plaintiffs being discriminated against, as seen in the 2018 film On the Basis of Sex. 

In 1980, Jimmy Carter appointed Ginsburg as a judge in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia. She became the second woman on the Supreme Court, and the first Jewish justice since 1969 when she was appointed by Bill Clinton in 1993. During her time, she eliminated almost 200 laws that discriminated against women. 

Ginsburg also fought for the rights of immigrants, the mentally ill, and members of the LGBTQ+ community. She approved gay marriage in the case of Obergefell v. Hodges, stating that if you can’t deny a 70-year-old couple the right to marriage due to their inability to procreate, you can’t deny a gay couple of that right either.

Ginsburg supported women’s reproductive rights, fighting for the coverage of contraceptives despite anyone’s religious beliefs. At the time of Roe v. Wade, she litigated a case where a pregnant Air Force captain was told she would have to have an abortion in order to return to her job. She noted the hypocrisy present in this case— that the U.S. government was encouraging abortion – and found that it served as a clear example of why women should have the right to make their own life decisions.

Ginsburg’s passing gives Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and President Trump the ability to appoint a new justice, despite her dying wish to not be replaced until after a new president is elected. This opportunity could make the Supreme Court more right-leaning and jeopardize cases like Roe v. Wade that are at the forefront of equal rights movements. 

This comes four years after McConnell’s 11-month Republican blockade of President Obama’s nominee for the court, where he argued “that a president shouldn’t be able to seat a new justice in the final year of their term.” Obama noted this in a statement released early Saturday, where he said “A basic principle of law— and of everyday fairness— is that we apply rules with consistency, and not based on what’s convenient or advantageous in the moment.”

After the news broke Friday night of Ginsburg’s death, hundreds of people gathered outside the Supreme Court to pay tribute and create a memorial on the building’s steps. Many signs have since been left outside of the court honoring her legacy.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced Saturday morning that there will be a statue built in Ginsburg’s hometown of Brooklyn to “serve as a physical reminder of her many contributions to the America we know today…”

Trump issued a proclamation Saturday ordering flags to be flown at half-staff until sunset on the day of interment “As a mark of respect for Ruth Bader Ginsburg…”

RBG will be dearly missed by Americans on both sides of the aisle. We have lost a longtime champion of equal rights, but her legacy will never be forgotten.

Challenger: The Final Flight

By Cassandra Yany

On Wednesday, Netflix released “Challenger: The Final Flight,” a four-episode docuseries about the tragic explosion of the Space Shuttle Challenger.

The doc was directed by Daniel Junge and Steven Leckart, and executive produced by JJ Abrams and Glenn Zipper. It provides a complete look at the events leading up to the takeoff and includes interviews with family members of the seven astronauts who died in the explosion.

According to CNN, the series uses archival footage and home videos, along with interviews from officials and crew members to shed light on the poor decision-making and systemic failures that led up to the disaster, as well as the aftermath that followed.

Challenger took off from the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral on January 28, 1986. Just 73 seconds after it launched, the shuttle began breaking apart, due to malfunctioning O-rings in the rocket boosters, which hardened as the temperature decreased. NASA had reportedly known about this damaged hardware for months prior, according to Vanity Fair.

The purpose of mission STS-51-L was to deploy a satellite to study the approaching Halley’s Comet, but it had been delayed multiple times because of technical difficulties.

The crew was one of NASA’s most diverse to date, as reported by the New York Post. One of the astronauts was a teacher, so school children across the country watched in class as the shuttle went down, engulfed by a huge, ominous cloud of smoke. The explosion devastated the nation, especially all of the young children who had watched it live.

Nearly thirty-five years later, we remember the passengers who lost their lives on that dreadful day:

Christa McAuliffe

Christa McAuliffe was a teacher at Concord High School in New Hampshire who learned of the Teacher in Space Project— NASA’s plan to fly an educator into space. NASA had hoped that this would help increase public interest in the space shuttle program. 

Along with 11,000 others, McAuliffe applied in 1984 to be the first teacher to communicate with students from space. She was chosen as one of two finalists from New Hampshire, then was selected to be part of the STS-51-L crew by a Review Panel in Washington, D.C.

McAuliffe took a year off from teaching to train for the space shuttle mission. While in orbit, she was planning to conduct experiments in chromatography, hydroponics, magnetism and Newton’s laws. She also would have taught two 15-minute classes— one providing a tour of the spacecraft, the other about the benefits of space travel— which would have been broadcasted to students on closed-circuit TV. 

The nationwide excitement of having McAuliffe in space was a significant reason why the explosion had such a lasting impact on the country, and was especially upsetting for young students who watched the takeoff or extensive coverage in class. 

Gregory Jarvis

Gregory Jarvis was an engineer for Hughes Aircraft who served as Payload Specialist 2 on Challenger. In 1984, he was one of two employees from the company that were selected for the Space Shuttle program. 

Jarvis was originally supposed to make his shuttle flight in April 1985, but was rescheduled to early January 1986, then rescheduled again, landing him a spot on the STS-51-L crew. From space, he planned to conduct experiments on the effects of weightlessness on fluids. 

Dick Scobee

Dick Scobee earned his pilot wings in 1966 and served as a combat aviator in the Vietnam War, for which he was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross and the Air Medal.

After the war, Scobee graduated from the USAF Aerospace Research Pilot School and became an Air Force test pilot. He was the commander on Challenger and died a lieutenant colonel.

Judith Resnik

After graduating from Carnegie Mellon, Judith Resnik worked as a design engineer in missile and radar projects at RCA (Radio Corporation of America). There, she performed circuit design for the missile and surface radar division. She later developed electronics and software for NASA’s sounding rocket and telemetry systems programs. 

Resnik qualified as a professional aircraft pilot in 1977 and was recruited into the NASA Astronaut Corps in 1978. She was one of six women selected for the program out of 8,000 applicants. At NASA, and piloted the Northrop T-38 Talon, trained intensely, conducted research, and developed different systems and software. 

Resnik served as a mission specialist on the maiden voyage of Discovery in 1984 for her first space flight from August to September. During this flight, she operated a shuttle’s robotic arm (which she created), and deployed and conducted experiments on a solar array wing to determine if there was a way to generate additional electric power during missions. She was the second American woman in space and the first Jewish woman in space. 

Resnik was a mission specialist on Challenger. After the explosion, further examination of the cockpit shows that her Personal Egress Air Pack was activated, indicating that she may have been alive after the cockpit separated from the vehicle to activate it. Her body was the first to be recovered from the crash by Navy divers. 

Ellison Onizuka

Ellison Onizuka served as a flight test engineer and test pilot for the U.S. Air Force in the early 1970s. After attending the U.S. Air Force Test Pilot School from 1974 to 1975, he became a squadron flight test engineer there and worked as a manager for engineering support in the training resources division. 

In 1978, Onizuka was selected for the astronaut program and later worked in the experimentation team, orbiter test team, and launch support screw for the STS-1 and STS-2. At NASA he also worked on the Shuttle Avionics Integration Laboratory test and revision software team. 

Onizzuka’s first space mission was one year before the Challenger explosion, on the mission STS-51-C on the shuttle Discovery. This was the first space shuttle mission for the Department of Defense, and he became the first Asian American to reach space. 

Onizuka was a mission specialist aboard Challenger. Similar to Resnik, it is speculated that he could have been alive when the cockpit separated from the vehicle because his Personal Egress Air Pack was also activated. When he died, he held the position of lieutenant colonel, but was later promoted to the rank of colonel. 

Ronald McNair

Ronald McNair received his Ph.D. in Physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1976 and became nationally recognized for his work in laser physics. After graduation, he worked as a staff physicist at the Hugh Research Lab in Malibu, CA. 

McNair was one of the ten thousand applicants to be selected in 1978 for the NASA astronaut program. He became the second African American astronaut in 1984 when he flew as a mission specialist for STS-41-B on Challenger from Feb. 3-11. 

McNair later served as a mission specialist for STS-51-L. During this flight, he had planned to record the saxophone solo for a song he had worked on with composer Jean-Michel Jarre for his upcoming album Rendez-Vous. This would have been the first original piece of music to be recorded in space. 

McNair was also supposed to participate in Jarre’s Rendez-Vous Houston concert through a live feed from Challenger. To honor McNair, Jarre dedicated the last song on the album to him and subtitled it “Ron’s Piece.”

Michael J. Smith

Michael J. Smith served in the Vietnam War, then attended U.S. naval Test Pilot School. After graduation, he was assigned to the Strike Aircraft Test Directorate at NAS Patuxent River in Maryland, where he worked on the A-6E TRAM and Cruise missile guidance systems. In 1976, later returned to NTPS for 18 months as an instructor. 

Smith was selected for the astronaut program in May 1980, in which he served as a commander in the Shuttle Avionics Integration Laboratory, the Deputy Chief of Aircraft Operations, the Technical Assistant to the Director, and the Flights Operations Directorate. 

Smith was the pilot for Challenger, and was set to pilot another mission the following fall. His voice was the last heard on the flight deck tape recorder with his final words being “Uh oh.”

All seven passengers were awarded with the Congressional Space Medal of Honor in 2004.

Stomp illustration by Kaelen Felix for 360 Magazine

Stomp Wars Virtual Homecoming Experience

Stomp Wars, the celebrated national stepping competition and cultural institution, insisted the show must go on for 2020, and that’s exactly what’s going to happen!

In order to engage, rally, and uplift students, the Stomp Wars program announces a historic first with the launch of The Stomp Wars HBCU-KNOW Virtual Homecoming Experience on September 26 – October 28. The event will be powered by The Thurgood Marshall College Fund and broadcast live from stompwars.com, with a live simulcast on Facebook and YouTube. The Top 2 Step Team Winners will go on to compete in the World Of Dance Championships.

Now on the event’s 13th year, on-air personality Rock-T returns as the host. In this latest installment of the program, The Collegiate Edition will celebrate the HBCU community by showcasing incredible stepping by the Greek organizations Divine 9, HBCU-KNOW Battle of the Bands, HBCU-KNOW Cheerleaders, HBCU-KNOW Majorettes, and more.

Since its inception, Stomp Wars has consistently inspired generations to graduate high school and pursue higher education. To date, more than 10,000 students have been galvanized by the event as the initiative rewrites the rules and brings us one step closer to the eradication of social injustice and systemic racism. For 2020, the core messageTomorrow can be better than today will be transmitted to the online audience.

Check out the impactful message for yourself by watching the virtual Stomp Wars.

About Rock-T:

Rocky Turner is an American Radio-TV Personality, Host, DJ, Producer, Sports Announcer, Author, and entrepreneur. Known to listeners as Rock-T and currently a member of the phenomenally successful Rickey Smiley Morning Show, Rock-T reaches 7 million listeners daily through this nationally syndicated show with markets that include Chicago, Dallas, Houston, Atlanta, Detroit, Miami, Philadelphia, and Orlando. He is also a member of the wildly popular TV show, Dish Nation and Rickey Smiley For Real.

Rock-T is also the founder and creator of Stomp Wars, the most successful stomping competition in the country. As Rock-T’s vision for these disenfranchised youngsters continued to grow and expand, as did the reach of the event. Today, Stomp Wars is not only an annual sell-out on the campus of the University of Texas Arlington, it is also a hit with thriving teens across the country teaching students about the power of perseverance and diligence.

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